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December 201S 


The World’s Oldest And Largest Firearm Authority 


BREAK IN CASE 
OF EMERGENCY 


Official Journal of the National Rifle Association 





STAND wwrf FIGHT 






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THE MINI-REFLEX REVOLUTION 


The World’s Oldest And Largest Firearm Authority 


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December 2015 

Volume 163, No. 12 




The NRA, the foremost guardian of the traditional American 
right to "keep and bear arms," believes every law-abiding 
citizen is entitled to the ownership and legal use of firearms, 
and that every reputable gun owner should be an NRA Member. ( 


OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 


features state of Play 18 

Chris W. Cox While the presidential primary grabs headlines, hard work goes on in the states as 
Bloomberg continues to flex his financial muscle. 

Freedom's On Fire 44 

Wayne LaPierre There's a raging fire burning in American politics right now, and your Second Amendment- 
protected right to keep and bear arms is quietly being shredded and used as kindling. 

Optics Ready: The Mini-Reflex Revolution 48 

Jeff Johnston Welcome to the revolution. More pistols are now offered red-dot ready from the factory. 

More Center-Fire For The Money 54 

John Zent Led by the stylish new Patriot, Mossberg has a well-rounded selection of center-fire rifles. 


First Fired In Anger? The Thompson 60 

Kenneth L. So, when was the first combat use of the Thompson submachine gun, really? 

Smith-Christmas 

How Scope Adjustments Work 64 

John Barsness Sure you use riflescopes, but do you know how they actually work? 


Safeguarding Our Children, Investing In Our Future 80 

Laurie A. Luebbert The NRA-backed NationaL School Shield program trains its first school security assessors. 



MEMBER PROGRAMS: (800) 672-3888 


Photo by Forrest MacCormack 






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AMERICAN 


m 


RIFLEMAN 


OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 

Wayne R. LaPierre, Executive Vice President 


official journal The Armed Citizen 10 


Special Reports 


Standing Guard 12 

President's Column 14 

Political Report 16 

ILA Report 82 

Regional Report/Member Info & Benefits .. .. 84 
Programs & Services 86 

correspondence The Keefe Report 8 

Readers Write 22 

Favorite Firearms 40 

news & notes Lock, Stock & Barrel 24 

Opening Shot, Random Shots, Product Previews, 

Rapid Fire, On Screen, Books In Brief, Where Can 
I Get ... ? and "American Rifleman Television" 

technical Latest toads 38 

The Gold Standard: .45 ACP 

Questions & Answers 42 

Souvenir Mauser 1914 

Dope Bag 74 

Magnum Research MLR .22 WMR Barracuda Rifle 
Vortex Razor HD Gen II 3-18X 50 mm Riflescope 

American Rifleman Volume 163 Index 90 

I Have This Old Gun 96 

Whitworth Rifle 


THE COVER: Not long ago, massive red-dot or reflex 
sights appeared only on competition 
handguns — not anymore. Nowadays, though, 
red-dots are getting smaller, and handgun 
makers are offering guns that are optics- 
ready right out of the box. One such gun is 
the 9 mm Luger Smith & Wesson M&P Ported 
as made by the S&W Performance Center. It 
is paired here with a Trijicon RMR sight. For 
more on the mini-reflex revolution, turn to 
p. 48. Photo by Forrest MacCormack. Design 
by David J. Labrozzi. 



NRA PUBLICATIONS 

Doug Hamlin 

Executive Director 
Chip Lohman 

Deputy Executive Director 
Marshall J. Flemion 

Director, Integrated Marketing 
Evelyn Q. Kessler 

Fiscal Operations Manager 
Terri A. Wolfe 

Executive Assistant 
Rachel Carr 

Sales & Fiscal Assistant 

KarieThomas 

Firearms Inventory Manager 

EDITORIAL 

John R. Zent 

Editorial Director 

Mark A. Keefe, IV 

Editor In Chief 

Brian C. Sheetz 

Senior Executive Editor 

Ann Y. Smith 

Senior Executive Editor, Digital 

Joseph L. Kurtenbach 
Managing Editor 
Kelly Young 

Associate Editor 
Christopher Olsen 
Assistant Editor 
Maureen A. Denfeld 
Editorial Assistant 
Bmce N. Canfield, Aaron Carter, 

Wiley Clapp, Rick Hacker, 

B. Gil Horman, Jeff Johnston, 

Bryce M.Towsley, Jim Wilson 
Field Editors 

ART 

Harry Lloyd Jaecks 

Creative Director 

Susan K. Kilday 

Art Director 

David J. Labrozzi 

Associate Art Director 

Jessica Kim 

Digital Graphic Designer 

Peter Fountain 

Photography Director 

Forrest MacCormack 

Photographer 
Michael Chisholm 

Associate Photographer 

American Rifleman (ISSN 0003-083X) is 
published monthly by the National Rifle 
Association of America, 11250 Waples Mill 
Road, Fairfax, VA 22030-9400, (703) 267-1000, 
for the benefit of its members. Membership 
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foreign postage add $5 a year in Canada and 
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only, call (877) 672-2000. Copyright 2015, 
the National Rif le Association of America. 

All rights reserved except where expressly 
waived. Periodicals Postage paid at Fairfax, 
VA, and at additional mailing offices. 

POSTMASTER: Please send address 
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TO CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS or to 
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Do not return damaged copies. Change of 
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Printed in the United States of America 





Model: Colt® Government Model® Pistol • Caliber: .45 ACP • Edition Limit: 500 Per Service Branch 


HONORING AMERICA’S DEFENDERS OF FREEDOM 

Since the beginning, the United States of Ameriea has stood for 
freedom and liberty for all our eitizens. Nothing is more eherished than the 
freedoms we share as a nation. To uphold these freedoms, our great eountry 
relies on a strong military. Generations of Amerieans have proudly served in 
our Armed Forees to ensure our freedoms. 

Millions of Amerieans have proudly served Ameriea when duty ealled, 
during times of peaee and during times of war. And many - from the earliest days to World War II, Korea, Vietnam 
and to eurrent day battles in the Gulf Region and Afghanistan - have paid the ultimate saerifiee for the prineiples 
that Ameriea stands for - freedom, liberty, and justiee for all. 

To pay Tribute to the brave warriors who have served our eountry, Ameriea Remembers is proud to offer 
handsome Tributes in honor of those who have served and saerifieed to ensure our freedom; the Saluting Ameriea’s 
Armed Forees Tribute Pistols. For these Tributes, we have seleeted the Colt® Government Model® .45 ealiber pistol, a 
firearm that stood the test of time and was the offieial military sidearm for our eountry ’s Armed Forees for almost 75 
years. No firearm in history ean boast a more impressive reeord of Ameriean military serviee than the elassie Colt .45 
military serviee pistol. Craftsmen eommissioned speeifieally for these Tributes by Ameriea Remembers deeorate eaeh 
Tribute with handsome artwork in stunning 24-karat gold and niekel artwork over a blued steel eanvas. 

There are three separate editions honoring Ameriea’s soldiers, sailors, and airmen - eaeh separate edition is issued 
in a strietly limited edition of 500 pistols per braneh of the Armed Forees. 


The right side features banners reading, “American Freedom Tribute” and, “Freedom is Never Free”, a reminder that 
Americans need to be ever vigilant in protecting our freedoms and there is always a price to pay to protect our cherished 
freedoms. Each Armed Forces Tribute also features artwork unique to the branch honored (Soldiers, Sailors, or Airmen) 
depicting scenes related to the branch. (Sailor Edition shown above.) 

For the veterans of Ameriea’s Armed Forees who earried the Colt .45 Pistol, the elassie military sidearm has 
speeial signifieanee. It was a eonstant eompanion that offered superior stopping power against all enemies. To put it 
simply, the Colt .45 pistol was a lifesaver. The Colt was utterly reliable, virtually indestruetible and awesome in its 
stopping power. In the hands of eourageous Ameriean warriors, it would beeome a military and firearms legend. For 
deeades, wherever Amerieans fought for freedom the Colt .45 was present. 

IIOXOR AMERICA’S SOLDIERS, SAILORS, AM) AIRMEIV WITH THIS EXCLUSIVE OFFER - RESERVE XOW 

Reservations will be aeeepted in the order they are reeeived. You ean mail us your order, or to prioritize your order 
and eonfirm availability, eall us toll-free at 1-800-682-2291. We will arrange delivery of your working Tribute Pistol 
through the lieensed firearms dealer of your ehoiee. As always, if you are not eompletely satisfied, you may return your 
Tribute to us in original, unfired eondition within 30 days for a eomplete and eourteous refund. 

These exelusive Tributes stand as monumental salutes to those who have served our eountry and earried the 
ieonie pistol in defense of freedom as well as all those who eontinue to serve. As a nation, we must never forget the 
eourage and saerifiee of those who served and eontinue to serve today. Seeure your Saluting Ameriea’s Armed Forees 
Tribute Pistol today and keep it forever as a handsome symbol of fine firearms eraftsmanship, Ameriean military history 
and serviee in defense of freedom. 


DISPLAY CASK AVAILABLE; 

An optional luxuriously lined, custom-built, wooden 
display case is available for purchase. 


©AHL, Inc. 

On the left side of each Tribute, prominently displayed 
as the focal point, there is an image of a soldier, sailor, 
or airmen framed with a patriotic banner. Additional 
artwork features a banner reading, “Saluting America’s 
Armed Forces” and “Lest We Forget”. Also featured is 
an outline of the USA framing “Freedom Forever”, a 
reminder that our Armed Forces are always on duty 
protecting our cherished freedoms. Another banner 
reads, “Country Before Self”, a reminder of the daily 
sacrifices our soldiers, sailors, and airmen make on 
behalf of all Americans. 


Please enter my reservation for the “Saluting America’s Armed Forces Tribute Pistol,” selected 
below. Eaeh is a working Colt .45 pistol, at the introduetory priee of $1,995.* My deposit of $195 
per Tribute is enclosed. I wish to pay the balance at the rate of $100 per month, no interest or 
carrying charges. Certificate of Authenticity included. Thirty-day return privilege. 

Edition Requested: □ Soldier □ Sailor □ Airmen *AII orders are subject to acceptance and credit verification 

prior to shipment. Shipping and handling will be added to 

I I Check enclosed for $ . order. Virginia residents please add sales tax. 

□ Charge payment of $ to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ AMEX □ Discover 

No. - - - - Exp 

Display Case 

□ I wish to reserve the optional, luxuriously lined, eustom-made display ease with locking glass 
lid. My payment of $149* is enclosed or add to credit card. 


Name 

Address 

City/State/Zip 

Daytime Telephone No. ( ) 

^ < America Remembers* 

|rjtC 10226 Timber Ridge Drive, Ashland, Virginia 23005 
www.americaremembers.com 

To place your reservation toll-free call 1 - 800 - 682-2291 





NRA PUBLICATIONS 



Photo by Peter Fountain 


TRUNK GUNS 


■ ONLINEH 

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 


Field-Tested Trunk Guns 


PRODUCTION & ADVERTISING SALES OPERATIONS 
Michael J. Sanford 

Production and Advertising Operations Director 

Michelle E. Kuntz 

Production Operations Manager 

James C. Handlon 

Marketing/Advertising Operations Manager 

Debra Oliver! 

Senior Production Coordinator 
Andrea C. Myers 

Production Coordinator 
Samantha Brown 

Senior Advertising Coordinator 
Tiffany Ngu 

Advertising Coordinator 

Membership Inquires: (877) 672-2000 
Eastern Sales Manager 
Tony Morrison 
(860) 767-9801 
Southeast Sales Executive 
Stan Yates 
(850) 619-8148 
Detroit Advertising Sales 
Ken Glowacki 
(703) 267-1300 
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Mike Edison 
(703) 267-1300 

Eastern Direct Sales Executive 
RachelleTrout 
(910) 262-0913 
Western Sales Manager 
Courtney Olson 
(303) 955-2194 
Western Sales Executive 
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(530)401-8607 
Midwest Sales Executive 
Tim Hamill 
(231)360-6434 

Western Direct Sales Executive 
Debbie O'Connell 
(805) 501-9138 

DIGITAL OPERATIONS 


A "trunk gun" is one that can be kept tucked away in a car or boat for plink- 
ing, hunting and, in a pinch, self-defense. Go to americanrifleman.org/trunk 
to see a few good candidates that won't break the bank. 


Defensive Awareness: Understanding The Color Code 

Handgunning and self-defense authority Col. Jeff Cooper developed the Color 
Code to help people understand the mental condition and level of prepared- 
ness necessary to deal with a potential criminal attack. For the Color Code in 
its entirety, go to americanrifleman.org/color. 


Let's Go To The Highlight Reel ... 

Competing in everything from Cowboy Action to 3-Gun, more than 200 profes- 
sional and amateur shooters vied for $250,000 in prizes at the NRA World 
Shooting Championship, presented by Magpul. If you missed the action, catch 

up at americanrifleman.org/world. 



Michael Pedersen 

Digital Operations Manager 

Tom Rickwalder 

Senior Digital Producer 

Steve Dulco 

Digital Producer 

Carolyn Lee 

Digital Advertising Trafficker 

WARNING: All technical data in this publica- 
tion, especially for handloading, reflect 
the limited experience of individuals using 
specific tools, products, equipment and 
components under specific conditions and 
circumstances not necessarily reported in 
the article and over which the National Rifle 
Association (NRA) has no control.The data 
have not otherwise been tested or verified 
by the NRA.The NFtA, its agents, officers and 
employees accept no responsibility for the 
results obtained by persons using such data 
and disclaim all liability for any consequential 
injuries or damages. See asterisked (*). 

* NO ADVERTISED ITEM IS INTENDED FOR 
SALE IN THOSE STATES, OR INTHOSE AR- 
EAS WHERE LOCAL RESTRICTIONS MAY 
LIMIT OR PROHIBITTHE PURCHASE, CAR- 
RYING OR USE OF CERTAIN ITEMS. CHECK 
LOCAL LAWS BEFORE PURCHASING. 
MENTION OF A PRODUCT OR SERVICE IN 
ADVERTISEMENTS ORTEXT DOES NOT 
NECESSARILY MEAN THAT IT HAS BEEN 
TESTED OR APPROVED BYTHE NRA. 

OFFICIAL NRA POSITIONS ARE EX- 
PRESSED ONLY IN STATEMENTS BYLINED 
BY NRA OFFICERS OR IN ARTICLES IDEN- 
TIFIED AS SUCH. 

THE EDITORS ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE 
FOR UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR 
PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Alliance for 

m m Audited Media 


The New Audit Bureau of Circulations 






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THE KEEFE REPORT 


R eflex sights are not new, nor 
are battery-powered red-dot 
sights, but as they have become 
miniaturized and lost their tubes, they 
have also become increasingly practical 
for handguns meant for more than just 
competition. And now, pistol makers 
have created an entirely "optics ready" 
category without the need for custom 
gunsmithing to attach such sights. 
There were a number of challenges — 
including illumination, battery life, 
size and mounting considerations — 
that had to be solved before the "Mini- 
Reflex Revolution" (p. 48) could begin. 

The first of the tubeless, battery- 
powered reflex sights I examined 
caused me to comment, "Hmm, it's 
like a Nydar with batteries." Don't 
know what a Nydar is? Let me take you 
back to the April 1946 issue and the 
words of Edwards Brown, Jr.: "We have 
recently received some letters asking 
us about the Nydar reflector sight ... 
made by the Swain Nelson Company, of 
Glenview, Illinois. At the present time 
the Nydar sight is being made for shot- 
guns only, but the Swain Nelson rep- 
resentatives inform us that they plan 
to produce them for rifles and pistols 
as well. We hope to get a look at these 
two latter developments in the near 
future." But the Nydar, dependent on 
available light, never made it as a prac- 
tical handgun sight. For more on the 
Nydar, and other articles documenting 
the evolution of the reflex sight, go to 
americanrifleman.org/reddot. 

The first battery-powered dot 
sight (they weren't red yet) tested in 
these pages was the Oxford Lightning 
Illuminated Gunsight in the January 
1969 issue (above), and it was, 
charitably, a monstrosity. The size 
of a riflescope with the addition of a 
bolted on penlight-like protuberance 
(it took "AA penlight batteries"), to 
get it on a pistol it had to be mounted 
using scope rings and a Bushnell 
M1911 grip replacement mount that 
made it look like something Han Solo 
would use in a Mos Eisley cantina. 
Despite its ungainliness, here is what 
the staff had to say: "On the field 
of vision 'floats' the spot of light, 
showing with clear contrast against 
the target. The sighting spot is visible 



in light so poor that conventional 
metallic sights cannot be defined. ... 
Consequently, the problem of trying 
to see in clear focus both a front sight 
and a rear sight as well as the target, 
as with iron sights, is not present. 

This is a commendable and unusual 
approach to overcoming a sighting 
hindrance that is particularly vexa- 
tious to those over 30 years of age." 

We tested our first Aimpoint in May 
1978 — powered by a red LED — that 
soon became the dominant optical sight 
for NRA Bullseye and Action Pistol. But 
it was still a large unit, and mounting 
took the form of rails and cantilevers. 

The first "mini" red dot I used 
was the British-made EPC tested in 
1992. The little unit, with its claus- 
trophobic field of view, could run 18 
whole hours on a couple of hearing 
aid batteries. The Electro Prismatic 
Collimators was small, but the problem 
of how to mount it still had not been 
solved. The caption is classic: "The EPC 
Subminiature Sight solves the auto- 
loader mounting problem; it simply 
attaches to the slide with glue." There 
were different mounting plates that 
more or less conformed to the slide 
surfaces of popular handguns. "[0]ne 
of these was selected by trial and error 
and bonded to a cleaned surface of the 
gun with a two-part adhesive used in 
the aerospace industry. The sight itself 
is glued to the mount strip." 

