Skip to main content

Full text of "ERIC ED056660: Public Negro Colleges - A Fact Book."

See other formats


DOCUMENT RESUME 



ED 056 660 



HE 002 660 



TITLE 

INSTITUTION 



SPONS AGENCY 
PUB DATE 
NOTE 

AVAILABLE FROM 



Public Negro Colleges - ’’ Fact Book» 

National Association of ricate Universities and Land 
Grant Colleges, Atlanta, Ga. Office for Advancement 
of Public Negro Colleges. 

Sears-Roebuck Foundation, Skokie, 111. 

Mar 7 1 
27p, 

Dr. Herman B. Smith, Director, OAPNC, 805 Peachtree 
St., N. E. , Suite 577, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 



EDP.S PRICE MF-'S0.65 HC-S3.29 

DESCRIPTORS Black Oommunxty; Higher Education; *Negro Colleges; 

’t'Negro Education; *Negro Institutions; Negro 
Leadership; Negro Role; *Negro Students; =5«Negro 
Teachers 



ABSTRACT 



This publication is a reference guide to the nation* s 
33 public Negro colleges and universities providing both background 
and current facts. These institutions have special significance 
because of their traditional and continuing role in educating 
minority group students. Today, serving students of all races, the 
colleges enroll almost one-third of all black students in higher 
education, and more than three-fifths of all students in 
predominantly Negro colleges. Like other public colleges, the 
traditionally Negro institutions have a strong commitment to service 
beyond the campus- These colleges work in many ways to better 
interracial understanding and community relations. The achievements 
of piiblic Negro colleges are especially remarkable because they have 
been carried out despite chronic shortages of funds and other 
resources. Until recently, these colleges received only minim?"'’ 
public and private attention and support. [HS) 



o 

ERIC 








us department OF HEALTH. 

;'i'c%rFSv^''s"RE«fvED"fR\M 

IONS STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY 

represent official office of edu- 
cation POSITION OR POLICY. 



V 




This Fact Book is a revised and updated version 
of a similar publication originally distributed in 
July, 1969. It has been prepared by the Office 
for Advancement of Public Negro Colleges of 
the National Association of State Universities 
and Land-Grant Colleges. The Office carries out 
a broad program designed to help public Negro 
colleges increase their share of private, 
voluntory support. The work of the Office 
suppoi ced by grants from foundations and 
corporations with basic support provided by the 
W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 

Publication of the 1971 Fact Book has been 
made possible by a grant from the Sears- 
Roebuck Foundation. The National Association 
of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges 
■and the Office for Advancement of Public Negro 
Colleges express appreciation to the Sears- 
Roebuck Foundatipn for its continued intererf 
in and support of higher education. 

Th edition of the Fact Book is not copyrighted. 
Pc dons rnay be quoted and reproduced without 
pe ission. The statistical information included 
w/as obtained from questionnaires circulated 

by the Office for Advancement of Public Negro 

eoileges or from published figures of the U. S. 
Office of Education. In soniie cases data were not 
available from ali institutions, and figures given 
are projections based on responses from 
representative ’ istitutiohs. 

Further informatibh about the irnportan^ group 

of colleges featured here and additional copies 

of this 197 1 Fact Book are available from the 
presidents of the individual colleges and from 
Dr. Herman B. Srnith, Jr., birector Of OAPNC. 



805 Peachtree Street, N, E.— Suite 577 
Atlanta, Georgia 30308 
(404) 874-8073 



March. 1971 




i'l'r ?■ . 

iBU: - 



This publication is a reference guide to the 
nation's public Negro colleges and universities. 

It provides both background information and 
current facts about an often overlooked 
segment of American higher education. 

These 33 institutions have special significance 
because of their traditional and continuing role 
in educating minority group students for full 
and productive participation in American life. 
Today serving students of all races, the 
traditionally Negro public colleges enroll almost 
one-third of all black students in higher 
education, and more than three-fifths of all 
students in predominantly Negro senic: .;eges. 

During the past century, the pubik Ne; o 
colleges have ;;>erved as “opportunity college*^ ', 
providing education otherwise unavailable to 
thousands of able and deserving youths. Their 
alumni serve in a wide variety of responsible 
positions throughout the nation. 

Like other public colleges, the traditionally 
Negro institutions have a strong commitment to 
service beyond the campus. These colleges 
work in many ways to better interracial 
understanding and community relationsiiThey 
extend their resources to surrounding 
communities by providing technical assistance 
in a variety of fields, from teacher training to 
business management. They are involved, also. 
In various remedial education programs for 
people of all ages. 

The achievements of public Negro colleges are 
especially remarkable because they have been 
carried out despite chronic shortages of funds 
and other resources. Until recently, these 
colleges received only mlnimaLpublic and 
private attention and support.^ith the 
expectation that recognition of their important 
role in American education will develop broader 
and more substantive support for the activities 
of public Negro colleges, this booklet is 
prepared and distributed. 




1 





History 


3 


Opportunity Colleges 


4 




Enrollment 


5 


Students 


6 




Degrees 


7 


Alumni ; 


8 



Curriculum 
Accreditation 
Co m m u nj ty^Ssr \/ 1 ce 






10 

12 

12 


. 1 > n'ci t; i ii 3 7;:-. ' 








raclljtles 


-• • 




14 


Faculty 


■ ■ ..v'-..; ;■■■ •' • 




15 


Finance 






16 



The Future 17 














. 




