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r OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES 
l AND DISEASES IN ALBERTA 



Lost-Time Claims and Claim Rates 


Alberta Construction 
Safety Association 

Industries 

2001 to 2005 

Released July 2006 ^1 


A Liberia 

WORK SAFE Human Resources 

alberta and Employment 


Building 

Alberta's 

Workforce 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Highlights ii 

1. Introduction 1 

2. Lost-Time Claim Rate and Duration Rate 3 

2.1 Lost-Time Claim Rate by Size of Employer 5 

2.2 Lost-Time Claims by ACSA Sub-Sector 5 

3. Injury and Disease Analysis 11 

3.1 Injured Worker Characteristics 11 

3.2 Nature of Injury or Disease 13 

3.3 Part of Body Injured 15 

3.4 Source of Injury or Disease 17 

3.5 Type of Event or Exposure 19 

3.6 Duration of Disability 22 

4. Occupational Fatalities 24 

5. Certificate of Recognition Employers 28 

Appendix A: Terms, Definitions and Formulas 30 

Appendix B: ACSA WCB Industry Codes 33 

Contact Information 35 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 

























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HIGHLIGHTS 


From 2001 to 2005... 

• There were 29,675 lost-time claims from workers in the Alberta Construction Safety 
Association (ACSA) industries. Of those, 27.3% involved Construction Trade 
Services, while Industrial Construction accounted for 25.6% of all claims. 

• Sprains, strains and tears were the most common nature of injury, accounting for 
42.1% of the total lost-time claims. 

• The trunk was the most common body part injured, accounting for 35.8% of the 
total claims. 

• More than one-third of accident types involved overexertion or being struck by 
objects. 

• Injured workers 25 to 44 years of age accounted for over half of the total claims. 

In 2005... 


• The Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) - Alberta accepted 5,754 lost-time 
claims from ACSA workers, representing 16.2% of all lost-time claims in the 
province. 

• The lost-time claim rate for the ACSA industries was 2.7 per 100 person-years, as 
compared to the provincial rate of 2.4. This was the lowest lost-time claim rate 
achieved over the past five years. 

• The duration rate for the ACSA industries was 93 days lost per 100 person-years 
compared to the provincial rate of 57 per 100 person-years. 

• Roadbuilders had the lowest lost-time claim rate of all ACSA sub-sectors, at 2.1 per 
100 person-years. Masonry had the highest lost-time claim rate, at 7.4 per 100 
person-years. 

• Employers with 20 to 39 person-years had the highest lost-time claim rate of 3.7 per 
100 person-years. 

• In the ACSA industries, 5.5% of all employers had a valid Certificate of 
Recognition (COR). 

• The WCB accepted 53 occupational fatalities for compensation in the ACSA 
industries, representing 37.1% of all workplace fatalities accepted in Alberta. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 




























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INTRODUCTION 


Role of Alberta Human Resources and Employment 

Alberta Human Resources and Employment (AHRE) provides a continuum of services 
and information to support the development of a skilled and productive labour force; 
fair, safe, healthy and productive workplaces; and helping improve the well-being of 
Albertans. AHRE develops and delivers programs and services that contribute to 
workplaces for employees and employers by: 

• working with industry and safety associations to audit and certify health and safety 
programs 

• helping employers, employees, unions and industry associations work together by 
offering facilitation services, workshops and partnership opportunities 

• developing and maintaining policy and legislated employment standards in Alberta 

• preparing and providing ongoing support of Alberta’s workplace health and safety 
regulations 

• explaining legislated standards under the Occupational Health and Safety Act and 
the Employment Standards Code and ensuring compliance through complaint 
resolution, investigation and targeted inspections. 

Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 2001 to 
2005 

Each year, AHRE prepares a report on the occupational injuries and diseases in the 
ACSA industries to provide a detailed review of workplace health and safety. The 
purpose of this report is to provide government, employers, workers, and health and 
safety professionals in the ACSA industries with information about key health and 
safety issues. This report includes: 

• an estimation of the risk of injury or disease in addition to general descriptive 
information about incidents and injured workers 

• the number of employers that earned a Certificate of Recognition (COR) 

• occupational fatalities accepted by the WCB for compensation and fatality rates for 
the ACSA industries. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


1 


Notes about this report: 

• This report presents 2005 data beside 2004 data to help with comparisons. Additional 
historical data are presented where possible. 

• Throughout the report, the lost-time claim rate is the number of claims per 100 
person-years, and the duration rate is the number of days lost per 100 person-years. 

• In 2005, improvements have been made to the data collection. A stricter definition of 
a lost-time claim has been adopted and applied to the data covering the period 2001 to 
2005. Previously, a small proportion of modified- work claims were also captured as 
lost-time. 

• Improvements have also been made in the analysis by workers occupation. The 2001 
National Occupation Classification (NOC) has been adopted for the presentation of 
figures by occupation. The NOC 2001 provides a standardized framework reflecting 
the Canadian labour market. For further information please see http ://www23 .hrdc- 
drhc.gc.ca/200 1 /e/generic/welcome, sfatml 

• Terms, definitions and formulas are described in Appendix A. Industry codes are 
listed in Appendix B. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


2 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 
AND DURATION RATE 


The lost-time claim rate 1 represents the probability or 
risk of a disabling injury or disease to a worker during a 
period of one year. The 2005 lost-time claim rate for the 
ACSA industries was 2.7 per 100 person-years. 

In 2005, there were 5,754 lost-time claims in the ACSA industries, representing 16.2% 
of all lost-time claims in the province. The ACSA industries’ lost-time claim rate was 
2.7 per 100 person-years, a decrease of 12.2% from 2004 and the lowest rate over the 
last five years (see Table 2.0). The 2005 provincial lost-time claim rate was 2.4 per 100 
person-years. The lost-time claim rate of 2.7 per 100 person-years translates to 14 lost- 
time claims per million hours worked. 

The duration rate is intended to show the severity of occupational injury and disease as 
reflected by the number of days off work per 100 person-years. In 2005, the ACSA 
industries had a duration rate of 93, the lowest in the last five years and 61.3% higher 
than the provincial duration rate of 57. 


Table 2.0 

ACSA Industries — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Lost-Time 

Lost Time 

Accounts 

Years 

Rate 

Claims 

Claim Rate 

2001 

31,594 

$38,961,506 

148,393 

272,422 

184 

6,140 

4.1 

2002 

33,206 

$47,841,157 

160,389 

300,008 

187 

6,341 

4.0 

2003 

34,694 

$45,764,550 

166,221 

245,952 

148 

5,892 

3.5 

2004 

36,045 

$43,407,879 

178,259 

204,256 

115 

5,548 

3.1 

2005 

39,089 

$46,491,899 

210,521 

195,336 

93 

5,754 

2.7 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


1 The rate has been calculated from lost-time claims data as of March 31, 2005. This rate underestimates the risk of occupational 
injury and disease since some lost-time claims that occurred in 2005 were not administered by March 3 1 , 2006. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


3 


I 0 


LOST-TIME CLAIM 
AND DURATION 

! _ — — 


RATE 

RATE 



Between 2001 and 2005, there were 29,675 lost-time claims in the ACS A industries. 
Construction Trade Services accounted for 27.3%. Industrial Construction accounted for 
25.6% of the total lost-time claims. The Masonry sub-sector experienced the fewest lost- 
time claims, with 1 .4% of total claims (see Chart 2.0). 