More than two decades later, the 
gun to which we glued the EPC, a 
Stainless Colt Commander in our refer- 
ence collection, still bears the stains 
of "aerospace industry adhesive." I 
don't know what it was but am grate- 
ful I did not get it on my skin. 

Sincerely, 


IM 


8 


December 2015 


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Official journal 

The Armed Citizen® 

S core two for one armed citizen. A Dayton, Ohio, woman who has been targeted by 
criminals multiple times has used a gun to protect herself twice. The latest incident 
occurred in September, when the 46-year-old fatally shot a man who broke into her 
home in the wee hours of the morning. At about 3 a.m. one day, she called 91 1 to report that 
someone had tried breaking in through a first-floor window. Security bars there kept him out; 
however, the man then climbed to the second story and broke through another window. The 
woman hid in the bathroom and shot the intruder when he came in after her. The wounded 
man jumped from the second story and fled, but he was found dead nearby. The same home- 
owner wounded a home invader in 2013. An investigation of the latest case is ongoing. 
{Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, 9/1 0/1 5) 



L uck ran out for a thief who was 
involved in a spree of car burglaries 
in Fayetteville, Ark. One would-be 
victim held the suspect at gunpoint 
after the armed citizen caught the bad 
guy in the act of breaking into his car. 
The suspect later confessed to multiple 
vehicle break-ins in the area. (KNWA, 
Fayetteville, Ark., 9/7/1 5) 


P ierre Phurcien has carried con- 
cealed for the past eight years. 
Recently, that practice came in 
handy when a would-be thief entered 
the Lehigh Acres, Fla., grocery store 
Phurcien owns. "I saw a guy with a mask, 
and I was thinking it was a kid playing," 
Phurcien told media afterward. Pretty 
soon, he found out it was no game. "He 
came right here, and he pulled a gun 
and said, 'Give me the money/" Phurcien 
said. "Then I pulled my gun, and ... he 
starts to run away." Lee County depu- 
ties were still looking for the suspect. 
(NBC2, Fort Myers, Fla., 9/14/15) 


T wo Nashville, Tenn., football fans 
were bidding each other farewell 
outside the home where they had 
just watched the Titans game on TV. 

As they were talking, a Jeep Cherokee 
pulled up in front of the house. One man 
got out of the Jeep, pointed a gun at the 
victims and demanded their valuables. 
An accomplice collected the goods 
and drove off in the Jeep. The gunman, 
meanwhile, had grabbed the car keys 
from one of the victims and was getting 
into that car to flee. One of the victims 


10 


then pulled his own gun and told the 
robber to stop. The bad guy opened 
fire, but the victim got off a fatal shot in 
self-defense. Police are still looking for 
the man who drove off in the Jeep and 
any other passengers. {The Tennessean, 
Nashville, Tenn., 8/24/1 5) 


uick thinking by a KwickShop 
clerk prevented a robbery. A 
masked man with a gun entered 
the convenience store in Wauconda, III., 
and demanded money from the clerk 
and a customer. The employee, though, 
retrieved a gun that was in the store 
for defensive purposes and shot the in- 
truder multiple times. Although authori- 
ties took the suspect to a medical center 
for treatment, the wounds proved to be 
fatal. The robber was later identified as 
a parolee who had several robbery and 
drug convictions in his past. {Chicago 
Sun-Tinnes, Chicago, III., 8/25/15) 


Hartford, Conn., man with a 
licensed handgun got the better 
of two home invasion suspects. 
The homeowner was returning to his 
house late one night. As he walked to 
the door, he was approached by two 


strangers, one of whom had a gun. 

The bad guys forced the man to open 
the door. After all three got inside, a 
struggle ensued, according to police 
Sgt. Reginald Early. During the scuffle, 
the homeowner grabbed his firearm 
from where it was stored and shot both 
suspects. One was taken by ambulance 
to a nearby hospital; the other arrived 
at the medical facility on his own. Police 
said the resident won't be charged as he 
was protecting himself and his family. 
{Hartford Courant, Hartford, Conn., 9/6/1 5) 


W hen Ontario, Calif., police 
responded to a call about a 
man with a gun, they were 
surprised to find an elderly homeowner 
who was holding a suspect at gunpoint. 
The man and his wife had been awak- 
ened one night by the sound of some- 
one trying to break into their home. The 
homeowner grabbed his shotgun and 
chased the would-be burglar across the 
street. When the bad guy turned and 
threatened him, the older man fired a 
shot, prompting someone to call 91 1 . 

The suspect was held at gunpoint until 
police arrived. {Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, 
Ontario, Calif., 9/1/15) 




If you have a firsthand "Armed Citizen" experience, 
call NRA-ILA PR/Communications at (703) 267-1193. 

Studies indicate that firearms are used more than 2 million times a year for personal protection, 
and that the presence of a firearm, without a shot being fired, prevents crime in many instances. 
Shooting usually can be justified only where crime constitutes an immediate, imminent threat 
to life, limb, or, in some cases, property. Anyone is free to quote or reproduce these accounts. 
Send clippings via e-mail to armedcitizen(g)nrahq.org, or by mail to "The Armed Citizen," 1 1 250 
Waples Mill Road, Fairfax, VA 22030-9400. For bonus features, visit "The Armed Citizen Blog"at 
americanrifleman.org. View this column online at nrapublications.org. 


December 2015 American rifleman 





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Official journal 

standing guard 

By Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President 

Obama, Hillary Embrace Gun Confiscation 


P resident Barack Obama once 

again embraced massive universal 
gun confiscation from innocent 
Americans as his answer to the isolated 
murderous acts of deranged mass 
killers. That call for gun confiscation 
was echoed by presidential candidate 
Hillary Clinton who said it is "worth con- 
sidering"a national program modeled 
on Australia's seizure of firearms from 
licensed gun-owners. 

Their demand that law-abiding 
Americans be disarmed of their property 
and their individual liberty came im- 
mediately following the unspeakable act 
of a copy-cat loser who murdered nine 
students at Umpqua Community College 
in Roseburg, Ore., on Oct. 1 , 201 5. The 
murderer asked his victims if they were 
Christians, then killed them. 


The killer had one thing in common 
with the last killer and the ones before 
him: he admired other mass-murderers 
and craved public attention. 

Yet in Obama's and Clinton's upside- 
down world, the blame lies with the 
innocent — you and me. 

In an unseemly "politicized" reaction 
to this horrendous crime, Obama repeat- 
ed his big-lie mantra, saying: "The United 
States of America is the one advanced 
nation on Earth in which we do not have 
sufficient common-sense gun-safety 
laws — even in the face of repeated mass 
killings. ..." 

"We know that other countries, in re- 
sponse to one mass shooting, have been 
able to craft laws that almost eliminate 
mass shootings. Friends of ours, allies of 


ours — Great Britain, Australia, countries 
like ours. So we know there are ways to 
prevent it," he said. 

In parroting this line, the media 
outlets leave out the details of what 
happened in those once-free nations: 
the massive taking and destruction of 
firearms from law-abiding gun owners 
by government. Ini 996-97, after a mass 
murder in Australia, licensed gun owners 
were forced to give up their registered 
pump-action and semi-automatic 
shotguns and semi-automatic rifles for 
government destruction. Every model 
of pump-action and semi-automatic 
shotgun. Every model of semi- 
automatic rifle. Seized. Chopped. 
Burned and melted. 

For what? To assuage an insane 
notion of collective guilt to impose a 


national gun ban. The same agenda 
that Obama, Vice President Joe Biden 
and Hillary Clinton all espouse. The one 
that begins with "universal" background 
checks — which equals registration of 
guns and owners — and ultimately ends 
with gutting the Second Amendment. 

Every time the Obama-Clinton 
axis lauds Australia's theft of freedom 
from its law-abiding citizens, you must 
remind others of the defining comment 
from George's Soros' protege, Rebecca 
Peters, who claimed credit for the Aus- 
tralian tyranny: 

"The National Firearms Agreement 
recognized the inherent inappropriate- 
ness of these highly dangerous weap- 
ons and took away nearly 700,000 of 
them to be melted down into soup cans 



and bus-stop benches." 

That "buyback" of all long guns was 
simply the first round of confiscations, 
falsely heralded as the means to end 
violence. In 2000, a second wave of 
confiscations took place with govern- 
ment seizing many models of registered 
handguns from licensed owners in the 
wake of another mass murder — and it 
isn't over yet. 

As the Melbourne Weekly Times 
reported in June 201 5, "Government 
authorities are moving quickly to restrict 
the sale of all lever-action firearms in 
Australia ... which could lead to a buy- 
back of the thousands of lever-actions 
already owned by Australian shooters." 

It will never end until the last firearm is 
removed from private hands. 

In a Jan. 1 6, 201 3, op-ed piece 
in The New York Times, titled "I Went 
After Guns, Obama Can Too," former 
Australian Prime Minister John Howard 
ultimately defined the insanity of his 
government's action: 

"Penalizing decent, law-abiding citi- 
zens because of the criminal behavior of 
others seemed unfair, ... yet I felt there 
was no alternative." 

Howard reckoned that the guns the 
government took from those "decent, 
law-abiding citizens" and destroyed 
would be "the equivalent of 40 million 
guns in the United States." 

This is Obama's demand for an 
Australian model on our soil. 

The president's end game has been 
embraced as mainstream in the media. 
Take the Oct. 4, 201 5 Washington Post 
editorial — headlined "A gun-free soci- 
ety" — in which the paper's editorial page 
editor, Fred Hiatt, declared: "Wouldn't it 
make sense to learn from other devel- 
oped nations, which believe that only 
the military and law enforcers, when 
necessary, should be armed " 

Hiatt seeks a "cultural shift," saying. 



The Democratic candidates would aiter 
the makeup of the Supreme Court with 
the goai of overturning iandmark deci- 
sions on the Second Amendment. 


^ Like us on Facebook at the National Rifle Association. View this column online at nrapublications.org. 


12 


December 2015 



AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


"Australia was a pioneer nation, too, 
and gave up its guns. Societies change, 
populations evolve." 

Then he levels this zinger, "The 
Supreme Court, which has misread 
the Second Amendment in its recent 
decisions, would have to revisit the issue. 
The court has corrected itself before, and 
if public opinion shifts it could correct 
itself again. If it did not, the Constitution 
would have to be amended." 

That last gem is the key to this out- 
in-the-open demand for the end of 
American liberty. Presidential Demo- 
cratic front-runner Hillary Clinton is ex- 
plicit, saying, "We've got to go after this. 
And here again, the Supreme Court 
is wrong on the Second Amendment. 
And I am going to make that case every 
chance I get." 

But Hillary is not alone. Virtually all 
of the candidates for the Democratic 
presidential nomination are in lockstep 
with Hillary and Obama. 

They would alter the makeup of 
the U.S. Supreme Court with the goal 
of overturning the landmark decisions 
that have recognized the sanctity of the 
Second Amendment in guaranteeing our 
right to keep and bear arms. 

None of the coy and disingenuous 
words from billionaire Michael Bloomberg 
or the Brady Campaign — words like "gun 
safety," o r "res po n s i b I e g u n -o wn ers h i p," 
or "common-sense regulations" — should 
fool free Americans about the gun ban- 
ners' intentions: ultimate confiscation of 
guns, as in Australia. 

The Washington Post's Hiatt said it all: 

"Maybe it's time to start using the 
words that the NRA has turned into 
unmentionables. 

"Prohibition. 

"Mass buyback. 

"A gun-free society. 

"Let's say that one again: A gun-free 
society," he wrote. 

Those words are the call to action 
for you, me and the nation's 1 00 million 
decent, law-abiding gun owners in the 
coming elections. 

As NRA members, we are in the 
vanguard in this full-blown fight to 
preserve freedom. We must organize as 
never before and stand united in vot- 
ing to save the Second Amendment in 
November 201 6. 




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Official journal 


president's column 

By Allan D. Cors, President 

Latest Anti-Gunner Tactic: Blame 
Law-abiding Gun Owners in Theft 

" . . [MJost illegal guns are simply legal guns that have been stolen or sold second- 
hand. Since the supply source for the illegal market is legal owners, imposing greater 
accountability on legal owners will cut down the flow to the illegal market" 

— Rebecca Peters 


T hat definition of gun control — 
from the woman who fanned the 
fires for the 1 996 confiscation and 
destruction of 700,000 registered shot- 
guns and rifles from law-abiding licensed 
owners in Australia — is now creeping 
into the Newspeak of journalists in our 
nation under the notion of "stolen guns" 
A ranting blogger who deserves to 
remain anonymous nailed it: "The legal, 
responsible gun owner is mainly respon- 
sible for arming up the gangs of America" 
As crazy as this sounds, this new"big lie" is 
gaining traction in the mainstream media. 
"Stolen guns" is becoming a guilt trip ap- 
plied to peaceable gun owners. 

Numerous news stories tell the tale: 

A Chattanooga Times Free Press 
piece — "ATF study: Criminals use stolen 
guns" — claims, "The majority of guns 
used by inner-city gang members in 
Chattanooga come from burglaries and 
car break-ins in surrounding counties." 

Another — "Spike in firearm thefts 
putting guns in hands of criminals" — 
from KOMO-TV news in Seattle, reported 
that "more guns than ever are being sto- 
len from homes, business and vehicles, 
putting firearms directly in the hands of 
criminals. And, law-enforcement officials 
say it's up to gun owners to stop that." 


NRA OFFICERS 

Allan D. Cors, president 

Pete R. Brownell, first vice president 

Richard Childress, second vice president 

Wayne La Pierre, executive vice president 

John Frazer, secretary 

Wilson H. Phillips Jr., treasurer 

R. Kyle Weaver, executive director, 

GENERAL OPERATIONS 

Christopher W. Cox, executive director, 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 


An Aug. 26, 201 5, story from Georgia's 
WTOC-TV — "90 percent of violent crimes 
in Savannah involve stolen guns" — pro- 
claims, "Police say the single greatest 
contributor to violent crime in Savannah 
includes everyone that owns a gun. ... 
[W]hen one of those guns gets stolen, 
chances are it will be used to commit a 
violent crime somewhere in the city." 

Perhaps the most cogent example 
of this new theme was "Legal guns fuel 
criminal gunfire," published in Septem- 
ber in the Raleigh, N.C, News & Observer. 

Writer Ned Barnett begins, "Guns 
have blazed a bloody path through the 

news in recent weeks 

"For many gun rights supporters the 

answer to such mayhem is more guns 

"Their line is that if guns are outlawed 
only outlaws will have guns. But an 
Associated Press story that ran the day 
before the shooting on live TV raised a 
starkly different point. It said most guns 
used in crimes are stolen, but not from 
gun shops or pawn shops. They're stolen 
from homes and cars." 

Barnett blustered, "The growing num- 
ber of law-abiding Americans who feel 
compelled to arm themselves is feeding 
the flow to criminals. Perhaps the phrase 
should be revised: 'If guns are outlawed, 
outlaws would have a harder time find- 
ing and affording guns.'" 

He cites as proof, "In Chicago, where 
gun violence is epidemic, authorities this 
year have seized close to 4,700 guns — 
nearly all of them stolen." 

The only pro-gun-rights source 
quoted in his story says the blame lies 
not with victims of theft, but with the 
people who break into cars and then are 
put back on the street. 

Barnett's retort is jaw-dropping: 



"Long prison sentences for breaking 
into a car would be expensive and unfair, 
especially because there's no serious 
penalty for someone who leaves their 
Glock in the glove compartment and it 
gets into a criminal's hands." 

Then he lays down another head- 
spinner, "The truth is more people legally 
arming themselves doesn't make us safer. 
It just provides more guns for criminals." 

Claiming that "Gun owners are aware 
that the legal purchase of guns is the 
headwaters in the river of guns that 
flows to criminals," Barnett proposes 
"having gun owners be held responsible 
for their guns." 

There is that gun-ban buzz word 
again, "responsibility." Cr/m/na/s — not 
the victims — are responsible for crime. 

All of this media focus on "stolen guns" 
is part of a big push for state and federal 
provisions making it a criminal act to fail to 
report theft or loss of a firearm. There are 
now eight states that have made failure 
to report a gun theft a crime. Along with 
this insanity, the state of California recently 
"reformed"its criminal statutes to reduce 
theft of a firearm to a misdemeanor. 

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y), in 
line to lead his party in the Senate, has 
introduced legislation making failure to 
report a lost or stolen gun within 24 hours 
a federal felony punishable by five years in 
a federal prison. This from someone who 
ignores the truth and lies about federal 
laws dealing with armed criminals. 

Schumer is one of the prime reasons 
that the coming 201 6 elections are criti- 
cal. If he ever becomes Senate majority 
leader, the gun-ban crowd's biggest 
champion will be in the ultimate seat of 
power. If that happens, if we lose our 
Second Amendment majority, gun 
owners will pay a heavy price. 


For news about your NRA, visit: nra.organdnranews.com • Viewthiscolumnonlineatnrapublications.org 


December 2015 



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Official journal 


political report 

By Chris W. Cox, NRA-ILA Executive Director 


Using Victims to Advance the Anti-Gun Agenda 



A nti-gun groups and politicians 
have long used tragedies to try 
to advance their agenda. When a 
tragic event occurs, we can always count 
on them to hold press conferences and 
put forth so-called "solutions" — which 
are no more than their gun control wish 
list — often before the facts are even 
known. Even worse, the "solutions" 
that they put forward would not have 
stopped or even been a deterrent to the 
crime in question. 