V ‘J*' ' ' 









MBIack^students in-:high^^ 

B-. Bachelors degrWs;ih4955-56.and 1969-70. 8 

C. Selected Errierging Programs at 

Public Negro Colleges 11 

D. Average faculty^ salaries , ^ /' / . 15 

E. Income of Rublfc Negro Colleges 

and all public cblleges ' ^ 16 



Photographs ■ y.:- :-.. 

Page 3, Office pf I rif of m ati pn South 

Carpi ina Stbte O arid all other 

photographs; Jpe^ 2 Public 

Relations; Tennessee State University. 





HISTORY 

Public Negro colleges have existed for more than 
a century. Most of them were founded in the 
decades following the Civil War, between 1867 
and 1900, to provide an education for newly 
freed slaves. The colleges are located in 19 
states, most of them Southern and border states. 
The oldest is Cheyney State College in 
Pennsylvania, founded in 1837, ' 

op'ri prr^dating the ivil ..ar. The^ ^ 

.ppi Valley State College, founded in 
lyoO. Only three of the colleges are less than 
50 years old, although only eight granted 
degrees more than 50 years ago. 

Fifteen of the colleges were founded as land- 
grant colleges or later given this status to 
conform with federal regulations stating that 
benefits of land-grant p"*ograms had to be 
available to both blacks and whites. As a result, 
public Negro colleges shared in the tradition of 
including service as well as teaching and 
research activities in their programs. 

Some of the colleges were founded as extensions 
of already existing private institutions. Norfolk 
State College, for example, was established as 
the Norfolk Unit of Virginia Union University. 
North Carolina A & T State Univer ity was an 
extension of Shaw University In Raleigh from 
1890 to 1893, to enable its state tc receive 
Morrill Act land-grant funds. Many of the 
colleges were founded as secondary schools. 

A majority of the colleges were founded as state 
colleges, often with significant black leadership. 
Elizabeth City State University, for example, 
was created in 1891, by a bill introduced into the 
North Carolina legislature by^ugh Cale, a black 
legislator from Pasquotank C'ounty. In 1871, 
when Alcorn A & M College was officially opened 

« 3 



for Mississippi's black citizens, Hiram R. 

Revels, the first black elected to the U. S. 

Senate, resigned his seat to oecome the college's 
first president. Alcorn originated as Oakland 
College, a school for the education of white males. 

A sizable minority— 40 per cent— of the colleges 
were initially organized under private auspices, 
generally with gifts from both black and white 
individuals and groups. The soldiers and 
officers of the 62nd U. S. Colored Infantry gave 
$5,000 to provide funds for Lincoln University's 
incorporation in Missouri and are credited with 
the college's founding and eventual financing. 
Fort Valley State College was established in 
1895, by leading local black and white citizens 
and was generously supported by gifts from 
Miss Anna T. Jeanes of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. Albany State College in Georgia, 
was begun as the Albany Bible and Manual 
Training Institute, receiving financial support 
from the Hazard family of Newport, Rhode 
Island, as well as from local philanthropists. 

Over time, but especially in the earlier years of 
this century, financial problems led some of the 
private colleges to seek state support, and they 
became public institutions. There remain about 
50 private black four-year colleges today. 

In their early years, most of the colleges 
concentrated on teacher education, subsequently 
adding other programs. Today like other former 
teachers colleges, public Negro colleges offer 
undergraduate and graduate studies in a broad 
range of fields covering a wide spectrum of 
liberal and professional education. 



OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES 

Throughout their history, the major role of public 
Negro colleges has been to provide educational 
opportunity. In years past, Negro institutions 
were the only source of higher education 
available to most black people. More recently, 
with other doors opening, thousands of young 
people continue to attend these colleges. Black 
students, like white students, look upon their 
college experience as a social as well as an 
academic opportunity. This, then, continues to 
make predominantly black colleges especially 
attractive to many black students. Moreover, 
these schools students find many opportunities 
and experiences that could not be duplicated 
anywhere else. 

In addition, because of generally low costs and 
concern for individual student problems, public 
Negro colleges serve as “opportunity colleges" 
for many students from low-income families. 




4 



The average parental income of students at these 
colleges Is under $4,500— less than half that of 
other college students. 

Finally, public Negro colleges are striving 
continuously to improve the quality of existing 
programs and develop their educational services 
to provide a first-class education in many 
contemporary career fieids. On the basis of their 
offerings, they are today attracting many white 
as weli as biack students to their campuses. 




ERIC 



ENROLLMENT 

Pubiic Negro coiieges currentiv Anroii over 
Ij 104,000 students and are growing rapidly. Their 

1] 1970-71 enroilment is 12.3 per cent higher than 

their 1969-70 enrollment, and more than two- 
ji and-a-third times their 1956 eni'o-’ment. If 

> recent trends continue, Ihe 33 public Negro 

colleges will enroll more than 110,000 students 
in 1971-72. 

More than three-fifths of all students in 
predominantly biack senior Institutions are 
enrolled in the 33 public Negro colleges. 

Almost one-third of all biack students in higher 
education today are enrolled in the 33 public 
Negro colleges. 