Chart 2.0 

Percentage of Lost-Time Claims by ACSA Sub-Sector — 

Alberta: 2001-2005 

Lime, Cement, and 
Masonry Concrete Producers 



Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


4 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 

AND DURATION RATE 


2.1 Lost-Time Claim Rate by Size of Employer 

In the ACSA industries, employers with 20 to 39 person-years had the highest lost-time 
claim rate of 3.7 per 100 person-years. Employers with 100 or more person-years had 
the lowest lost-time claim rate at 1 .6. For the province, employers with 20 to 39 and 40 
to 99 person-years had the highest lost-time claim rate while employers with less than 10 
person-years had the lowest lost-time claim rate (see Table 2.1). 


Table 2.1 

Lost-Time Claim Rate by Size 2 of Employer — Alberta: 2005 


Size of Employer 

Number of 

Lost-Time 

Person- 

Lost-Time 

Accounts 

Claims 

Years 

Claim Rate 

Less than 10 person-years 

35,147 

1671 

48,120 

3.5 

10 to 19 person-years 

1,382 

656 

19,474 

3.4 

20 to 39 person-years 

857 

892 

24,136 

3.7 

40 to 99 person-years 

569 

1160 

34,579 

3.4 

100 or more person-years 

285 

1330 

84,211 

1.6 

Unspecified 

849 

45 

0 

N/A [1] 


[1] These are employers with no payroll information or with person-years equal to zero. 
Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


2.2 Lost-Time Claims by ACSA Sub-Sector 

Between 2001 and 2005, the Masonry sub-sector had the highest lost-time claim rate 
each year except for 2004, when the Lime, Cement and Concrete Products 
Manufacturing sub-sector had the highest rate. The Roadbuilders sub-sector had the 
lowest rate each year (see Chart 2.2). 


Size is measured in terms of person-years. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 
AND DURATION RATE 


L 


I 

* 


Chart 2.2 

Lost-Time Claim Rate by ACSA Sub-Sector — Alberta: 2001-2005 



2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 



ACSA Industries 
Glaziers 
Masonry 
Road Builders 

Lime, Cement and Concrete Products Manufacturing 


A Construction Trade Services 
■ A— Industrial Construction 
— 0™~ Mechanical Electrical Insulation 
Roofers 


Sub-Sector 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

ACSA Industries 

4.1 

4.0 

3.5 

3.1 

2.7 

Construction Trade Services 

4.9 

4.9 

4.4 

3.7 

3.4 

Glaziers 

5.7 

5.3 

4.3 

3.4 

3.5 

Industrial Construction 

3.7 

3.6 

2.9 

2.9 

2.5 

Masonry 

10.3 

7.3 

8.2 

5.5 

7.4 

Mechanical, Electrical Insulation 

3.6 

3.6 

3.2 

2.8 

2.2 

Road Builders 

3.2 

2.7 

2.7 

2.4 

2.1 

Roofers 

7.5 

6.5 

5.7 

4.4 

3.9 

Lime, Cement, and Concrete Producers 
Manufacturing 

7.2 

6.3 

6.6 

6.0 

5.1 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


6 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 
AND DURATION RATE 



2.2A Construction Trade Services 

In 2005, the Construction Trade Services sub-sector had a lost-time claim rate of 3.4 per 
100 person-years, the lowest rate over the past five years for this sub-sector. The 
duration rate was 137 days lost per 100 person-years, a decrease of 11.0% from 2004 
and also the lowest over the past five years (see Table 2.2A). 


Table 2.2A 

Construction Trade Services — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Lost-Time 

Lost-Time 

Accounts 

Years 

Rate 

Claims 

Claim Rate 

2001 

11,287 

$9,085,544 

31,293 

73,495 

235 

1,546 

4.9 

2002 

12,185 

$12,563,135 

36,952 

87,647 

237 

1,819 

4.9 

2003 

12,954 

$14,458,976 

38,966 

81,177 

208 

1,719 

4.4 

2004 

13,140 

$11,161,118 

40,607 

62,711 

154 

1,483 

3.7 

2005 

13,991 

$12,404,388 

45,020 

61,649 

137 

1,529 

3.4 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


2.2B Glaziers 

The Glaziers sub-sector had a lost-time claim rate of 3.5 per 100 person-years in 2005, a 
rise in the rate observed in 2004. The duration rate was 85 days lost per 100 person- 
years, an increase of 10.4% in 2004 (see Table 2.2B). 


Table 2.2B 

Glaziers — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 
Accounts 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Years 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Rate 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

Lost-Time 
Claim Rate 

2001 

551 

$1,244,186 

6,444 

9,997 

155 

366 

5.7 

2002 

548 

$1,471,605 

6,668 

9,067 

136 

353 

5.3 

2003 

579 

$1,366,508 

7,089 

7,790 

110 

308 

4.3 

2004 

592 

$1,048,289 

7,402 

5,668 

77 

249 

3.4 

2005 

627 

$1,165,007 

7,734 

6,549 

85 

273 

3.5 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


7 


1 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 
AND DURATION RATE 


1 1 1 s 'i 


■fili 


2.2C Industrial Construction 

Industrial Construction had a lost-time claim rate of 2.5 per 100 person-years in 2005, a 
decrease of 13.4% from 2004 rate in this sub-sector. The duration rate decreased from 
107 days lost per 100 person-years in 2004, to 78 in 2005 (see Table 2.2C). 

Table 2.2C 

Industrial Construction — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Lost-Time 

Lost-Time 

Accounts 

Years 

Rate 

Claims 

Claim Rate 

2001 

7,094 

$11,973,664 

44,241 

77,555 

175 

1,628 

3.7 

2002 

7,290 

$13,296,770 

45,185 

82,805 

183 

1,622 

3.6 

2003 

7,337 

$10,617,367 

46,478 

54,822 

118 

1,351 

2.9 

2004 

7,785 

$10,687,315 

49,325 

52,660 

107 

1,436 

2.9 

2005 

8,857 

$11,739,074 

61,383 

47,602 

78 

1,548 

2.5 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


2.2D Masonry 

The Masonry sub-sector experienced a 33.3% increase in the lost-time claim rate from 
5.5 in 2005, to 7.4 per 100 person-years in 2005. The duration rate was 281 days lost per 
100 person-years, an increase of 31.3% from the previous year (see Table 2. 2D). 

Table 2.2D 

Masonry — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 
Accounts 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Years 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Rate 

, • ... V ; :: T 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

Lost-Time 
Claim Rate 

2001 

232 

$429,039 

993 

3,223 

324 

102 

10.3 

2002 

241 

$767,108 

1,098 

3,242 

295 

80 

7.3 

2003 

275 

$584,013 

1,101 

3,068 

279 

90 

8.2 

2004 

270 

$800,570 

1,084 

2,325 

214 

60 

5.5 

2005 

287 

$787,702 

1,071 

3,006 

281 

79 

7.4 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


8 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 
AND DURATION RATE 



2.2E Mechanical, Electrical Insulation 

The Mechanical, Electrical Insulation lost-time claim rate decreased from 2.8 in 2004 to 
2.2 per 100 person-years in 2005, the lowest rate in the last five years. The duration rate 
experienced a 21.7% decrease from 69 in 2004 to 54 per 100 person-years in 2005 (see 

Table 2.2E). 