Your membership dues 
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The shocking murders of two Virginia 
journalists while they were conducting 
a live television interview displayed this 
callous strategy. Within hours of the 
crime, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe de- 
manded what he called "common-sense 
gun legislation/'specifically calling for 
"universal" background checks. But when 
asked by the press if the murderer had 
passed a background check, McAuliffe 
said he didn't know. 

In fact, at the time of McAuliffe's 


statement, the identity of the perpetra- 
tor was still unknown, as was his motive. 
The type of gun used and the shooter's 
method of acquiring it were also un- 
known — it would take more than a day 
for that information to come out. 

And McAuliffe wasn't alone. 

Barack Obama's White House and 
Hillary Clinton weighed in the same day 
with similar calls for gun control, also 
before knowing the facts involved. 

McAuliffe, Clinton and Obama chose 
to exploit a violent tragedy to push their 
political agenda, plain and simple. And 
they did it with the willing assistance of 
the anti-gun media, which refused to call 
them on it because that agenda fits their 
shared gun control narrative. 

The next day, the facts came to light. 
The deranged individual bought his gun 
legally, months before he used it, through 
a federally licensed dealer. He passed a 
background check because he had no 
prior criminal record, nor had he been 
adjudicated mentally ill or committed to 
a mental institution. The fact is that no 
piece of legislation pushed by gun control 
advocates would have stopped him from 
committing this brutal crime. 

McAuliffe knows this, as does Clinton. 
The White House even admitted — later — 
that gun control legislation, including 
so-called "universal" background checks, 
would not have stopped this. But to 
them, that's beside the point. They will 
use any tragedy as an excuse to push 
their agenda — regardless of the facts 
involved. What's most egregious about it 
is that by exploiting tragedy to push gun 
control, they deflect the conversation 
away from real solutions that would solve 
our nation's pressing problems — like fix- 
ing our broken mental health system. 

And it's not just politicians who 
use this craven strategy. Anti-gun 
groups, such as Michael Bloomberg's 


Everytown for Gun Safety, use the tactic 
to advance their anti-gun agenda and 
even raise money. Immediately after a 
tragedy, they push emotional appeals to 
promote their cause. Unfortunately, they 
offer no real solutions to the problems of 
violence in our communities — ^just the 
same old rhetoric, devoid of common 
sense, logic or even the smallest connec- 
tion to reality. 

The list of mass shooters who passed 
background checks includes the 
most recent tragedies in Roanoke, Va., 
Lafayette, La., Chattanooga, Tenn., and 
Charleston, S.C. Although our govern- 
ment has spent more than $1 billion on 
the national background check system 
over the past two decades, it still lacks 
the criminal and mental health records 
on which it's supposed to rely. 

Most people rightly believe that it's 
inappropriate to use a tragedy to push 
a political agenda moments after a 
tragedy occurs. But that doesn't stop, 
or even slow down, proponents of gun 
control. As a matter of fact, that exact 
strategy was laid out in their 201 2 guide 
"Preventing 'Gun Violence'Through Effec- 
tive Messaging." 

In that guide, anti-gun advocates are 
directed to immediately hit television, 
Twitter, Facebookand other social media 
outlets with emotional pleas for more 
gun control as soon as tragedy strikes. 
Facts don't matter; the only thing that 
matters is to advance their agenda. 

If anti-gun politicians were really 
interested in solving problems, instead 
of using tragedies to push a political 
agenda, they would work to solve under- 
lying issues. Of course, that would require 
them to admit that the "solutions"they 
prescribe are not solutions at all. 

A/, 


NRA-ILA: (800) 392-8683 • NRA-ILA website: nraila.org • View this column online at nrapublications.org 


December 2015 



AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


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December 2015 






By Chris W. Cox 

NRA-ILA 
Executive Director 



State of Play 

While the Presidential Primary Grabs 
Headlines, Hard Work Goes on in the 
States as Bloomberg Continues to 
Flex his Financial Muscle 

T he presidential election cycle keeps getting longer and more expensive. 

Nearly a year before Americans will finally cast their ballots, candidates 
already have come and gone, untold millions of dollars have been spent, 
and those in a crowded field of primary contenders are jockeying for media atten- 
tion and name recognition. 

On the Democratic side, the long-anticipated coronation of Hillary Clinton no 
longer seems so certain, as the FBI investigates whether her"unorthodox"email 
practices as secretary of state might have compromised sensitive national security 
information. Meanwhile, her declining poll numbers on honesty and trustworthi- 
ness have been worrying Democratic insiders. According to Quinnipiac University 
poll results released in August, '"Liar' is the first word that comes to mind . . . when 
voters think of Clinton." 

The Republican field remains crowded, with a diverse group fighting for the 
nomination. How long it will take for a clear leader to materialize is unknown. 

What is at stake, however, is the very future of our nation. 

When the final challengers from both parties emerge, we will provide all the 
information you need to make the right choices to ensure the continued strength 
of the Second Amendment. Stay tuned. 

In the meantime, an anti-gun billionaire continues to cast an ominous shadow 
over American politics. Michael Bloomberg needs no introduction in these pages. 

Yet the degree to which he seeks to use his influence to undermine your rights 
cannot be overstated. Fellow dictatorial-minded moguls are urging him to run for 
president. Whether or not that happens, Bloomberg will be as involved in the po- 
litical scene as any candidate. He has pledged his fortune to pursuing gun control, 
and in the motto of one of his many front groups, he will do "whatever it takes." 

When you don't have real grassroots support, money is what it takes in politics, 
and that alone ensures Bloomberg's ability to attempt to exert his will. 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 



December 2015 


19 ► 


Photo by Anthony Behar/Sipa USA/AP Images 


ILA STORY 


Recently, I discussed how gun control proponents began 
retooling their legislative game plan in the wake of the stinging 
defeat Congress handed to Barack Obama's 201 3 gun control 
agenda (see "The 'Security of a Free State'? Not If Bloomberg 
Has His Way" in the April 2015 issue of this magazine). As I 
mentioned in that article, they are looking to change the map 
one state at a time, hoping they will eventually achieve a tip- 
ping point that will allow them to pursue their ambitions on 
the federal level. 

Even if you feel insulated in a pro-gun state for now, don't count 
on the status quo lasting forever. It takes work — difficult, unglam- 
orous, little-noticed work — day in and day out 
at the state level to maintain our nation's heri- 
tage of freedom, and it takes work to enact the 
"fundamental transformation" the president 
has promised his followers. We at the NRA have 
known this for a long time. Now the opposition 
is getting wise. Count on them to take the bat- 
tle to the states and seize the offensive. While 
media outlets remain distracted by the ongo- 
ing spectacle of the extended primary season, 
don't take your eyes off the legislative contests 
that are happening closer to home. 

Not only is Bloomberg becoming smarter 
about arraying his forces, but his troops are 
showing more sophistication in marketing their 
prohibitionist agenda to the public. No longer 
do they speak of pursuing "gun control." In- 
stead, they use the rhetoric of preventing "gun 
violence" (and violence is always attributed to 
the guns, never to the criminals who wield 
them) or what"responsible"gun ownership means. Besides us- 
ing their mouthpieces in academia and the media, they exploit 
grieving survivors of violent crime, and they use them to ward off 
any criticism of their agenda or any level-headed discussion of 
the issues. Their objective is to obscure the issues. In case after case, 
none of the "solutions" presented would have made any difference. 

Those "solutions," moreover, are not the gun control challenges 
of years past. Proposals to ban handguns are, for the most part, 
long gone, their fate sealed by the Supreme Court's historic 
/-/e//er decision in 2008. Rather than push for gun bans, blatant 
registration schemes or confiscation programs, the gun control 
advocates of today are willing to settle for incremental victories. 

But make no mistake, this is all part of a larger plan. Each 
measure that gets passed reinforces the false perception that 
guns cause violence and that more controls are needed on the 
law-abiding to rein in the lawless. What you and I call freedom, 
they refer to as loopholes. The burdens they would heap on 
lawful gun ownership are portrayed as "common sense" or 
"responsible" measures to "keep guns out of the wrong hands." 

A few examples make the point. Bloomberg's gun control 
mothership — Everytown for Gun Safety — claims on its web- 
site,"Requiring a criminal background check for all gun sales 
is the single most effective policy for keeping guns out of the 
hands of dangerous people and saving lives." Of course, they 
know that almost all of the perpetrators of the high-profile 
crimes they use to promote their policies successfully passed 
a background check. They also know that the more common 
types of thugs who have long records and roam the streets 


with guns don't go through background checks to get them 
and never will. 

But so-called "universal" background checks often poll well, 
because most respondents don't understand the issue. And, 
more to the point for Everytown, a truly universal background 
check system would set the stage for licensing and universal 
registration. It doesn't make sense to require background checks 
for private sales unless the authorities know who had the gun in 
the first place, so the lack of a registry will become just one more 
"loophole" that needs to be closed. 

Another issue that's frequently invoked by gun control advo- 
cates is keeping guns away from domestic 
abusers. Federal law, of course, already 
prohibits persons convicted of domestic 
violence misdemeanors or who are the sub- 
ject of a domestic violence restraining order 
from possessing or receiving a firearm. But 
that's not enough, Bloomberg's troops say. 
Don't wait for a hearing, they say. Don't limit 
the misdemeanors to violent offenses. Don't 
limit the relationships that are considered 
"domestic." And for crying out loud, they 
insist, seize the guns right away. Make the 
"abusers" disprove the allegations against 
them if they want their firearms returned. 

Meanwhile, while they're blaming 
the gun, what is the system doing about 
perpetrators of actual abuse? Are they be- 
ing charged with, much less convicted of, 
felonies? Are they subject to detention so 
they don't violate protective orders? 

Also in this category are so-called "safe storage" laws. Who, 
after all, could argue with safe gun storage? No one. That is why 
laws aren't needed to ensure that it remains the nearly univer- 
sal practice of responsible gun owners (who, of course, are the 
only targets of such laws). The people I know who own guns 
are good citizens, love their families and want to protect their 
investments in firearms. They don't need the threat of punish- 
ment to secure their guns appropriately when not being used. 

But the point isn't safe storage. It's making the innocent 
gun owner responsible when a criminal wrongly uses a gun. It's 
perpetuating the premise that the gun in your home poses a 
threat to your neighbors, or their kids, even though you don't. 
It's making prospective gun owners weigh the potential for 
ruinous liability against the need to protect their families. In 
short, it's the usual tactic of making the law-abiding owner of 
the gun responsible for the wrongful acts of another. 

These sorts of concepts can gain traction even in gun- 
friendly states. But the result is the same as with any sort of gun 
control. Bit by bit, gun owners are marginalized. Step by step, 
your rights disappear. 

The news isn't all bad, of course. As always, we'll be hard at 
work pursuing our pro-gun agenda in the states: streamlin- 
ing concealed-carry laws; expanding the scope of permits; 
strengthening your right to self-defense. While America is 
transfixed by the drama and theater of the early political pri- 
mary season, battles for the Second Amendment will be joined 
in the states. We'll be doing our part. And with your continued 
support, we will win.^ 


Not only is 
Bloomberg 
becoming smarter 
about arraying 
his forces, but 
his troops are 
showing more 
sophistication in 
marketing their 
prohibitionist 
agenda. 


December 2015 



AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


20 



RING o/ FREEDOM 

Freedom's Future 

By Wilson H. Phillips Jr., NRATreasurer 


No Need to Change Your Will Unless... 


M aking arrangements for the 
long-term management and 
distribution of your assets 
through a will, trust or other plan is a 
considerate way to provide for the future 
financial well-being of your loved ones 
and the causes you cherish. 

As your circumstances change, it is 
important to keep your will and other 
plans up-to-date to reflect your cur- 
rent needs and wishes. Some common 
changes that may require you to update 
your plans are: 

Your Family 

Births, deaths, marriages and other 
changes in family are among the most 
common reasons for making revisions to 
wills, trusts and other plans. 

Your Financial Circumstances 

Past plans may no longer be 
appropriate or applicable due to 
changes in the value of your assets, 
any income they produce or other 
circumstances. 

Your Gun Collection 

You may have added to your gun 
collection and would like to distribute your 
most prized firearms to different heirs. 


Your Executor 

The person you originally named to 
settle your affairs may no longer be able 
to serve. If this is the case, you will want 
to name an alternate, otherwise, a court 
may name someone you neither know 
nor trust. 

You Move 

Your plans may have been drafted 
under the laws of your former state of 
residence. It is important to have them 
reviewed to make sure they are valid 
under the laws of the state of your 
current residence. 

Your Charitable Interests 

Just as other priorities may shift over 
time, your charitable interests may also 
change. After first providing for family 
and other loved ones, you may want to 
give to one or more charitable interests 
through your will or other estate plans. 

Now is a good time of year to talk 
with family and friends who are named in 
your estate plans. Share with them what 
you plan to do and educate them about 
where you keep important documents, 
how to contact your advisers, and what 
they need to do in case of your passing. 



If you choose to leave a gift to the 
National Rifle Association, or any of 
its affiliated charities, share with your 
family why this cause is important to you 
and how to get in touch with the NRA 
Planned Giving offices. After you pass, 
our staff will work with your executor to 
ensure the gifting process goes smoothly. 

Remember to consult with your 
advisers if you believe changes are in 
order. They will help make sure your 
entire will, trust or other plan is written 
to meet your wishes. NRA staff members 
can locate and provide the names of 
local attorneys who can assist in writing 
your estate plans. 


To request your complimentary 
guide, please call the NRA's 
Planned Giving Department at 
(877) NRA-GIVE [(877) 672-4483] 
or email 

plannedgiving@nrahq.org. 
You can also download the guide 
directly from our website at 
nraplannedgiving.org 


Creating a 

Constitutioratty 
Centered Will 


Creating Your Legacy 



Each individual or family situation is 
unique, and this is particularly true 
when planning a gift to the National 
Rifle Association (NRA). One of the 
most popular ways to give is through 
a provision in one's estate plan. 

The next time you sit down to 
update your will, think about in- 
cluding the NRA. After first provid- 


ing for the financial well-being of your family 
and loved ones, I urge you to join me in 
taking a step that can be a very special way 
to extend important freedoms to future 
generations. 

Contact the NRA's Planned Giving team for 
more information. 

( 877 ) 672-4483 

nragive.com plannedgiving(^nrahq.org 


Correspondence I readers write 



Real Limitations 

Craig Boddington's story — "How To Shoot Big Guns: 'A 
Man's Got To Know His Limitations'" (October 2105, p. 76) — 
on shooting heavy-recoiling rifles was one of the best pieces 
I've read in a long time. As usual, his advice is practical, real-world stuff you can 
use because it was gained from his own hard-won experience. 

In my youth I, too, thought fear of recoil was for sissies and loved to shoot 
anything someone handed me. That was fine up into my 50s or so, but then 
I acquired a Steyr Scout rifle in .376 Steyr that weighed a mere 6 lbs., 8 ozs. 

I found out then exactly what Craig meant about a man "learning his limita- 
tions." That rifle got sold within a year. 

Craig's writing style is impeccable. He is clear, concise, funny and smart as a 
whip. Always a treat to see his byline appear. Thanks for a great article. 

Jim Murphy, Massachusetts 

In Country, 1 969 

I thoroughly enjoyed "In Country: Small Arms Of 
The Vietnam War" (October 2015, p. 62) by Capt. Dale 
Dye with my favorite photo being the G.I. with the "Ma 
Deuce" on the Jeep. Not readily apparent in this 1969 
photo of me in the Mekong Delta is the "Grease Gun" 
in my left hand. That firearm was well-covered in your 
magazine a number of years ago (January 2000, p. 26), 
and mine was flawless — unlike the rifle in my right hand. 

Thankful to be home 45 years. 

Steve "Preacherman" Anderson, New York 

OnTheDMZ 

Captain Dye's article on Vietnam small arms was sincerely 
appreciated by those of us of the era. A small correc- 
tion, though, is that the "Patrol Near the DMZ" (p. 64) 
appears armed not with a Remington Model 10, but with 
a Winchester Model 12. As an aside, I would encourage 
all members to open their mail from NRA. I did not on an 
occasion, and as a consequence stopped receiving American 
Rifleman. That was because, even as a Life member, since I 
did not reply, I was considered an inactive member. 

Glen Warren, Washington 

Better Armed On The Issue 

Thank you for Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre's informative article 
"Existing Laws — If They Were All Applied — Could Put Gunrunners Away For A 
Long Time" (October 2015, p. 12). By listing each statute, Wayne makes it very 
clear that there is no "gun show loophole." It is each individual buyer or seller 
who is bound by these statutes, whether or not the gun is purchased at a deal- 
ership or a NICS background is performed. 

I am now better armed to discuss the matter with some of my more liberal 
friends and relatives. The article is much-appreciated. 

Frank Engle, Arizona 





"Readers Write" affords members an opportunity to comment on material published in 
American Rifleman. Single-topic letters are preferred and may be edited for brevity. Send letters to: 
Readers Write, NRA Publications, 11250 Waples Mill Road, Fairfax, VA 22030-9400 or e-mail us at 
publications@nrahq.org. 