The average enrollment at public Negro colieges 
is 3,170 students. There are, however, wide 
variations in size. Southern University In 
Louisiana, with three campuses, is the largest 
institution, enrolling 11,753 students. Elizabeth 
City State University, one of five public Negro 
coiieges in North Carolina, is the smallest, 
enrolling 1,104. Altogeth^i four of the 33 



5 



colleges enroll 5,000 or more students and two 
enroll more than 4,500. Only two enroll fewer 
than 1,400 students. 




STU DENTS 

The students at these colleges show outstanding 
ability and desire to profit from higher 
education. They generally achieve more, In both 
college and their careers, than their scores :xs 
prospective freshmen on standardized national 
tests would indicate. 

Many of the students had impressive high school 
records before coming to college. Approximately 
650 of this year's freshmen were high school 
valedictorians or saiutatorians. About 12 V 2 per 
cent ranked in the top tenth of their high school 
class; more than 50 per cent in the top half. 
Public Negro colleges, however, enroll a cross- 
section of students. In many cases, they accept 
students with questionable qualifications, give 
them a second educational chance, and help 
them become high achievers. 

In recent years, most of the colleges have had to 
limit enrollment of out-of-state students due to 
increasing enrollment pressure frorr In-state 
students. However, these colleges continue to 
serve students from all parts of the country. 
About nine-tenths of the students are residents 
of the states in which the colleges are located. 
The remaining tenth represent every state 
except Alaska. A large number of out-of-state 
students are from New York and fMew Jersey. 



In the last two years, the proportion of male 
students has risen from approximately 46 per 
cent to more than 48 per cent. The proportion 
of white students at the undergraduate level has 
increased from about three to eight per cent 
and, at the graduate level, from 13 to 21 per 
cent. Some 85 per cent of the students attend 
full-time, from about 18 per cent of the graduate 
students to 81.6 per cent of undergraduates. 



BUACK STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION TODAY 



^ 5^ of ths'iptal, are, 2,50p^ 
r predomlr^aotlyV white 









DEGREES 

Altogether, public Negro colleges award 
approximately 11,300 bachelors and 1,150 
masters degrees annually. The largest share of 
these degrees is still In education. However, as 
job opportunities continue to expand and 
students realize that their options are ever- 
widening, they have begun to enter non- 
education fields In significant numbers. 

In 1955-56, education accounted for 66.2 per 
cent of all bachelors' degrees. Today it accounts 
for only 34.8 per cent. Meanwhile, degrees in 
+ht social sciences have risen from 10.6 per 
cent to 19.0 percent. Bachelors' degrees In 
business fields have increased from 3.4 per 
cent of the total in 1955-56 to 16.7 per cent 
today. Four institutions— North Carolina A &T, 
North Carolina Central, Texas Southern, and 
Southern— each awarded more than 100 
bachelors' degrees in business in June, 1970. 
Thirteen other public Negro colleges each 
awarded more than 50. 

At the master’s level, education accounts for 83 
per cent of all degrees. Mathematics and science 
fields account for 6.59 per cent. 



7 




ALUMNI 



Gradua.es of public Negro colleges are found in 
a variety of positions in business, education 
and government. Although only ten per cent'of 
the students are initially froin out-of-state, a far 
igher proportion of alumni become residents 
and taxpayers of other states after graduation 
m general, most alumni working in education 
have remained in the South while alumni in 
business and industry have more often left their 
home states and the South. 

Among alumni in business are researchers and 
managers in many major corporations as well as 
the owners of small firms. In education, 
graduates include scores of teachers, principals 
college faculty, college presidents, deans 
department chairmen, and school board 
rnembers. In Mississippi, more than a third of 
the principals and half of the teachers in the 
public school system are alumni of Jackson 
State College. 

service, alumni are prominent on 
the lists of foreign and military service officials- 
rnunicipal, state, and federal judges, 
administrators, and legislators. In other public 
service professions, hundreds of doctors 
lawyers, ministers, and civic leaders are alumni 
of public Negro colleges. 



space limitations permit mention of only a few 
examples of outstanding alumni. Maynard 
Jackson, Vice-Mayor, Atlanta, Georgia, is a 
graduate of North Carolina Central University. 
Boston Daniels, first black chief of police of a 
major city (Kansas City, Kansas), is an alumnus 
of Arkansas A, M & N College. Dr. Helen G. 
Edmonds, Alternate Delegate to the United 
Nations and Joseph Black, Vice President for 
Special Markets of the Greyhound Corporation 
are graduates of Morgan State College. Dr. 

Percy Williams, Assistant State Superintendent 
of Schools, the first black educator to serve the 
State of Maryland at this level, is a Bowie State 
College alumnus. James Burch, Assistant 
Superintendent of Public Instruction for the 
State of North Carolina, is a graduate of 
Fayetteville State University. Robert Brown, 
Superintendent of Schools for Greene County, 
Alabama, is an alumnus of Alabama A & M 
University. Dr. Mildred W. Barksdale, Professor 
at Georgia State University in Atlanta, is a 
graduate of Jackson State College. Lee N. *'Pete^* 
Collins, an electronic engineer at Wright- 
Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, is a 
graduate of Tennessee State University. In 1970 , 
he received an award and citation for rocket 
re-programming which resulted in savings of 
several million dollars to the Air Force. 