Table 2.2E 

Mechanical, Electrical Insulation — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 
Accounts 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Years 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Rate 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

Lost-Time 
Claim Rate 

2001 

4,198 

$4,921,026 

28,493 

30,642 

108 

1,013 

3.6 

2002 

4,380 

$6,852,228 

30,733 

41,540 

135 

1,104 

3.6 

2003 

4,573 

$4,919,137 

31,089 

26,217 

84 

999 

3.2 

2004 

4,792 

$5,512,683 

32,640 

22,678 

69 

908 

2.8 

2005 

5,071 

$6,435,040 

39,775 

21,434 

54 

886 

2.2 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


2.2F Roadbuilders 

The lost-time claim rate for the Roadbuilders sub-sector fell from 2.4 in 2004 to 2.1 per 
100 person-years in 2005. The duration rate was 86 days lost per 100 person-years, the 
lowest in the past five years and a 12.2% decrease from 2004 (see Table 2.2F). 


Table 2.2F 

Roadbuilders — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Lost-Time 

Lost-Time 

Accounts 

Years 

Rate 

Claims 

Claim Rate 

2001 

6,272 

$8,024,295 

29,587 

52,417 

177 

944 

3.2 

2002 

6,481 

$8,551,226 

31,658 

47,751 

151 

845 

2.7 

2003 

6,742 

$9,089,190 

32,972 

45,361 

138 

903 

2.7 

2004 

7,098 

$9,847,707 

37,279 

36,448 

98 

907 

2.4 

2005 

7,703 

$10,099,682 

44,360 

38,208 

86 

948 

2.1 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


1 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


9 


LOST-TIME CLAIM RATE 
AND DURATION RATE 




2.2G Roofers 

In 2005, the Roofers sub-sector experienced an 1 1.9% decrease in the lost-time claim 
rate from 4.4 to 3.9 per 100 person-years, the lowest in the past five years. The duration 
rate was 157 per 100 person-years, the lowest in the past five years and a 25.9% 
reduction from 2004 (see Table 2.2G). 

Table 2.2G 

Roofers — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 
Accounts 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Years 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Rate 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

Lost-Time 
Claim Rate 

2001 

984 

$1,902,962 

4,114 

14,792 

360 

308 

7.5 

2002 

1,005 

$2,551,131 

4,543 

15,129 

333 

293 

6.5 

2003 

1,084 

$3,005,772 

4,696 

15,441 

329 

270 

5.7 

2004 

1,162 

$2,417,100 

5,622 

11,893 

212 

249 

4.4 

2005 

1,257 

$2,250,667 

6,485 

10,196 

157 

253 

3.9 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 

2.2H Lime, Cement and Concrete Products Manufacturing 

The lost-time claim rate for the Lime, Cement and Concrete Products Manufacturing 
sub-sector was 5.1 per 100 person-years in 2005, a 14.8% decrease from 2004. The 
duration rate was 143 days lost per 100 person-years, the lowest in the past five years 
and a 37.8% reduction from the previous year (see Table 2.2H). 


Table 2.2H 

Lime, Cement and Concrete Products Manufacturing — 
Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Number of 
Accounts 

Cost of Claims 

Person- 

Years 

Days Lost 

Duration 

Rate 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

Lost-Time 
Claim Rate 

2001 

976 

$1,380,790 

3,228 

10,301 

319 

233 

7.2 

2002 

1,076 

$1,787,955 

3,553 

12,827 

361 

225 

6.3 

2003 

1,150 

$1,723,588 

3,829 

12,076 

315 

252 

6.6 

2004 

1,206 

$1,933,097 

4,300 

9,873 

230 

256 

6.0 

2005 

1,296 

$1,610,339 

4,691 

6,692 

143 

238 

5.1 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


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Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


10 



INJURY AND 
DISEASE ANALYSIS 


Overexertion was the most common cause for lost-time 
claims in the ACSA industries. Sprains, strains and 
tears continued to be the leading nature of injury with 
the trunk being the most commonly injured body part. 

In this section, we examine the characteristics of the injured workers and the nature of 
their injuries or diseases. Tables are provided to enable comparisons of 2005 injuries and 
diseases in ACSA industries with provincial averages and trends. A detailed explanation 
of the formulas for calculating the indicators of the comparison tables is available in 
Appendix A. 

3.1 Injured Worker Characteristics 

In 2005, five occupations accounted for 48.3% of all claims in the ACSA industries, 
construction trades helpers and labourers had the most claims accounting for 13.0% of 
all claims (see Chart 3.1 A). 

Chart 3.1 A 

Lost-Time Claims by Occupation — Alberta: 2005 


Other Labourers in 
Processing, 
Manufacturing and 


Construction Trades Utilities 


Help J ' ~ u 1 ° 0/ - 



Plumbers 

5.4% 


Residential and 
Commercial Installers 
and Servicers 
5.9% 


All Other Occupations 
51.7% 


Carpenters 

11 . 2 % 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 



Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA 



July 2006 


11 


INJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


Between 2001 and 2005, more than half of claims were from workers aged 25 to 44 
years. Young workers aged 15 to 24 accounted for 22.3% of total claims, while workers 
aged 45 years and older had 24.8% of claims (see Table 3.1 A). 

Table 3.1A 

Lost-Time Claims by Age — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Total 


Age 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claim 

% 

15-19 Years 

340 

366 

351 

301 

357 

1,715 

5.8% 

20-24 Years 

997 

1,047 

1,012 

912 

938 

4,906 

16.5% 

25-34 Years 

1,720 

1,751 

1,594 

1,489 

1,503 

8,057 

27.2% 

35-44 Years 

1,641 

1,685 

1,492 

1,428 

1,373 

7,619 

25.7% 

45-54 Years 

996 

1,037 

939 

941 

1,039 

4,952 

16.7% 

55-64 Years 

385 

410 

430 

409 

441 

2,075 

7.0% 

65+ Years 

49 

41 

71 

64 

99 

324 

1.1% 

Unspecified 

12 

4 

3 

4 

4 

27 

0.1% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100 . 0 % 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


In the ACSA industries, the majority of lost-time claims were from men. Between 2001 
and 2005, 92.4% of claims involved men. Women accounted for 5.3% of total claims 
and the number of claims varied from year to year (see Table 3.1 B). The proportion of 
injuries broadly reflects the labour market make-up of the Construction industry where 
men comprise approximately 87% of the labour force 3 . 

Table 3.1 B 

Lost-Time Claims by Gender — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Total 


Gender 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

% 

Female 

302 

312 

297 

297 

371 

1,579 

5.3% 

Male 

5,683 

5,857 

5,432 

5,148 

5,291 

27,411 

92.4% 

Unspecified 

155 

172 

163 

103 

92 

685 

2.3% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100 . 0 % 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


3 Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (2005 Historical Review). 



Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


12 


INJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


3.2 Nature of Injury or Disease 

The nature of injury is used to identity the physical characteristics of the injury or 
disease. Between 2001 and 2005, 89% of all the lost-time claims were caused by 
traumatic injuries and disorders. The four most common traumatic injuries and disorders 
were: sprains, strains and tears, 42.1%; fractures and dislocations, 13.8%; open wounds, 
1 1.4%; and surface wounds and bruises, 9.9% (see Table 3.2A). 

