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355 
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1958-60 
1 



S i A I L >rvu'Ji?it:.>:l J. 



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BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



ADJUTANT GENERAL 

STATE OF MONTANA 



1 July 1958 to 30 June 1960 




State of Montana 

OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 

Helena, Montana 



Montana State Library 




October 15, 196O 

Governor of Montana 
State Capitol 
Helena, Montana 
Sir: 

In compliance with Section 13^9, Revised Laws of Montana, I9U7, 
I have the honor to submit the Biennial Report of the Adjutant 
General of Montana, for the period 1 July, I958 - 30 June, I96O. 

Respectfully yours. 



S. H. MITCHELL 

Major General, AGC, Mont NG 

The Adjutant General 



INDEX 

Biogrcjphical Shetch, S. H. Mitchell 1 

Adjutants General cf Montana I867- 2 

Folic jes of Department of the Amy & Air Force Relating to the ICG 3 

Montana Army National Guard Allocation and Fresent Status 6 

Personnel and Administration (Army) 7 

Roster of Army KG Officers 9 

Training (Army) I6 

Regular Army Instrr^ctors 21 

Logistical Support --Army NG 23 

State Support 29 

Federal Support 33 

Facilities (Army) 37 

Air National Guard , ^3 

Roster of Air NG Officers ^8 

Regular Air Force Adviser Staff 51 

Montana Military Academy 5^ 

Trophies and Awards 5° 

State Emergencies Requiring Mobilization of the National Guard 5^ 





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in 2010 with funding from 

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 

S. H. MITCHELL 
ADJUTANT GENERAL, STATE OF MONTANA 

Born January 13th, I896, at Willi ston. North Dakota, and a resident 
of Montana since birth. Raised on a cattle ranch in Eastern Montana. 
Ovned and operated own ranch since beginning of World War I. Educated 
in Montana schools but did not attend college or university. 

Entered World War I in I918 and served honorably approximately 
18 months and was discharged with grade of Corpora! . 

Enlisted in National Guard of Montana in 1923 as an enlisted man 
and was commissioned Second Lieutenant in December 1927- 

Served with the National Guard as Company Commander and State 
Staff Officer until induction in Federal Service in September 19^0 
with the grade of Captain. Was appointed Director of Selective 
Service in Montana on September 1, 19^2, and was raised in grade to 
Colonel in December 19^3. 

Was separated from the AUS in September 19^7 and was commissioned 
Brigadier General, AGD, in August 19^7> as Adjutant General of Montana, 
being first appointed to that position in February 19^3 while still on 
active duty in the AUS. Promoted to Major General 17 May 1955* 

In addition to being Adjuteint General of Montana, is also serving 
as State Director of Selective Service commencing under the 19^0 Selec- 
tive Service Law. 

Has a family of wife and three daughters, church affiliation — 
Protestant . 



Decorations 



Service Ribbons 



Legion of Merit 

Army Commendation Ribbon 



World War I Victory 

American Defense 

American Campaign 

World War II Victory 

National Defense 

Armed Forces Reserve with two 

ten year devices (Over 30 

years service) 



•1- 



ADJUTANTS GENERAL CF MONTANA 

Martin Beem (Territorial) -I667 

James H. Mills (Territorial) -l877 

C. W. Turner (Territorial) -I887 

Samuel R. Douglas I889-189I 

H. S. Howell 1891-1892 

C. F. Lloyd - 1893-1896 

Jas, W. Drennan I897 

Chas. 0. English I898-I9OO 

R. Lee McCulloch I9OI-I9O3 

Shirley C . Ashby ■ — 1903-1904 

Adlebert M. Alderson ^— 1904-19O8 

Phil Geenan • I9O9-I92O 

Charles L. Sheridan — I92O-192I+ 

Erastus H. Williams - I925-I937 

John W. Mahan 1937-19^0 

Frederick A. Lange 19^0-19^1 

Everett M. Birely 19^+1-1942 

Spencer H. Mitchell 19^3" 



-2- 



POLICIES OF DEPAETMENT OF THE ARMY AM) DEPARTMENT CF THE AIR 
FORCE RELATING TO THE NATIONAL GUARD 

I. DEFINITION 

A. National Guard 

The National Guard of the United States and the Air National Guard 
of the United States are integral parts and first line reserve components 
of the Army <->f the United States and the United States Air Force. The 
National Guard of the States and Territories continues to exist and in 
time of national emergency may be called or ordered into the Arxsy of 
the United States and the United States Air Force through its National 
Guard of the United States status. All federally recognized units and 
elements of the Active National Guard and the personnel of the Inactive 
National Guard of the several States, the District of Columbia, and 
Puerto Rico together, constitute the National Guard of the United 
States . 

II. MISSIONS 

A. Mission of the National Guard of the United States 

The mission of the National Guard of the United States is to 
provide a reserve component of the Army of the U.S. and U. S. Air 
Force, capable of immediate expansion to war strength, able to furnish 
units fit for service anywhere in the world, trained and equipped to: 

1. Befend critical areas of the United States against land, 
seaborne, or airborne invasion. 

2. Assist in converting the mobilization and concentration of 
the remainder of the reserve forces. 

3. Participate by units in all types of operations, including 
the offensive, either in the United States or overseas. 

B. Mission of the National Guard of the Several States 

The mission of the National Guard of the several states is to 
provide sufficient organizations in each State, so trained and equip- 
ped as to enable them to function efficiently at existing strength 
in the protection of life and property and the preservation of peace, 
order, and public safety, londer competent orders of the State authorities. 

III. COMPOSITION OF THE MONTANA NATIONAL GUARD 

A. The organization and units allotted to the several States will 
be those which are equ:jped for the accomplishment of the mission of the 
National Guard, and when taken with the units of the Regular Army and 
the United States Army Reserve, and the Regular Air Force and the 
United States Air Force Reserve, will provide the essential forces 



required for early mobilization. Within the total allotment, organi- 
zations of the proper type will be allotted to each State to enable 
it to accomplish the Federal and State missions. 

B. Units allotted to the State of Montana in accordance with the 
above policy are listed on page 7 of this report. 

IV. STATE AND FEDERAL RESPONSIBILITY 

A. General 

The National Guard is an integral part of the Army of the United 
States and the United States Air Force and its success depends upon 
mutual confidence between the Federal government and the several 
states . Such confidence is obtained only by the wholehearted efforts 
of all parties to maintain an effective National Guard. 

B . Supply 

It will be the responsibility of the Departments of the Army and 
of the Air Force to clothe, equip, supply and arm the National Guard 
according to the standards established for the Regular Army and the 
Regular Air Force. 

C . Facilities 

The division of Federal and State responsibilities is as follows: 

1. The states will furnish the personnel, adequate armories, and 
storage facilities . 

2. The Federal Government will furnish the outdoor training 
facilities . 

D . Training 

Unit training objectives will be to assume that all units will be 
capable of immediate mobilization and early development for field 
service. The training of the National Guard will be conducted by the 
National Gueird organizations of the respective States under the super- 
vision of the Chief, Army Field Forces and the Chief, Civilian Components, 
Branch United States Air Force, in accordance with policies prescribed 
by the Departments of the Army and Air Force. Period of field training, 
attendance of personnel at service schools, and tours of active duty 
will be conducted in the reserve status of the National Guard of the 
United States and the Air National Guard of the United States. Armory 
drill training will be conducted in the status of the National Guard 
of the States . 

E. State Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment and Headquarters 
Montana AKG 

Within each State, there shall be an administrative staff to be 



designated as "State Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment and 
Headquarters Montana ANG" and which will be organized and federally 
recognized as a u-.it of the National Guard. The numters and -racles of 
officers, warrant officers, aiad enlisted men within "he State Headquarters 
and Headquarters Detachment will be based upon the strength of allotted 
National Guard units to the State and, in addition, will provide a^ 
suitable number of officers and enlisted men for duties in connection 
with Selective Service and internal security. 

F . Instructors 

Under policies of the Department of the Army and Department of the 
Air Force, selection and assignment of qualified instructors is reserved 
as a function of Headquarters, Department of the Army and Headquarters, 
Department of the Air Force. The supervision of the training responsi- 
bility of the instructors is vested in the Chief, Army Field Forces, and 
Chief "^ of Reserve Forces, Headquarters, United States Air Force. Person- 
nel on duty as instructors with the National Guard will have no command 
status with troops or \inits of the National Guard nor will they be 
subject to orders of State military authorities. The primary duty of 
instructors will be to advise and assist responsible commanders in the 
attainment and maintenance of that state of efficiency of the National 
auard units as is prescribed by Headquarters, Department of the Army 
and Headquarters, Department of the Air Force. 

G. National Guard Bureau 

The National Guard Bureau is charged with administration of approved 
Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force policies, other 
than those relative to training, for the National Guard not in the 
service of the United States. It is fvirther charged with the promul- 
gation of Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force 
(directives and regulations applicable to the National Guard, including 
biiose relating to training. It is fiirther charged with the keeping of 
Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force records pertaining 
to the National Guard, except for current records in time of war or 
national emergency. 

H. National Guard 

All policies affecting the National Guard are prepared by the 
General Staff Committee on National Guard Policy (known as the 
"Section Five Committee") for action by the Secretary of the Army 
and Secretary of the Air Force under normal Department of the Army 
and Department of the Air Force procedure. All regulations to carry 
such policies into effect are reviewed by the committee. 



MONTANA ARMY KATIOKAL GUAED ALLOCATION AND PRESENT STATUS 

I. ALLOCATION 

The Montana rational Guard is the organized militai-y force of the State , 
except v;hen ordeu:d into Federal service in time of war. During times of 
peace, the Governor is Coiiimander-in-Chief of the National Guard and exer- 
cises his command through the Adjutant Gereral. The Adjutant General is 
assisted, daring training periods, in the adainjstration of the National 
Guard of the State by a Headquarters and Ileadqua.rtera Detachment consisting 
of 16 officers and 26 enlisted men in the Tjationcl Guard section and 7 
officers ■'n the Selective Service Section, for the Army NG. 

II. Di^^LliAivGljii 

A. During the two fiscal years covered in this report a considerable 
number of officers and enlisted men were discharged from the Montana National 
Guard for various reasons, thereby complicating the progressive training 
of the units. Discharges were granted for many various reasons, as listed 
below: 

FY 58 FY 59 

Enlist in Regular Service 99 58 

Enlist in Reserve Component 26 32 

To Accept Commission 22 15 

Enter Advance POTC 5 h 

Physical Disqualified 8 I6 

Rejected NGB 12 5 . 

Minor li; 7 

Change of Residence 127 129 

Ipcompatoble Occupation 6h 213 

Continued Absence from Drill 38 7I 

Fraudulent Enlistment 2 

Priority nduction 10 10 

Death 9 k 

Other 107 27 

Expiration Term of Service 523 555 

TOTAL DISCHARGES MONTANA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD lC6h ll48 

Total Re-enlistments koQ h^6 

Total New Enlistments 63^ 553 

TOTAL ENLISTlvENTS 10^2 1009 

B. The Inactive National Guard was reconstituted and transfers were 
made in December, 19U8. Inactive National Guard status is provided to 
allow individuals who, for one reason or another, cannot maintain active 
participation, to revert to an inactive basis b'lt still maintain their 
connection with the Montana National Guard for potential emergency service. 

-6- 



PERSOMEL AND ADMINISTRATION 



OFF 



ENLISTED AGGRE- 
WO MEN GATE 



163d APM) CAV 
Hq & Hq Trp 
Aviation Co 

Hq, 1st Recon Sq 
Hq & Hq Trp 
Sep Pit, Hq Trp 
Troop A 
Troop B 
Troop C 
Troop D 
How Btry 

Hq, 2a Recon Sq 
Hq & Hq Trp 

Troop E 
Troop F 
Troop G 
Troop H 
How Btry 

Hq, 3rcl Recon Sq 
Hq c: Hq Trp 
Troop I 
Troop K 
Troop L 
Troup M 
How Btry 

154th FA GROUP 
Hq & Hq Btry 
190th Arty 
Hq, 1st How Bn 

Hq £t Hq Btry 

Btry A 

Btry B 

Btry C 

Service Btry 

Hq, 2d How Bn 
Hq &, Hq Btry 
Btry A 
Btry B 
Btry C 

Service Btry 
Medical Det 



Bozeman 


17 


2 


ko 


59 


Helena 


22 


1 


30 


53 


Culbertson 


13 


3 


53 


69 


Fairview 


1 





25 


26 


Qlendive 


k 





78 


82 


Sidney 


3 





36 


39 


Glasgow 


3 





62 


65 


Malta 


h 





53 


57 


Plentywood 


k 





81 


85 


Bozeman 


15 


k 


5k 


73 


Havre 


5 





92 


97 


Butte 


5 





58 


63 


Livingston 


5 





56 


61 


Chinook 


5 





62 


67 


Dillon 


k 





52 


56 


Billings 


Ik 


3 


60 


77 


Billings 


k 





57 


61 


Miles City 


k 


1 


69 


7k 


Lewiitown 


5 





kl 


52 


Billings 


5 





k3 


kQ 


Harlowton 


h 





35 


39 


Missoula 


Ik 


2 


ko 


56 


Missoula 


12 





6k 


76 


Deer Lodge 


5 





kd 


53 


Hamilton 


3 





h3 


k6 


Anaconda 


6 





80 


86 


Missoula 


2 


3 


53 


58 


Kali spell 


16 


1 


76 


93 


Whitefish 


k 





51 


55 


Kalispell 


5 





61 


66 


Shelby 


5 





65 


70 


Kalispell 


2 


2 


58 


62 


Kalispell 


1 





6 


7 



-7- 



PERSONNEL AND ADMINISTRATION- (COMTIKUED) 







OFF 


WO 


ENLISTED 
ivEN 


AGGRE- 
GATE 


1049th Engr Co (-) 
Sep Pit, 10^9th 


Poison 
Helena 


2 

1 


1 



58 
2? 