CURRICULUM 



o 

ERIC 



Public Negro colleges offer a broad variety of 
educational programs, ranging from 
anthropology to sociology, business to music, 
black studies to law. Nineteen of the colleges 
have graduate programs. 

Traditionally, the emphasis has been on 
education, but in recent years other fields have 
demonstrated significant growth. In business, 
for example, only 19 colleges had degree- 
granting programs in 1955-56; today 29 colleges 
nave baccalaureate programs and five have 
master’s level programs. The number of colleges 
offering degrees in accounting has increased 
Trom three to 18; in economics, from six 
to l^i; in nursing, from one to seven. 

Furthermore, in response to broadening student 
and employer interest, the colleges are 

degree programs in many new fields. 
Alabarna A & M University, for example, has 
instituted a four-year baccalaureate program in 
computer science and a master's level program 
in urban studies. Prairie View A & M College 
has a bachelor's program in chemical 
engineering; Norfolk State College offers a 
degree program in commercial arts; Southern 
university has baccalaureate programs in 
journalism and in radio and television. 

The colleges are also upgrading existing 
programs in changing fields like business and 
science. Bachelors' degree programs in 
Industrial Technology and Medical Technology 
are available today at 17 of the colleges 
Many are providing; work-study opportunities 
for interested students in both government and 
industry. North Carolina A & T, for example, 

10 



112 



SELECTED mEMGIHQ PROGRAiVlS AT 33 PUBLIC BS.ACh COLLEGES 



CHART C 



1. ARTS and HUMANITIES 



2. BUSINESS and INDUSTRY 



3. SCIENCE and HEALTH 



NOTE: This chart Ulustrates the diversity of 
baccalaureate and master's level programs 
currently offered at individual public black 
colleges. Indicated, also, are strengths in basic 
arts and sciences subject areas which are being 
utilized in the development of new degree 
programs at these institutions. 

In addition to the degree programs presented m 
the chart, many others are available at the 
public black colleges, especially in the fields - 
education and agriculture which have been tf 
traditional fields nf instructional emphasis az 
these insiitutions. Major and minor options are 
available, also, at many of the colleges 
wh ■*' do net offer degree programs in the 
su: areas //s fed. 



ALABAMA A&M U. 



ALABAMA STATE U. 



ALBANY STATE C. (Ga.) 



ALCORN A&M C. (Miss.) 



ARKANSAS A,M&N C. 



BOWIE STATE C. (Md.) 



CENTRAL STATE U. (Ohio) 



CHEYNEY STATE C. (Pa.) 



COPPIN STATE C. (Md.) 



DELAWARE STATE C. 



ELIZABETH CITY STATE U. (N.C.) 



FAYETTEVILLE STATE U. (N.C.) 
FLORIDA A&M U. 



FORT VALLEY STATE C. (Ga.) 



GRAMBLING C. (La.) 



JACKSON STATE C. (Miss.) 



KENTUCKY STATE C. 



LANGSTON U. (Okla.) 



LINCOLN U. (Mo.) 



MISS. VALLEY STATE C. 



MORGAN STATE C. (Md.) 



N.C. A&T STATE U. 



N.C. CENTRAL U. 



NORFOLK STATE C. (Va.) 



PRAIRIE VIEW A&M C. (Tex.) 



SAVANNAH STATE C. (Ga.) 



S.C. STATE C. 



SOUTHERN U.(La.) 



TENNESSEE STATE U. 



TEXAS SOUTHERN U. 



VIRGINIA STATE C. 

o 



ERIC 



IRGINIA STATE C. 



IN-SALEM STATE U. (N.C. 





-r=:;ij..EGES 



lUSINESSand INDUSTRY 



3. SCIENCE and HEALTH 



iJ-. SOCIAL SCIENCES 







has a new work-study program designed to 
prepare students for the C. P. A. exa? nation. 

In the professions, Negro colleges a ill the 
major producers of black lawyers, nurs >, and 
engineers for the nation. North Caroline Central, 
Southern University, and Texas Southe i operate 
law schools. Southern, North Carolina A & T, 
Tennessee State, and Prairie View A & M offer 
bachelors' degrees in engineering. Florida 
A & M, Albany State, Morgan State, North 
Carolina A & T, North Carolina Central, Prairie 
View and Winston-Salem State University have 
four-year programs in nursing. 



ACCREDITATION 

All public Negro colleges are fully accredited 
by their respective regional accrediting agencies. 
This means that they meet certain minimum 
standards expected of all institutions of higher 
education and that their work is accepted for 
credit at other colleges and universities. 
Increasingly, their individual departments are 
gaining specialized accreditation from 
professional agencies. For example, the Texas 
Southern School of Business is accredited by 
the American Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Business; the Southern University School 
of Engineering is accredited by the Engineering 
Council for Program Development; and, the 
Florida A & M University School of Pharmacy 
is accredited by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. 



COIVIIVIUNITY SERVICE 

Public Negro colleges are committed to the 
concept of community service. They conduct 
both formal and informal programs to broaden 
educational opportunities and improve the quality 
of life for nearby residents in all age groups. 