Table 3.2A 

Nature of Injury or Disease ■ — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Total 


Nature of Injury or Disease 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

% 

Traumatic Injuries and 
Disorders 

5,462 

5,626 

5,287 

4,940 

5,198 

26,513 

89.3% 

Sprains, Strains and Tears 

2,642 

2,741 

2,467 

2,230 

2,422 

12,502 

42.1% 

Fractures and Dislocations 

850 

838 

781 

821 

793 

4,083 

13.8% 

Open Wounds 

663 

731 

715 

633 

638 

3,380 

11.4% 

Surface Wounds and Bruises 

644 

587 

571 

556 

593 

2,951 

9.9% 

Burns 

110 

102 

123 

84 

104 

523 

1.8% 

Other Traumatic Injuries and 
Diseases 

553 

627 

630 

616 

648 

3,074 

10.4% 

Systemic Diseases and 
Disorders 

359 

353 

321 

352 

294 

1,679 

5.7% 

Symptoms, Signs and Ill- 
Defined Conditions 

13 

15 

16 

14 

10 

68 

0.2% 

Other Diseases, Conditions and 
Disorders 

4 

5 

2 

3 

5 

19 

0.1% 

Multiple Diseases, Conditions 
and Disorders 

4 

4 

3 

0 

4 

15 

0.1% 

Neoplasms, Tumors and Cancer 

3 

2 

3 

3 

4 

15 

0.1% 

Infectious and Parasitic 
Diseases 

1 

2 

1 

3 

1 

8 

<0.1% 

Nature of Injury - Unknown 

294 

334 

259 

233 

238 

1,355 

4.6% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100.0% 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


13 


INJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


In 2005, sprains, strains and tears accounted for 42.1% of all claims in the ACSA 
industries. This was 1 . 1 times higher than the average percentage of injuries for this 
nature of injury category for the whole province. Percentages of injuries in all nature of 
injury categories were equal to or higher than the provincial average, except bums, other 
diseases, conditions and disorders, infectious and parasitic diseases, and symptoms, 
signs and ill-defined conditions (see Table 3.2B). 


Table 3.2B 

Nature of Injury or Disease — Comparison 2005 4 


Nature of Injury or Disease 

% of ACSA 
Industries' Claims 

% of Total 
Provincial 
Claims 

Number of Times 
Higher/ Lower Than the 
Provincial Average 

Traumatic Injuries and Disease 

90.4% 

90.9% 

1.1 

Sprains, Strains and Tears 

42.1% 

47.6% 

1.0 

Fractures and Dislocations 

13.8% 

8.9% 

1.8 

Open Wounds 

11.1% 

9.2% 

1.4 

Surface Wounds and Bruises 

10.3% 

11.5% 

1.0 

Burns 

1.8% 

2.7% 

0.8 

Other Traumatic Injuries and 
Diseases 

11.3% 

10.9% 

1.2 

Systemic Diseases and Disorders 

5.1% 

4.9% 

1.2 

Symptoms, Signs and Ill-Defined 
Conditions 

0.2% 

0.3% 

0.6 

Other Diseases, Conditions and 
Disorders 

0.1% 

0.2% 

0.4 

Multiple Diseases, Conditions 
and Disorders 

0.1% 

<0.1% 

3.5 

Neoplasms, Tumors and Cancer 

0.1% 

<0.1% 

2.6 

Infectious and Parasitic 
Diseases 

<0.1% 

<0.1% 

0.5 

Nature of Injury - Unknown 

4.1% 

3.5% 

1.3 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Number of Times Higher/Lower than the Provincial Average: 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is equal to the 
provincial average; greater than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is higher than the provincial average; less 
than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is lower than the provincial average. See Appendix A for calculation 
details. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


14 


INJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


i 



3.3 Part of Body Injured 

Between 2001 and 2005, the trunk was the most commonly injured body part, 
accounting for over one-third of the total lost-time claims in the ACSA industries. This 
was followed by injuries to the upper extremities at 24.5%, and lower extremities at 
23.0%. The most common trunk injury was to the back, including spine and spinal cord, 
accounting for 22.7% of the total lost-time claims (see Table 3. 3 A). 

Table 3.3A 

Part of Body Injured — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Total 


Part of Body Injured 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

% 

Trunk 

2,260 

2,280 

2,107 

1,971 

2,019 

10,637 

35.8% 

Back, Including Spine, Spinal 
Cord 

1,454 

1,456 

1,330 

1,228 

1,271 

6,739 

22.7% 

Other Trunk 

806 

824 

777 

743 

748 

3,898 

13.1% 

Upper Extremities 

1,535 

1,564 

1,412 

1,400 

1,346 

7,257 

24.5% 

Wrist(s) and Hand(s) Except 
Finger(s) 

602 

616 

567 

553 

521 

2,859 

9.6% 

Finger(s), Fingernail(s) 

525 

551 

496 

492 

483 

2,547 

8.6% 

Other Upper Extremities 

408 

397 

349 

355 

342 

1,851 

6.2% 

Lower Extremities 

1,371 

1,421 

1,378 

1,242 

1,412 

6,824 

23.0% 

Leg(s) 

646 

700 

655 

610 

737 

3,348 

11.3% 

Ankle(s) and Foot (Feet) 
Except Toes 

652 

640 

632 

549 

608 

3,081 

10.4% 

Other Lower Extremities 

73 

81 

91 

83 

67 

395 

1.3% 

Head 

420 

394 

452 

415 

454 

2,135 

7.2% 

Eye(s) 

207 

185 

212 

186 

200 

990 

3.3% 

Other Flead Parts 

213 

209 

240 

229 

254 

1,145 

3.9% 

Multiple Body Parts 

358 

516 

398 

348 

373 

1,993 

6.7% 

Neck, Including Throat 

153 

126 

114 

125 

115 

633 

2.1% 

Body Systems 

18 

19 

13 

24 

17 

91 

0.3% 

Other Body Parts 

2 

1 

0 

2 

1 

6 

<0.1% 

Part of Body - Unknown 

23 

20 

18 

21 

17 

99 

0.3% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100.0% 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


15 




O H 


INJURY AND DISEASE 


ANALYSIS 


In 2005, the back, including spine and spinal cord, accounted for 22.1% of all claims in 
the ACSA industries. The average percentage of injuries for this part of body category 
was equal to the whole province. Percentages of injuries in all part of body categories 
were greater than or equal to the provincial average except body systems and other body 
parts (see Table 3.3 B). 


Table 3.3B 

Part of Body Injured — Comparison 2005 s 


Part of Body Injured 

% of ACSA 
Industries' Claims 

% of Total 
Provincial 
Claims 

Number of Times 
Higher/ Lower Than 
the Province 

Trunk 

35.1% 

38.6% 

1.0 

Back, Including Spine, Spinal Cord 

22.1% 

26.0% 

1.0 

Other Trunk 

13.0% 

12.6% 

1.2 

Upper Extremities 

23.4% 

23.8% 

1.1 

Wrist(s) and Hand(s) Except 
Finger(s) 

9.1% 

9.2% 

1.1 

Finger(s), Fingernail(s) 

8.4% 

8.1% 

1.2 

Other Upper Extremities 

5.9% 

6.5% 

1.0 

Lower Extremities 

24.6% 

19.8% 

1.4 

Leg(s) 

12.8% 

9.8% 

1.5 

Ankle(s) and Foot (Feet) Except 
Toes 

10.6% 

8.8% 

1.4 

Other Lower Extremities 

1.2% 

1.2% 

1.1 

Head 

7.9% 

7.9% 

1.1 

Eye(s) 

3.5% 

3.2% 

1.2 

Other Head Parts 

4.4% 

4.7% 

1.1 

Multiple Body Parts 

6.5% 

7.0% 

1.1 

Neck, Including Throat 

2.0% 

2.3% 

1.0 

Body Systems 

0.3% 

0.5% 

0.7 

Part of Body - Unknown 

0.2% 

0.2% 

1.4 

Other Body Parts 

<0.1% 

0.1% 

0.4 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


5 Number of Times Higher/Lower than the Provincial Average: 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is equal to the 
provincial average; greater than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is higher than the provincial average; less 
than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is lower than the provincial average. See Appendix A for calculation 
details. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


16 


NJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


L 


3.4 Source of Injury or Disease 

The source of injury or disease describes the object or substance that the worker came 
into contact with resulting in an injury or disease. Between 2001 and 2005, the two 
primary sources of injury in the ACS A industries were structures and surfaces and parts 
and materials accounting for 20.9% and 17.2% of total claims respectively (see Table 
3.4A). 