61 

28 


lU3d Ord Co 


Helena 


3 


1 


52 


56 


3669th Ord Co 


Helena 


5 


2 


66 


73 


103d Pub Info Det 


Helena 


1 





2 


3 


k6th. Array Band 


Bozeman 





1 


20 


21 


STATE HQ & HQ DET 


Helena 


21 


3 


26 


50 


TOTAL ARMY UNITS (30 


June i960) 


254 


30 


2,039 


2,323 



-8- 



ROSTER OF ARMY NG OFFICERS AS OF 30 JlME I96O 
NAME UNIT 

Ma,1or General 

Mitchell, S. H. State Hq & Hq Det 

Colonel 



Benson, William C. 
Foster. Mayhew Y. 



Foster, .._^ 

McCabe, James J 
Neely, James F, 

Lt» Colonel 

Barker, James E. 
Christensen, Arvild J. 
Ellsworth, Edward C. 
Kendall, Richard C. 
Kendall, Robert M. 
Martin, George E. 
McKinney, Howard A. 
Mitschke, John J., Jr. 
Nelson, Howard I. 
Overturf, Arthur W. 
Redpath, Don G. 
Rhodes, Cecil C. 
Strong, Frank D. 
Thode, Harry W. 
Trinder, Claude R. 
Weiser, John T. 

Ma.jor 

Agee, Raymond E. 
Barfknecht, James F. 
Beley, Ward H. 
Chrisinger, Raymond G. 
DeGroat, James R. 
Dwight, Reuben L. 
Gilbertson, Carlyn L. 
Goodwin, Manfred H. 
Hansen, Christian A. 
Hansen, Robert W. 
Hundahl, Maxirice E. 
Huso, Kenneth W. 
Kalberg, Louis C. 
Keyes, Robert A. 
King, James H. 
Leppink, Gerrit K. 



Hq & Hq Trp, l63d AC 
Hq & Hq Btry, 15Uth FA Gp 
State Hq & Hq Det 
State Hq & Hq Det 



1st How Bn, 190th Arty 
15^th FA Gp 



State Hq 8e Hq Det 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Hq & Hq Btry, 

Hq & Hq Btry, 

State Hq & Hq Det 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Hq St. Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, l63d AC 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

State Hq & Hq. Det 

State Hq & Hq Det 

State Hq & Hq Det 



Hq & Hq Trp, 
Aviation Co, 
Hq & Hq Trp, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 
Hq 85 Hq Trp, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 
State Hq & Hq 
Hq & Hq Trp, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 
Hq & Hq Trp, 
State Hq & Hq 
State Hq & Hq 
State Hq & Hq 



3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 
163d AC 
163d AC 

15^th FA Gp 
163d AC 
15i*th FA Gp 
15 ^th FA Gp 
Det 
1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 
15 ^th FA Gp 
2d How Bn, IpOth Arty 
2d How Bn, 190th Arty 
163d AC 
Det 
Det 
Det 



-9- 



McElwain, Hugh P. 
Nybo, Clarence H. 
Sather, Olaf K. 
Saunders, Charles V. 
Sorby, Lyle V. 
Wolcott, Frank S. 
Wcmack, John J. 

Captain 

Amsberry, Berton L. 
Anderson, Robert H. 
Antonich, John M. 
Babcock, Harold E. 
Baker, Donald C. 
Baugh, Kenneth J. 
Bechtel, Oscar F. 
Bergman, Alvan D. 
Callen, Joseph F . 
Chernausek, Warren W. 
Conklin, Glenn H. 
Cook, Robert W. 
Dahlgren, Raymond D. 
Duff, Roy M. 
Effing, Gerald B. 
Erickson, Kenneth H. 
Eusterman, George B. 
Fichtler, Helmuoh • 
Finnegan, Floyd T. 
Frisch, Fred B. 
Fryslie, Harold A. 
Girard, James A. 
Graves, Charles W. 
Gregory, Horace W., Jr. 
Grossman, Raymond A. 
Habeger, John G. 
Hansen, Earl E. 
Harrison, Ben F. 
Hawley, Earl V. 
Hetherington, Thomas C. 
Hove, James G. 
Humphrey, Melvin G. 
Kidder, Hugh G. 
Kincheloe, Philip L. 
Kojancik, Joe J. 
Kramer, George A. 
Larsen, Dean W. 
Liston, John T. 
Listen, William M. 
Lynch, Donald J. 
Marsh, Marshall J. 
Marvin, Charles E. 



Hq & Hq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Hq & Eq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Eq & Eq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Eq Trp, 163d AC 

Hq & Bq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 



Trp G, 163d AC 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Btry C, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp E, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp K, 163d AC 

Trp L, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Eq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Med Det, 2d How Bn, IpOth Arty 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 
1st How Bn, 190th Arty 
154th FA Gp 
2d How Bn, 190th Arty 
1st How Bn, 190th Arty 
2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Eq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq 8c. Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry A, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Eq & Eq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

Hq & Eq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq Sc Eq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

l43d Crd 

Hq & Eq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

State Bq & Hq Det 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

State Eq & Hq Det 

3669th Ord 

Trp A, 163d AC 

How Btry, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp I, 163d AC 



Hq 

Hq & Hq Btry, 
Hq & Eq Btry, 
Hq & Eq Btry, 
Eq 8e Eq Btry, 
Hq & Hq Btry, 



-10- 



Mufich, William P. 
Nardella, Frank 
Nelson, Harvey H, 
Wopper, Thomas E. 
O'Connell, James D. 
Pfau, Harold J. 
Popiel, Frank F. 
Reynolds^ Hugh Z. 
Riggert, William T. 
Root, James W. 
Rowland, Richard W. 
Schledewitz, Ray L. 
Schwarzrock, James W. 
Small, Wallace E. 
Smiley, Earl G., Jr. 
Sorrell, Raymond C, Jr, 
Swan, Valentine A. 
Tyanich, Peter 
Upshaw, Joseph W. 
Van Risswick, Anton G. 
Vogel, George H. 
Warren, Gilbert V. 
Watkins, Arthur E. 
Wedum, John J. 
Willey, Earl C. 
Yost, Harold W. 

1st Lieutenant 



Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

lCi+9th Eng Co (-) 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 15ilth FA Gp 

How Btry, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, IpOth Arty 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 15ifth FA Gp 

Hq 8e Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry C, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Trp H, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Trp M, 163d AC 

State Hq 8e Eq Det 

Trp F, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 



Aanes, Vincent G. 
Anderson, Grover L. 
Armstrong, David F . 
Ballard, John W. 
Blankenship, Bernard 0. 
Bock, Leonard W. 
Boe, Herbert R. 
Powdish, John T. 
Brown, Hugh B. 
Buker, Emery 0. 
Burke, Robert F. 
Card, Kenneth B. 
Carson, Daniel F. 
Clonlnger, Everett E. 
Dalin, Clayton R. 
Dart, Elwcod D. 
?avis, John D. 
Delano, Charles W., Jr. 
Donner, Donald L. 
Dube, Paul F. 
Duffy, James W. 
Duffy, Richard B. 
Fairhurst, William A. 



Trp F, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Trp E, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Trp E, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry B, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Eq Trp, 163d AC 

3669th Ord Co 

Trp F, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Btry C, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

How Btry, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry C, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Btry C, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

3669th Ord Co 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 



■n- 



Fisher, Bruce A. 
Flint, Billy F. 
Forsythe, Peter 
Glover, Dean W. 
Greenfield, Delbert J. 
Grieb, Kenneth G. 
Hanson, Edward L. 
Harris, Lee C. 
Harshman, Don P. 
Harshman, Francis C. 
Hill, Robert R. 
Hodges, Donald E. 
Hoover, Dsirrell V. 
Hurry, James J. 
Johnson, Maynard I. 
Jones, Raymond J. 
Jordahl, Henry 0., Jr, 
Keim, Stephen F. 
Ketcham, Kenneth F. 
Kjelstrup, Kenneth R. 
Lee, Ronald P. 
Linendoll, Leslie V. 
Lorello, Peter J. 
Lundquist, Ronald W. 
Magelky, Bernard J. 
Maness, James 
Manley, Willis L. 
Manseau, Francis P. 
Marsh, Delbert J. 
McDonald, Shelby D. 
McKay, Leslie A. 
McKay, Robert H. 
Mills, William T. 
Moir, William E. 
Moore, Delbert D. 

Morehouse, Gene A. 
Mosher, Elton L. 
Keibaur, Frederick C. 
Nelson, Martin J. 
Nevin, James R. 
Wilson, Edward W. 
Pewitt, Robert A. 
Pre vis, Arthur L. 
Pulis, Richard H. 
Fulliam, Francis R. 
Reesman, Kenneth 0. 
Roth, James G. 
Ruff, Jerome A. 
Slocum, Robert J. 
Sorg, William E. 
gpeer, Evan G. 



Sep Det, 1049th Eng Co 

Serv Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp K, 163d AC 

How Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Btry B, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

State Hq & Hq Det 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp H, 163d AC 

Trp H, 163d AC 

Eq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq> 163d AC 

Trp M, 163d AC 

Trp A, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

How Btry, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp K, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry C, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp H, 163d AC 

Btry C, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Eq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp I, 163d AC 

103d Pi.b Info Det 

Btry A, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Eq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, l63d AC 

How Btry, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp L, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Btry A, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Sep Det, Hq 8e Hq Trp, 1st Recon 

Sq, 163d AC 
Trp C, 163d AC 
3669th Ord Co 

Btry A, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 
Btry C, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 
Aviation Co, 163d AC 
Trp E, 163d AC 

Btry B, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 
10lf9th Eng Co (-) 
Trp D, 163d AC 
Aviation Co, 163d AC 
Serv Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 
Trp G, 163d AC 
Trp B, 163d AC 

Btry A, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 
Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 
Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th i'jrty 



-12- 



Spurgeon, Allen 
Stallings, Lawrence W. 
Stocker, Ross R. 
Storer, Duane L. 
StrielD, James R. 
Sullivan, Gerald D. 
Sundheim, Stewart D. 
Torgerson, Don B. 
Walsh, Burton K. 
Waugh, William H. 
Williamson, Donald F. 
Wolf, Rotert C. 
Wolff, Bernard A. 
Wosepka, Edward T. 

2d Lieutenant 

Adams, Cheirles R. 
Alexander, Louis K. 
Bissell, Robert M. 
Bosma, Stephen F . 
Bowers, Robert C, Jr. 
Burbridge, Bradley B. 
Christopherson, Kenneth 
Clinton, Carl E. 
Crumley, Alonzo R. 
Daniels, Frederic R. 
Deffinbaugh, Harold L. 
Dunlop, Lowell A. 
Evans, John M. 
Fischer, Theodore E. 
Foster, Jack H. 
Fowler, Wallace J. 
Heim, Roger E. 
Howard, Harrison J. 
Iversen, Erik R. 
Jensen, Darryl J. 
Jensen, Donald E. 
Johnson, Tim E. 
Korb, August W. 
Kraft, Reinhold J. 
Larsen, Leif C. 
Lynch, David J. 
Kanson, Dwayne D. 
Menge, Darrell L. 
Miller, Gerald H. 
Monforton, Donald P. 
Morehouse, Warren L. 
Nathe, David M. 
Omdahl, Derold L. 
Perry, Ronald L. 
Reese, Donald L. 



Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp F, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp F, 163d AC 

Trp G, 163d AC 

Trp B, 163d AC 

Btry A, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq 8e Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp H, 163d AC 

How Btry, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

How Btry, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp A, 163d AC 



How Btry, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp C, 163d AC 

Btry A, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp K, 163d AC 

lll3d Crd Co 

Btry C, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp E, 163d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp M, 163d AC 

Trp L, 163d AC 

Trp M, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp B, 163d AC 

How Btry, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Serv Btry, l?t How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq 8e Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, l63d AC 

How Btry, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp G, 163d AC 

Btry C, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty . 