December 2015 



AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 






imovative, Jeatufe^p^cHed pfoducts like 
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T he 2015 MidwayUSA & NRA Bianchi Cup saw Doug 
Koenig return to the top position for a historic 16th 
championship. The 37th Bianchi Cup competition 
was held May 21-24 at the Green Valley Rifle & Pistol 
Club in Hallsville, Mo., and nearly 300 competitors from 
nine different countries shot the challenging courses of 
fire. With a perfect score of 1920-180X, Koenig secured 
the High Overall and High Open titles. Full results are 
available from Shooting Sports USA, NRA's competitive 
shooting journal, at ssusa.org. 

Shown here shooting his open class, .38 Super, Smith 
8< Wesson M1911 with a Leupold DeltaPoint reflex sight, 
Koenig has been utilizing optical sighting systems on 
his competition guns for decades. The advantages of 
optics-enhanced handguns are now well-known and 
well-documented, and the tide seems to be coming in 
for optics-ready pistols, not just for competition, but 
for hunting, duty use and personal protection, as well. 
For more regarding optics-ready handguns, turn to Field 
Editor Jeff Johnston's article "Optics Ready: The Mini- 
Reflex Revolution" on p. 48. 





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RANDOM SHOTS 


Unprecedented Commitment: 

Ruger's 2 Million Gun Challenge Is Going Strong 


THI 20I5-I(i ItUGCR 



Ruger CEO Mike Fifer brings important news 
9^^ owners less than halfway through 
'TkSPf his company's 2 Million Gun Challenge. 



H ere at the halfway point of 

Ruger's 2 Million Gun Challenge, 
NRA-ILA's war chest for the 
coming elections is growing in an 
inspiring new way, increasing by $2 
with the sale of every new Ruger 
firearm on the way to a projected total 
contribution of $4 million. 

NRA Executive Vice President 
Wayne LaPierre praised Ruger for 
being part of the effort to take back 
the White House and expand pro- 
Second Amendment majorities in both 
houses of Congress next year. NRA-ILA 
Executive Director Chris W. Cox added, 
"[B]y supporting the NRA's fight to 
defend the right to keep and bear 
arms, Ruger not only advances the 
rights of American gun owners and 
hunters — it also directly benefits the 
freedoms and safety of all Americans." 

Perhaps as noteworthy as Ruger's 
generosity, is how this American 


company is extending itself, in a 
sense betting on itself, in making 
such a promise. The 2 million guns 
Ruger has pledged to build and sell in 


the year leading up to the 2016 NRA 
Annual Meetings is an unprecedented 
number. Four years ago the company 
stretched its manufacturing capacity 


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26 


December 2015 


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to meet, and ultimately to exceed, 
its original Million Gun Challenge. 

The 1.4 million Rugers produced then 
smashed the firm's previous annual 
record, and now with the bar set 
even higher, it's clear that all 1,843 
Ruger employees are fully committed 
to meeting the objective. 

In a conversation with Ruger CEO 
Mike Fifer, NRA Editorial Director 
John Zent learned about the corporate 
transformation that is making this 
ambitious undertaking a reality. 

ZENT: Is this a good time to be an 
American gun manufacturer? 

FIFER: This is a really good time 
to be an American gun consumer. In 
the past 10 years, as Ruger innovated, 
we've brought out lots of good prod- 
ucts, and the best part is our competi- 
tors have started to follow. If you like 
guns, it's never been better, and so 
when the consumer base is energized 
and excited, then it's a lot of fun to 
be a manufacturer. 

ZENT: How have you balanced your 
goal to reshape today's market while 


staying true to Ruger's tradition of 
quality firearms at great value? 

FIFER: Our founder. Bill Ruger, set 
the tone early on when he decided he 
was going to make an utterly reliable, 
honest, workingman's gun for about 
a week's pay, and we have stuck to 
that. Ruggedness and reliability are 
the keystones, and we strive for great 
value in continuing to develop new 
products that always fit their market 
segment. Among my concerns now 
are: Would Bill Ruger be proud of this? 
Are we doing the right thing? That's 
key in all of our product development. 

ZENT: Rapid growth, corporate 
or otherwise, can be difficult, yet it 
seems Ruger has taken that in stride. 
How are you managing to do so? 

FIFER: About eight years ago, we 
decided to adopt "lean" [processes] 
throughout our company. It is most 
noticeable in manufacturing. The key 
to going lean is eliminating waste, 
which frees up all kinds of resources. 
Whether it's space, equipment, people, 
cash or inventory, it gives you back a 


THI 2015-1(1 RUGCd 



lot of resources, and we reinvest those. 
This is why we've been able to grow so 
fast both on the product development 
side and then build lots of those new 
products. We've gone from eight years 
ago producing 450,000 or so guns to 
our goal this year of 2 million. 

ZENT: We've heard you speak 
about how a company's structure 
affects the products it makes. How is 
Ruger dealing with that? 

FIFER: My experience, starting when 
I was in the Navy on submarines, and 
through different industries, convinced 
me that smaller organizations work 
better. It's more personal, you get to 
know everyone and you get to know 
their families and all the stories. It's a 
lot easier to get everyone to pull the 
oars in the same direction. 

When it gets too big — and for me, 
when that exceeds 500 people and cer- 
tainly over 1,000 — there is no way to 
know everybody or know what's going 
on, and different groups of people are 
working in different directions. You get 
continued on p. 30 


PRODUCT PREVIEWS 


LasorLyte Laser Color Guard Kit 

E ven more important during a self-defense scenario than accurate shot 
placement is the sound judgment required to decide whether to pull 
the trigger at all. And just as LaserLyte's Score Tyme Target (May 2015, 
p. 77) brought practical laser training to the former skill, the company's new 
Laser Color Guard Kit is doing the same for the latter. 

The bundle contains both a Color Guard Trainer Target and a Trainer Pistol 
Full-Size. The Color Guard Trainer Target features one 3.5" illuminated target 
that randomly shifts its colored display between red, yellow, blue and green. 

The Color Guard Trainer Target weighs just 9.5 ozs., uses two AA batteries and 
can be operated either muted or with sound to provide auditory feedback. 

Green and blue targets are designated as "enemy" targets, and a success- 
ful strike on one of those colors adds a point to the user's score, while red 
and yellow targets represent non-threats, and shooting the target at that 
time will forfeit a point. The amount of time each color is presented changes 
at random, forcing users to quickly decide whether the situation calls for a 
shot or not. Price: $240. Contact: LaserLyte (Dept AR), 30 N. Alamos Drive, 
Cottonwood, AZ 86326; (928) 649-3201; laserlyte.com. 

— Kelly Young, Associate Editor 


EDITOR'S 
DICE 



POCKET CANNONS' MINI CANNON launches a .30-cal. slingshot ball 
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Reasons to Join NRA 

1. For Your Freedom 

NRA aggressively defends your rights to own and use the firearms 
si^Jmpi^rtant to your lifestyle. NRA champions Americans’ individual 
rights and strives to block efforts by misguided government officials, 
fegislatbrs and courts attempting to strip away these guarantees. 

2. For Your Family 

3. For Your Community 

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Mill ION, 


continued from p.28 


a lot of inefficiencies. I believe we're 
better off with smaller factories, say 
500 people, than with one big facil- 
ity with thousands of people. When 
it's personal, everyone cares and that 
translates directly to higher-quality 
products because someone's name is on 
that gun when it leaves the building. 
They care about it. 

ZENT: Given all that, your ability 
to build increasingly large numbers of 
quality products, what makes you so 
confident that gun owners, who come 
with all different interests and ideas 
about what they want, will choose 
to buy so many new Rugers over the 
span of the 2 Million Gun Challenge? 

FIFER: Since the 2012 NRA show 
we've brought 31 major new products 
to market. I think that's more than 
the rest of the industry combined, and 
we've done so by reinvesting everything 
back in. When I joined the company 
nine years ago, we had 17 engineers [on 
board], now we have more than 100. 
We've invested a lot of effort, we now 
have product managers, we've spent a lot 
of time listening to the customers. We 
actually go out and ask people what they 
want from Ruger. That's a much easier 
way of doing business than just sitting 
in a factory trying to guess what they 
would like. So we ask, put the resources 
behind it, work very hard at it. And I get 
to test all the new products, that's fun. 


Every member can help the 2 Million 
Gun Challenge succeed in providing 
NRA-ILA with badly needed funds to 
elect pro-gun candidates. When shop- 
ping for a firearm or advising others 
in the market for one, please consider 
what Ruger has to offer. In fact, its 
selection is among the largest, most 
varied and highest-quality available. 

The Challenge extends to all of us. 



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30 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 






PRODUa PREVIEWS 


SoundGear 
In-The-Canal Digital 
Hearing Protection 



A side from following NRA's three 
rules of firearms safety, respon- 
sible shooters must always 
protect their eyes and ears. One of the 
smallest and lightest ear-protection 
products available is SoundGear's 
In-The-Canal digital hearing protec- 
tion. The pint-size plugs feature a 
noise-reduction rating of 25 decibels 
(dBs) and weigh only 0.096 ozs. Noise 
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ear canal adapters to fit anyone. Two 
packs of size 10 hearing aid batteries 
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SoundGear backs its products with a 
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sample exhibited crystal clear sound 
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soundgearhearing.com. 

WINCHESTER'S latest wood box 
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PRODUCT PREVIEWS 



Sneaky Pete Arsenal 

B uilt to the same standards as the rest of its line, the Sneaky Pete Arsenal allows 
you to discreetly carry an extra 50 rounds of ammunition on your hip. Made 
from high-quality black leather, the walls of the Arsenal have been reinforced in 
order to support the weight of your favorite ammunition. The portable case utilizes a 
single spring-steel belt clip for retention and two pairs of rare-earth magnets to keep 
the front flap secured. Each Arsenal is specifically sized and comes with an empty 
plastic cartridge tray for use with .380 AGP, 9 mm huger, .40 S&W, 10 mm Auto or 
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Gun Pro Delta 1 Ml 911 Sights 

W hether you're using your handgun to compete, hunt or 
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picture. Gun Pro's Delta 1 adjustable 1911 Sights provide fast 
and intuitive target acquisition for your M1911-pattern pistol. 
The set's Novak-style rear sight features a green fiber-optic delta 
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vertex of the front sight's groove with the tip of the rear sight's 
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The Ultimate Step-By-Step AR-15 Build Guide 

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DVD conveniently breaks the process into 10 easy-to-follow chapters. Jim 
VanMiddlesworth uses his 25 years of law enforcement experience and 10 years 
of practice as an AR armorer to guide viewers as they assemble their guns' lower 
and upper receiver groups, buttstocks, barrel assemblies and bolt carrier groups. 
The approximately 100-minute video uses multiple camera angles to help pro- 
vide the best possible view of the assembly as it occurs, and effectively utilizes 
close-ups to demonstrate the precise fitting of small parts. In addition to the 
tutorial, the DVD also includes a list of 11 essential tools that will be needed 
as your AR comes together, as well as an extra list of optional tools that help 
streamline the process. Price: $17. Contact: The Gun Coach; theguncoach.com. 


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34 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 








COLT 

SON 


BOOKS IN BRIEF 


Colt Thompson Submachine Gun: 
Serial Numbers & Histories 



E very gun collector has a pet pas- 
sion, a particular niche where 
he or she feels most at home. 
Gordon Herigstad's passion was the Colt 
Thompson submachine gun, however, 
unlike most collectors, Herigstad did the 
community of collectors a big favor — he 
wrote down everything he knew about 
Thompsons and published it. 

At two volumes, 2,200 pp. and 
weighing nearly 20 lbs., Colt Thompson 
Submachine Gun Serial Numbers & 
Histories is the Thompson story's mag- 
num opus. The bulk of the work is an 
examination of each and every one of 
the serial numbers for all 15,000 Colt 
Model 1921s made during its production 
run. Every page seems to have some- 
thing of interest, whether it is a Usting 
of a sale to your local police depart- 
ment, the USMC or to Irish rebels. 

The second volume centers on more 


detailed descriptions of the larger con- 
tracts and an index of persons, poUce 
departments, counties and just about 
any other entity where a Thompson may 
have been shipped. Spread throughout 
both volumes are color reproductions of 
original Auto-Ordnance correspondence 
as well as period photos, catalogs and 
user manuals detailing the wide variety 
of Thompson tools and accessories. 

The price tag may be a bit steep, but 
as a museum curator, miUtaria enthu- 
siast, historian and gun collector, I 
consider this monumental effort to be a 
"must have" in my personal collection. 
Available for purchase on amazon.com. 
Price: $350. Contact: Graphic Publishers 
(Dept AR), 2510 N. Grand Ave., 

Suite 104, Santa Ana, CA 92705; 

(800) 496-8726. 

— Philip Schreier, Senior Curator, 
National Firearms Museum 



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rail sections and an internally mounted 
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The Fully Loaded version of the 
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five-slot segment of ARC LOK rail and 
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36 



December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 





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t was a half-century ago this year that American ground forces entered into 
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Feature Fabrique Nationale Systems 

Rifleman Review Springfield XD Mod.2 .45 ACP Pistol 

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Feature Men & Guns of Vietnam, Part I 

Rifleman Review Browning Model 1911-380 .380 ACP Pistol 

I Flave This Old Gun Colt Model 601 Carbine 

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Feature Men & Guns of Vietnam, Part II 

Rifleman Review Beretta ARX-160 .22 Long Rifle Carbine 

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AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


LATEST LOADS 



The Gold Standard 


A n original offering is sometimes 
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WARNING: Technical data and information 
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Stauer. A Different Tale to Tell. 



FAVORITE FIREARMS 


Correspondence I 
Winchester Model 1890 



* 


O ne of my favorite firearms is a 
.22-cal. Winchester Model 1890 
pump-action rifle that had 
belonged to my grandmother's next- 
door neighbor. The neighbor passed 
away in 1960 when I was 12 years old. 
I was at my grandmother's house after 
the funeral, and the neighbor's widow 
came over to our kitchen with the rifle 
and asked me if I would like to have 
it. I graciously accepted the rifle and 
thanked her for the gift. 

Since I knew the neighbor had 
kept the rifle on his back porch as his 
varmint gun, and had kept it ready for 
quick access in case something came 
around, the first thing I did was check 


to see if it was loaded, which it was. 
The safety was on, but there was a 
round in the chamber and a magazine 
full of .22 Shorts. I had been taught 
gun safety from a young age by my 
father, and had attended an NRA 
hunter safety course at about that 
same time. I was also a Junior member 
of the NRA by that age, so I knew that 
the cardinal rule was to always treat 
every gun as if it were loaded. 

The gun would also become my 
varmint gun, although my "varmints" 
were mostly bottles and cans on 
my grandparents' farm in southern 
Illinois— and no can or bottle was safe. 


NRA member photo 

I do remember, however, shooting at 
a snake one time that was about 30 yds. 
away. I sent a bunch of rounds his way, 
but never could hit him. Wasn't his time 
to go, I guess. Couldn't have been that I 
just wasn't a very good shot. 

Based on its serial number, this 
Model 1890 was produced in 1915, one 
of 20,271 manufactured that year. In 
total, more than 760,000 Model 1890s 
were made by Winchester, so they cer- 
tainly aren't rare, but mine still holds a 
special place in my heart and memory. 
It may now be 100 years old, but to me 
that rifle will always be timeless. 

— Terry Ridgley, Tennessee 


Nearly every shooter has a favorite firearm. If you would like to share the experience of owning yours 
with other American Rifleman readers, or on americanrifleman.org, send a sharp color photograph of the 
gun, accompanied by its story in fewer than 400 words, with your name, address and daytime telephone 
number to: Favorite Firearms, American Rifleman, National Rifle Association, 11250 Waples Mill Road, Fair- 
fax, VA 22030-9400. Photos and submissions cannot be returned and may be edited for clarity and brevity. 







Technical I questions s answers 


Souvenir Mauser 1914 


Q I am looking for some help with a pistol I inherited 
from my grandfather. One of his brothers brought it 
home as a souvenir after World War II. The gun has no 
Nazi markings. To the best of my knowledge, my grandfather 
never fired it. Am I the lucky owner of something awesome 
or just fortunate to have inherited grandpa's gun? 

A Your pistol is a Mauser Model 1914, which is cham- 
bered in 7.65 mm Browning (the American .32 AGP) 
cartridge. It is a slightly larger version of the .25 AGP 
Model 1910. The Model 1914, like the Model 1910, is a 
striker-fired, blowback-operated pistol. The Model 1914 has 
a 3.42" barrel and an eight-round-capacity detachable box 
magazine with its release on the frame's heel. The rear of 
the striker protruded through the back of the slide, serv- 
ing as a cocking indicator. There is a manual safety on the 
frame's left, and the slide locks back on an empty magazine. 

These guns were made from 1914 until 1934. A change 
to the shape of the grip frame resulted in the .32 AGP 
Model 1934, and the design was gradually replaced by the 
double-action Mauser HSc. The Model 1914 was a popular 


commercial gun in its day and was used 
through both world wars by various 
German police agencies and military units. 

To me, any gun with a family connection 
is "awesome," but you are fortunate in that 
the Model 1914 is a very interesting pistol. 

— Gharles E. Petty 


From the thousands of questions and letters on guns, ammunition and 
their use that American Rifleman receives every year, it publishes the most 
interesting here. Receiving answers to technical and historical questions is a 
privilege reserved to NRA members. 