Almost half of the 33 colleges operate evening 
schools to provide educational opportunities 
for those who must work during the day, or to 
provide job-related training to workers seeking 
to upgrade or add to their knowledge and skills. 
The Department of Economics and Business at 
Morgan State College, for example, has 
provided systems training for Model Cities and 
other agency personnel involved in programs 
designed to improve conditions in the Inner 
city. South Carolina State College offers a course 
focusing on tlie learning patterns of adults 
at two nearby towns as well as on-campus. 

In addition, all of the colleges conduct 
workshops and institutes for teachers and 
school administrators, as well as for other 
groups, both professional and non-professional. 

12 




The Grambling College Project on Aging, for 
example, trains women of all ages to work as 
paid homemaker health aides with elderly 
persons living In six counties surrounding the 
college. Tennessee State University operates 
an employment counseling institute for the 
state which trains counselors to assist hard-core 
unemployed and underemployed persons. 
Elizabeth City State University is one of the 
public Negro colleges that have conducted 
community workshops on drug abuse. 

During its Summer Mathematics Institute, 

Florida A & M University introduced the 
computer to 40 junior and senior high school 
mathematics teachers from nine southeastern 
states. North Carolina A &T State University 
operates one of 12 regional manpower research 
and training centers for the U. S. Department 
of Labor. 

Coppin State College’s Career Opportunities in 
Education program (COPE) is designed to 
Improve the learning of low-income families and 
Vietnam-era veterans working as educational 
auxiliaries in poverty area schools in Baltimore. 
Central State University has a training 
program designed to help poor people use 
money more effectively. Delaware State College 
is organizing a library of information files on 
various programs and assistance available to 
individuals and groups in the greater Dover area. 

Several institutions have named directors of 
community relations and services. Fayetteville 
State University, for instance, has a new Dean 
for Continuing Education and Community 
Services who coordinates activities of FSU’s 
evening college and serves as the university’s 
liaison in developing programs sought by 
people in the community. 

As centers of black culture, public Negro 
colleges provide enrichment programs for both 
campus and community. Cheyney State College 
is sponsoring a series of evening lectures on 
world cultures. Grambling College’s production 
of “A Raisin in the Sun” was one of six selected 
nationwide for presentation during the 1970 
American College Theatre Festival. 

Students are involved in many ways. At Virginia 
State College they volunteer for service in the 
children’s ward at Central State Hospital. At 
Florida A & M they are helping to organize a 
literacy program as members of the ”FAMU in 
Tampa Model Cities team.” North Carolina A & T 
students are conducting a survey of black- 
owned businesses in Greensboro preparatory 
to publishing a directory which will assist the 
university in organizing classes, seminars. 



13 



Institutes, and workshops designed to help 
the businesses thrive- 

At Morgan State College, home economics majors 
surveyed food stores to check on pricing and 
quaiity in low-income areas. These students 
have worked with community organizations 
ranging from the Youth Division of the Baltimore 
Police Department to the Governor's Human 
Relations Commission, helping both public and 
private agencies seek solutions to urban 
problems. At one point, some 45 agencies 
had requested nearly 400 student assistants. 





FACILITIES 

The combined physical plants of 33 public 
Negro colleges are worth an estimated half- 
billion dollars. Their libraries hold a total of 3.7 
million books and more than 100,000 reels of 
microfilm. Current and bound general Interest 
periodicals as well as government documents 
help to keep students and faculty abreast of 
social changes. Growing collections of scholarly 
journals provide substantive support for 
developing programs of study. In addition, 
several libraries have unique collections of black 
literature, history, and educational resources. 

Library and other resources are extended by 
participation in cooperative programs. In 
addition to the 192,000 books in their own 
University collection, students and faculty at 
Texas Southern can also draw on the collections 
of 27 other Texas and Louisiana college libraries 
through a teletype inter-library loan program. 
Similar cooperative arrangements are already 
in effect or under study in several other states. 

Most of the colleges now either have their own 
computers or share computer facilities 
available at other locations. Lincoln University, 
which Installed Its first comouter in 1960, was 



one of the first in Missouri to acquire its own 
facility. Colleges in several states have terminal 
access to central computer systems. Third- 
generation computers are on campus at Jackson 
State, Central State, and Alabama A & M. 
Mini-computers are in use at Delaware State 
College and at Florida A & M University. 



FACULTY 






s. 




To carry out their programs, the 33 public Negro 
colleges rely on more than 5,000 full-time 
talented and dedicated faculty members. Of 
these, nearly 30 per cent hold Ph.D, degrees. 

The faculty/student ratio averages 1:18 and is 
as low as 1 :12 at one college. 

Although several distinguished black faculty 
members have been lost to predominantly white 
institutions due to recent recruitment offers, 
many young and enthusiastic teachers, 
products of some of the nation's outstanding 
graduate schools, are accepting positions at Negro 
colleges. No other institutions, they feel, can 
offer them opportunities to help so many black 
students who have grown up with so little. 

Recent efforts of public Negro colleges to secure 
support from private sources for faculty salary 
supplements have met with some success and 
have helped to stem the flow of valuable 
teachers to better-endowed institutions. The 
reduction of teaching loads and extra- 
instructional responsibilities have helped also. 

In addition, opportunities for further study, 
participation in professional meetings and 
workshops, and inter-institutional cooperation 
have helped to make public Negro colleges 
more attractive places for talented teachers. 
Nonetheless, In 1970-71, average faculty salaries 
at the public Negro colleges continue to lag 
behind national average salaries of other 
categories of institutions. 