Table 3.4A 

Source of Injury or Disease — Alberta: 2001-2005 

Total 


Source of Injury or Disease 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

% 

Structures and Surfaces 

1,155 

1,332 

1,263 

1,155 

1,295 

6,200 

20.9% 

Parts and Materials 

1,088 

1,023 

1,033 

947 

1,018 

5,109 

17.2% 

Persons, Plants, Animals and 
Minerals 

936 

1,059 

1,057 

978 

1,004 

5,034 

17.0% 

Person - Injured or III Worker 

810 

972 

944 

882 

891 

4,499 

15.2% 

Minerals - Metallic or Nonmetallic 
(except fuel) 

73 

45 

57 

45 

73 

293 

1.0% 

Person - Other Than Injured or III 
Worker [1] 

4 

4 

14 

16 

9 

47 

0.2% 

Other Persons, Plants, Animals & 
Minerals 

49 

38 

42 

35 

31 

195 

0.7% 

Tools, Instruments and 
Equipment 

476 

489 

502 

454 

479 

2,400 

8.1% 

Hand tools - Powered 

109 

129 

121 

109 

130 

598 

2.0% 

Hand tools - Non powered 

241 

231 

250 

216 

206 

1,144 

3.9% 

Other Tools and Equipments ! 

126 

129 

131 

129 

143 

658 

2.2% 

Vehicles 

320 

321 

303 

313 

352 

1,609 

5.4% 

Containers [2] 

367 

298 

288 

287 

307 

1,547 

5.2% 

Machinery 

297 

309 

301 

297 

306 

1,510 

5.1% 

Furniture and Fixtures 

83 

104 

104 

81 

81 

453 

1.5% 

Chemicals and Chemical 
Products 

45 

43 

60 

39 

56 

243 

0.8% 

Other Sources 

233 

219 

305 

322 

324 

1,403 

4.7% 

Source of Injury - Unknown 

1,140 

1,144 

676 

675 

532 

4,167 

14.0% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100.0% 


[1] Person - other than injured or ill worker: classifies injuries or illnesses inflicted by family members as well as non-family 
relations, including co-workers, former co-workers, and patients. 

[2] Containers: classifies receptacles commonly used to hold, store or carry materials (examples: dishes, cups and glasses, luggage, 
etc.). 

Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


17 


s e t n o ti 


INJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


In 2005, structures and surfaces accounted for 22 . 5 % of all claims in the ACSA 
industries. This was 1.5 times higher than the average percentage of injuries for this 
source of injury category for the whole province. The percentage of lost-time claims 
caused by minerals - metallic and non-metallic, was 3.6 times higher than the provincial 
average, while powered hand tools was 2.4 times higher (see Table 3.4B). 


Table 3.4B 

Source of Injury or Disease — Comparison 2005 6 


Source of Injury or Disease 

% of ACSA 
Industries' Claims 

% of Total 
Provincial 
Claims 

Number of Times 
Higher/Lower Than the 
Provincial Average 

Structures and Surfaces 

22.5% 

16.7% 

1.5 

Persons, Plants, Animals and 
Minerals 

17.5% 

24.5% 

0.8 

Person - Injured Worker 

15.5% 

17.4% 

1.0 

Minerals - Metallic or Nonmetallic 
(except fuel) 

1.3% 

0.4% 

3.6 

Person - Other Than Injured or III 
Worker 

0.2% 

5.0% 

0.1 

Other Persons, Plants, Animals & 
Minerals 

0.5% 

1.7% 

1.7 

Parts and Materials 

17.7% 

10.5% 

1.9 

Tools, Instruments and 
Equipment 

8.4% 

6.7% 

1.4 

Hand tools - Non powered 

3.6% 

3.4% 

1.2 

Hand tools - Powered 

2.3% 

1.1% 

2.4 

Other Tools and Equipments 

2.5% 

2.2% 

1.3 

Vehicles 

6.1% 

7.4% 

0.9 

Machinery 

5.3% 

5.6% 

1.1 

Containers 

5.3% 

10.1% 

0.6 

Furniture and Fixtures 

1.4% 

3.1% 

0.5 

Chemicals and Chemical 
Products 

1.0% 

1.2% 

0.9 

Other Sources 

5.6% 

5.2% 

1.2 

Source of Injury - Unknown 

9.2% 

8.8% 

1.2 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


6 Number of Times Higher/Lower than the Provincial Average: 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is equal to the 
provincial average; greater than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is higher than the provincial average; less 
than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is lower than the provincial average. See .Appendix A for calculation 
details. 


xm. m. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


18 


NJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 



3.5 Type of Event or Exposure 

The type of event or exposure describes the incident or event that occurred at the time of 
the exposure that directly resulted in the injury or disease. The two most common types 
of event or exposure comprised 62.4% of total lost-time claims in the ACS A industries 
in the last five years. They are bodily reaction and exertion, 34.9% and contact with 
objects and equipment, 27.5% (see Table 3. 5 A). 


'vf': 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


19 


NJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


Jill. 



Table 3.5A 

Type of Event or Exposure — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Total 


Type of Event or Exposure 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

% 

Bodily Reaction of Exertion 

2,120 

2,207 

2,095 

1,916 

2,012 

10,350 

. 

34.9% 

Overexertion 

1,290 

1,208 

1,117 

972 

1,067 

5,654 

19.1% 

Bodily Reaction [1] 

620 

733 

719 

637 

667 

3,376 

11.4% 

Repetitive Motion 

144 

177 

175 

200 

176 

872 

2.9% 

Other Bodily Reaction/Exertion 

66 

89 

84 

107 

102 

448 

1.5% 

Contact with Objects or 
Equipment 

1,661 

1,622 

1,646 

1,587 

1,648 

8,164 

27.5% 

Struck by Object 

907 

904 

901 

867 

896 

4,475 

15.1% 

Struck against Object 

341 

326 

358 

292 

351 

1,668 

5.6% 

Caught in Object 

271 

283 

249 

258 

243 

1,304 

4.4% 

Rubbed or Abraded 

117 

79 

91 

90 

95 

472 

1.6% 

Other Contact with 
Object/Equipment 

25 

30 

47 

80 

63 

245 

0.8% 

Falls 

1,328 

1,348 

1,291 

1,144 

1,265 

6,376 

21.5% 

Fall to Lower Level 

715 

735 

707 

551 

633 

3,341 

11.3% 

Fall on Same Level 

486 

521 

480 

524 

513 

2,524 

8.5% 

Other Falls 

127 

92 

104 

69 

119 

511 

1.7% 

Transportation Accidents 

254 

263 

238 

258 

280 

1,293 

4.4% 

Exposure to Harmful 
Substances 

163 

173 

191 

182 

233 

942 

3.2% 

Assaults and Violent Acts 

7 

5 

12 

15 

14 

53 

0.2% 

Assaults and Violent Acts by 
Person(s) 

3 

3 

9 

12 

7 

34 

0.1% 

Other Assaults and Violent Acts 

4 

2 

3 

3 

7 

' 

19 

0.1% 

Fires and Explosions 

21 

9 

14 

12 

6 

62 

0.2% 

Type of Event - Unknown 

586 

714 

405 

434 

296 

2,435 

8.2% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100.0% 


[1] Bodily reaction: injuries or illnesses resulting from a single incident of free bodily motion which imposed stress or strain on some 
part of the body. 

Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


riesj" 


July 2006 


20 


L 


NJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


In 2005, overexertion accounted for 18.6% of all claims in the ACSA industries. The 
average percentage of injuries for this type of event category was higher than the whole 
province. Percentages of injuries in all type of event categories were equal to or higher 
than the provincial average, except overexertion, repetitive motions, assault and violent 
acts and fire and explosions (see Table 3.5 B). 

Table 3.5B 

Type of Event or Exposure — Comparison 2005 7 


Type of Event of Exposure 

% of ACSA 
Industries' Claims 

% of Total 
Provincial 
Claims 

Number of Times 
Higher/ Lower Than the 
Provincial Average 

Bodily Reaction and Exertion 

35.0% 

41.4% 

1.0 

Overexertion 

18.6% 

23.0% 

0.9 

Bodily Reaction 

11.6% 

11.8% 

1.1 

Repetitive Motion 

3.1% 

4.7% 

0.7 

Other Bodily Reaction/Exertion 

1.8% 

1.9% 

1.1 

Contact With other Objects and 
Equipment 

28.7% 

25.5% 

1.3 

Struck by Object 

15.6% 

13.2% 

1.3 

Struck against Object 

6.1% 

5.5% 

1.3 

Caught in Object 

4.2% 

4.4% 

1.1 

Rubbed or Abraded 

1.7% 

1.5% 

1.3 

Other Contact with Object/Equipment 

1.1% 

0.9% 

1.3 

Falls 

22.0% 

16.9% 

1.5 

Fall to Lower Level 

11.0% 

5.0% 

2.5 

Fall on Same Level 

8.9% 

10.4% 

1.0 

Other Falls 

2.1% 

1.5% 

1.6 

Transportation Accidents 

4.9% 

4.9% 

1.1 

Exposure to Harmful Substances 

4.1% 

4.6% 

1.0 

Assaults and Violent Acts 

0.2% 

1.6% 

0.1 

Assaults and Violent Acts by Person(s) 

0.1% 

1.3% 

0.1 

Other Assaults and Violent Acts 

0.1% 

0.3% 

0.5 

Fires and Explosions 

0.1% 

0.2% 

0.8 

Type of Event - Unknown 

5.1% 

4.9% 

1.2 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


7 Number of Times Higher/Lower than the Provincial Average: 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is equal to the 
provincial average; greater than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is higher than the provincial average; less 
than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is lower than the provincial average. See Appendix A for calculation 
details. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


21 


NJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


L 


3.6 Duration of Disability 

Duration of disability 8 is intended to reflect the severity of the effects of occupational 
injury and disease as reflected by the number of days off work. However, the efforts of 
employers to introduce modified work programs to integrate injured workers more 
quickly back into the workforce can have a positive impact on workdays lost. 

Over 40% of lost-time claims involved durations of disability between one and ten days. 
Claims with one to five days duration represented 29.1%, and six to ten days, 12.8%. 
Claims involving 51 days or more comprised 26.1% (see Table 3.6A). 

Table 3.6A 

Duration of Disability — Alberta: 2001-2005 


Total 


Duration of Disability 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Lost-Time 

Claims 

% 

1-5 Days 

1,750 

1,717 

1,732 

1,632 

1,793 

8,624 

29.1% 

6-10 Days 

816 

852 

754 

665 

709 

3,796 

12.8% 

11-15 Days 

449 

421 

426 

430 

442 

2,168 

7.3% 

16-20 Days 

308 

294 

269 

279 

310 

1,460 

4.9% 

21-30 Days 

452 

413 

409 

421 

435 

2,130 

7.2% 

31-40 Days 

336 

343 

334 

341 

347 

1,701 

5.7% 

41-50 Days 

273 

310 

259 

278 

271 

1,391 

4.7% 

51 Days or More 

1,685 

1,907 

1,567 

1,329 

1,246 

7,734 

26.1% 

Unspecified 

71 

84 

142 

173 

201 

671 

2.3% 

Total 

6,140 

6,341 

5,892 

5,548 

5,754 

29,675 

100.0% 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


8 The duration of disability refers to the length of time, in days, for which the worker receives wage compensation from the WCB. 
Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries^ 


July 2006 


22 


NJURY AND DISEASE ANALYSIS 


In 2005, lost-time claims with one to five days duration of disability accounted for 
31.2% of all claims in the ACSA industries. Percentages of injuries in all duration 
categories were equal to or higher than the provincial average except claims with one to 
five days duration of disability (see Table 3.6B). 

Table 3.6B 

Duration of Disability — Comparison 2005 9 


Duration of Disability 

% of ACSA 
Industries' Claims 

% of Total 
Provincial 
Claims 

Number of Times 
High/ Lower Than the 
Provincial Average 

1-5 Days 

31 . 2 % 

40 . 4 % 

0.9 

6-10 Days 

12 . 3 % 

13 . 8 % 

1.0 

11-15 Days 

7 . 7 % 

7 . 9 % 

1.1 

16-20 Days 

5 . 4 % 

5 . 3 % 

1.2 

21-30 Days 

7 . 6 % 

6 . 9 % 

1.3 

31-40 Days 

6 . 0 % 

5 . 0 % 

1.4 

41-50 Days 

4 . 7 % 

3 . 6 % 

1.5 

51 Days or More 

21 . 7 % 

13 . 4 % 

1.8 

Unspecified 

3 . 4 % 

3 . 6 % 

1.1 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


9 Number of Times Higher/Lower than the Provincial Average: 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is equal to the 
provincial average; greater than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is higher than the provincial average; less 
than 1 indicates that the injury percentage of the industries is lower than the provincial average. See Appendix A for calculation 
details. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


23 


I 


i 




OCCUPATIONAL FATALITIES 


In 2005 the WCB accepted 53 fatalities in the ACSA 
industries, accounting for 37.1% of all 143 fatalities in 
the province. 


A WCB accepted occupational fatality is defined as the death of a worker, resulting 
from a work-related incident or exposure, which has been accepted by the WCB for 
compensation. Some of the fatalities accepted in a particular year occurred in prior 
years. Unless otherwise specified, occupational fatalities in this report refer to 
occupational fatalities accepted by the WCB. The WCB classifies occupational fatalities 
into three general types: 

Motor Vehicle Incidents 

Motor vehicle incidents typically involve non-industrial vehicles operating on public 
roads in which the fatally injured worker was either the driver or a passenger. This type 
of occupational fatality also includes cases involving aircraft crashes, train crashes, 
helicopter crashes and water vehicle crashes. In 2005, 16 ACSA fatalities accepted by 
the WCB were motor vehicle incidents (see Table 4.0). 

Workplace Incidents 

Workplace incidents consist of cases in which the worker died at a worksite or as a 
result of injuries sustained at a worksite. This is the type of fatality that AHRE typically 
investigates. In 2005, 14 ACSA fatalities accepted by the WCB were workplace 
incidents (see Table 4.0). 