Btry A, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Trp D, 163d AC 

Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq 8c Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp A, 163d AC 

3669th Ord Co 

Trp D, 163d AC 

How Btry, 3d Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Trp C, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp D, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp L, 163d AC 



■13- 



Rhodes, Charles A. 
Riddle, Ralph M. 
Ridgway, Kerry J. 
Sangray, Andrew R. 
Schessler, Robert P. 
Schwartz, Edgar G. 
Simpson, Joe R. 
Smith, Vernal J. 
Spurgin, Lelon E. 
Stefanik, David L. 
Stetzner, Carl J. 
Stevens, Reid E. 
Stockwell, William A. 
Sukin, Jack D. 
Tracy, Gordon M. 
Wat kins, Bruce L. 
V/atters, Gene H. 
We stall, Thomas S. 
Yaeger, V7illiam J. 
Zuern, Edwin F . 

CWO-4 

Fry, Walter W. 
Bars tad, Adolph L. 
King, Carl H. 
Tillman, Thomas F. 



Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp G, 163d AC 

li^3d Ord Co 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry C, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp L, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

Trp I, 163d AC 

Trp M, 163d AC 

Btry B, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp I, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry A, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Serv Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 



Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 
46th Army Band 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 
3669tli Ord Co 



CWO-3 



Dahl, John E. 
Fritz, George J. 
Gerleman, Richard 
Olson, Elmer 0. 
Onslow, Donald R. 



State Hq & Hq Det 

3669th Ord Co 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 163d AC 

Serv Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 



CWO-2 



Coty, Milton A., Jr. 
Gipe, Gordon A. 
Green, Clare A. 
Isakson, Orville E. 
Lanning, Thomas L. 
Louis, Lyle P. 
McQuirk, John J., Jr. 
Mehus, Alfred P. 
Mills, William R. 
Moore, Benjamin L. 
Morgan, Robert E. 
Nichols, Aldon R. 
Seaman, Robert W. 



State Hq & Hq Det 

1049th Eng Co (-) 

Trp K, 163d AC 

Hq 8e Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Aviation Co, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Serv Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Hq & Hq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Serv Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

l43d Ord Co 

Hq & Hq Trp, Ist Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Serv Btry, 1st Hbw Bn, 190th Arty 



-14- 



Tillo, Joseph J. Hq & Hq Btry, 15'^th FA Gp 

Wahl, Robert E. Hq & Hq Trp, 2d. Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Watts, Robert R. Hq & Hq Trp, l63d AC . ,„ 

Willems, Frank E. Hq & Hq Trp, 2d Recon Sq, I63d AC 

Williams, Richard E. St Hq & Hq Det 



WCJG 



Prill, George J. Hq & Hq Trp, 3d Recon Sq, l63d AC 

Yetter, Joseph F. Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 



-15- 



TRAINING 
AFMORY DRILLS 



Armory Drills are held forty-eight times per year at local armories. 
I^ach drill is of two hours dTiration and training is conducted in complete 
uniform and with equipment allotted to the various units. Officers and 
l:ey Non-Commission'. a Officers conduct classes in accordance with the 
l::ational Guard Training Program covering the same military subjects given 
to personnel in th? Regular Army. The complete tr3ining cycle requires 
.hree years and eq.iials tl-..e baric and spec1."ai\zed tr-ainir.g given Regular 
Army personnel. Mjst traininr: at Arirory drills is conducted in the form 
of lectures, train-L-ig filns, and practical On-the-Jot training covering 
such subjects as specialist training, motor maintenance, survey, supply, 
administration, bridge construction, etc. Armory Drills are generally 
scheduled once each week, four each month, twelve each quarter. 

II. FIELD TRAINING 

Field Training is a requirrment of the Department of the Army and the 
National Gjrrd Bureau. Succe-.'^ful trsinir ; has o'^-en held each year since 
the re-activation of the Montana National Guard. Troops move from their 
h.ome stations with all clothing and equipment for all of the fifteen day . 
training period. The Federal Government pays the entire cost for housing, 
feeding, clothing,, and training; on the same basis as r^.'^ular army units. 
The piirpose of th .s trai- ing puriod is to put to p.racti. ?.l test all the 
theoretical traiu .ng given during ths pre/;'jus fcrty-e-'-.;-hfc Armory drills. 
Train-'^n/? is carefv .ly watched by senior c&r.vanders ana -:,heir staffs, by 
Regul: r Army inst- uctors, and by an insp^jction U-am de' c'iled by the 
Commaiiding Genersi, Sixth Amy. All deficiencies are corrected promptly 
'snd petsonnel instructed in the practical way to perforin each task. 
Medical facilities are available at Fort William Henry Harrison at all 
times to handle any emergency. Personnel too seriously ill or injured are 
given first aid tTeatii".r!t and then evacuated to the Veterans' Administration 
Hospital, Fort Hr. rrison, Morgana, where the best possible medical attention 
is provided. The annusl sumT.r.>r Field Training encampments for army units 
were held at Fort William Henry Harrison from ik to 28 June I959 and 12 :o 
26 June i960. Also, during I959 the 3rd Squadron, 163d Armored Cavalry 
conducted their training at Camp Irwin California, 20 March to 5 April" 1959. 
The firing, and training areas provided excellent training for the tankers 
of the 3rd Squadron. 

III. SERVICE SCHOOLS 

As an aid to better training and specialized training for officers 
and key enlisted personnel, the Army Service School program is open to t>ie 
Army National Guard. This program is two fold in its results as the par- 
ticipants receive highly specialized training in their branch or speciality 
and in turn pass on their learning to the members cf their unit "as 
instructors . 



•16- 



During the last blennum the mmber of applications increased sharply, 
however, the funds to send all applicahts were not available. A program 
of selecting applicants on the basis of the greatest need and net worth to 
the Army National Guard was adopted to get the most out of the funds avail- 
able. 

Service school attendance for Army National Guard personnel for FY 
59-60 was as follows: 

ARMY SERVICE SCHOOLS Officers Enlisted 

Fort Knox, Kentucky: 

Armored Officer Refresher 1 

Armored Officer Advanced Course 5 

Armored Company Officer Course 12 

Armored Officer Basic Course 10 

Armored Officer Refresher Course 10 

Senior Officer Preventive Maintenance Course 5 

Armor Communication Officer Course 1 

Armored Truck Vehicle Maintenance Course 1 

Armored Advanced NCO Course 1 

Armor Automotive Supervision Course 1 

Armor Radio Maintenance Course 5 

Armor General NCO Course 11 

Armor Track Vehicle Maintenance Course 13 

Turret Maintenance Course 1 

Fort Sill, Oklahoma: 

Artillery Motor Transport 1 

Artillery Officer Familiarization Course . 3 

Artillery Communications Officer Course 1 

Field Artillery Field Grade Officer Refresher 9 

Field Artillery Officer Advanced Course 1 

Field Artillery Battery Officer Course 3 

Field Artillery Officer Basic Course 6 

Field Artillery Officer Communication Course 2 

Field Artillery Officer Refresher Course 1 

Field Artillery Officer Battery Refresher Course 1 
Artillery Survey Advanced Course 2. 

Artillery Radio Maintenance Course 2 

Artillery Communication Supervisor 2 

Artillery Track Vehicle Maintenance Course 1 

Field Artillery Officer Candidate 1 

Special ARKG OCS Course 1 

Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana: 

Finance Officer Refresher Course 2 

Military Personnel Officer 1 

Personal Management Specialist ]_ 

-17- 



Officers Enlisted 



Fort Belvoir, Virginia: 

Engineer Officer Basic Course 

Engineer Field Grade Officer Refresher Course 

Engineer Equipment Maintenance Officer Course 

Engineer Equipment Repair Course 

Engineer Equipment Maintenance Course 

Aberdeen Proving Grounds^ Maryland: 

Automotive Maintenance & Repair Course 

Ordnance General Supply Officer Course 

Ordnance Officer Refresher 

Field Artillery Repair Course 

Automotive Repair Course 

Fuel £: Electrical Systems Repair Course 

Ordnance Supply Cours^^ 

Turret Artillery Repair Course 

Fort Lee, Virginia: 

Food Service Supervision 
Supply Management Seminar 
General Supply Specialist Course 
General Supply Course 

rort Ord, California: 

Intelligence School 

Ordnance Officer Refresher Course 

Automotive Maintenance Helper Course 

Food Service Cooking Course 

NCO Academy (Leadership Course) 

Presidio of San Francisco, California: 

Army Area Intelligence 

Associate Army Intelligence Company Officer Course 

Projectionist Instructor Course 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: 

Nuclear Weapons Employment Course 
Fort Gordon, Georgia: 

Radio Teletype Operator Coui'se 
Fort Benning, Georgia: 

Infantry KG OCS 



2 

1 
1 
2 



5 
2 

3 



2 
2 



2 

1 



1 
1 
3 



3 

k 

8 

1 
1 



1 
2 



3 

8 
Ik 



-18- 



Officers Enlisted 



3 

1 
1 



Fort Rucker, Alabama: 

Officer Fixed Wing Aviation Course 
Army Aviation Tactics Course 
Rotary Wing Aviation 

Fort Mamouth, New Jersey: 

Associate Signal Officer Advanced 1 

Projector Equipment Repair 

Fort Eustis, Virginia: 

Reconnaissance Helicopter Repair 

Fort Lewis, Washington: 

Armorer Artificer Course 

Turret Artillery Maintenance Course 

Wheel Vehicle Maintenance Course 

Message Center Clerk 

Shop Operation Records & Parts Supply 

CBl'i Defense Course 

Tactical Employment Atomic Weapons Co\irse 1 

Refresher Tng in Tactical Employment of Nuclear Weapons 6 

Camp Gary, Texas: 

Aviation Primary Flight Course 1 

Decatur Signal Depot, Illinois: 

'Familiarization Avionica Equip Ccxirse (civilian status) 
Fort Holabird, Maryland: 

Intelligence Staff Officer Course 1 

Oakland Airport, Oakland, California: 

6th US Army Civilian Contact Instrument Flying Course lo 
Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania: 

Army War College, Regular Course 1 

Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California: 

Asilomar National Strategy Seminar 2 



1 

3 

1 
1 
1 
1 



-19- 



Officers Enlisted 

Naval Medical School, Bethesda, Maryland: 

Medical Military Training Course 1 

Camp Welters, Texas: 

Officer Rotary Wing Qualification 2 

Rotary Wing Aviator (Phase I) 1 

Camp Marby, Texas: 

Special Training Course for Helicopter Technicians 1 

UCLA Campus, California: 

Special Supply Management Seminar _1 

TOTAL ARMY NATIONAL GUARD ATTENDANCE 139 HO 



IV. SIX MONTHS TRAINING (ARMY NG) 

A. Since 1 April 1957 all individuals enlisting in the Montana ARNG, 
without prior service and those with technical skills, are required to 
participate -in the six months training program in accordance with the 
Reserve Forces Act of 1955 (RFA 55). These personnel receive their basic 
training at Fort Ord, California and the Advanced Individual and Basic Unit 
Training at an active army service school or with an active army unit. 

At the beginning of the biennum the quotas were small and the Montana 
ARNG was able to fill the majority of them. Dmring FY 6o the quotas were 
increased and much harder to fill, many of the quotas went unused. As a 
result of a recruiting drive in the state the last few months of FY 6o 
most of the quotas were met. 

Problem areas result in the fact that the larger quotas are in the 
winter and spring months when they are the hardest to fill. Attempts will 
be made to recruit more personnel for these short months to take the load 
off of the peak months of the summer and fall. 

B. The Montana ARNG sent the following numbers of personnel on six 
months training during the past tiennum: 

Six Month Trainees--Army National Guard 

FY - 1959 318 

FY - i960 - 335 

TOTAL - V33 



-20- 



REGULAR ARM INSTRUCTORS 

I. GENERAL— PRIMARY MISSION 

The primary mission of advisors with the National Guard is that 
of advising and assisting in the training, administration and supply 
of the National Guard organizations or units to vhich detailed. 

II. SENIOR ARM" ADVISOR 

The Senior Army Advisor is the Senior Officer on duty with the 
Advisor Group and as such is the Commanding Officer of the organi- 
zation and directly responsible to the Commanding General, Sixth 
United States Army. He reports specifically to the Deputy Commanding 
General for Reserve Forces. 