Questions must be in the form of letters addressed to: Dope Bag, NRA Publica- 
tions, 11250 Waples Mill Road, Fairfax, VA 22030-9400; must contain the member's 
code line from an American Rifleman or American Hunter mailing label or 
membership card; must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed, legal-size 
envelope; and must be limited to one specific question per letter. Non-members 
may submit a question with a membership application. We cannot answer 
technical or historical questions by telephone, e-mail or fax, and we cannot place 
even an approximate value on guns or other equipment. Please allow eight to 10 
weeks for replies. 

"Questions & Answers" is compiled by staff and Contributing Editors: 
Bruce N. Canfield, Garry James, Charles Pate, Charles E. Petty, Matt 
Sharpe, John M. Taylor and John Treakle. 


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COVER 


STORY 



CCwE CAN 
SHAKE OUR 
HEADS AND 
WATCH 
EVERYTHING 
WE LOVE 
ABOUT 
AMERICA 
SLIP AWAY- 
INCLUDING 
OUR SECOND 
AMENDMENT 
RIGHTS AND 
EVERY OTHER 
FREEDOM WE 
CHERISH. OR 
WE CAN STEP 



here's a raging fire 
burning in American 
politics right now, and 
your Second Amendment-protected right to keep 
and bear arms is quietly being shredded and used 
as kindling. Fortunately for all Americans who 
treasure liberty, there's a monumental firewall 
standing tall between the flames of failure and 


freedom's future — the 5 million members of the 


National Rifle Association. 



by Wayne LaPierre 


NRA Executive 
Vice President 


After seven years of President Barack Obama in the White House, we now live in a 
country where our values and heritage are being turned upside down, in a country where 
political leaders and the media are willing to tell any lie that advances their political agenda. 

Thanks to his refusal to prosecute violent criminals, Obama's hometown of Chicago is 
awash in a sea of blood. But instead of putting thugs in jail, Obama points his cowardly finger 
at gun owners like you and me, who've never committed a violent crime and never will. 

When a radical Islamic terrorist killed four U.S. Marines and a Navy sailor in Chattanooga, Tenn., 
last summer — servicemen who were disarmed and defenseless thanks to reckless gun 
control policies that have turned our military installations into "gun-free zones" — Obama's 
billionaire backer Michael Bloomberg launched a campaign to blame honest, law-abiding 
Americans for this heinous crime. 

And within minutes of the tragedy in Charleston, S.C. — where nine worshipers were 
murdered in church by a deranged, lone racist — Obama's political machine was cranking 
out anti-NRA lies and trying to implicate you and me in this heinous crime. 

It's crazy — and beyond anything we could have imagined a few years ago. Day by 
day, our country is being hijacked by liars and elites who believe in one set of rules for 
themselves and another set of rules for you and me. 

They send their children to private schools surrounded by armed guards— then call 
me "crazy" when I demand the same protections for every other kid in this country. They 
send thousands of guns to Mexican drug lords — then blame the NRA and the Second 
Amendment when their irresponsible actions result in hundreds of deaths. They turn a blind 


45 ► 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG DECEMBER 2015 



COVER 



eye to violent gangs who terrorize our cities 
with no fear of the police — then persecute 
honest citizens who defend their own lives. 

Our news anchors lie to millions night 
after night, but decent people are afraid to 
speak their minds for fear of persecution 
from Obama's weaponized IRS and other 
government agencies. And every horrific 
crime is another opportunity for Barack 
Obama and Hillary Clinton to tell more lies 
and point their fingers at the innocent. 

Everywhere I go, I hear good people 
telling me that our country is falling apart. 
That we're losing our way of life. That 
Thomas Jefferson and James Madison 
wouldn't begin to recognize this country 
today. Now, the future of everything we 
love about this country comes down to the 


outcome of one single election— and one 
choice that you and I must make today. 

We can shake our heads and watch 
everything we love about America slip 
away — including our Second Amendment 
rights and every other freedom we cherish. 
Or we can step forward — and shake our 
fists instead. 

If we make a commitment together to 
stand and fight and win right now, we can 
be the ones who decide the outcome of this 
presidential election— not Barack Obama or 
Hillary Clinton or Michael Bloomberg. 

We've played the deciding role in 
presidential elections before. We have the 
track record. And if we can get them to 

46 


the polls, we have the votes — with more 
than 50 million gun owners in the key 
battleground states where this presidential 
election will be won or lost. 

The moment you and I win the White 
House next year is the moment we can 
start taking our country back from those 
who want to regiment our lives and tell us 
how to think and feel. 

But it's going to take a huge 
commitment from top NRA members like 
you — starting with your decision to extend 
your annual membership today, or upgrade 
your Life, Patron, Endowment or Benefactor 
membership to the next level of our 
leadership ranks. 

That brings me to an important point: 
Today I need to announce an important 


decision to you and to every NRA member. 
I've put it off for as long as I can, and it's not 
a decision I've made lightly. But it's the right 
decision for the NRA, and for the long-term 
survival of our freedoms. 

As of Jan. 1, 2016, we will be increasing 
NRA dues for the first time in more than 
20 years. Our one-year dues rate will 
increase to $40 from $35, and the price 
of our multi-year memberships and Life, 
Endowment, Patron and Benefactor 
memberships will increase as well. 

Since taking the helm of NRA more than 
20 years ago. I've always tried to stretch 
every NRA membership dollar as far as it 
will go. But not only have NRA dues dollars 


been deeply eroded by inflation for more 
than 20 years, but we now have to fight 
24/7 — on far more fronts than before — 
against enemies with deeper pockets than 
we've ever faced. 

When we last increased dues back in 
1994, most Americans still got their TV 
news from the "big three" networks. Now, 
we have no choice but to answer daily and 
nightly attacks from a dozen separate news 
channels around the clock. 

In 1994, most Americans had never 
even heard of the Internet. Now, politicians 
like Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton can 
use the Internet to spread their anti-gun 
lies like wildfire in a matter of minutes — 
or instantly spin new attacks via email, 
Facebook and Twitter. 

Back in 1994, Michael Bloomberg wasn't 
even a billionaire. Now, his personal fortune 
totals more than all the membership dues 
NRA has taken in over the past 144 years, 
and he could spend hundreds of millions of 
dollars in this presidential campaign to put 
Hillary Clinton over the top. 

And it takes far more money and effort 
to make our message heard at election 
time. In fact. House and Senate campaigns 
now cost three times what they did 20 
years ago— and presidential campaign 
spending has increased five-fold. 

The bottom line is that, without this 
dues increase, we won't be able to compete 
in the election a year from now, which will 
be the most expensive in American history 
and that could be the final defeat for the 
Second Amendment and every freedom 
we cherish. 

But before this increase goes into effect, 

I want you and my most loyal friends to 
have one more opportunity to extend 
your membership at the same discount 
rates we offered you at this time last year. If 
you're an annual member, you can extend 
your membership for one, two, three or 
even five years — all at special prices that 
will never be repeated. And if you're a Life, 
Endowment, Patron or Benefactor member, 
this is your chance to upgrade your 
membership to the next level at the lowest 
dues rates we've offered in years. 

To take advantage of the special offers 
we've reserved especially for you, simply 
visit NRA2016.org and log in with your 
membership number from the mailing 
label on this magazine. No matter which 
of our discount offers you select, you'// c//so 
receive a commemorative gift from NRA as a 
reminder of your role in saving freedom in 
the do-or-die elections one year from now. 

Please do it now. These special 
discounts and gift offers will expire at 
midnight Dec. 31, and our new rates will go 


II BACK IN 1994, MICHAEL BLOOMBERG 
WASN’T EVEN A BILLIONAIRE. NOW, HIS 
PERSONAL FORTUNE TOTALS MORE THAN 
ALL THE MEMBERSHIP DUES NRA HAS 
TAKEN IN OVER THE PAST 144 YEARS, AND 
HE COULD SPEND HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS 
OF DOLLARS IN THIS PRESIDENTIAL 
CAMPAIGN TO PUT HILLARY CLINTON 
OVER THE TOP. JJ 


December 2015 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 





into effect on Jan. i, 2016. But even more 
importantly, NRA needs your help now to 
save our freedom, save our country and 
save our way of life. 

I'm asking you not to sit this one out. I 
need you to be with me on the tip of the 
spear by continuing your NRA support 
right now. None of us can win this election 
alone — but one by one by one we can and 
will make the difference. 

This is our fight. Our time. This is the 
moment when good people like you need 
to take the future into your own hands. We 
can take our country back. We can keep our 
guns. And we can keep our freedoms and 
the sacred right to defend our own lives. 

It starts with your decision to renew your 
membership or upgrade your membership 
today. Only NRA can protect your right to 
protect yourself. Only NRA can turn the tide 
against gun-banners who want to turn our 
country into a nanny state where only the 
government and criminals are allowed to 
have guns. 

And you can make a difference— as 
well as lock in a great membership rate 
before the NRA dues increase on Jan. 1 — 
by visiting NRA2016.org today. Thank 
you in advance for standing with me in 
the most important battle for freedom 
we'll ever fight! 



Renew or upgrade your membership before 
Jan. 1 , 2016, at the lowest prices we’ve 
offered in years, and receive an extraordinary 
gift in honor of your leadership and support! 







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HANDGUN OPTICS 



Optics 


THE MINI-REFLEX REVOLUTION 






Competitive shooters and the U.S. military have known about the advantages of reflex sights for 
years, hut it wasn't until these "red dots" were miniaturized that rank-and-file gun owners took 
note. Several major gun companies now make handguns with integral mounts for these sights, 
and more are surely on the way. 



) / /t wasn't that long ago when Picatinny rails were new 
/ / to rifles. What did we do before them? Well, we didn't 
^ mount riflescopes on our ARs very swiftly, for one. Yet 
competitive shooters would not be denied the vast benefits 
of optics, and so they rigged them to their guns however 
they could — often with the help of professional gunsmiths 
and custom-machined mounts. Manufacturers took note 
and began integrating slotted rails atop AR receivers, and 
the Picatinny design was more or less accepted across the 
Now optics on ARs are as common as white on rice. 


BYJEFF JOHNSTON, Field Editor 

A similar evolution is happening right now with 
handguns. Again, it was the competitive shooters who 
started it, but the movement required the miniaturiza- 
tion of reflex, or red-dot sights, to make them practical for 
everyone else. Today, about a half-dozen companies offer 
handguns with integral mounting solutions for a growing 
catalog of mini-reflex sights, and the trend is snowballing 
as shooters of all disciplines discover them. Indeed, when 
we look back in 20 years, 2015 may just be the year of the 
mini-reflex revolution. 


/A Trijkon RMR (far i) is mounted on the 
S&W Performance Center Ported M&P 
Leupotd's DettaPoint shown atop the FN 
America FNX-45 Tacticai, is thinner than 
other reflexes and is the only unit that fits 
the Kahr Arms Gen2 Premium TP9 and TP45. 


[11 Til 


49 


HANDGUN OPTICS 


THE MINI-REFLEX CONCEPT 

The reflex, or reflective, sight is more than a cen- 
tury old and grew into a better gunsight for aircraft 
and anti-aircraft gunners because it didn't limit field of 
view and eye relief like telescopic sights of the time. The 
sight relied upon an optical system that formed a visual 
collimator to superimpose a reflected image of a reticle 
onto a curved lens in the shooter's line of sight. Whereas 
a simple reticle that's etched or wired onto a lens moves 
in relation to the target as the eye moves, an image of a 
reticle that is reflected stays on target. What this means 
is that parallax is minimized. 



With this invention, gun sights needed only one focal 
point rather than a front and rear sight that must be 
aligned on the target. Its only limitation as a heads-up 
sighting device was that it depended on light to work. 

In the 1970s the reflex sight as we know it was brought 
to market by the Swedish firm Aimpoint. It contained a 
battery-powered, light-emitting diode (LED) that allowed 
these compact, tube-enclosed reflex sights to function in 
darkness. Its glowing "red dot" soon became this sight's 
nickname. It took a little while longer for a few cutting-edge 
handgunners to discover the red-dot sight's advantages. 



REFLEX SYSTEM USING LED 




KAHR GENE PREMIUM TP9. TP45 

Kahr will initially offer two optics- 
ready models of its radically new Gen2 
Premium line in 9 mm Luger (TP9) and ^ 
two in .45 ACP (TP45) — with two cham- ” _ 

bered in .40 S&W likely to follow. In each caliber, one 
model will come with a Leupold DeltaPoint sight, while the 
other one will accommodate the DeltaPoint but will not ship 
with it. All reflex-ready models feature tall sights for cowit- 
nessing. The guns are geared toward competition shooters, 
employing 5" and 6" barrels and triggers much lighter than 
those used in Genl firearms. Price: $976-$l,576. kahr.com 


SIG SAUER P320 RX. 

P226 ELITE SAG RX. P227 RX 

SIG Sauer took a different approach in offering a reflex-sight- ready handgun: It 
branded its own sights, called Romeo 1 and Romeo 3, and offers one in a package 
with the gun. The company's RX series handguns accommodate the sights by way of 
a machined cutout in the slide. The guns also have raised iron sights. That, along 
with a unique channel made in the Romeo sights, allows unfettered cowitnessing. 
I fired the P320 RX and found that the Romeo 1 only added to the 9 mm 
Luger P320's versatility. It was already a solid, full-size duty gun, 
but now it's great for competition and pure fun. The Romeo 
sights are slightly wider than many mini-reflux sights, but 
it is simple with two rubber brightness buttons, robust 
and easy to use. I was twice as accurate at 25 
yds. and much faster shooting the SIG topped 
with the Romeo. I hope SIG will carry the RX 
concept to its compact models in the future. 
Price: $913-$1,484. s1gsauer.com 


50 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


RED DOTS ON HANDGUNS? 

In 1990, a young Doug Koenig won the Bianchi Cup 
pistol championship, and he did it with a contraption 
bolted atop his pistol. He was the first to win the cup using 
an optic of any kind (since then he's used Aimpoint, Tasco 
Pro Point II, Leupold/Gilmore and Leupold models), and 
he's done it 16 times over. He's taken 10 world champion- 
ships and countless other titles. There is no more qualified 
or outspoken advocate of reflex sights on handguns. Quite 
simply, Koenig thinks they're superior to open sights. 

"I knew my times with irons, so I had a baseline to test 
against — the red dot was faster. It's faster because your 
focus isn't bouncing back and forth [between sight and tar- 
get], and there's nothing to align," Koenig said. "You just 
focus on the target and put the dot on it, just like pointing 
your finger." 

But speed isn't the reflex's only advantage. 

"Back in those days we shot a lot of indoor matches in 
low light," Koenig said. "The red dots were optimal, and we 
[fellow red-dot user and pro-shooter Jerry Barnhardt] shot 
just as well as we did in daylight. Night sights don't cut it." 


As reflex sights have gotten smaller, they have become more 
unobtrusive on carry or personal-protection guns. As con be seen 
through the Burns Fast Fire 3 with an 8-m.o.o. dot (r.) on a Clock 
G40 MOS (Modular Optic System) pistol, the dot is readily visible. 
Once you hove the dot aligned, then you con concentrate on other 
fundamentals, such os trigger press and breathing. 




CLOCK GEN4 G34 MOS, G35 MOS, 

'G40 MOS, G41 MOS 

In 2015, GLock released its MOS (Modular Optic System) that uses a 0.196"-deep, 1.929"-long 
machined slide cutout with four stability posts to mount an optic. All MOS Glocks come with five 
numbered mounting plates that fit most currently made mini-reflex sights. 

The company's Gen4 G40 MOS in 10 mm Auto is marketed toward hunters, what with its 6" barrel 
and 9.49"-long slide. Even though it has a 15-plus-one capacity of 10 mm Auto ammunition, it weighs 
28 ozs. (unloaded) and 40 ozs. (loaded), which compares favorably to many six-shot revolvers. Plus, 
with a reflex sight installed, it's good for low-light situations. In sum, I consider the Glock G40 MOS 
one of the most versatile consumer handguns ever produced. Its one downside is that it does not 
come with taller sights for indexing through the optic, so I recommend installing an aftermarket set. 

While all of Glock's MOS models are geared toward competitive shooters and hunters at this time, 
the company's national sales manager. Bob Radecki, said that, based on the MOS' great reception, 
it's considering future carry models. Price: $840. glock.com 



AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


51 ► 


HANDGUN OPTICS 



Still most pros were skeptical of their accuracy; for recre- 
ational shooters they were overly bulky and too difficult to 
mount. Protruding nearly 3" above the bore and averaging more 
than a pound with mounts, only race gun holsters could accom- 
modate them. Batteries were suspect. ConcealabiUty was a joke. 

Twenty years later, advancements in circuitry and bat- 
tery technology allowed engineers to redesign the sights. 
Deciding that they were more robust than necessary, they 
stripped them down to the bare minimum of parts— a lens 
to reflect the reticle image, a power source, LED, circuit 
board and frame — and tossed everything else. The remain- 
ing "mini-reflex sight" (MRS) weighed under 2 ozs., was 
an inch tall and featured greater field of view thanks to its 
single lens and tubeless design. 

Three-gun competitors latched onto them for a quick, 
short-range option to mount on their rifles in tandem with 
their riflescopes. Naturally some advantage-seeking soul 
realized one would be perfect on a handgun where it would 
only minimally hamper his vison and the gun's handling. 
After all, an MRS is only about 3/4" taller than standard 
irons. There is no problem bolstering MRS-equipped pistols 
with most open-top, carry-style holsters because the sight 
doesn't extend past the ejection port, and as such, holsters 
have no bearing on it. So, just like that, optics became a 
viable option for all handgunners. 