Occupational Disease 

Occupational disease fatalities consist mostly of recognized occupational disease, that is, 
disease known to be primarily or exclusively work-related. This category also includes 
heart attacks suffered on the job. Occupational diseases are frequently diagnosed several 
years after the initial or crucial exposure to the toxic substance and, in such cases, it is 
difficult to determine when the fatal exposure occurred. The occupational disease 
category, therefore, should not be interpreted to reflect present worksite hazardous 
conditions or exposures. 



July 2006 


24 


OCCUPATIONAL FATALITIES 


L 


I 


Each year the WCB accepts some occupational fatality claims for compensation. 
Occupational fatality claims that were accepted in a particular year may include fatalities 
from prior years. In 2005, 23 fatalities accepted by WCB in ACSA industries were 
occupational disease incidents (see Table 4.0). 


Table 4.0 

Types of Occupational Fatalities Accepted by the WCB - 
Alberta: 2001-2005 


Year 

Motor Vehicle Incident 

Workplace Incident 

Occupational Disease 

Total 

Number of 
Fatalities 

% 

Number of 
Fatalities 

% 

Number of 
Fatalities 

% 

Number of 
Fatalities 

2001 

6 

18.2% 

9 

27.3% 

18 

54.5% 

33 

2002 

6 

24.0% 

10 

40.0% 

9 

36.0% 

25 

2003 

9 

27.3% 

11 

33.3% 

13 

39.4% 

33 

2004 

10 

22.7% 

10 

22.7% 

24 

54.5% 

44 

2005 

16 

30.2% 

\A 

** 

26.4% 

23 

43.4% 

53 

Total 

47 

25.0% 

54 

28.7% 

87 

46.3% 

188 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


driesjf 


July 2006 


25 


L 


OCCUPATIONAL FATALITIES 


The fatality rate is calculated by dividing the number of accepted fatalities in the year by 
the number of person-years in that year. The result is expressed as “per million person- 
years.” The 2005 fatality rate was 252 per million person-years, an increase of 2.0% 
from 2004 (see Chart 4.0). 


Chart 4.0 


Fatality Rate 10 in ACSA Industries: 2001-2005 



Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


10 Estimates are based upon information provided by the WCB. Fatalities occurring under Government of Canada jurisdiction are 
excluded from the calculation of the fatality rates. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


26 


OCCUPATIONAL 



Between 2001 and 2005, the WCB accepted 188 fatalities in the ACSA industries. The 
Roadbuilders sub-sector had the most with 64 accepted fatalities, accounting for 34.0% 
of all fatalities in the ACSA industries. There were no fatalities in the Glaziers sub- 
sector over the past five years (see Table 4. 1 ). 


Table 4.1 

ACSA Occupational Fatalities Accepted by the WCB by 
Sub-Sector - Alberta: 2001-2005 


Sub-Sector 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 

2005 

Number of 
Fatalities 

% 

ACSA Industries 

33 

25 

33 

44 

53 

188 

100.0% 

Construction Trade Services 

6 

4 

6 

4 

5 

25 

13.3% 

Industrial Construction 

7 

4 

7 

12 

18 

48 

25.5% 

Mechanical, Electrical and Insulation 

10 

5 

6 

6 

15 

42 

22.3% 

Roadbuilders 

10 

8 

13 

19 

14 

64 

34.0% 

Roofers 

0 

2 

0 

1 

1 

4 

2.1% 

Masonry 

0 

2 

1 

1 

0 

4 

2.1% 

Lime, Cement and Concrete Products 
Manufacturing 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

1 

0.5% 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


27 


CERTIFICATE OF 
RECOGNITION EMPLOYERS 


A Certificate of Recognition (COR) is given to 
employers who develop health and safety programs 
that meet established standards. Certificates are issued 
by Certifying Partners and are co-signed by AHRE 11 . 

In 2005, 5.5% of ACSA industries’ employers were COR holders. These employers 
accounted for 47.4% of all person-years in the ACSA industries. The Roadbuilders sub- 
sector had the highest proportion of CORs. 12.5% of employers in this sub-sector had 
valid CORs in 2005 and covered 72.2% of person-years in this sub-sector (see Table 
5 . 0 ). 


Table 5.0 

Employers With Valid COR — Alberta: 2005 


Sub Sector 

Number of 
Certified 
Employers 

Total Number of 
Employers 

% of Total 
Employers 
Certified 

% of Total Person- 
Years Certified 

ACSA Industries 

2,149 

39,089 

5.5% 

47.4% 

Construction Trade Services 

228 

13,991 

1.6% 

15.3% 

Glaziers 

33 

627 

5.3% 

31.7% 

Industrial Construction 

454 

8,857 

5.1% 

53.0% 

Lime, Cement & Concrete Products 
Manufacturing 

43 

1,296 

3.3% 

27.3% 

Masonry 

7 

287 

2.4% 

39.2% 

Mechanical, Electrical and Insulation 

357 

5,071 

7.0% 

55.2% 

Roadbuilders 

961 

7,703 

12.5% 

72.2% 

Roofers 

66 

1,257 

5.3% 

34.7% 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared by Data Development and Evaluation 


n 


For more information on the COR program visit http://www.hre.gov.ab.ea/cps/rde/xchg/hre/hs.xsl/277.html 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


28 


CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION EMPLOYERS 


In both 2004 and 2005, employers with a valid 2005 COR experienced lower lost-time 
claim rates than non-COR holders. In the ACSA industries, the lost-time claim rate for 
COR holders was 2.0 per 100 person-years in 2005, while the rate for non-COR holders 
was 3.4. For the province, employers with a valid COR and non-COR holders both had 
lost-time claim rates of 2.4 per 100 person-years in 2005 (see Table 5.1). 


Table 5.1 

Lost-Time Claim Rate for 2005 ACSA COR Holders — 
Alberta: 2004 and 2005 


Employer 

Year 

ACSA Industries 

Province 

LTCs 

Person- 

Years 

LTC Rate 

Change in 
LTC Rate 

LTCs 

Person-Years 

LTC Rate 

Change in LTC 
Rate 

COR 

2004 

1,920 

83,726 

2.3 

- 12 . 1 % 

10,563 

431,347 

2.4 

- 3 . 0 % 

2005 

2,012 

99,835 

2.0 

11,093 

467,041 

2.4 

Non-COR 

2004 

3,628 

94,533 

3.8 

- 11 . 9 % 

23,869 

921,867 

2.6 

- 6 . 2 % 

2005 

3,742 

110,686 

3.4 

24,367 

1 , 003,280 

2.4 


Data Source: 2005 WCB Data, Prepared Data Development and Evaluation 



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Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


29 


I 


APPENDIX A: TERMS, 
DEFINITIONS AND FORMULAS 


Lost-Time Claim 


Person-Years 


Lost-Time Claim 
Rate 


Duration 
(Days Lost) 


■ 



A lost-time claim (LTC) is a claim for an occupational injury or disease 
that causes the worker to have time away from work beyond the day of 
injury. Included are claims receiving reimbursement of full or partial lost 
wages due to occupational illness or injury, or payment for permanent loss 
of function. 


Person-years are estimates calculated from wage and payroll data provided 
by account holders to the WCB. Alberta Human Resources and 
Employment uses data to estimate an average industry wage, and uses the 
average industry wage and employer payroll data to estimate person-years 
for each employer and each industry. One person-year is equivalent to one 
full-time worker working for one year, and can be assumed to equal 2,000 
hours worked. 