Responsibilities of the Senior Army Advisor are to assist and 
advise the Adjutant General, State of Montana in the training of the 
Montana National Guard so that they will be capable of meeting mobili- 
zation schedules by being prepared to be "Combat Ready" with a minimum 
of training after mobilization. This readiness is to be accomplished 
through the medium of informal inspections, advice and assistance to 
the National Guard. Appoints Boards of Officers to examine Montana 
National Guard Officers and Warrant Officers who are candidates for 
Federal recognition and for retirement of waivers and promotion. 
Appoints Physical Fitness and Efficiency Boards and orders Federally 
recognized National Guard Officers to appear before such boards. 
Supervises subordinate advisors through inspections, consultations 
and policy directives to coordinate a uniform and effective 
means of improving training, administration, supply and discipline 
in the National Guard. Inspects new Armory Facilities for Federal 
approval to house National Guard units already Federally recognized. 
Determines adequacy of existing armories from annual report of 
inspection of armory facilities. Protects the interest of the Arusy 
and the Federal Government by insioring that the interest of the 
Army and the Federal Government is consistently maintained through 
adherence to directives, policies, and regulations. Conducts the 
annual training inspection of the Montana National Guard Officers 
Candidate School to assure the maintenance of prescribed training 
standards. Provides administrative support for all advisor personnel. 

III. ARM ADVISORS 

Advisors act as a representative of the Army Commander and the 
Senior Army Advisor in their responsibility for the supervision of the 
National Guard training. Advisor responsibility in regard to such 
training includes administration and verification of attendance of 
Federally recognized National Guard personnel at inactive duty 
training assemblies . Advisors perform other diverse duties within 
the broad scope of their mission as they individually see the 
necessity therefore, as requested by National Guard authorities, 
or as directed by higher advisor authority. 

-21- 



IV . PERSONKEL ROSTER AND LOCATION 



Name 

Colonel Edward E. Rager 
Major Harry L. Herres 
Captain Warren H. Sadler 
CWO Chester C. Kerstein 
MSgt (E-8) E. D. Weppner 
Sgt (E-5) Daniel L. Tlppins 
Sgt ^E-5) Eugene. S. Hale 
Sfc (E-6) Floyd Martin Jr. 
Sfc (e-6) Carrol R. Hamilton 
Lt Col Edward R. Garten 
MSgt (E-7) Winfield W. Eblen 
Sgt (E-5) James M. Basta 
Captain William T. Mahaffey 
Sfc (E-6) Oliver C. Ludlow 
Major Joseph H. Dunlap Jr 
Sfc (E-6) Hugh D. Adcock 
Major Richard E. Morgan 
Captain Melvern C. Hughes 
Sfc (E-6) Richard G. Cropp 
Lt Col John D. Erlrkfson 
Sfc (E-6) Harley F . Nlrbo] son 

Sfc (E-6) Frederick R. Buck Jr 

Sfc (E-6) John P.. Wood 



Duty Location 

Senior Army Advisor Helena 

Signal Advisor Helena 

Aviation Advisor Helena 

Administrative Supervisor Helena 

Senior Enlisted Advisor Helena 

Personnel Admin Supervisor Helena 

Assistant Admin Supervisor Helena 

Track Vehicle Rep Advisnr Helena 

Aircraft Maint Adviser Helena 

Unit Advisor (l63d AC) Bozeman 

Asst Unit Advisor (l63d AC) Bozeman 

Asst Unit Advisor (163d AC) Bozeman 

Unit Advisor (1st Sqdn) Sidney 

Asst Unit Advisor (1st Sq) Sidney 

Unit Advisor (2d Sqdn) Bozeman 

Asst Unit Advisor Bozeman 

Unit Advisor (3d Sqdn) Billings 

Asst Unit Advisor pd Sqdn) Billings 

Asst Unit Advisor (3d Sqdn) Billings 

Unit Advisor ( 154th FA Gp) Missotila 

Asst Unit Advisor (1st Bn Missoula 

190th Arty) 

Asst Unit Advisor (2d Bn Kalispell 

190th Arty) 

Asst unit Advisor (2d Bn Kalispell 

190th Arty) 



-22- 



LOGISTICAL SUPPORT - ABM NATIONAL GUARD 

I. OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES PROPERTY AND FISCAL OFFICER. 

Under authority contained in Title 32, United States Code, Sec- 
tion 708 there is established in each State an Office of the United 
States Property and Fiscal Officer. A National Guard officer is ap- 
pointed to be Property and Fiscal Officer, subject to the approval of 
the Secretary of the Army and the Air Force, and is ordered to active 
duty to serve in his state. The USP&FO functions under the direction 
of the State Adjutant General, and complies with National Guard regu- 
lations and policies of the Departments of the Army and the Air Force, 
Federally paid technicians are provided to perform the various admin- 
istrative, fiscal and supply functions of the office. 

An Administrative Assistant in a civilian technician capacity is 
provided to act in the absence of the USP&FO. To further assist the 
USP&FO in matters pertaining to the Air National Guard, Assistant 
USP&FO 's have been appointed in the Fiscal, Property and Real Property 
fields . 

The mission of the United States Property and Fiscal Officer for 
Montana is to receive and accovmt for all Federal property issued for 
the use of the Army and Air National Guard of Montana and to maintain 
such records and render such returns as may be required by the Chief, 
National Guard Bureau and the Secretary of the Army or the Air Force. 
He is responsible for obligating, accounting, reporting, financial 
planning and administrative control of all Federally appropriated 
funds allotted to the State for National Guard use . He is appointed 
Purchasing and Contracting Officer for the Army and Air National 
Guard of Montana for all Federal contracts involving the use of Fed- 
erally appropriated funds . He is appointed Transportation Officer 
for the State and is responsible for arrangements for transporting 
National Guard personnel, civilian technicians, supplies and equipment 
when Federal funds are involved. 

He is responsible for financial inventory accounting for all Fed- 
eral property the value of which exceeded $52,000,000.00 as of 30 Jina 
i960. 

The Annual General Inspections for Fiscal Year 1959 and Fiscal 
Year I96O of the Office of the United States Property and Fiscal 
Office were conducted by inspectors of the Inspector General's Office, 
Headquarters Sixth U. S. Army and resulted in a rating of "Superior" 
for both yeeirs. 

The reorganization of the Montana Army National Guard in April 
1959 had a strong impact on the activities of the Supply Division in 
that excesses generated in deactivated units had to be transferred to 
other units, returned to the control of the USP&FO, or otherwise dis- 
posed of. While the number of customer activities declined, the num- 
ber of troops to be supplied and serviced was only slightly reduced. 

-23- 



A continued program of reporting and disposing of excess property 
vas followed during the period reported on. Activity in this field 
vas as follows: 

FY 1959 FY i960 
Excess inventory on hand beginning $ 92,268 $ l65,4lO 
of fiscal year 

Reported for disposition 361,063 755,766 

Returned to depots and transferred 283,388 ^75,1^9 
to other Federal and State agencies 

Turned over to Property Disposal ^6,893 112,995 
Officers 

Year end balance on hand 165,1+10 186,097 

While the dollar value of issues to units as shown below appears to 
have been greatly reduced in Fiscal Year 196O as compared to Fiscal 
Year 1959^ the latter figure was inflated by the issue of a number of 
high dollar value tracked vehicles. 

FY 1959 FY i960 

Dollar value of issues to units $7;130>3l*0 $3,lf80,l04 

Inventory on hand in USP&FO stocks 1,197,1+1+2 1,1+1+1+, 555 

Prescribed changes in accounting procedures saw the droppage 
from the accounts of the USP&FO of the "In use" or memorandum receipt 
quantities carried on the Stock Record Cards. This procedure makes 
the proper and accurate maintenance of unit property records of utmor-t 
importance. This change resulted in the necessity for requiring from 
units special stock status reports on some major items. 

During this period National Guard Bureau Equipment Guides were, 
for the first time, placed in effect. These provide for a reduction 
of TOE quantities of equipment authorized for National Guard units, 
based on strength and training requirements. Lt. Col. John T. Weiser 
of the USP&FO Office was called to active duty at Continental Army 
Command Headquarters at R>rt Monroe Virginia for a period of six months 
to assist in the preparation of these Equipment Guides. 

Aside from receipt of Army Green shade kh uniforms and acces- 
sories, additional quantities of M-1+1 and M-1+8 tanks and L-19 fixed 
wing and H-23 helicopters were received. Major items of equipment on 
hand as of 30 June 196O include : 

Personnel carrier, M39 27 

Personnel carrier, M75 ■ 13 

I55MM towed howitzer 11 

IO5MM Self-rrcjelled howit7,er M7B1 -16 

k .2" mortar, gxound mount 9 

-2l+- 



Carbine, 3O cal. IO35 

Pistol, automatic, cal. .k^ k8k 

Rifle, caliber .22 126 

Rifle, caliber .30 728 

Tank, light gun, m4ia1 58 

Tank, medium gun, UhQ 39 

Truck, utility, l/k ton 235 

Truck, 3/4 ton, all types 87 

Truck, 2-^ ton, all types 202 

Truck, 5 ton, all types 3O 

All other wheeled vehicles 3I 

Trailer, all types 258 

Machine g^jns, all types 382 

Binoculars, all types 169 

Radio sets, all types ij-20 

Aircraft, fixed wing 11 

Aircraft, helicopters 2 

The most critical equipment shortages at this time are the lack 
of authorized quantities of gasoline trucks, 3A "ton cargo trucks, 5 
ton cargo trucks, armored personnel carriers, 155MM self-propelled 
howitzers, modern IO5MM self-propelled howitzers, k.2" self-propelled 
mortars, teletypewriter sets, radar sets and Army aircraft. All of 
these items are in short supply nationally and are controlled for 
issue by the National Guard Bureau. 

II. STATE MAINTENANCE OFFICE, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 

The Adjutant General, representing the State Military Department, 
is responsible for the proper utilization, care, and maintenance of 
Federal supplies and equipment issued to the State of Montana. 

Maintenance is defined as any action taken to keep material in a 
serviceable condition or to restore it to serviceability when it is 
unserviceable. Thus maintenance of material includes inspecting, 
testing, servicing, classifying as to serviceability, repairing, re- 
building, suid reclaiming. 

The State Maintenance Officer is the Staff Advisor to the 
Adjutant General on all technical matters pertaining to the mainten- 
ance of Federal material in possession of the National Guard, and the 
full time technical advisor for all Unit and Organization Commanders. 
The Maintenance Officer is responsible for the promulgation of tech- 
nical orders and instruction, through command channels, pertinent to 
organization maintenance . 

Personnel of the State Maintenance Office supervise the care, 
servicing, use inspection, and repair of all Federal (Amy) equipment 
issued National Guard units. They supervise and standardize the es- 
tablishment and allocation of shops; insure that provisions have been 
made for the evacuation of unserviceable material that is beyond the 
repair capability of the unit concerned; insure preparation of, or 

-25- 



instruction of, the proper use and maintenance of equipment, and render 
all possible assistance in matters relating to maintenance; study re- 
quirements and make recommendations for tool loads and other mainten- 
ance equipment necessary for the upkeep, repair and conditioning of 
Army equipment issued to the National Guard; maintain the liaison with 
the technical service responsible for the replenishment of spare parts 
and maintenance of equipment beyond the echelon of this headquarters; 
maintain the liaison with Headquarters Sixth US Army relative to 
Command Maintenance Inspection and Spot Check Inspection of Army equip- 
ment issued to the National Guard. 

The Maintenance Branch of the Adjutant General Tepartment is 
organized as indicated in the Organizational diagram as follows: 




STATE MAINTENANCE OFFICER 



COlvffilNED FIELD 

MAINT SHOP 

Helena, Mont 



ARMi: AVIATION 

MAINTENANCE 
Helena, Mont 



FLD CONCENTRATION 
STORAGE SITE 
Eelena, Mont 



Direct Responsibility 
-Technical Responsibility 



7 ORGANI- 


ZATIONAL SHOPS . 


#1 


Kalippell | 


#2 


Mieecula 


#3 


Helena 


#^ 


Culbert?cn 


#5 


Eczejtan 


#5A 


Chinook 


i#6 


Billings 



Personnel of the Combined Field Maintenance Shop perform field 
maintenance, command maintenance inspections, spot check inspections, 
and offer technical assistance and information on all Federal equip- 
ment issued to the National Guard; furnish contact teams for technic il 
assistance and maintenance in the field; furnish technical advice and 
assistance to Unit Administrative, Supply and Maintenance Technicians 
when required; and serve as instructors for all \inits of the Montana 
National Guard on maintenance subjects when requested. 

Personnel of the Army Aviation Section perform Organizational 
and Field Maintenance and offer technical assistance and information 
on all Army National Guard aircraft issued to the National Guard, 
furnish contact teams for technical assistance and maintenance in the 



-26- 



field, fiirnish technical advice and assistance to pilots, and serve 
as instructors for all aviation sections of the Montana National 
Guard on maintenance subjects when requested. 