MINI-REFLEX SIGHTS ON 
PRACTICAL HANDGUNS 

As Koenig described, red-dot-style sights are faster than 
irons and better in low light. But they're also more accu- 
rate, particularly at ranges past 50 yds., thanks to fine dots 
and triangles, generally representing 2 to 13 m.o.a., that 
are more precise than the front posts of modern pistols. 

The U.S. Army bought thousands of Aimpoints for its ser- 
vice rifles because research showed that it made the aver- 
age soldier more accurate with less training. Additionally, 
an infinite field of view makes locating targets and transi- 
tioning between them easier. What's more, with their zero 
magnification, MRSs are best used with both eyes open to 
maximize peripheral vision, depth of field and low-light 
capability. Eye relief is also unlimited, so there's never 
worry about mounting locations or getting "scope eye." 

But perhaps most notable of all, mini-reflex sights make 
accurate handgun shooting possible for more people. 



SMITH S WESSON MSP PRO SERIES C.O.R.E 

S&W offers the C.O.R.E. (Competition Optics Ready 
Equipment) in its M&P Pro Series Line. The M&P9L and 
M&P40L competition models have Long slides and 5" 
barrels; yet, at the time of this writing, the company 
also offers the closest thing yet to true optics-ready 
carry guns in its M&P9 and M&P40 Pro Series C.O.R.E. 
that weigh 24 ozs. with 4.25" barrels. These guns are the 
same as the non-C.O.R.E. models, except they feature taller sights, enhanced tex- 
ture on the palm swell, C.O.R.E. engraving on the slide, and of course, the machined 
cutout on the slide that accommodates five mounting plates designed to fit the C-More 
CTS, Trijicon RMR, JP Rifles J Point, Leopold DeltaPoint, Doctor and Insight MRDS. Other 
optics-ready models— such as the gun shown on p. 48 and on this month's cover— are offered in the 
Performance Center M&P Ported line. 

In shooting the M&Ps, however, I found the taller sights were not tall enough to see through 
several different sights I tried. Nonetheless, the C.O.R.E. models are wonderful, low-profile, handguns 
that, like the rest, have no downside other than an extra hundred bucks. If you choose not to use the 
optic, just take it off and replace the hardly noticeable slide cover. Price: $812. sm1th-wesson.com 


December 2 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 




PRESBYOPIA 



Can red-dot sights heip your shooting? Ask 16-time NRA Bianchi 
Cup Champion Doug Koenig. He soys its foster because you hove 
only one focal plane and your eyes ore not jumping bock and forth 
between the front and rear sight Just put the dot on the target 


the unit on, simply use the iron sights through the MRS' 
lens and fire away. It is this fact that gave me the confi- 
dence to place a mini-reflex on my own carry gun and not 
worry. Still, battery life is an issue, and that brings me 
to the next section, because MRSs are not without some 
trade-offs. 



AND A GAME CHANGER 

Presbyopia is the inevitable eye condition caused by 
aging that prevents the eye from focusing on close objects. 

I remember when my father said he could no longer see 
the rear sight, front sight and the squirrel all at the same 
time and so he had to defile his engraved Browning .22 
by topping it with a 4X Weaver scope. Fortunately for him 
and millions like him, optics "flatten" the sight picture, 
allowing shooters to focus only on the target and then 
superimpose the reticle onto it. Focusing on the target is 
desirable for obvious reasons, such as target identification 
and anticipation of its movement. For shooters over the age 
of 40, the advent of mini-reflex sights for handguns may 
prove to be a game-changer. 

What's more. I've found that reflex-style sights will 
make you a better shooter, because slight imperfections in 
trigger squeeze and steadiness of hand are made obvious by 
movement of the glowing red dot. Koenig agrees. 

"Red-dots simplify instruction because they allow the 
student to concentrate on the fundamentals— not keeping 
the sights aligned," he said. 

Finally, another advantage of some MRS-style sights 
over other optics is that the shooter can see the iron sights 
through them— so-called "cowitnessing"— as a backup 
sighting method. This is possible due to the sight's low 
profile. It should be noted that most factory iron sights 
aren't tall enough to see through an MRS, but they can be 
easily replaced with taller ones. If you draw and aim only 
to realize that the battery is dead or you forgot to turn 


Smith & Wesson supplies different mounting plates (1.) for most 
standard (and some not so standard) reflex sights on its M&P 
C.O.R.E. (Competition Optic Ready Equipment) Military & Police pis- 
tols. Attach the plate to the slide and then the reflex to the plate. 


DISADVANTAGES 

Most MRSs require batteries — usually one 2032 lithium 
type. Although some can be left on continuously for a 
year in moderate temperatures, the possibility exists for 
all models that the user could find the battery depleted, 
rendering the sight useless at precisely the wrong time. In 
addition, said Koenig, "If you have to shoot in a pouring 

continued on p. 78 


FN AMERICA FNX-45 TACTICAL 

FN geared its new optics-ready gun to operators rather than competitors with 
its FNX-45 Tactical 15-round handgun. Like the others, the American-made gun 
features a machined cutout in the slide to mount a mini-reflex optic. It also 
includes sights that are amply tall for cowitnessing. The pistol, which features 
a 5.3" threaded barrel and weighs 33 ozs. unloaded, comes with two mounting 
plates to accommodate the RMR and the DeltaPoint. The polymer frame comes in 
black or flat dark earth. The company has already established itself as a maker of 
extremely durable polymer pistols, and the addition of an optics-ready gun only 
lends the line more versatility. Price: $1,399. fnhusa.com 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


53 ► 


Photo courtesy of Doug Koenig 






RIFLES 



Led by the stylish new Patriot bolt-action, a well-rounded collection of 
value-priced Mossberg center-fire rifles has emerged from a maker 
best known for its shotguns and .22s. 

BY JOHN ZENlfditorial Director 


54 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 





ow prolific has Mossberg been at producing rimfire rifles? So prolific that the incomparably 
comprehensive Blue Book of Gun Values chose to cry "uncle" rather than include every last 
model in a section that still runs almost seven pages. 

But even though millions of Americans have enjoyed plinking, hunting and competing 
with the ubiquitous Mossberg rimfires, that's hardly the case with center-fire rifles from 
this 96-year-old manufacturer that also dominates in shotgun sales. Despite valiant efforts 
and some promising designs along the way, Mossbergs have never made much of a dent in 
big-game hunting, NRA High Power competition or tactical rifle circles. 

That appears to be changing thanks to market dynamics that have been intelligently 
addressed by the company's management and product developers. While the stable isn't 
large, Mossberg now has promising entries in a few notable categories, all of them priced 
to make buyers take a hard look. Leading the charge is the bolt-action Patriot, a rifle 
whose classic good looks, functionality and solid workmanship are commanding as much 
attention as its affordability. Patriot sales have been hot throughout 2015, especially a 
combo offering that includes a mounted Vortex scope, and, somewhat surprisingly in this 
day and age, a walnut-stocked selection. But that's not all. Another turnbolt, the MVP, can 
be readily modified for all sorts of tactical and hunting specialization, while the Model 464 
is a lever-action so faithful to the form it makes one want to saddle up. 

1965 - 1981 : 

Private-Label Economics 

Fifty years ago Mossberg entered the center-fire business at the urging of retail 
giant Montgomery Ward, whose private-label Western Field line largely consisted of 
Mossberg-made .22s and smoothbores. It was the heyday of the bolt-action hunting rifle, 
a time when American riflemen were trading up from military surplus and lever-actions. 
Winchesters and Remingtons ruled the roost, the new Ruger Model 77 was on the rise, and 
Savages, Weatherbys, Brownings and a slew of imports made for a rich buyer's market. 

Mossberg responded with the Model 800, borrowing elements from the company's Model 385 
shotgun and a turnbolt prototype fashioned by German immigrant gun designer Louis Seecamp, 
who later founded his own company to make pocket-size, semi-automatic pistols. The short- 
action design, initially chambered for .243 Win. and .308 Win., featured a solid-body, front- 
locking bolt with a hook extractor, bolt-face ejector and sliding tang safety. Counter to the 
prevailing dual, opposed locking-lug designs, the 800's bolt boasted six lugs arranged 
in pairs 120 degrees apart, similar to that of standard-caUber Weatherby Mark Vs, 
except that the front lugs were more than twice the size of those in the rear. 
The short 60-degree bolt Uft aided cycling speed and eased scope mounting. 



Mossberg's half-century-long ambition to storm the center- 
fire rifle market hit a home run with the Patriot in 2015. 
Rather than following the standard development track, 
the company soys it simply listened to customers' requests 
for 0 traditional, walnut-stocked, affordable hunting rifle. 
High-volume soles affirm that Amencon riflemen still hove 
keen interest in the classic bolt-action. 


Photos by Forrest MacCormack 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


55 ► 


MOSSBERG 


Associate Technical Editor Ludwig Olson's favorable review 
in the August 1966 issue of The American Rifleman noted 
safety features such as the bolt's counterbored face and solid 
rear shroud, as well as the gun's fast lock time, while calling 
shooting test results "... exceptionally fine for a lightweight 
big-game rifle." At 7 lbs., 2 ozs., the Model 800 was not 
quite what we'd consider a lightweight rifle today, but its 
$97.95 price tag certainly sounds reasonable. 

The 800's run extended to nearly 150,000 guns under 
Mossberg, Western Field and other private-label brands, 
demand that eventually spawned the long-action Model 810, 
which also became a Western Field mainstay. The 810 cham- 
bered in-demand big-game cartridges such as .30-'06 Sprg., 
.270 Win. and 7 mm Rem. Mag., but did so in a redesigned 
receiver that relied on conventional opposed bolt lugs, a 
beefier extractor and a choice of drop-box or hinged maga- 
zines. Although it was a good-looking rifle, labor-intensive 
production methods reportedly ate into profitability, and the 
810 series was discontinued after less than a decade. 

Mossberg made a final run at bolt-gun sales in that 
early era with its Model RM7. That rifle's most interesting 
characteristic was touted as a "rotary" magazine, however 
our reviewer observed it was not a true spool-type like the 
Savage 99's, but instead " ... a metal feed arm powered 
by a 'mousetrap' spring, which directs cartridges around a 


curve in the magazine box ... ". The review was otherwise 
quite positive, but nonetheless, the RM7 quickly vanished. 

Also in the early 1970s, the company set its cap on 
lever-action sales, by then a two-horse race between the 
long-entrenched Winchesters and Marlins. Again, motiva- 
tion came from partners that were the big-box stores of 
the day, principally Wards, but also Western Auto and 
Coast to Coast Hardware. When Mossberg completed devel- 
opment of the Model 472 .30-30 Win., Wards dropped its 
affiliation with Marlin. 

Western Field carbines appeared first, and soon a 
rifle-length variant was added along with the .35 Rem. 
chambering. Both straight and pistol-grip stock styles 
were produced. Spent cases ejected on the side a la the 
scope-friendly Marlin 336, but the designers took safety 
a step further with a bilateral crossbolt safety, as well as 
an "intercept notch," both of which stopped the hammer 
fall short of the firing pin. Further innovation came by 
housing the trigger blade within the lever. When cycled 
in and out of battery, the trigger would ride along inside 
the guard, thus preventing pinched fingers and plausi- 
bly hastening follow-up shots. Unfortunately, Mossberg 
had to price its upgraded lever-action at $10-15 over the 
better-known competition, which proved more than the 
market would bear. 


2015 : Make Wav For The Patriot 




» ^y all accounts, the Patriot bolt-action has been selling 
^ extremely well since its formal introduction at the 
2015 SHOT Show. On the surface, that success would seem to 
run counter to the industry-wide trends toward tactical styl- 
ing and technological innovation. Instead, the Patriot looks 
like a classic from the 1960s and sticks with engineering 
prevalent to the affordable bolt-rifle category. 

And that reflects the rifle's unique origin. According to 
Mossberg press relations manager Linda Powell, "The Patriot 
introduction did not go the more traditional route of an engi- 
neer bringing an idea to management or marketing research 
showing an interest in a particular category. We listened 
directly to our customers' requests for a more traditional, 
wood-stocked hunting rifle. 

"Initial responses from our customers at last year's 
[wholesaler] shows told us that we had a home run, with the 
walnut Patriots and walnut/Vortex-scoped combos outselling 
other versions," said Powell. 

Call it clean, conventional, old-school or even plain vanilla, 
the Patriot represents a look and a shooting platform that's been 
around for well over half a century and its reception affirms that 
America is not yet done with it, especially when it can be had for 
around $500. 


56 


December 2015 ^ 


Mossberg's round-bodied receiver carries over to the Patriot 
and, as with predecessor models, its streamlined barrel nut is 
made to be tightened by a hook spanner and thus lacks the 
tooling indents that kept other brands off some critics' best- 
dressed lists. The bolt is a conventional design with twin lock- 
ing lugs flanking a recessed face that houses a plunger ejector. 
The right-side lug bears a sliding-plate extractor and is slotted 
to ride in a thin guide rail along the receiver wall. The straight 
bolt handle ends in a flattened, oval knob encircled by a band 
of checkering, and a toggle left of the tang releases the bolt. 
Opposite a two-position pivoting safety, a projection on the 
bolt's left side is intended to prevent over- rotation. The bolt 
body is finished with attractive spiral fluting. 

Decorative shallow fluting is also found on the barrel, 
extending 9 V 2 " from the fore-end tip nearly to the muzzle. 

Our synthetic-stocked test model, in .308 Win., was fitted 
with a No. 2 sporter contour, match-crowned, 22" barrel. The 
receiver's barrel nut secures a recoil lug whose rectangular 
underside mates into a slot molded into the stock. It measures 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 



2005 - 2014 : Opportunity Knocks 

Though private-label economics weren't the motivation, 
no doubt Mossberg factored in potential sales through a 
new generation of big-box stores when it resumed center- 
fire rifle manufacturing shortly into the new century. 
Plenty of the company's shotguns and rimfires were selling 
through Cabela's, Bass Pro, Walmart and other retailers, so 
why not deer rifles? 


Bolt-action center-fires returned to the Mossberg catalog at 
mid-decade, first the ATR, followed a few years hence by the 
4x4, related models based on the round-bodied/barrel-nut- 
style receiver that is all the rage at present. The former came 
in three short- and two long-action calibers, was equipped 
with a simple but effective single-stage trigger and a blind 
magazine. Several camouflage patterns, along with black 
synthetic and walnut, were available for stock finishes, and in 



1.34" wide by 0.20" thick. Those dimensions — and in fact the 
basic blueprint — haven't changed since Mossberg adopted this 
receiver design for the ATR in 2005. 

The stock also comes with standard features, such as stip- 
pling panels that bracket the fore-end and grip areas, an inte- 
gral trigger guard, detachable plastic magazine, sling swivel 
studs and a soft, generous buttpad. While such touches are all 
fairly typical, what's really worthy of attention — but tends to 
go unnoticed when rendered in plain black synthetic — are the 
stock's lines and proportions, which are actually quite graceful. 


The rifle's attractiveness is naturally more apparent in its 
walnut-stocked variants like the one seen on these pages, but 
that goes beyond just the richness of wood grain and color. 

I'm hardly the first to remark on the Patriot's "classic" 
lines, though there's no set definition for the term. The way 
it came together, said Powell, was that, "[After] the sales 
force brought the idea of an affordable, walnut, bolt-action 
hunting rifle with a classically styled stock, our engineering 
design team looked at many of the classics, their dimensions 
and overall appeal. From that, the Patriot was born." 



AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


57 ► 


MOSSBERG 


addition to matte blue, metalwork could be had in Marinecote. 

The 4x4 boasted many more caliber options— from var- 
mint rounds to heavy hitters such as the Winchester Short 
Magnums and the .338 Win. Mag. — and it was the platform 
for introducing Mossberg's take on the adjustable, lever- 
in-blade trigger, dubbed the Lightning Bolt Action (LBA). 
Often sold in combo packages with scopes mounted, both 
the ATR and 4x4 were discontinued a year ago. 

Effectively, they paved the way for the MVP, introduced 
in 2011, another gun utilizing the round-bodied receiver, 
but one that made news with a chambering option in 5.56 
NATO (as opposed to .223 Rem.) and the ability to accept 
AR-type magazines. Since then a large array of MVPs have 
emerged, mostly with features geared to the tactical genera- 
tion. These include long-range, patrol, tactical. Scout, Flex 
and Light Chassis versions bearing Picatinny rails, flash hid- 
ers, adjustable stocks and other contemporary furniture. 

Concurrent with the bolt-gun developments was a move to 
fill the void when upheaval at Winchester in 2006 resulted in 
shelving that firm's legendary Model 94 lever-action. Mossberg 
was quick to jump in with a nicely made straight-grip carbine, 
unmistakably a Model 94 clone, but upgraded with a rear 
receiver bridge that added rigidity to the frame and made for 
more stable scope mounting. Covering the Model 464 intro 
for American Rifleman, former NRA Publications editor Dave 
Campbell said, ''... an American-made, forged steel receiver 


2015 : Make Wav For The Patriot 


rifle that is handsome, well made and functions properly . . . 
[for] less than $500 is quite an accomplishment." Campbell 
wasn't shy in calUng for a walnut option to the stained birch 
stock as well as a pistol-grip model, and eventually those two 
wishes were combined. Mossberg designers also thought way 
outside the box a few years later in conceiving the 464 SPX, 
with a stock treatment mimicking tricked-out AR rifles. 