CHART D 

AVERAGE FACULTY SALARIES 









Public Public Inde- 

Black Liberal Public pendent 

Insti" Arts Univer- Univer- 

RANK tutions Colleges sities sities 

Professor $14,500 $16,542 $18,148 $23,299 

Assoc. Professor 12,000 13,090 13,577 15,938 

Asst. Professor 10,000 10,846 11,189 12,687 

Instructor 8,500 8,557 8,592 9,797 



Figures for Average Salaries, 9-10 months 

Source: OAPNC SURVEY— Data from 33 public black colleges 
(1970-71); American Association of University Professors— 
Comparison Groups (1969-70). 




15 



FINANCE 

The major source of income for these schools 
is state appropriations which account for about 
49 per cent of their revenue. For years, public 
Negro colleges In many states received relatively 
less money than other public institutions. 

Funds for construction have often been generous, 
but operating funds, especially for salaries and 
programs, have tended to lag behind. Most of 
the colleges are now getting a fairer share 
of current appropriations. However, they have 
generally not received the extra ‘*catcj-up" 
funds they need to overcome their cumulative 
deficit in resources. 

A second source is tuition and student fees, 
including room and board charges. Tuition, room 
and board average $1,025.00 at public Negro 
colleges for In-state students and $1,440.00 
for out-of-state students. Tuition accounts for 
about 16 per cent of college income. Auxiliary 
enterprises, which include student room and 
board charges as well as income from bookstores 
and other revenue-producing activities, 
account for about 15 per cent of income. 

Almost 12 per cent of income comes from the 
federal government, with less than two per cent 
supporting research. Federal funds provide 
about 61.0 per cent of all student aid money 
available at public Negro colleges. Federal 
funds also help to support construction, special 
projects, and cooperative activities. Many of 
the colleges have been unable to take full 
advantage of existing federal programs because 
they cannot raise their required “matching" 
share of funds nor finance necessary planning 
studies on which to base applications. 



ERIC 



BiBck'PubUc)jns^^ :;rAirPub'lic 

'■ i , 11.6% ' Tuition 

16 . 1 % • ’ -'C'--- "■‘•cv ;. r ' ’-'r ■' 







Private gifts and grants provide 1.5 per cent of 
income for public Negro colleges, with 
foundations accounting for approximately 64 
per cent of ail such support. Until recently, 
most public Negro colleges lacked active fund- 
raising programs. Because public institutions 
are not included in any national fund-raising 
effort such as the United Negro College Fund, 
they cannot benefit from this major channel of 
private contributions. Many of the colleges, 
therefore, have recently begun active Individual 
fund-raising efforts and are now vigorously 
seeking support from local communities, 
alumni, corporations, and foundations. Their 
most urgent needs are funds for student aid 
programs and for faculty development, 
including salary supplements. 



THE FUTURE 

There is no question that the future of 
predominantly Negro public colleges lies 
beyond serving only one race. All of the 
traditionally Negro public institutions now enroll 
white students and have white faculty 
members. A few, in fact, have become 
predominantly white. About 75 per cent of the 
students at West Virginia State College are 
white. Approximately half of the enrollment at 
Lincoln University is white; more than a third 
of the commuter enrollment at Bowie State 
College is white. About 43 per cent of the total 
enrollment at Kentucky State College is white 
and at Alabama A & M State University, 
approximately 16 per cent of the enrollment, 
principally at the graduate level, is white. 

Like other public colleges and universities, then, 
public Negro colleges see their principal future 
role as one of providing iovy cost, high quality 
education to students of all races. In serving a 
broader constituency, these institutions stand 
ready to assume specific new roles as a viable 
sector and equal partner in the total structure of 
higher education in America. At the same 
time, they remain committed to their historic 
objective of serving as “opportunity colleges", 
providing a chance for higher education to 
many able and deserving students. 

As these institutions face a future of rendering 
even broader service to the nation hey do 
so with the expectation of receivli fuller 
financisjl and professional support in order to 
carry out their vita! educational rrsssion. 



17 




The first section of this booklet introduced the 
nation's 33 public Negro colleges as a group. 
This section presents some additional 
information about each one of these institutions. 

Listed for each of the colleges and universities 
is the following information : 

• mailing address 

o degree-credit enrollment 

• degrees offered 

• tuition and required fees 

• room and board charges 

• president 

• founding date 

Tuition, room, and board rates are given for two 
semesters, two trimesters, or three quarters- 
in other words, for an entire academic year. 

(IS) designates the tuition and required fees 
paid by in-state students; (OS), the out-of-state 
charges. Enrollment and student charges given 
are for the 1970-71 academic year. Assuming 
continuation of present trends, these figures 
may show moderate increases at many 
colleges in 1971-72. 

Further information about any of the colleges 
is available directly from the college. The 
president's office can provide information about 
programs underway and private support 
opportunities. The admissions office has 
catalogues and application blanks. That office 
can also furnish information about requirerr.ents 
and procedures. 



1. ALABAMA A & M 
UNIVERSITY 

Normal, Alabama 35762 
Enrollment: 2,755 
B.S., B.A., M.S., M.B.A. 