Personnel of the Field Training Equipment Concentration Site 
inspect all equipment prior to receipt for storage and issue, receive 
all track vehicles, process for storage and perform schedule mainten- 
ance in storage including on vehicle material, reprocess all track 
vehicles and re-inspect prior to issue, including on vehicle material. 

Personnel of Organizational Maintenance Shops perform all 
scheduled organizational maintenance and emergency repairs on organic 
vehicles. They assist in training unit mechanics in organizational 
maintenance, records and reports. They conserve spare parts by meai^^ 
of central distribution, operate a collecting point for all xinservice- 
able equipment and provide vehicle storage facilities and supervise 
MIS of organic vehicles. 

A new Combined Field Maintenance Shop was completed in January 

1958 at the cost of $225,000.00. The shop provides all the modern 
conveniences for maintenance of equipment. Some of the types of equip- 
ment maintained and operations performed are as follows: 

Wheeled Vehicles Painting 

Tanks Welding 

Dozers Machining 

Artillery Cleaning and Lube 

Watches Degreasing and Processing 

Instruments Carpenter 

Radios Canvas and Leather 

Small Arms 

The new Army Aircraft Maintenance Hangar was completed 1 March 

1959 at the cost of $91,000.00, This hangar provides maintenance and 
storage facilities for foiorteen (l4) Army Aircraft assigned the 
Montana Army National Guard. Type aircraft maintained as follows: 

L-19 L-20 

TL-19 H-23 Helicopter 

Tentative plans have been submitted for an additional 36OO sq ft 
of floor space to be used for supply rooms, class rooms and office 
space for the Aviation Company, 163d Armored Cavalry, Helena, Montana. 

The Field Concentration Storage Site moved in to those facilities 
formerly used by the Combined Field Maintenance Shop. 

All of the above facilities are located at Ft. Harrison, with the 
exception of the Army Aircraft Hangar which is located at the Munic r'.-oi.l 
Airport, Helena, Montana. 



-27- 



Recommendations have been submitted to the Chief, National Guard 
Bureau for construction and location.. of OliS where present facilities 
are considered inadequate. 

At the present seventy-nine people are employed in the mainten- 
ance program. 

Manning Table allocations are as follows: 

Combined Field Maintenance Shop 38 

Army Aviation 8 

Equipment Concentration Site 8 

Organizational Maintenance Shops 25 



-28- 



STATE SUPPORT 

I, REPONSIBIIITY 

Responsibilities of the State of Montana in connection with the 
support of the Montana National Gu3.rd include: 

4. The furnishing of personnel for the allotted units by voluntary 
recruiting methods. 

B. Furnishing adequate armories for drill periods. 

C. Providing adequate storage facilities for federal property- 
issued the Montana National Guard. 

D. Providing proper supervision and administration to include 
-viaintenance of records of the units of the Ibntana National Guard in 
the office of the Adjutant General. 

II. PERSONNEL 

Personnel employed in the office of the Adjutant General of 
Ifontana, paid from State Funds, as of June 30, 19'-'0 are ?.s follows: 



Kaj. Gen. S. H. Mitchell 
Lt. Col. Richard C. Kendall 
Lt. Stephen F. Keim 

Cl-JO Richard E. 1-Jilliams 
Capt. Raymond \h Sanders 
Lawrence E. Heller 
^arl L. Rohrdanz 
Marian C. Kruse 
Josephine A. Dolin 
Virginia A. Steckler 
Rita A. Tenneson 
David A. Petek 
Clarence A. Andrews 
Keith Meier 
Louis W. Schwarz 



The Adjutant Genaral 

Ass 't \.djuc.c.nt Gsneral 

Armory Construction &■ Facilities 

Supervisor 
Administrative A-^s 't - Army 
Administrative Ass't - Air & PIO 
Records CL-rk - Air- 
Records Clc;rk - Army 
Secretary 
Bookkeeper 
Clerk Typist 
Clerk Typist 
Publications Clerk 
Custodian - Helena Armory 
Janitor - Helena Armory 
Custodian - Janitor - Pozeman 
Armory 



Salaries for the =t,ate employees listed below are paid from 
State Funds. However, reimbursement is made by the Federal 
Government to the State in the amount of 75 per cent of such 
salaries. 



William J. Weiser 
John E. Milligan 
Phillip Richards 
Joseph V. Carson 
Virgil L. Terry 
Norman J. Uhlenberg 
Roger A. Wadsuorth 
Louis E&bson 



>aint. Supv. Ft. Iferrison 
Ass't Jfeint Supv. Ft. Harrison 
Utility Repairman - Ft. Missoula 
Plumb. & Ma int. Repair. Gore Field 
Carpenter Painter - Gore Field 
Custodian - Gore Field 
Utility Repairman - Gore Field 
Utility Repairman - Gore Field 



-29- 



III. 



STATE APPROPRIATIONS 
Adjutant General Department 



These functions being the responsibility of the State, are support- 
ed by funds made available from the General Fund of the State by tb^ 
State Legislature. Expend itur© af the^e monies dui'ing the tv<y-year 
period is as follows: 



ADMINISTRATION 
Sala ries 

Office 

Custodial & Repairmen 

Total 

Operation 

Postage 

Stationery, Record Pooks & Blanks 

Sundry Office Supplies & Expenses 

Telephone & Telegraph 

Freight, Express & Drayage 

Official Bonds 

Travel 

Auto Expense 

Doctor (?' Clinic Fees 

Uniform /Allowances 

National Guard Expense 

Supplies & Equipment 

Subsistence 

Light & Power 

Fuel 

VJater 

Rentals 

Legal Publications 

Subscriptions & Periodicals 

Dues to Associations & Compacts 

Industrial Accident Insurance 

Other Insurance 

Social Security 

P. E. R. S. 

Miscellaneous 

Printing & Binding 

Total Operations 

Capi tal 

Buildings & Attached Fixtvires 

Machinery & Appliances 

Hand Tools & Petty Equipment 

Total Capital 



FY 59 

$ A0,880.2B 
8,22ii.72 



:FI 60 

$ 39,^60.65 
25,-496.00 



$ -49,105.00 


$ 6/i,956.65 


$ 556.00 


$ 25.00 


865.35 


563.30 


77-4.55 


612.68 


11,975.06 


1-4,103.30 




3.36 


35-4.25 


379.25 


-4,856.17 


-4,811.66 


379.91 


l,08i4.0A 


1,110.50 


2,820.50 


13,300.00 


13,300.00 


1/^,556.17 


13,095.00 


/;,210.58 


9,0/^8.79 


10-4.96 


40.96 


12,715.01 


13,390.90 


19,515.03 


23,252.70 


1,900.-4-4 


2,555.67 


28,075.00 


2-4,98/4.25 




133.60 


79.15 


69.09 


A28.90 


U88.A0 


883. /.5 


778.05 


1,921.23 


1,808.19 


2,033.97 


2,476.03 


2,101.63 


2,208.99 


13.3-4 


798.21 


1,285.05 




$123,995.70 


•15132,831.92 


$ 1,168.20 


$ 2,943.55 


19.98 


1,0-43.07 


33. U 


11.01 



3 1,221.92 



$ 3; 997.55 



-SO- 



Repairs & Replacements FY 59 FI 60 

Land & Land Improvements $ ^ 865.4-1 

Buildings & Attached Fixtures 29. U 8,139.20 

Machinery & Appliances UlB.OO 3,961.76 

Hand Tools & Petty Equipment 67.70 ^24. 29 



Total Repairs & Replacements $ 5U.BU !*i;i3,390.66 

GRAND TOTAL - ADMINISTRATION ^17/^,837.^6 $215,176.86 

ARKORIES 

Salaries 

Janitors & Custodians 

Operation & >fe.intenace 
Heat & Gas 
Light & Power 
I'&ter 

Janitor Supplies & Expenses 
Other Physical Plant Expenses 
Industrial Accident Insurance 
Other Insurance 
Taxes & Licenses 
Social Security 
P. E. R. S. 

Total Opq.rat.ions & ^^intenance 

Capital 

Land & T^nd Improvements 
Buildings & Attached Fixtures 
^kchinery & Appliances 
Hand Tools & Petty Equipment 
Furniture & Fixtures 

Total Capital 

Repairs & Replacements 

Land & land Improvements 
Buildings & Attached Fixtures 
Machinery & Appliances 
Hand Tools & Petty Fqiipment 
Furniture & Fixtiores 

Total Repairs & Replacements 

GRAl^'D TOTiL ARKORIES 

GRAND TOTAL - ADJUTAFT GEf^RAL 

-31- 



^? 11,130.30 


% 10,275.5ii 


$ 13,201.08 


% U,665.13 


8,257.51 


10,760.34 


793.83 


l,0/.9.65 


620.85 


252.58 


781.50 


2,0a.l7 


79. 8A 




2^8.55 




236.08 


30U.U2 


281.20 


339.13 


365.81 


302.01 


$ 2/^,866.25 


% 29,7U./,3 


$ 962.95 


5 3,645.91 


1,Z^25.00 


2,585.33 




533.79 


16.07 


251.76 




170.79 


$ 2,U0U.02 


% 7,187.58 


% 


% 36.93 


10,252.96 


8,506.74 


161.23 


118.20 


33.96 




133.76 




$10,581.91 


% 8,661.87 


$/,8,982.ii8 


$55,839.42 


$223,819.9/V 


0271,016.28 



FY 59 FY 60 

GRAND TOTAL - ADJUTANT GENERAL $223,819.94 $271,016.2?! 

REIMBURSEMENTS TO GEl^ERAL FUND: 

Federal Gov't Share of Service Contracts 52,245.27 

Rental Income from Armories 2,378.58 

Right-of-I'Jay Payment by State Highway Dept. 1.150.00 

Total Reimbursements $ 55,773.85 

TOTAL COST TO ST-VTE OF MONTANA %23, 819.94 $215,242.43 

In addition to the appropriations for regular Administrative 
functions and upkeep of Armories, an additional appropriation of 
^'?200,000 was appropriated for construction of new 'Irmories in the 
State. Under a joint agreement with the Federal Government, the State 
pays only 25^ of the cost of these Armories and the Federal Government 
pays the other 75^. 

The following is a tabulation of these expenditures to June 30, 
I960: 

(Cost to State) 

Hamilton Armory (Completed) $18,923.78 

I'Jhitefish " " 19,020.06 

Dillon " '• 20,307.17 

Billings " •• 213.30 

Chinook " " 24,649.53 

Butte Arr ory (Just Pegun) 694.60 

Salary - Construction Supv. 4,500.00 

P. E. R. S. for above 59.4^1 

Total for Arj/ory Construction f^88,367.84 



-32- 



FEDERAL SUPPORT 

I . Gi:i>ERAL 

Responsibilities of the Federal government in the support of the National 
Guard include clothing, equipping, supplying, and arming individuals and 
units. The Federal government also furnishes outdoor training facilities 
and supervises training. All pay and allov;ances to individuals for field 
training, attendance at Service Schools, and armory drill are from Federal 
funds. Subsistence is furnished to enlisted men at field training and 
service schools by the Federal government . 

II. SUPPLY AM) EQUIH^Fr 

In addition to furnishing clothing, arms and equipment, the Federal 
government through the National Guard Bui-eau, provides for the maintenance 
of these items. Funds are available for equipment repair, and cleaning 
and repair of uniforms. In the Air National Guard, where maintenance of 
aircraft and vehicles is a major problem, a substantial number of air tech- 
nician personnel is employed on a full time basis, with funds also being 
made available for necessary full time administrative and supervisory 
specialists. Each company-size Army unit is authorized to employ on a foil 
time basis an /idministrative Supply Technician who records supply and ad- 
ministrative details necessary to the operation of the National Guard unit. 
Maintenance personnel of the State Maintenance Shop and the Equipment 
Concentration Site are all paid for by Federal monies. All accounting 
clerks in the office of the USP&FO are carried on Federal payrolls, 

III. WON DISABILITY RETIREIffiKT 

Public Law 8lO, which provides non-disability retirement pay for 
officers and men of the National Guard in the highest grade held by them 
was approved by the President 29 June 1948. 

The act provides an additional incentive to younger men to join the 
National Guard and remain active, and further compensate older guardsmen 
vho have given many years of service to their country. 

The law provides that any person not a member of a regular force, who 
attains the age of 60 and who has performed satisfactory service in the 
status of commissioned officer, warrant officer, or enlisted person in the 
Army or Air National Guard, and who has completed an aggregate of 20 or 
more years' satisfactory service in any or all of the services shall be 
granted retirement benefits. 

IV. ARMY TECHNICIANS 

A. Section 709, Title 32, U.S. Cede authorizes the employment 
from Federal funds of technicians for administrative accounting duties, 
maintenance, repair and inspection of materiel, armament, vehicles, and 
equipment provided for the Army National Guard. Technicians, except female 
employees in designated stenographic and clerical positions, must be 



•33- 



federally recognized members of the Montana National Guard and must occupy 
table of organization positions in units appropriate to technician manning 
table positions they occupy. 