The lost-time claim (LTC) rate is calculated by dividing the number of 
lost-time claims by the person-year estimate, and multiplying the result by 
100. The LTC rate represents the probability or risk of an injury or disease 
to a worker during a period of one-year work, that will result in time lost 
from work. Comparisons of LTC rates between industries, or between 
years, can be used to indicate increases, decreases, or differences in this 
risk. 


Number of LTCs x 100 
Person- Y ears 


The duration of disability is the number of days following the injury or 
disease for which the worker was disabled and unable to perform normal 
work duties. This information is obtained for this report from data on 
compensation days paid on each claim from the WCB. Alberta Human 
Resources and Employment obtains these data on March 31 of the year 
following the claim year, and does not update the information, even though 
many injured workers continue to be disabled beyond this date. As a result, 
the duration information reported here underestimates the true impact of 
lost-time injury and disease. 


TERMS, DEFINITIONS AND FORMULAS 


Duration Rate 


Cost of Claims 


WCB Accepted 
Fatality 

Fatality Rate 


Number of 
Times 

Higher/Lower 
than the 
Provincial 
Average 


The duration rate is calculated by dividing the number of workdays lost 
(disability days) by the person-year estimate, and multiplying by 100. The 
result is expressed as days lost per 100 person-years, and indicates, in part, 
the economic impact of occupational injury and disease. Duration rates are 
not recommended as reliable indicators of full economic cost. In addition, 
readers are warned that duration rates are highly unstable when based on 
only a few lost-time claims; it is recommended that the duration rate not be 
calculated based upon fewer than 30 lost-time claims. 


Duration Rate = 


Disability Days x 100 
Person- Y ears 


Compensation cost of a claim is the reimbursement of full or partial lost 
wages that a worker received from the WCB due to occupational illness or 
injury. 

An occupational fatality is the death of a worker which resulted from a 
work-related incident or exposure and which has been accepted by the 
WCB for compensation. A fatality is counted in the year it is accepted. 


The fatality rate is calculated by dividing the number of accepted fatalities 
by the person-years estimate and multiplying the result by one million. The 
result is expressed as fatalities per million person-years. Fatalities that are 
found under the jurisdiction of the Government of Canada are excluded 
before the calculation of the fatality rate. 


Fatality Rate = 


Number of Fatalities x 1,000,000 
Person-Years 


The number of times higher/lower than the provincial average is used to 
compare the performance of the industries with the province regarding 
specific injury or disease. A number less than one indicates that the injury 
of the industries is lower than the provincial average; if equal to one it 
indicates the injury of the industries is the same as the provincial average 
and a number greater than one indicates that the injury of the industries is 
higher than the provincial average. 

Percent of Total Claims for the 

Industries x Industries’ LTC Rate 

Percent of Total Claims for the x Provincial LTC Rate 

Province 


Where: 

Percent of Total Claims for the Industries = 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


31 


TERMS, DEFINITIONS AND FORMULAS 



Number of LTCs for the Industries (e.g. back injury) x 100 
Total LTCs for the Industries 

Percent of Total Claims for the Province = 

Number of LTCs for the Province (e.g. back injury) x 100 
Total LTCs for the Province 

NEC Means ‘Not Elsewhere Classified’. 

UNS Means ‘Unspecified’. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


32 


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AC S A WCB 


APPENDIX B: 
INDUSTRY CODES 12 


1. Construction Trade Services 

02100 - Landscaping Including Maintenance 

40401 - Construction, Residential 

40405 - Residential General Contractor 

42111 - Painting and Decorating 

421 13 - Tile and Terrazzo, Sales/Installation 

42 1 1 5 - Paving Stone, Sales/Installation 

42125 - Floor Covering, Sales/Installation 

42133 - Cabinets and Counters, Assemble/Installation 

42135 - Drywall, Plaster, Lath and Stucco, Sales/Installation 

42136 - Underground Sprinklers, Sales/Installation/Service 

42141 - Suspended Ceiling and Acoustic Materials, Assemble/Installation 
42143 - Wood Framing 
42147 - Finishing Carpentry 
42155 - Moving of Buildings 

2. Glaziers 

30302 - Overhead Doors, Installation/Repair 
42121 - Door and Window, Manufacturing/Installation 


3. Industrial Construction 

40400 - Construction and Industrial General Contracting 

42105 - Prefabricated Steel Structures Erect/Removal 

42106 - Structural Steel Erect 

42109 - Stationary Machinery or Equipment, Install/Service 

42120 - Sandblasting 

42127 - Fence Sales, Rent, Installation 

42129 - Industrial Plant Maintenance 

42156 - Storage Tanks Erect/Dismantle 

42159 - Piling, Caisson Operations and Foundation Boring 

42161 - Precast Concrete Erect/Installation 

51504 - Cathodic Protection Services 

62302 - Machinery or Equipment-NEC, Sale/Service/Repair 

8691 1 - Manpower Services- Industrial Labour 

89401 - Welding 

89605 - Service Station Equipment, Sales/Installation/Repair 
89928 - Scaffolding and Tower Cranes, Rental/Erect 


12 Codes are Workers’ Compensation Board 2004 industry codes. 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


33 


ACSA WCB INDUSTRY CODES 


4. Masonry 

42102 - Brick and Masonry Construction 


5. Mechanical, Electrical and Insulation 

31508 - Servicing (Only ) of Overhead Cranes 
421 10 - Elevators and Escalators, Installation/Service 

421 17 - Heating, Ventilation, Air Systems, Installation/Service 
42122 - Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fitting 

42124 - Electrical Instrumentation Contracting 
42144 - Fire Sprinklers Systems, Sales/Service/Installation 
42184 - Mechanical Insulation, Installation/Service 
89600 - Refrigeration Equipment, Sales/Service 

6. Roadbuilders 

02200 - Right-of-Way Maintenance, Industrial 
34800 - Transit Mix Operations 
40602 - Paving and Surfacing 

40604 - Mobile Equipment Operations, Road Construction 

40901 - Power Lines, Construction/Removal 

40905 - Pipeline Construction 

42 1 03 - Drilling, Horizontal or Angular 

7. Roofers 

42 1 1 8 - Roofing 

42139 - Waterproofing, Industrial Coating Applications 
42151 - Siding, Soffit, Eaves Trough, Fabrication/Installation 


8. Lime, Cement and Concrete Producers Manufacturing 

42104 - Concrete Construction 


Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA Industries 


July 2006 


34 


CONTACT INFORMATION 


Alberta Human Resources and Employment 
Data Development and Evaluation 
2nd Floor, 10808 - 99 Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T5K 0G5 

Phone: 780-427-853 1 , toll free by calling 3 1 0-0000 


Alberta Human Resources and Employment website: 

htt p://www.hre.gov.ab.ca/cps/rde/xclig/hre/hs.xsl/563.html 

Work Safe Alberta website: 

http : //www3 . gov .ab.c a/hre/ whs/worksafelv /index, asp 

Workplace Health and Safety Contact Centre: 

Telephone: 780-415-8690, toll free by calling 1-866-415-8690 

http :// w 7 w 7 w . hre . gov.ab . ca/cps/rde/ xch g/hre/hs.xsl/2 874. htrnl 

Certificate of Recognition (COR) Program: 

http://ww ? w.hre.gov.ab.ca/eps/rde/xchg/hre/hs.xsl/277.html 


Fax: 


780-422-5070 



Occupational Injuries and Diseases in ACSA 



July 2006