Mossberg 's Center-Fire Outlook 

With the Patriot and MVP, it certainly appears Mossberg 
possesses a clear read on today's bolt-gun spectrum, at 
least the end within reach of most gun owners. For a num- 
ber of specialized uses, Mossberg can match or beat com- 
petitor pricing. And though I know many need to stretch 
their dollars, it's also my belief that gun folks generally 
rate performance and features above cost, so ultimately it's 
what happens on the range, in the field and on duty that'll 
determine their future. 

When it comes to lever-actions, it's not clear to me 
if there's much future beyond the nostalgia vote. The 
Model 464 certainly gets mine and perhaps more from my 
demographic, but that's a small number. I think under-50 
riflemen mostly see them as relics, but perhaps there are 
two glimmers of hope. First, you can empty a lever-action's 
magazine faster than a bolt-action's and in most cases the 
lever gun holds more rounds (albeit .30-30 vs. just about 


Whatever examples inspired Mossberg designers, the end 
result closely follows a template offered up by the virtual 
father of the modern sporting rifle. Jack O'Connor. 

In his Complete Book ofRifles and Shotguns (Harper Row, 
1965), O'Connor argued for a comb that's rounded, thick and 
is straight (level) front to back, with the same amount of 
drop at the heel as at the comb. He stated a preference for a 
small grip (circumference of 4 V 2 ") that follows a "slight, par- 
abolic curve," what we now refer to as an "open-radius" grip. 
In his view, the cheekpiece should be "flat ... about 5/8" 
thick at most." A fore-end that's 10" long and "fairly sub- 
stantial" is ideal for rifles with 22" barrels, he said, whereas 


SHOOTING RESULTS (100 YDS.) 


.308 WIN. 
CARTRIDGE 

VEL. @ 10' 
(EPS.) 

ENERGY 

(FT.-LBS.) 

GROUP SIZE (INCHES) 
SMALLEST LARGEST AVERAGE 

REMINGTON 

150-GR. 

CORE-LOKT ULTRA 

2653 Avg. 
22 Sd 

2,345 

1.55 

2.98 

2.23 

NORMA 150-GR. 
TAC-308 FMJ 

2602 Avg. 
20 Sd 

2,255 

1.61 

2.21 

1.90 

HORNADY 

150-GR. SST 

2756 Avg. 
15 Sd 

2,530 

1.76 

2.83 

2.25 

AVERAGE EXTREME SPREAD 




2.13 


Velocity average for 10 shots over a Shooting Chrony Beta chronograph 10 ft. from 

THE MUZZLE. ACCURACY RESULTS FOR FIVE CONSECUTIVE, FIVE-SHOT GROUPS AT 100 YDS. FROM A 

BENCHREST. Temperature 69° F. Humidity 51%. Abbreviations: PSP (pointed soft-point); 
Sd (Standard deviation); FMJ (full metal jacket); SST (Super ShockTip). 


58 


buttplates (buttpads nowadays) should be "large and flat to 
minimize recoil by distributing it over a large area." 

Keeping those guidelines in mind, the Patriot stacks up as 
follows: grip is an open-radius measuring 3V8" from the trig- 
ger to far point of the curve, while its smallest circumference 
is 5"; the comb is IVs" across and it slants only slightly, 1/4" 
variance from drop at comb to drop at heel; cheekpiece maxi- 
mum thickness equals 9/16"; and the buttpad is 5V4" x IVs". 
Indeed, the measurables are pretty close to O'Connor's ideal. 

What's noteworthy is that these stock dimensions aren't 
just aesthetic considerations, but also contribute to shootabil- 
ity. The former is a matter of taste, though a common enough 
standard that it seemingly is helping to 
drive sales. But the latter can help drive 
sales, too, as early Patriot owners report 
positive experiences to friends. 

I certainly found it a very slick-han- 
dling rifle, one that fit me well, and didn't 
beat me up in the least during bench 
sessions with our .308 Win. test gun and 
a .300 Win. Mag. I encountered in hunting 
camp. The LBA trigger, set at a pull weight 
of 2 lbs., 2 ozs. from the factory, absorbed 
noticeable tension, but then broke in an 
instant. It's owner-adjustable, and so fol- 
lowing directions in the manual, I reset it 
to 1 lbs., 8 ozs., which would be great for 
offhand match shooting but too light for 
my liking in field use. 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 



/A tno of Mossbergs proved to be the right 
stuff for an Alberta bear hunt Flanking a 
Model 500 slug gun ore a Model 464 lever- 
action and a walnut-stocked Patriot oil 
carrying Sworovski Z6i optics. 


every other caliber). Of course ARs, AKs and the like are 
even faster and have much greater capacity, but you'll pay 
hell to find one that rides a fraction as comfortably in a 
saddle scabbard. The second chance periodically comes to 


light on reality TV programs depicting life in the Alaskan 
bush, where it's not uncommon to see off-the-grid types 
toting lever-actions when they go out to check their live- 
stock, pick berries or pot a caribou, 







I did not Like how the rifle shot initially, and so swapped 
scopes and then tried a succession of loads until I hit on 
one that grouped acceptably. With that one on paper, I went 
back to my first test load and, then, with an additional 80 
rounds down the bore, it had settled in nicely for a light- 
weight hunting rifle shooting factory loads. 

I'd like to see what kind of accuracy could be had from 
Patriots equipped with heavier barrels. While that's not yet an 
option, 10 model variants are already on tap, including walnut. 


synthetic and laminate stocks, a Bantam youth model and more. 
Patriots are offered in 11 different chamberings, culminating in 
.375 Ruger, which means this is the first Mossberg truly geared 
for African dangerous game. Since returning to the bolt-action 
center-fire marketplace 10 years ago, the company has been 
proactive about churning out line extensions and always at bar- 
gain pricing. That flexibility will help ensure the Patriot holds 
its own in a market niche filled with fine models, and it doesn't 
hurt to be the best-looking of the lot. 


MANUFACTURER: O.F MossBERG & Sons, Inc. (Dept. AR), 7 Grasso Ave., North Haven, CT 06473; (203) 230-5500; mossberg.com 



7 MM Rem. Mag., .308 Win. (tested), 
.30-'06 Sprg.; .300 Win. Mag., 

.338 Win. Mag., .375 Roger 

ACTION TYPE: BOLT-ACTION, REPEATING 
CENTER-FIRE RIFLE 


MAGAZINE: FIVE-ROUND DETACHABLE BOX 
SIGHTS: NONE, DRILLED AND TAPPED FOR 
SCOPE MOUNTING 

TRIGGER: Lightning Bolt-Action 
adjustable; 2-lb., 2-oz. pull 


WEIGHT: 6 LBS., 5 OZS. 

ACCESSORIES: Weaver bases, owner's 

MANUAL, LOCK 

MSRP: $386 (tested) to $811 



AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


59 





HISTORICAL 



All ro naii.n^NCi roRfVHWTioh 
.xRW VOaKai.S A- 


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1 |p r, 

<hY^»i!d.u 

.. r aH'IKMil 

/li.Hiiiri Piiiiniii r 
r>trruiii,iK ‘111,111 


FIRST FIRED 
IN MGER? 


I 

■ n the early 1950s, a dapper and courtly Englishman 

■ told a fascinating tale to a budding young arms 

■ enthusiast, who was excited to have been invited to 
^L’ a luncheon with a number of older Los Angeles-area 

firearm aficionados. The gentleman, Donald B.H. Coates, 
claimed to be the first man ever shot at by someone armed 
with a Thompson submachine gun (TSMG). 

While probably serving as an underage intelligence 
agent with the Auxiliary Division of the Royal Irish 
Constabulary in 1921, Coates (later a soldier. Royal 
Auxiliary Air Force pilot, adventurer and noted pistol 
expert) claimed that, while on patrol in Dublin one night 
alongside the River Liffey, he was met with a withering 
burst of fully automatic gunfire. He naturally assumed that 
an Irish Republican Army (IRA) gunman had a Lewis light 
machinegun, but on searching the area in the daylight, he 


found a pile of spent .45 ACP cases, instead of the expected 
.303 British brass. 

According to Coates, he submitted an official report 
claiming to have been fired at by someone armed with a 
"select-fire M1911 Colt pistol." However, shortly thereafter, 
he and his fellow "Auxies" learned of an ambush on June 
16, 1921, in which two Thompsons were used to shoot up 
several railway carriages of a troop train carrying a detach- 
ment of the Royal West Kent Regiment at the suburban 
Dublin station at Drumcondra. He now knew that the IRA 
gunmen had "Tommy Guns," and he assumed that one of 
them had used one of the submachine guns against him 
that night. Another attendee at that luncheon, Gordon 
Ingram, the inventor of the Mac- 10 and Mac- 11 submachine 
guns, duly recorded the story in his unpublished memoirs. 

Some 20 years later, Coates again related the story to 


60 



December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 



So, when was the Thompson submachine gun first fired in comhat? 
Was it during the June 1921 West Virginia "coal wars" or perhaps 
even earlier? 


THE 
THOMPSON 


BY KENNETH LSMITH-CHRISTMAS 


Photo of Thompson by Talmadge G. 
Rutledge; Background image of Dublin, 
Ireland, circa 1920; Library of Congress 


another young fellow, an aspiring police officer, while 
Coates was repairing the sear on the young man's M1911A1 
pistol. During an informal shooting match on the indoor 
range in the basement of arms author Tom Nelson's home 
in Virginia, the young man's pistol had suddenly gone into 
intermittent full-automatic mode, and was firing three- 
round bursts. The malfunction reminded Coates of the story 
he had told years earlier in California. However, this time 
Coates had more to tell about the incident in Dublin. As he 
replaced the faulty sear on the pistol, he told the young 
man why he had originally reported being fired at by a 
select-fire M1911 pistol. 

Shortly before the incident on the Dublin quays, Coates 
had pursued an IRA suspect into a house in the city. The 
lady of the house was well known to Coates (he didn't 
specify why), and as he searched the home, he found a 


double shoulder holster rig under a coat, hanging on a hall 
rack. In the holsters were two specially modified select-fire 
Ml 9 11s — each one with a thumb selector lever. When he 
asked the lady about the owner of the guns, she replied 
that they belonged to "an American gentleman who was 
visiting from Chicago." Coates, who had turned 17 a few 
weeks earlier, assumed that an Irish gangster from Chicago 
was staying there, but since there were no rules against 
foreigners having such pistols, he did not confiscate the 
guns. After the incident on the quays, but before he 
learned of Tommy guns being used at Drumcondra, Coates 
now figured that the owner of the two pistols was not a 
gangster after all (the Irish mob was being pushed aside 
by the Italian Mafia at that time in Chicago), but rather an 
IRA gunman, and that the owner of the pistols was most 
likely the man who had shot at him that night. 



AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


61 ► 



THE THOMPSON 



James Dineen 
played the Irish 
game of hurley in 
America before 
World War L Many 
of the proponents 
of the Irish nation- 
alist movement 
were involved in 
Gaelic athletic 
associations on 
both sides of the 
Atlantic in the 
early 20th century. 


Two "American gentlemen from Chicago/' James Dineen 
and his cousin, Patrick Cronin, brought at least two 
Thompsons to Ireland in May 1921. Both Dineen and Cronin 
were former U.S. Army officers who had fought in France 
with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I, 
as well as having seen earlier service on the Mexican border. 
After landing in Ireland, they demonstrated the Thompsons 
to a group of IRA luminaries — including Michael Collins and 
Tom Barry — on May 24 in a disused tunnel outside Dublin. 
They were staying in downtown Dublin at 2 Wilson's Place, in 
a house a short walk south of the River Liffey. 

Oscar Traynor, the commander of the IRA forces at the 
May 25 attack on the Dublin Customs House, acknowledged 
that his force had a "machine gun," but maintained that, 
"for some unknown reason," it had not been brought into 
play during the battle. The British already had several 
TSMGs in Dublin, which had been ordered for "testing" by 
Maj. Hugh Pollard, a senior intelligence officer in Dublin 
and a noted arms authority. According to research by 
Pollard's biographer, Michael Curran, Maj. Pollard did claim 
that the IRA used a TSMG at the Customs House fight. 

However, in the early hours of June 9, 1921, the IRA 
launched a major night attack on the "Forces of the Crown" 
alongside the river in Dublin, exactly as Coates described 

continued on p. 88 





WWW.SPRINGFIELD-ARMORYXOM 







This cutaway Leupoid \/X-6 reveals the relatively sophisticated internal 
construction of a modern-day high-quality nflescope. Not only is there 
an erector tube assembly with its own set of optical lenses, there is a 
mechanical system of turrets and springs that effect user-input changes 
to the scope's parallax, windage and elevation adjustments. 



64 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 






KNOW-HOW 



Todays riflescopes are better than ever, but most users don't know how they work. To understand 
what happens when you turn those dials, take a peek inside — you might be surprised. 

BY JOHN BARSNESS,FI[[D[DITOB 


indage and elevation, Mrs. Langdon, windage 
and elevation." That sage advice came from Col. 
John Henry Thomas (John Wayne) in "The Undefeated," a 
film set in the era immediately after the Civil War, but it 
seems particularly appropriate today, when many shooters 
prefer adjusting their scopes for windage and elevation. 

Modern scopes adjust for point-of-impact by turning 
two knobs, one on top of the scope for elevation, the other 
on the side for windage. The knobs that the shooter turns 
are actually the tops of screws pressing against an erec- 
tor assembly, which consists of a second tube with optical 
lenses that lies inside the main scope tube. 

The erector tube's function is partly optical, "erecting" 
the image: If a scope only contained the convex lenses at 
each end, the image would appear upside down, making 
aiming somewhat difficult. This inversion can be easily 
demonstrated by looking through two magnifying glasses 
in approximately the same positions as a scope's front and 
rear lenses, the first a couple inches from your eye and the 


other about a foot away. The erector tube usually contains 
several lenses and, as it is adjusted from side-to-side within 
the scope, affects the firearm's point of impact. 

Only the rear end of the erector tube connects directly 
to the main exterior tube, usually with a two-axis gimbal, 
a pivoting frame. Before Google Earth, most people were 
familiar with the two-axis gimbals on the map models of our 
planet called globes. The gimbals allowed globes to both spin 
and tilt, so we could easily examine places from Antarctica 
to Zanzibar. An erector tube doesn't spin, but does need to 
move horizontally and vertically inside the scope. 

A spring system presses the erector tube against the 
bottoms of the windage and elevation screws. When the 
adjustment screws are turned inward, they push the erector 
tube against the spring system; when the screws are backed 
off, the spring system moves the tube. 

This sounds simple and foolproof, but in most rifle 
scopes the pair of adjustment screws sit at what a target 
shooter would call 12 o'clock and 3 o'clock, and a flat 



Photos by Forrest MacCormack 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


65 ► 






HOW RIFLESCOPES WORK 



spring sits opposite the adjustment turrets at approxi- 
mately 7 o'clock, between the erector tube and the main 
tube. A single spring can't provide nearly as much push as 
the two adjustment screws, and, as a result, the erector 
tube may not move when the adjustments are backed off. 

As an example, while sighting-in, a shooter fires a 
three-shot group at 100 yds., centered 4" low and 3" left of 
the aiming point. The shooter then turns the adjustments 
4" high and 3" right, but the fourth shot lands in the origi- 
nal group, because the erector tube didn't move. 

The recoil of the fourth shot, however, jars the erector 
tube against the adjustment screws, where the spring was 
supposed to push the erector in the first place. But the 
shooter doesn't realize this, so he or she adjusts the scope 
again. The fifth shot may end up at the aiming point, but 



the sixth shot probably won't, because the recoil knocked 
the erector tube loose again. 

Such erratic adjustments were common in early internal- 
adjustment scopes, partly because they often had 3/4" 
or 7/8" tubes, and thus provided little room for a strong 
spring. However, as recently as the early 1990s one opti- 
cally superb and fairly expensive brand of scope had really 
weak adjustment springs. After the scopes were sighted-in 
they worked great, but getting them there could be a real 
trial. Sometimes two or even three shots needed to be fired 
to really settle the scope down. I had several such scopes 
but eventually sold them, using the money to buy scopes 
that could be sighted-in without firing an entire box of 
ammunition, even if their optics weren't quite as good. 

This is why some shooters (particularly those of a certain 
age) tap the dials with an empty cartridge case after any 
adjustment. Many don't understand the mechanical reason 
for the tapping ritual, just that it's supposed to help the 
adjustments "take," but it's not always necessary. American- 
style scopes (including those made in China) have adjust- 
ments with right-hand threads. When we turn the dials 
clockwise, like we're tightening a bolt, the screw underneath 


The erector assembly is necessary for the scope to render the 
image in its correct vertical and horizontal position. 


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66 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 



the dial pushes directly against the erector tube, firmly 
shoving the erector tube in the direction it's supposed to go. 

Problems occur only when we turn the dial counter- 
clockwise, and erector-tube movement depends on the 
spring. Tapping the dial afterward can then knock a balky 
erector tube loose, allowing the spring to shove it against 
the adjustment screws — but so can bumping a rifle's recoil 
pad on the ground, simulating recoil. However, some 
European scopes have left-threaded adjustments, another 
reason many shooters always tap the adjustments no mat- 
ter which way they're turned. 

You can often see these parts by peering inside the objec- 
tive lens of your scopes with the help of a flashlight. The 
erector tube is always visible, and the adjustment spring 
sometimes appears as well, though often you have to back 
the adjustment screws all the way out before the erector 
tube moves enough to reveal the spring. In many scopes the 
erector tube barely extends past the turrets, and you can see 
not only the spring but the ends of the adjustment screws. 