B. The following information is furnished regarding the Army Tech- 
nician Program: 

TOTAL FUNDS 
OBLIGATED (SALARIES) 
FY 1959 --- $925,250.00 
FY i960 -— $891,500.00 

TOTAL NO. TECHNICIANS 30 June 1959 179 

TOTAL NO. TECHNICIANS 30 June I960 I67 

C . During the period covered by this report the Army Technician 
Program fluctuated dovraward coincident vith the overall reorganization of 
the Montana Army National Guard to Department of Army current concepts, 
late in FY I959 and the early part of FY i960 a net loss of 12 positions 
v.'s experienced in the area of Organizational Technicians. During the last 
quarter of FY i960 the National Guard Bureau completed an extensive survey 
in the area of Maintenance of US Government equipment which resulted in a 
x'-q^uirement for additional technicians to support the Maintenance Program 
ac the national level of 85^ of total requirements. In FY 1959 tlie pay 
schedule of Army Technicians was converted to a biweekly pay system to 
rouform with other Federal conditions. 

In FY i960 the grade structure of Wage Board Technicians was con- 
verted from the old 28 grades to a new 15 grade structure now known as 
KGW type positions. Additionally, Wage Board technicians received three 
cost-of-living salary increases during the period covered by this report. 

V. ALLOTL'EKT OF FUNDS ' ' , ' 

The magnitude of the operation of the Montana Army ani Air National 
Guard and the extent to which it is a source of income to the State of 
Montana is apparent when it is realized that Federal funds of over eleven 
million dollars has been expended for its support during the biennium. Tb?.- 
Guard therefore is worthy of the whole-hearted support of every community 
where a unit is located if for no other reason than its being a source of 
income to the locality. 



-3^- 



FEDERAL FUNDS EXPENDED IN SUPPORT OF 
MONTANA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 



ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 



A. Salaries 
Army Technicians (Civilian Employees) 
Military Personnel 

Training Assemblies (Armory Drill) 
Service & Technical Schools and 
Supplemental Exercises 
Annual Active Duty Training (ANACDUTRA) 

B . Travel 
Civilian Personnel 
Military Personnel 

C . Fuels & Lubricants 

D. Construction of Facilities 
S. Miscellaneous Operating Supplies 

F. Equipment 
Purchased 
i>iaint & Repairs 8c Parts 

G. Transportation of Supplies & Equipment 8,289 15,346 

H. Subsistence Unit Training Assemblies 

and Annual Active Duty Training (ANACDUTRA) 

I. Operation & Repair of Facilities 

J. Uniform & Clothing 
Enlisted Personnel 
Officer Personnel 

K. Communication Services 

L. Service Contracts 

M. wedical Care 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

TOTAL FOR BIENNIUM 



FY 


FY 


1959 


i960 


$ 924,754 


$ 891,413 


869,964 


747,765 


110,315 
270,160 


156,841 
260,900 


12,431 
86,821 


l6,o64 
36,464 


63,648 


77,435 


154,070 


133,937 


17,673 


13,834 


50,195 
99,620 


59,034 
111,778 



^+7,675 




^+9,737 


6o,io4 




91,608 


9,714 

5,800 




23,645 

6,4oo 


3,005 




3,621 


24,569 




25,676 


5,820 
$2,824,627 


5,800 
$2,727,298 


$5,551,925 





-35- 



FEDERAL FUNDS EXPENDED IN SUPPORT OF 
MONTANA AIR NATIONAL GUARD 



FY FY 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 19$9 196Q 

A. Salaries 

Air Technicians (Civilian Personnel) $ 876,526.86 $ 939,l'+7.53 

Military Personnel 

Unit Training Assemblies 238,903.63 251,550.14 

Service and Technical Schools 128,378.65 11^1,05^^.83 

Field Training 84,66o.36 l68,220.?.3 

Supplemental Exercises 1,363-95 732. ':-7 

B. Travel 

Civilian Personnel 8,361.78 6,730.^2 

Military Personnel ^3, 839. 92 28,896.35 

C. Fuels and Lubricants 

Ground Fuel 5,687.1+1 5,607.51 

Aircraft Fuel and Lubricants 528,580.^7 ^^39,512.31+ 

D. Construction of Facilities 89,658.73 596,777.59 

E . Miscellaneous Operating Supplies 

Material and Aircraft Parts 52,899.75 k^,6lh.20 

F. Equipment (^^kkk.3k 13,966.':0 

J. Transportation of Supplies and Equipment 19,109.76 12,682.81 

H, Subsistence 

Unit Training Assemblies 6,301.l8 6,400.0:. 

Field Training 6,602.^3 

I . Uniforms 

Officers 5,900.00 2,550.00 

Airmen 51,996,62 5,011.25 

J. Service Contract 

Custodial and Security Salaries 19,903.89 26,834,95 

Utilities 13,099.76 19,824,93 

Capital, Repair and Replacement 6,056.82 5,151.C(' 

X. Communication Services 5,579-30 5,719.o4 

L. Depot Level Aircraft Maintenance 4o2,679.42 321 263.', ' 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $2,598,932,60 $3,020,^850 ,'69 

TOTAL FOR BIENNIUM $5,619,783,29 



-36- 



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FACILITIES 

I . ARMORIES 

Responsibilities of the State of Montana in the operation of the 
Montana National Guard is to provide for and maintain armory facilities, 
both for training pvirposes and for storage of supplies and equipment. 
At the present time, units of the Montana National Guard occupy thirteen 
state-owned armories located at Kalispell, Glendive, Sidney, Miles City, 
Billings, Hamilton, Whitefish, Dillon, Chinook, Butte, Plentyvood, 
Bozeman and Helena. Two additional armories are proposed for construc- 
tion at Lewistown and Anaconda. The requirements for armories have been 
alleviated to a great extent, however, there are still many units of the 
Montana National Guard in need of adequate armory facilities. The 
Congress of the United States enacted Legislation to assist the States 
in the construction of armories on a fund matching basis. This is based 
on 75^ Federal and 25^ State shares in the cost of armory construction. 
In March of 1958, the Legislative Assembly of the State of Montana 
appropriated an additional $100,000.00 to match Federal funds for armory 
construction. Since that time armories have been constructed in Dillon, 
Chinook, Plentyvood, and Butte, with construction of armories anticipated 
to get underway at Lewistown and Anaconda in the early spring. Many units 
are located in space which is rented from individuals, cities, or under 
license to the State by the Federal Government. Some of the State 
owned, and most of the rental space, is entirely inadequate for efficient 
assembly and instruction of troop, and it does not provide adequate or 
secure storage facilities. Some units training in such sub-standard 
armory space are faced with the difficulty of maintaining a high pro- 
ficiency in training, as well as finding their recruiting problem multi- 
plied, by not being able to offer an attractive meeting place. 

The fact that units of the Montana National Guard have been able 
to obtain excellent results with their training program is due to the 
keen interest of individuals concerned as many of the armory facilities 
are still inadequate. It is the strong desire of the State of Montana, 
The Department of the Adjutant General, units in the field, as well as 
the many citizens in the State of Montana, that this armory construc- 
tion program continue in the interests of local. State, and National De- 
fense . 

II. FEDERAL FACILITIES 

Another phase of providing adequate facilities, involve the Annual 
Active Duty Training Facilities located at Fort William H. Harrison. 
The buildings were constructed prior to and during World War II, as 
temporary facilities. They have badly deteriorated since that time, to 
the extent that many buildings are entirely inadequate or non-usable. A 
study has been made both at State and National levels to determine the 
requirements of the Montana National Guard to provide for adequate train- 
ing facilities at Fort Harrison, to include: barracks, m^ss halls, lat- 
rines, headquarters, and company orderly and supply buildings. Presently, 
$123,000.00 has been programed to begin the initial phase of this 

-37- 



construction, with additional IOO5& Federal annual funding, anticipated. 
It is contemplated that the eventual and long range development and re- 
construction of Fort Harrison will become a reality in the near future. 

A portion of Fort Missoula Military Reservation, including the Target 
Range Area, is also licensed by the Department of the Army to the State 
of Montana. This facility is used as armory 'and storage space for Guard 
nnits located in Missoula. 

III. STATE LAND 

In 1957 the State of Montana made available to the National Guard 
6 acres of land adjacent to Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana. During 
the past two fiscal years several structures were constructed on this 
land the cost of which was borne 100^ by the Federal Government. These 
structures consist of a Combined Field Maintenance Shop, Organizational 
Maintenance Shop Building and a Paint, Oil and Dope Storage Building. 
All the land in this area was also inclosed by a chain-link security 
type fence and hardstand was placed where vehicles would be stored out- 
side. The cost of this was also supported by IOO5& by the Federal 
Government. These facilities become the property of the State of Montana 

IV. SERVICE CONTRACTS 

For federally owned or leased facilities at Fort Harrison, Fort 
Missoula and Gore Field, the cost of maintenance and operation of build- 
:lngs and grounds is considerable. Since the Federal Government has an 
interest in these facilities, service contracts between the State and 
federal Governments have been entered into to provide for reimbursement 
CO the Adjutant General by the National Guard Bureau for 75?i of the cost 
of maintenance and repair of the building and grounds . These contracts 
were continued in effect during the blennium with only slight changes. 
The amounts covered by the contracts are as follows: 

SERVICE CONTRACT EXPENDITURES 

FY 1959 FY i960 

Location Federal Share State Share Federal Share State Shar e 

Fort Harrison $19,266.70 $6,422.23 $19,293-00 $6,936.91 

Port Missoula $ 3,919.81 $1,306.60 $ 3,897.20 $1,299.07 

Great Falls $24,1^70.87 $8,156.96 $29, 818. 66 $9,939-55 

Army Aviation $ 39^.15 $ 131-38 $ l,l66.Ul $ 388. 80 

Tiillings $ 988.21 $ 329.40 $ 1,319.69 $ 439.90 

Note: Army Aviation Contract for I959 became effective 1 March I959 thus 
the small amount of expenditures. 

Note : Fort Harrison Contract for I96O limited Federal Share to amount 
sho;,m. Expenditures exceeded contract amount. Therefore, State expendi- 
tures exceeds the 2^% amount. 



-38- 



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-1+2- 



TEE AIR NATIONAL GUARD 



MISSION 



A. The Montana Air National Guard located at Great Falls Inter- 
naticnal AJi-port consists of the 12Cth Fi^-.ter Group (Air Defense) whose 
mission is training to achieve an all-wea-u,'er operational readiness cap- 
ability that will put 5C^ of our aircraft and crews airborne combat ready 
withi'.n two hours after being alerted. Tho organization at present is 
equipped with F-Soj "Scorpion" all-weather fighter interceptor aircraft 
which have a nucVar weapon capability. Trese aircraft are considsred 
first line aircrr.ft capable of meeting Air Defense Command requirements 
for E.n all-weath'^r intsiceptor. 

B. This organization, although a reserve unit, is considered an 
essential part or: the Air Defense of the United States and the goal of all 
training is to further increase the effective capability of the Group. 

C. At present, the Group has a capability of meeting its mission 
with 20 combat ready crews and 10 training crews. 



II. GROWTH 

A. Since 1958, the Montana Air National Guard has achieved and cein- 
tained 90"^ cf its authorized strength. The following statistics indicate 
the comparative growth of the units during the past biennium: 

(1) On 1 July 1958, strength was as follows 



(2) 



(3) 





Off 
12 


wo 




AMN 
53 


TOTAL 


Hq, 120th Ftr Gp 


50 


120th ABRON 


12 


1 


233 


2k6 


120th CAMRON 


r 


1 


285 


292 


186th Ftr Intcp Sq 


h6 





19 


65 


120th USAF Dispensary 


^ 





/^ 


30 
683 


TOTAL 


81 


2 


600 


On 30 June 1959^ strength was 


as follows : 






OFF 


WO 


AMN 


TOTAL 


Hq, 120th Ftr Gp 


13 





kO 


53 


120th ABRON 


13 


2 


262 


277 


120th C/^MRON 


8 


1 


351 


360 


ie6th Fir Intcp Sq 


59 





2k 


83 


120th US.4F Dispensary 


9 





26 


.''1 


TOTAL 


102 


3 


703 


808 


On 30 June i960, strength was 


as follows : 






OFF 


WO 


AMN 


TOTAL 


Hq, 120th Ftr Gp 


13 





kl 


5^^ 


120th ABRON 


13 


2 


273 


288 


120th CAMRON 


9 


1 


350 


360 


186th Ftr Intcp Sq 


58 





2k 


82 


120th USAF Dispensary 


10 





3°- 


ko 


TOTAL 


103 


■3 


718 


B24 



.U3- 



B. Facilities have increased by the addition of a rocket storage 
building, two - stall addition to Motor Vehicle Shop, addition to Paint, 
Oil and Dope building, 50,000 gallon increase to /uel Storage and a new 
$400,000 Operations and Training building which includes a new, modern 
mess kitchen and dining hall and a most modern Medical Dlrpensary. At 
present, the main runway is under construction increasing its length from 
7^700 ft. to 9,000 ft. of paved runway which will nake it one of the finest 
runways on a municipal airport in the Northwest. 