T uition : $290 (IS) 

$440 (OS) 

Room and Board: $788 
President: R. D. Morrison 
Founded in 1875* 

2. ALABAMA STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Montgomery, Alabama 
36101 

Enrollment: 2,524 
B.A., B.S., M.Ed., M.S. 
Tuition: $260 (IS) 

$410 (OS) 

Room and Board: $695 
President: Levi Watkins 
Founded in 1874 

3. ALBANY STATE COLLEGE 

Albany, Georgia 31705 

Enrollment : 1,942 

A. B., B.B.A., B.S. 

Tuition: $390 (IS) 

$759 (OS) 

Room and Board: 
$702-$726 
President: 

Charles L. Hayes 
Founded in 1903 

4. ALCORN A & M COLLEGE 

Lorman, Mississippi 
39096 

Enrollment: 2,520 

B. S. 

Tuition and Fees: 

$350 (IS), $950 (OS) 
Room and Board : $598.50 
President: 

Walter Washington 
Founded in 1871* 

5. ARKANSAS A M & N 

college 

Pine Bluff, Arkansas 
71601 

Enrollment: 3,006 
B.A., B.S. 

T uition and Fees: 

$330 (IS), $630 (OS) 
Room and Board: $648 
President; 

Lawrence A. Davis 
Founded in 1873* 



6. BOWIE STATE COLLEGE 

Bowie, Maryland 20715 
Enrollment: 2,259 
B.A., B.S., M.Ed. 

Tuition: $200 (IS) 

$450 (OS) 

Room and Board: $900 
President; 

Samuel L. Myers 
Founded in 1867 

7. CENTRAL STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Wilberforce, Ohio 45385 
Enrollment: 2,565 

A. A., A.S., B.A., B.S., 
B.S.Ed. 

Tuition and Fees: 

$477 (IS), $652 (OS) 
Room and Board: $960 
President: 

Lewis A. Jackson 
Founded in 1887 

8 . CHEYNEY STATE 
COLLEGE 

Cheyney, Pennsylvania 
19319 

Enrollment: 2,071 

B. A., B.S., B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 
T uition and Fees: 

$710 (IS), $1,290 (OS) 
Room and Board: $720 
President: Wade Wilson 
Founded in 1837 

9. COPPIN STATE COLLEGE 

Baltimore, Maryland 
21216 

Enrollment: 1,759 
B.S., B.A., M.Ed. 

T uition and Fees: 

$295 (IS), $535 (OS) 

Room and Board: 

Not provided 
President: 

Calvin W. Burnett 
Founded in 1900 

10. DELAWARE STATE 
COLLEGE 

Dover, Delaware 19901 
Enrollment: 1,669 
B.A., B.S. 

T uition and Fees : 

$325 (IS), $750 (OS) 
Room and Board: $650 
President: Luna 1, Mishoe 
Founded in 1891* 



*De5/gnates fand^grant institution 




20 



11. ELIZABETH CITY STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Elizabeth City, North 
Carolina 27909 
Enrollment: 1,104 
B.S., B.A. 

Tuition: $214 (IS) 

$800 (OS) 

Room and Board: $704 
President; 

Marion D. Thorpe 
Founded in 1891 

12. FAYETTEVILLE STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Fayetteville, North 
Carolina 28301 
Enrollment: 1,430 
B.S., B.A. 

Tuition and Fees : 

$370 (IS), $1,020 (OS) 
Room and Board: $/41 
President: 

Charles A. Lyons, Jr. 
Founded in 1877 

13. FLORIDA A & IVI 
UNIVERSITY 

Tallahassee, Florida 
32307 

Enrollment: 4,939 
B.A., B.S., M.Ed., M.S. 
Tuition: $450 (IS), 

$1,350 (OS) 

Room and Board: $723 
President: 

Benjamin L. Perry 
Founded in 1887* 

14. FORT VALLEY STATE 
COLLEGE 

Fort Valley, Georgia 
31030 

Enrollment; 2,338 
B.A., B.S., M.Ed. 

Tuition and Fees: 
$1,095(IS),$1.500(0S) 
Room and Board: $714 
President: 

Waldo W. E. Blanchet 
Founded in 1895* 

15. GRABBLING COLLEGE 

Grambling, Louisiana 
71245 

Enrollment : 3,700 
B.A., B.S. 

Tuition: $250 (IS) 

$949 (OS) 

Room an 3oard : 

$601 (IS), $727.50 (OS) 



President: 

Ralph W. E. Jones 
Founded in 1901 

16. JACKSON STATE 
COLLEGE 

Jackson, Mississippi 
39217 

Enrollment: 4,G65 
B.A., B.S., B. Music, 
B.S.Ed., M.S., M.A.T., 
M.S.Ed. 