C. The amount of equipment for support has Increased a great deal in 
vehicles and ground powered equipment 

III. FUTURE 

A. The future as to aircraft can never be forecast as the require- 
ment in this fast moving, modern age are continually changing. However, it 
appears that we will be on the first team of Air Defense for some time to 
come . 

f 

B. As these new facilities and equipment increase, it is only natural 
that the cost of operating increases requiring a like increase in service 
contract funds. A comparable estimate of federal and state funds expended 
based on an estimated $2,600,000 annual expenditure by the AWG in Great 
Falls area and state funds of service contract, shows a ratio of over $425 
federal funds expended for each $1 of state funds expended. 

IV . TRAINING 

A. The Air National Guard is authorized 48 training periods each 
year. Turing the year the Air National Guard holds cheir training periods 
on Saturdays and Sundays . Credit is given those attending for two normal 
armory assemblies for each day attending drill. This system proved to be 
very satisfactory in attendance and allowed increased training of personnel 
•^f the units. Greater stress was placed on specialist training. Mess 
personnel prepare noon-day meals for those personnel attending the weekend 1 
training periods. This also provides a greater participation of flying ^ 
personnel in meeting their yearly requirements. 

B. Since the return from active federal service in 1952, the Air 
National Guard has sent quite a number of pilot trainees to the Air Force 
Pilot training program. Since the conversion to all-weather aircraft in 
1956, the Air National Guard now has a requirement for Radar-Observer 
personnel, and have sent a number of applicants to the Air Force for traixr 
ing. 

C. The Air National Guard conducts their field training out of state 
in most cases, however due to inadequate facilities for the unit aircraft 
(F-89-j) the National Guard Bureau has indicated that Air Guard units will 
be training more and more at their home stations. During 1959^ the Air 
Natlor.al Guard went to CRr.per, Wyoming 28 June to 12 July 1959, and at 
Great falls, i/ir.Tih.oi)F> 12 to 26 .Tune I96C, 



kh- 



D. Air Force Service School Attendance by Members cf the Montana Air 
National Guard vas as follows for Fiscal Years 1959 - I96O 

CHAMUTE AFB. ILLINOIS Officer Airmen 

Electronics Instrument Trainer Specialist 1 

Aircraft Electrical Repairman 1 

Instrument Repair Technician 1 

SHEPPARD AFB, TEXAS 

Aircraft Maintenance Technician 3 

Jet Engine Mechanic ^ 

Jet Engine Technician 2 

Communication Center Specialist 1 

Statistical Specialist 1 

FORT SLOCUM. NEW YORK 

Information Officer 1 

MAXV^LL AFB, ALABAMA 

Squadron Officer School 1 

LO^JRY AFB. COLORADO 

Weapons Mechanic •'' 

Munitions Specialist •'■ 

VJeapons Control Systems Mechanic 15 

Guidance Systems Mechanic " 
Armament Systems Officer 1 

Guidance Systems Technician 1 

Firefighter ^ 

KEESLER AFB. MISSISSIFFI 

Air Electronics Officer 1 

BROOKS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER, TEXAS 

Management of Mass Casualties 1 

LACKLAND AFB. TEXAS 



Officer Preflight 11 

Airman Personnel Records 

EAWDOLPH AFB. TEXAS 

Flight Sui-geon Refresher Course 1 



-h3- 



6 



AMARILLO AFB. TEXAS 

Mechanization of Base Supply Accounting 
Aircraft Mechanic 
Organizational Supply Supervisor 
Supply Officers Course 

CHARLOTTESVILrj: ■ VTRC; TTJTA 

Judge Advocate General Refresher Course 

CINCIMATIt OHIO 

Jet Engine Technician Accident Investigation Course 

WALTER REED ABMY HOSPITAL 

Ophthalmic Pathology Course 

Prosthodontic Course 

Symposium on Current Surgical Practices 

WILLIAMS AFB. ARIZONA 

NCO Preparatory School 

BEAUMENT ABM HOSPITAL 

Surgery in Acute Trauma 

GTJWTER AFB, ALABAMA 

Dental Lab Specialist 

Basic Orientation Course for Officers of the Medical 

Service 
Administration Specialist Course 

IMDIAM HEAD. MARYLAND 

Explosive Ordnance Disposal 

FORBES AFB, KANSAS 

F & Maintenance 

■JAMES CONNALLY AFB, TEXAS 

Primary Navigator Training (Officer) 
Radar Interceptor Officer Com-se 

^tREAT FALLS. MO NTANA 

II. .iR« P hat ion Transition (Pilot) 



Officer 



1 
1 
1 



9 

10 



Airme n 

1 
2 
2 



-46- 



ELLINGTON AFB . TEXAS Officers Airmen 

ANG Jet Instrument School 15 

KIRTIAND AFB. NEW MEXICO 

NCO Preparatory School 1 

MC CLELLAN AFB . CALIFORNIA 

NCO Preparatory School 1 

V. ENLISTMENTS AND DISCHARGES 

The following charting shows the total enlistments and discharges 
for the Montana Air National Guard for fiscal years I059 and I96O: 

DISCHARGES 

Excessive Absence 

Incompatible Occupation 

Change of Permanent Residence 

Enlistment in Regular Forces 

Failure to re-enlist (ETS) 

Unfitness 

Physical Disability 

Enlist in Army National Guard 

Induction 

To Accept Commission 

Death 

TOTAL DISCHARGES MONTANA AI!? NATIONAL GUARD 

TOTAL ENLISTMENTS 



FY 59 


FY 60 


19 


22 


11 


15 


25 


34 


Ik 


15 


10 


26 


2 


3 


1 





1 








6 





5 


_0 


_l 


83 


127 


189 


136 



'kl- 



VI. ROSTER OF AIR N. G. OFFICERS AS OF 30 JUKE I960. 
NAME UNIT 

COLONEL 



Clarke, William H 

LIEUTEHAKT COLONEL 

Dardis, Robert L 
Edberg, Rolland E 
Schrammeck, Donald R 
Young, Rodger D 

MAJOR 

Coefield, Thomas C 
Dalquist, Kenneth R 
Devine, Joseph R 
Donaldson, Walter R 
Franken, Norman A 
Gemberling, Edwin L 
Gerlach, William B 
Gremaux, Leonard A 
Hanson, Clifford E 
Judge, Joseph P 
Morris, Earl D 
Murphy, Francis J 
Sherman, Robert B 
Svingen, Perry N 
Whalen, Emmett J 
Wilhelm, Paul J 

CAPTAIN 

Aiken, James E 
Annala, Andrew A 
Annala, Robert J 
Bredow, Herbert E 
Buley, Charles A 
Burditt, Donald J 
Campbell, Robert L 
Chovanak, Clement P 
Christofferson, Alfred P 
Cunningham, Edwin L 
Dairy, Norman C 
Dorrance, George A 
Enloe, Larry C 
Fox, David W 
Gardner, Raymond A 
Hadford, Wendell D 



Headquarters, Montana A'NG 



120th Fighter Group (AD) 
120th Fighter Group (AD) 
120th Fighter Group (AD) 
120th Fighter Group (AD) 



120th Air Base Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squsdroi 

120th Air Base Squadron 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

120th USAF Dispensary 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

120th USAF Dispensary 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

120th Air Base Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

Headquarters, tontana AKG 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadrcu 

Headquarters, Montana AKG 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

120th USAF Dispensary 



( 



< 



186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Sqaadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 

120th Air Base Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

120th Air Base Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

186th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 

120th Air Base Squadron 

120th Air Base Squadron 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

120th USAF Dispensary 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 



- h8- 



Hanmer, Donald G 
Hommas, V'arren L 
Larsen_, Dirk K 
Mehring, Donald V 
Morgan, Robert F 
Olson, Henry S 
Peterson, Ralph C 
Peterson, Walter F 
Heinke, Frederick W 
Rognaldson, Allan W 
Samuels, Glen A 
Sanders, Raymond W 
Sheet z, Hugh H 
Smith, Donald S 
Souder, Roy, Jr 
Strope, Philip W 
Tariberg, Rex \I 
Taylor, George L 
Woods, William D 

1ST LIEUTEKAKTS 



120th USAF Dispensary 

120th Air Base Squadron 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 

120th USAF Dispensary 

120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 

120th Air Base Squadron 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

120th Fighter Group (AD) 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 

120th Air Base Squadron 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 

l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 



Anderson, Irene E 
Belyea, Edward A 
Campbell, Robert L 
Cogswell, Edward B, Jr 
Earll, John A 
Hansen, John L 
Higgins, Flora n C 
Jones, Paul E 
Kantola, Kenneth K 
ICritzer, Donald L 
Kozich, George J 
Liddle, Robert K 
Lippert, Robert K 
Martinson, Ronald H 
Maxwell, Paul N 
Mc Adams, John A 
O'Brien, Richard S 
Olson, Donald L 
Richter, William R 



120th USAF Dispensary 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
12Cth Air Bose Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l66th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86tb Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
120th USAF Dispensary 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 



2HD LIEUTENAKTS 



Anderson, Robert J 
Bear, Howard J 
Braig, Jacob J 
Brown, Whitney P 
Cawlfield, George E 
Chenoweth, Joe E 
Crum, Arthur G 



l66th 
l86th 
l86th 
l86th 
l86th 
ie6th 
l86th 



Fighter 
Fighter 
Fighter 
Fighter 
Fighter 
Fighter 
Fighter 



Interceptor 
Interceptor 
Interceptor 
Interceptor 
Interceptor 
Interceptor 
Interceptor 



Squadron 
Squadron 
Squadron 
Squadron 
Squadron 
Squadron 
Squadron 



-49- 



Garry, Thomas T 
Hovland, Donald G 
Jackson, David L 
Johnson, Bruce M 
Johnson, John F 
Lovchik, Philip D 
McDermott, Patrick C 
Melvin, Paul M 
Ness, Donald L 
Kett, Gene A 
Olson, John K 
Potter, Kim S 
Rothwell, John A 
Sahberg, Ernest A 
Sartain, Russell L 
Schmidt, Albert 
Sowold, Donald B 
Stanton, Lynn M 
Sutherland, Sidney A 
Wickham, Kenneth W 
Windels, Burchard J 

WARRAin' OFFICERS 



l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
120th Fighter Group (AD) 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l36th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
120th Air Base Squadron 
120th Air Base Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
120th Fighter Group (AD) 
120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 
l86th Fighter Interceptor Squadron 



Gruenhagen, Robert W 
Kaste, William G 

Payne, James M 



120th Consolidated Aircraft Maint Sq 
120th Air Base Squadron 
120th Air Base Squadron 



-50 



VII. REGULAR AIR FORCE ADVISER STAFF 

A. The mission of the Air Force Adviser Staff is to assist the 
Commander of the Montana Air National Guard in a program designed to build 
and maintain a unit possessing the highest degree of operational capability. 
In accomplishing this mission. Air Force Adviser personnel direct their 
efforts primarily toward assisting the Commander in his training program 
which is based on Air Force policies and directives, and providing tech- 
nical and administrative assistance when such is requested by Gucid personnel. 

B. On 1 July i960, the parent organization of the Air Force Advi- 
sory staff was changed from the 2322d Instructor Squadron, Hamilton Air 
Force Base, California, to the 29th Air Division, Malmstrom Air Force 
Base, Montana. This change was made in conjunction with Air Force policy 
of assigning Air National Guard units directly to parent commands. 

C. Subsequent to the issuance of the last Biennial Report, the 
advisory staff has been reduced in number to two officers and two non- 
commissioned officers. The high level of productivity and combat ready 
capability demonstrated by members of the Montana Air National Guard have, 
to a large extent, made this staff reduction possible. 

Major Gerald B. Bliss 3^^1&A Air Force Senior Advisor 

Major Bliss assists the unit commander in determining the state 
of operational readiness and advises him on the preparation of regulations 
pertaining to the operation of aircraft. He acts as liaison between the 
unit commander and appropriate Air Force agencies. Upon request of the 
unit commander, the Senior Air Force Advisor provides Air Force technical 
advisors to conduct technical, .administrative and general military training 
for Air National Guard personnel. Major Bliss also acts as a voting member 
on the Flying Evaluation Board, the Standardization Board, and the Aircraft 
Accident Investigation Board . He keeps the Air Force Commander advised, 
through periodic reports on progress toward operational readiness, conduct 
of training assemblies, general condition of unit relative to logistics and 
competence of leadership and the quality of command as it affects training 
supervision. 

Captain John K.. Maher 45775A Air Force Advisor 

Captain Maher instructs Montana Air National Guard radar observers 
and pilots in airborne radar interception in accordance with Air Force 
training directives. He administers tactical evaluation checks to Air Guard 
air crews to determine eligibility for interceptor air crew qualification 
and participates in Air Defense exercises as well as regularly scheduled 
training flights with Air National Guard interceptor pilots. In addition 
to the above duties. Captain Maher is responsible for the administration of 
the Air Force teshing program for the unit, and acts, also, as Air Force 
Senior M-tlnuv in the n<lsence of that officer. 



-51- 



M/Sgt Harvey C. Holland AFI9018106 Air Technical Advisor 

M/Sgt Holland assists the Montana Air National Guard personnel 
supervisor in interviewing, classifying and counseling officers and air- 
men. He audits personnel records and reports, assists in the interpretation 
of Air Force regulations, and administers tests in various career fields. 

M/Sgt William H. Minor AFI303398I Air Technical Advisor 

M/Sgt Minor assists Montana Air National Guard maintenance 
personnel in repair and maintenance problems and evalutates the main- 
tenance functions of the unit for the Senior Advisor. M/Sgt Minor also 
assists in administering career field tests and airmen qualification 
examinations . 



VIII. GEIOERAL RESPOI^IBILITIES 

A. Federal responsibilities in support of the Air National Guard 
include furnishing the following items: 

1. All supplies, parts and equipment necessary to operation 
of the Air National Guard and accomplishment of its mission. 

2. All pay for the civilian personnel employed to support 
the operation. 

3. All military pay and allowances and subsistence for unit 
training assemblies, field training, supplemental training exercises and 
active duty in connection with service or technical school. 

h. Transportation of personnel and equipment involved in 
federally authorized movement or travel. 

5. Uniforms and other special clothing required in performance 
of military duties. 

6. Communication facilities necessary for flight service, 
telephone service for attached United States Air Force personnel and TWX 

facilities. 

7. It has also been the policy of the Federal Government to 
construct at Federal expense runways, hangars, shops, warehouses and 
administrative office space where the state is unable to provide adequate 
facilities. 

IX. AIR TECHNICIAN AND AIR ADMINISTRATION 

A. The following information is furnished regarding the Air 
TecbnJoian Detoohment : 



^52- 



FY 1959 
FY i960 



TOTAL WAGES 
PAID 

$876,526.86 
$939,1'+T.58 



AVERAGE AVERAGE WO. EMPL 

MONTHLY SALARY PER MONTH 



$443.20 
$463.85 



162 
165 



B. During the period of this report the Air Technician Detachment 
was increased in size coincident with the requirement to perform l4 
hour per day runway alert for Air Defense. This requirement was ter- 
minated on 30 June i960. During the period , Army-Air Force Wage board 
type employees received one cost of living wage increase. 



-53- 



MOIilTAKA MILITARY ACADEMY 

The Montana Military Academy is now in it fourth year, having been 
organized in March, 1957- During this period, ninety-four {^k) cadets have 
enrolled in the school with forty-eight (48) successful graduates and twenty- 
one (21) currently enrolled. 

The students receive instruction in a course prescribed by the National 
Guard Bureau and prepared by the US Army Infantry School. The course 
parallels that taught in the special Army National Guard Schools conducted 
by the active Army. In addition, the Cadets are required to give instruc- 
tions in their home unit, as well as, function in positions that will further 
develop their leadership. The uniform prescribed for Cadets of the Montana 
Military Academy is worn by them during assemblies at their home station. 

The program of instruction is designed to be taught at two ANACDUTRA 
periods (Summer Camp) of one hundred and eight (108) hours of scheduled 
instruction in each period, plus, four week-end assemblies conducted at 
Helena. The week-end assemblies consist of twelve (12) hours of scheduled { 
instruction, conducted from 1300 on Saturday until 1^30 on Sunday. The 
instruction is given by qualified officers, who have demonstrated ability 
as instructors and in most cases are specialists in the fields in which 
they instruct. 

Applicants may be Warrant Officers or enlisted men, who are qualified 
by reason of meeting the minimum standards as set forth in NOR 46, plus 
receiving the recommendation of Commanders and a screening board appointed 
to interview applicants. The application must include Military and Civilian 
history, as well as, a current physical examination and character references 
from at least two people not connected with the National Guard . 

ROSTER OF 59-60 CLASS #3 

CruDiley, Alonzo R Hq & Hq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Daniels, Frederic R Troop M, 3rd Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Iversen, Erik R Troop G, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Manson, Dwayne D 3669th Ord Co (DS) 

Menge, Darrell L Troop D, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Omdahl, Derold L Troop D, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Rhodes, Charles A Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Smith, Vernal J Hq & Hq Btry, 154th FA Gp 

Stetzner, Carl J Btry B, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Stockwell, William A, Jr Hq & Eq Btry, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Ycager, William J Aviation Co, 163d AC 

-54- 



Aspenlieder, Lloyd J 
Battershell, Arthur J 
Brown, James 
Cornelius, Don E 
Deaton, Vernon W 
DeTienne, Mearl M 
Foley, Gordon D 
Gilbow, Delbert W 
Holshue, Donald J 
Horning, Normal L 
Ki-use, Clifford D 
Johnson, Edwin C 
Kurzeribaum, Gerald J 
Meissner, Paul G 
Ohs, Gerald D 
Schutty, Charles W 
Sol, Joel R 
Stone, Malcolm E 
Taulman, Darryl J 
Tierney, Henry J 
Williams, Byron A 



MONTANA MILITARY ACADEMY 

RCSTER OF 60-61 CLASS #U 

Hq & Eq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Sep Pit, 10ii9th Engr Co (C) 

3669th Ord Co (DS) 

Btry B, 2d How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp A, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Hq & Hq Trp, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp A, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp D, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

3669th Ord Co (DS) 

Trp A, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Avn Co, 163d AC 

3669th Ord Co (DS) 

Svc Btry, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp A, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Trp D, 1st Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry C, Ist How Bn, 190th Arty 

1049th Engr Co (C) (-) 

How Btry, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

Btry B, 1st How Bn, 190th Arty 

Trp F, 2d Recon Sq, 163d AC 

State Hq & Hq Det, Mont ARNG 



-55- 



TROPHIES AND AWARDS 



I. THE EISE MOWER TROPHY 

A . General — The Eisenhower Trophy is named for General of the Army 
Dwight D. Eisenhower, former Chief of Staff of the United States Army, 
who consented to a request hy the Chief, National Guard Bureau, that his 
name be used in connection with a trophy to be awarded after the end of 
each calendar year to the most outstanding company-size unit of the 
National Guard in each State and Territory. 

B. Award — This trophy will be in the form of an lorn. It will be 
presented to the winning unit at a suitable ceremony during the field 
training period. The name of the winning unit will be engraved on the 
urn, which will remain in the custody of the unit during the current year. 
Thereafter it will be replaced with a smaller replica to remain in the 
permanent possession of the unit . 

C. Selection of Winning Unit — The winning unit will be selected with- 
in each State by a board composed of: 

a. The Adjutant General. 

b. The Senior federally recognized tactical Army Commander. 

c . The Senior Army Advisor . 

D. Rules Governing the Award — The board will consider only such units 
as have accoimplished all of the following: 

1) Strength (all fractions of personnel to be counted as a whole). 

a. All units (including detachments) which have maintained 90 
percent of the officers and warrant officers authorized by the National 
Guard Bureau throughout the calendar year. 

b. All company and battery sized units which have attained 50 
percent of the enlisted personnel authorized by the reduced column of the 
applicable TOE. 

c. All detachments or units authorized less than 50 enlisted 
personnel under the full TOE which attain 90 percent of the enlisted 
personnel shown in the reduced strength column thereof. 

2) Units which have thereafter maintained during the calendar year 
an average aggregate attendance of officers and enlisted personnel of 
90 percent of the actual strength of both armory and field training. 

3) Units which have achieved an adjectival training index rating 

of EZnF.T.TEKT or higher on Army National Guard Training Evaluation Report. 



-56 



k) Received a rating of excellent or superior on Annual General 
Inspection. 

Units receiving the Eisenhower Trophy are as follows: 

For Calendar Year I958, Awarded Field Training 1959: SERVICE BATTERY, 
2D HOWITZER BATTALION, 19OTH ARTILLERY, KALISPELL, MOKTAKA, Commanded by 
Lt. James A. Root. 

For Calendar Year 1959, Awarded Field Training 196O: HEADQUARTERS 
TROOP, 163D ARMORED CAVALRY, BOZEMAW, MOiSTAKA, Commanded by Captain 
Kenneth B. Card. 

II. THE S. H. MITCHELL TROPHY 

A. General— The S. H. Mitchell Trophy, is named for the Adjutant 
General Major General S. H. Mitchell. 

B. Award— This trophy is in the form of an irrn. It is presented 
at field training each year. 

C. Selection of Winning Unit— The S. H. Mitchell trophy is awarded 
on the basis of statistical information on recruiting. 

D. Rules Governing the Award— The unit accomplishing the highest 
gain in strength and drill attendance for the annual period 1 June to 
31 May. 

Winners of the S. H. Mitchell Trophy: 

1959: No award was awarded. 

i960: Howitzer Battery, 1st Reconnaissance Squadron, Plentywood, 
Montana, Commanded by Captain Marshall J. Marsh. 

III. THE DAV CUP 

A. General--The DAV Gup is so named for the Disabled Veterans 
Organization of Helena, Montana. 

B. Award--The DAV Cup is in the form of an urn. It is presented 
to the winning unit at field training each year. The name of the winning 
unit is engraved on the urn. 

C. Selection of Winning Unit --Select ion of the winning vmit is nadc 
from the reports by the Regular Army Inspection teams during field traini;^-?. 
The award is for the outstanding unit in participation, training, and schii.re- 
ment. (USCOKARC Form 9lk) 

Winners of the DAV Cup are as follows: 

ANACDUTRA 1959: l^+Sd Ordnance Company, Helena, Montana, Coipjnandod 
by Captain Phillip L. Kincheloe. 

ANACDUTRA I960: Aviation Company, 163d Armored Cavalry, Helena, 
Montana, Commanded by Major James F. Barfknecht. 

-57- 



STATE EMEHGEWCIES REQUIRING MOBILIZATION OF THE NATIONAL GUARD 

On April 16, 1959^ the Commander-in-Chief, Governor Aronson, called 
tor mobilization of certain units of the Montana Army National Guard for 
the purpose of sujpressing an uprising of convicts within xhe Montana State 
Prison. 

The Adjutant General immediately dispatched units of the 1st How Bn, 
and 15ii-th FA Group from Deer Lodge, Anaconda, and Missoula, to the scene 
to take appropriate action. 

A situation developed when inmates seized rifles and ammimition from 
the prison guards inside the cell blocks. They gained control by taking 
all the guard personnel within the prison, including the warden and 
deputy warden, as hostages . All the participating convicts were armed 
with knives, clubs and other weapons. 

In the initial phase, the deputy warden was shot and killed and one 
of the guards severely wounded. Shortly thereafter^ the warden was able 
to escape and join our forces. 

An operational plan for entering the prison was made, and security 
forces employed out side the prison. 

As the situation developed, we eventually received intelligence from 
the inside which justified the assault of the area defended by the rioting 
convicts . 

This operation was successfully launched with an assaulting force of 
about thirty-five men and officers, supported by members of the Highway 
Patrol and Prison Officials. The hostages were released without harm 
^'mmediately and control gained of cell block. After securing this area 
we assaulted the tower where the convicts armed with rifles and make-shiit 
incendiary grenades were forted up. 

Attacking this area with rockets, automatic rifles and tear gas, we 
were successful in cap+uring the convicts with exception of the two leaders 
who destroyed themselves by committing suicide when it became obviouo they 
could resist no longer. On completion of this phase we left a detail of 
twenty-five men and officers who assisted the warden in searching the 
premises and restoring order. 

We suffered one casualty, Lt. Pulliam of Missoula, who was severely 
wounded in the arm and leg when shot by one of the convicts. 

The operation provided an excellent opportimity for the Governor, 
The Adjutant General, and Troop Commanders to evaluate the capabilities 
of Montana National Guard. The conduct of the men and officers reflected 
favorably the high level of training and ability to rapidly organize under 
emergency conditions. 

The ability of Montana National Guard Troops to join the Highway 
Patrol HT>(\ lo<-aT x-^li.-r; .»rgnTn"?.ntir»ns to handle any emergency was 



58- 



dramatically demonstrated. The successful conclusion of this imfortunate 
incident has done much to instill confidence and a greater sense of 
security, knowing that Montana National Guard stands ready and capable to 
serve at a moments notice in time of disaster. 



-59- 



•q 



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