Tuition: $350.01 (IS) 
$950.01 (OS) 

Room and Board: $648 
President: 

John A. Peoples, Jr. 
Founded in 1877 

17. KENTUCKY STATE 
COLLEGE 

Frankfort, Kentucky 
40601 

Enrollment: 1,754 

A. B., B.S., A.A., A.A.S. 
Tuition: $300 (IS), 

$800 (OS) 

Room and Board; $565 
President: Carl M. Hill 
Founded in 1836* 

18. LANGSTON UNIVERSITY 

Langston, Oklahoma 
73050 

Enrollment: 1,109 

B. A., B.S., Associate 
Tuition and Fees: 

$406 (IS), $782 (OS) 
Room and Board : 
$549-$666 
President: 

William E. Sims 
Founded in 1897* 

19. LINCOLN UNIVERSITY 

Jefferson City, Missouri 
65101 

Enrollment: 2,445 
B.A., ET3., B.Ed., B. Music, 
A.A., A.S., M.A., M.Ed. 
Tuition: $350 (IS) 

$620 (OS) 

Room and Board: $700 
President: 

Walter C. Daniel 
Founded in 1866* 







21 



20. MISSISSIPPI VALLEY 
STATE COLLEGE 

Itta Bena, Mississippi 
38941 

Enrollment: 2,005 
B.A., B.S. 

Tuition: $286.50 (IS) 
$600 (OS) 

Room and Board: $551.75 
President: J. H. White 
Founded in 1950 

21. MORGAN STATE 
COLLEGE 

Baltimore, Maryland 
21212 

Enrollment: 5,106 

A. B., B.S., M.A., M.S., 
M.B.A. 

Tuition: $388 (IS) 

$688 (OS) 

Room and Board : 

$840 (IS), $990 (OS) 
President: KingV. Cheek 
Founded in 1867 

22. NORTH CAROLINA A & T 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27411 

Enrollment: 3,797 

B. S., M.S. 

Tuition: $251 (IS) 

$699 (OS) 

Room and Board: $745 
President: 

Lewis C. Dowdy 
Founded in 1891* 

23. NORTH CAROLINA 
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY 

Durham, North 
Carolina 27707 

Enrollment: 3,541 
B.A., B.S., B.S.N., M.A., 
M.S., M.S.Lib. Sci., 
L.L.l?.., J.D. 

Tuition: $200 (IS) 

$950 (OS) 

Room and Board : $742.50 
President: 

Albert N. Whiting 
Founded in 1910 

24. NORFOLK STATE 
COLLEGE 

Norfolk, Virginia 23504 

Enrollment: 5,202 
A.A., A.S., B.A., B.S. 



Tuition: $420 (IS) 

$590 (OS) 

Room and Board: $375 
President: 

Lyman B. Brooks 
Founded in 1935 

25. PRAIRIE VIEW A & M 
COLLEGE 

Prairie View, Texas 78661 

Enrollment: 4,192 
B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S., 
M.Ed. 

Tuition: $100 (IS) 

$400 (OS) 

Room and Board: $750 
President: 

Alvin I. Thomas 
Founded in 1876* 

26. SAVANNAH STATE 
COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 31404 

Enrollment: 2,444 
B.S., M.S. 

Tuition and Fees: 

$381 (IS), $786 (OS) 
Room and Board: $720 
Acting President; 

Prince A. Jackson, Jr. 
Founded in 1890 

27. SOUTH CAROLINA 
STATE COLLEGE 

Orangeburg, South 
Carolina 29115 

Enrollment: 2,148 
B,A., B.S., M.Ed., M.S. 
Tuition: $150 (IS) 

$380 (OS) 

Room and Board : 

$606, $639, & $666 
President: 

M. Maceo Nance, Jr. 
Founded in 1896* 

28. SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
70813 (Branches at 
New Orleans and 
Shreveport) 

Enrollment: 11,753 
B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S., 
M.Ed., J.D. 

Tuition: $275 (IS) 

$630 (OS) 

Room and Board: $730 
President: 

G. Leon Netterville, Jr. 
Founded In 1880* 



•v^ 




22 



29. TENNESSEE STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Nashville, Tennessee 
37203 

Enrollment: 4,404 
B.S., B.A., M.A., M.S., A.A. 
Tuition and Fees: 

$225 (IS), $705 (OS) 
Room and Board: $777 
President: A. P. Torrence 
Founded in 1912* 

30. TEXAS SOUTHF I 
UNIVERSITY 

Houston, Texas ■VC'l 4 
Enrollment: 5,4Sc 
Associate, B.A., ST.F.A., 
B.S., B.S. in ■ rmacy, 
M.A., M.S., [/. 

M.B.A., M.A. V 
Music Ed., J.D. 

Tuition: $176 (IS) 

$476 (OS) 

Room and Boar : 700 
President: 

Granville M. Sc -'a'sr 
Founded in 1947 

31. VIRGINIA STATE 
COLLEGE 

Petersburg, Virginia 
23803 

Enrollment: 2,948 
B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S., 

B. Music, M.Ed. 



Tuition and Fees: 

$690 (IS), $950 (OS) 
Room and Board: $648 
President: 

Wendell P. Russell 
Founded in 1882* 

32. WEST VIRGINIA STATE 
COLLEGE 

Institute, West Virginia 

7^112 

E" c iiment : 3,663 

A. A., A.S., B.S., B.A. 
i uition : $50 (IS) 

$350 (OS) 

Room and Board : 
i;i,001.16 
F'"=s dent: 

‘.'AUiam J. L. Wallace 
Founded in 1891 

33. WINSTON-SALEM STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina 27102 

Enrollment: 1,401 

B. A., B.S. 

Tuition; $150 (IS) 

$800 (OS) 

Room and Board: $704 
President: 

Kenneth R. Williams 
Founded in 1892 



LOCATION OF PUBLIC NEGRO COLLEGES