The big trick is to clean the objective lens thoroughly 
before taking a look, because even a little dust creates a lot 
of flare, but before scopes were thoroughly sealed against 
outside moisture, most could be easily taken apart at home. 
Which is exactly why some ended up back at the factory 
after their curious owners couldn't put them back together. 



This simpiified drawing iiiustrates the basic mechanicai functions 
of a modern riflescope. The windage and elevation adjusters press 
against the erector tube assembly on two different axes, and a 
spnng forces the tube against them, keeping it in position. 


Tidings of Comfort 



Illustrations by David J. Labrozzi 


HOW RIFLESCOPES WORK 




FALL CARRY DAYS 


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from other writers. I still have that scope, but the adjust- 
ments aren't what they used to be. 

The reason the adjustments don't work as reliably now, 
of course, is the erector-tube spring has weakened with 
time and use. This often happens, especially on scopes 
designed to be simply sighted-in and left that way, rather 
than dialed for different ranges. The reason is simple eco- 
nomics-most shooters don't want to pay for adjustment 
springs that stay strong forever. 

When new, the clicks on that scope felt pretty crisp, 
and on calm days, with no one yacking at me, I could even 
hear them through my earmuffs, which is saying some- 
thing for an "experienced" shooter. However, contrary to 
what many shooters believe, the clicks of adjustment dials 
aren't connected to the erector-tube spring. Instead, clicks 
are created by notches around the perimeter of the dial, 
combined with a tiny spring in each adjustment turret. 

In many older scopes this was obvious, because the click 
spring stood right out in the open, next to the notched 
edge of the dial, but today both the spring and notches are 
hidden inside the turret. 


In earlier scope designs, the ends of the adjustment screws pressed 
against the erector tube. In modern, high-quality scopes, however, 
there's typically an interface installed at the end of the screw. 


Thanks to the appearance of affordable laser rangefind- 
ers in the late 1990s, even the adjustments of many lower- 
priced scopes work far more reliably than those earlier 
models, because so many shooters want to run the eleva- 
tion dials of their scopes up and down. However, accurate 
adjustments on lower-priced scopes don't hold up to that 
kind of repetitive use. 

A few years ago a certain scope company sent several 
shooting writers samples of a brand-new scope with a very 
affordable price. The adjustments on mine were precisely 
repeatable, even compared to some far more expensive 
scopes, and within a few months I'd heard the same thing 



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Like an erector-tube spring, a dial spring can weaken 
with use, and the notches around the dial can wear, result- 
ing in mushy clicks and slightly erratic adjustments. Scopes 
with consistent and long-lasting adjustments use strong 
erector and turret springs, combined with adjustment click- 
notches that don't wear after relatively little use. 

Some scopes use a pair of flat erector springs, and a few 
feature a coil spring housed in a little "knob" at the 7-o'clock 
position opposite the adjustment turrets. Some place the 
spring system at the rear end of the erector tube, leaving more 
room inside the scope for either larger lenses or more adjust- 
ment range. Several Swarovski scopes have coil springs in the 
rear end of the erector tube, and in some Simmons scopes the 
entire rear end of the erector tube is essentially a spring. 

Accuracy of adjustments, however, is also affected by the 
size of the erector and main tubes, especially at the extremes 
of adjustment range. This wasn't as much of a problem in the 
days when shooters sighted-in rifles and then left their scopes 
alone, but when we click the elevation adjustment to shoot at 
long range, the contact point of the windage screw may meet 
the curvature of the erector tube at a slight angle. 

This can also happen when a scope's not aligned reason- 
ably closely with the bore. Even if there's enough scope 
adjustment to sight-in, point-of-impact may not track per- 
fectly straight along horizontal and vertical lines, one reason 


An angled cam pin track 
causes the Lenses inside an 
erector tube assembly to 
move fore and aft, changing 
the magnification of the 
scope. These mechanical 
assemblies have become 
even more precise and 
sophisticated in recent years 
with the advent of wide 
zoom ratios — some as great 
as eight to one. They also 
ore a factor in the increase 
of tube body sizes, which, 
through the years, have 
grown from 3/4" to 34 mm. 


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AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


69 ► 



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HOW RIFLESCOPES WORK 


tube diameters of internally-adjustable 
scopes have increased since they started 
becoming popular in the 1930s. Back 
then, most American scopes had 3/4" 
or 7/8" tubes, and unless precisely 
mounted in Une with the bore the 
adjustments could work in strange ways. 
A larger scope diameter allows the use 
of a larger erector tube, providing a 
broader area of contact for the adjust- 
ment screws. 

The highest and best use of an 
optical collimator isn't sighting-in a 
rifle, since we can do that through 
old-fashioned bore-sighting. Instead, a 
collimator helps us to align our scope 
with the bore during mounting, then 
precheck the adjustments before going 
to the range, by watching the reticle's 
movement across the collimator grid 
while turning the adjustments. 

Many of the "faulty" adjustments 
shooters supposedly encounter in new 
scopes are actually the result of poor 
mounting alignment. I mount a lot of 
scopes every year, including some old 
ones, and in small-diameter scopes 
the moving reticle can perform inter- 
esting gymnastics. Some even follow 
S-curves when only one adjustment 
dial is turned, and smaller curves aren't 
uncommon even in modern scopes at 
the extremes of their adjustment range. 

Also, despite modern computer 
machinery, the final assembly of scopes 
is performed by humans. New scopes 
sometimes have machining marks or 
tiny bits of grit on their adjustment 
threads, creating slight hitches in the 
reticle's movement. These aberrations 
can often be eliminated by turning the 
adjustment dials all the way through 
their range a few times. 


Some scopes. Like this Burris, use a 
single spring mounted at the "7:30" 
position (arrow) to counteract the force 
of the adjustments. 



Photo by author 






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HOW RIFLESCOPES WORK 


Many shooters feel compelled to 
tighten ring screws like they tighten 
lug nuts on their pickup, because 
they worry about the scope shift- 
ing in the mounts due to the vicious 
recoil of their .243 Win. Well, if you 
really tighten those rings, the erector 
tube may not be able to shift inside 
the scope the way it's supposed to — 
another reason for erratic adjustments 
in scopes "right out of the box." 
Torque specifications for scope rings 
are measured in inch-pounds and not 
foot-pounds. 

I've even seen variable scopes 
turned into fixed-powers by gorilla- 
tightening, and the adjustments of 
variables are also more commonly 
affected than those in fixed-power 
scopes. Variables change magnifica- 
tion by sliding the erector lenses 
lengthwise inside the erector tube. 
This requires yet another tube outside 
the regular erector tube, with angled 
slots to cam the lenses back and forth, 
leaving less room inside the main tube 
than the single-wall erector tube of 
fixed-power scopes. 

If you crush a variable scope even 
slightly while tightening the mount- 
ing rings, the erector tube won't be 
able to move as much during windage 
and elevation adjustments. It may also 
move erratically, or even "jump" to 
a different position during the rifle's 
recoil, like the erector tube in a scope 
with a weak erector spring. 

The extra cam tube is the reason 
variable scopes usually allow less 
windage and elevation adjustment 
than fixed-power scopes of the same 
basic design. It's also why scopes 
with 30-mm body tubes have become 
popular among longer-range shoot- 
ers: There's more room inside the 
main tube for the erector tube to 
move up and down. Of course, this 
depends to a certain extent on how 
each company engineers their scopes, 
and relatively few make fixed-power 
scopes today. 

Today's riflescopes are superior to 
those of even a generation ago, both 
optically and mechanically. Still, 
understanding how they work can 
help us get the most out of what they 
have to offer. ^ 


72 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 









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Smart Luxuries — Surprising Prices 







S hortly after Sturm, Ruger & Co.'s 
1999 introduction of its 
.22 WMR-chambered Model 
10/22 Magnum, Magnum Research, 
Inc., rolled out its U.S.-made 
Magnum Lite Rifle (MLR) in the 
same chambering. Ironically, when 
production of the Model 10/22 
Magnum ceased in 2006, the MLR 
not only began filling the former's 
niche, but, according to the Blue 
Book of Gun Values, Thirty-Fourth 
Edition, the 10/22 Magnum's receiver 
was also used in the manufacture 
of some MLRs. Since that time, the 
.22 WMR MLR has been offered in 
an array of configurations, with the 
most recent being the Magnum Lite 
Rifle .22 WMR Barracuda American 
Black Walnut (MLR22WMBW) variant 
reviewed here. 


The rifle's foundation is a CNC- 
machined, anodized-aluminum 
receiver measuring 6^/4 " in length 
and IV4" wide. A IVs" extension at its 
front serves as the attachment point 
for the steel V-block that secures 
the barrel via two screws. Integral to 
the receiver is a 6 Vie" -long rail that 
accepts Weaver-style scope rings. A 
series of holes and scalloping on the 
rail enhance the rifle's aesthetics. 
Overall, the machining of the receiver 
was consistent and featured few tool- 
ing marks, however, there were two 
exceptions. At the rear of the rail 
there was unevenness, and internally 
the left receiver wall had several 
deep, unsightly gouges. Safety 
wouldn't be compromised but, for a 
rifle approaching $1,000 in price, we 
expected more attention to detail. 


SHOOTING RESULTS (100 YDS.) 


.22 WMR 
CARTRIDGE 

VEL. @5' 
(EPS.) 

ENERGY 

(FT.-LBS.) 

GROUP SIZE (INCHES) 
SMALLEST LARGEST AVERAGE 

CCI 22 MAG GP 
40-GR. JSP 

1 833 Avg . 
30 Sd 

298 

0.53 

1.03 

0.75 

CCI MAXI-MAG 
40-GR. TMJ 

1868 Avg. 
35 Sd 

310 

0.90 

1.21 

1.01 

HORNADY CD 
45-GR. FTX 

1646 Avg. 
32 Sd 

271 

0.71 

1.15 

0.96 

AVERAGE EXTREME SPREAD 




0.91 


Notes: Measured average velocity for 10 shots from a 19" barrel over a Competition 
Electronics ProChrono Digital chronograph. Accuracy results for five consecutive, 
FIVE-SHOT GROUPS AT 100 YDS. FROM A CaLDWELL 7 ReST. TEMPERATURE! 84° F. HUMIDITY! 
67%. Abbreviations: CD (Critical Defense), FTX (FlexTip expanding), GP (Game 
Point), JSP (jacketed soft point), Sd (Standard deviation), TMJ (Total Metal Jacket). 


74 




The polymer fire-control housing is 
attached to the receiver via two cross 
pins. Contained within is the bolt- 
lock lever, extended magazine-release 
lever, two-position cross-bolt safety 
and trigger. With the exception of 
the bolt-lock lever, the other controls 
are made from polymer. The single- 
stage trigger broke at 4 lbs., 4 ozs. 
with slight creep but no overtravel. 
The magnum MLR22 uses nine- 
round-capacity detachable Ruger 
10/22 Magnum rotary magazines, 
and the extended magazine-release 
lever facilitates efficient magazine 
changes. Whereas the rear of the 
magazine's steel feed lips provide 
ejection, extraction is achieved via a 
spring-tensioned hook extractor. 

Considered a gas-assisted, blow- 
back-operated rifle, several inter- 
related features are needed to ensure 
safe, reliable functioning with a range 
of .22 WMR loads. However, ammu- 
nition with bullets weighing less 


A carbon fiber barrel reduces overall 
weight and enshrouds a steel bore liner. A 
stainless cop and 11-degree crown protect 
the rifled liner at the muzzle. 



December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 



MANUFACTURER: Magnum Research, Inc. (Dept. AR), 12602 33rd Ave. S.W., Pillager, MN 56473; (508) 635-4273; 

MAGNUMRESEARCH.COM 



CALIBER: .22 WMR SIGHTS: none; integral Weaver-style cable lock 

ACriOA/TT'PE: GAS-ASSISTED, BLOWBACK- SCOPE BASE MSPP: $941 

OPERATED, SEMI-AUTOMATIC RIMFIRE RIFLE TRIGGER: SINGLE-STAGE; 4-LB., 4-OZ. PULL 



The Barracuda-style Magnum Lite Rifle presents a unique, but purpose-driven profile. 
From the carbon fiber and steel barrel to the swells, windows and ledges of the 
black walnut stock, the MLR22WMBW incorporates components that save weight and 
promote accuracy. 


The 0.920"-wide, 19"-long sightless 
barrel is comprised of unidirectional 
graphite carbon fiber and stainless 
steel. The latter material is employed 
in critical areas, including: lining 
(bore), muzzle, and near the receiver, 
where the chamber, V-block, vent hole 
and gas-dispersion block are found. To 
protect the rifling, the barrel lining 
stops just shy of the muzzle's steel 
cap, which features an 11-degree 
crown. Further, the rear of the 
receiver has a hole through which a 
rifle rod can pass (once disassembled, 
of course) to facilitate chamber- 
to-muzzle cleaning, an additional 
safeguard for the rifling. The barrel's 
graphite/stainless steel junctions 


are seamless, and the combination 
of materials contributes to the gun's 
light, 4-lb., 7-oz. heft. 

The MLR22WMBW is named for 
the "Barracuda" thumbhole stock. 
Although offered since the first 
MLRs debuted in 1997, to date, only 
colored-laminate versions were avail- 
able. For 2015, the company began 
offering the stock in American black 
walnut. For average-size hands, the 
unconventional design has a near-per- 
fect fit and feel; the thumbhole, palm 
swell and flared shelf at the bottom of 
the pistol grip are quite comfortable 
and provide a rock-solid hold. Behind 
the pistol grip, a fair bit of wood is 
removed to save weight, and the comb 


The American Rifleman has used the phrase "Dope Bag" since at least 1921, when Col. Townsend 
Whelen first titled his column with it. Even then, it had been in use for years, referring to a sack used 
by target shooters to hold ammunition and accessories on the firing line. "Sight dope" also was a 
traditional marksman's term for sight-adjustment information, while judging wind speed and direction 
was called "doping the wind." 

WARNINGiTechnical data and information contained herein are intended to provide information based 
on the limited experience of individuals under specific conditions and circumstances. They do not detail 
the comprehensive training procedures, techniques and safety precautions absolutely necessary to 
properly carry on similar activity. Read the notice and disclaimer on the contents page. Always consult 
comprehensive reference manuals and bulletins for details of proper training requirements, procedures, 
techniques and safety precautions before attempting any similar activity. 


than 40 grs. cannot be used in this 
model— a stipulation that eliminates 
most of the new high-performance and 
leadless loads. Concerning its features, 
the rifle has a beefy steel bolt with 
a 0.735"-wide charging handle also 
made from steel that must be in place 
during firing. Obviously, the bolt's 
mass, along with recoil spring tension, 
is essential to the blowback operation. 
Additionally, the barrel has a small 
venting hole through which some gas 
is bled into a steel, rectangular-shaped 
block that then disperses excess gas 
through its 21 holes. The vented gas 
flows into the barrel channel of the 
stock. According to the instruction 
manual, the barrel's vent helps to 
equalize the timing of peak pressure 
variances in .22 WMR ammunition and 
the gas dispersion block must not be 
removed. Because of the vent/ gas dis- 
persion block requirement, aftermar- 
ket barrels cannot be used. 



AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


75 



DOPE BAG 


exhibits considerable slope to align 
the eye with an optic. Capping the 
butt is a l/4"-thick rubber recoil pad 
with slight tackiness. Three-and-one- 
half inches forward of the receiver 
the fore-end angles downward and 
continues forward without touching 
the barrel, therefore, much of the 
barrel is free-floating. The floating 
barrel probably improves accuracy, 
and definitely speeds heat dissipa- 
tion during extended range sessions. 
Immediately forward of the magazine 
the stock is a wide, 2.18" in diameter. 
Lefties beware, the stock design is 
not bilateral. 

For testing, we topped the Model 
MLR22WMBW with a Weaver Grand 
Slam 4-16X 44 mm riflescope in 
Weaver Grand Slam rings and shot 
five, five-shot groups at 100 yds. from 


a Caldwell 7 Rest using three different 
loads. Of the loads, the most accurate 
proved to be CCI's 40-gr. GamePoint, 
which had both the smallest single 
group (0.53") and five-group aver- 
age (0.75"); however, all three of the 
ammunition types provided satisfac- 
tory accuracy. During testing, the 
evaluation arm experienced four 
malfunctions, all of which occurred 
with the Hornady load. There was one 
failure to feed and three "stovepipes" 
(half ejection). 

Testing in the direct sunlight dur- 
ing a hot summer day, the graphite/ 
stainless steel barrel heated surpris- 
ingly quickly, though the cooling time 
was less than with an all-metal barrel. 
Still, vertical stringing occurred as 
the barrel heated. Additionally, the 
evaluators liked the Barracuda stock 


design; specifically, when cheekweld 
was established, the eye automatically 
aligned with the scope, and the pistol 
grip is dimensionally correct for maxi- 
mum control and comfort. Lastly, that 
the rifle uses Ruger's rotary magazine 
is a bonus. 

The Model MLR22WMBW is not for 
everyone; hunters who pursue small 
game and predators in areas requir- 
ing lead-free ammunition will need 
to look elsewhere, as the rifle cannot 
safely and reliably use lightweight 
leadless loads. But for shooters and 
hunters who pine for a .22 WMR- 
chambered semi-automatic rifle to use 
in places without such restrictions, 
the MLR Barracuda is certainly worth 
a look. It offers a unique blend of tra- 
ditional and high-tech features with 
good performance. fT 


Vortex Razor! GEN II 3-1ll)( 50 mm 



P urpose-built long-range rifle- 
scopes are a breed apart from 
typical variable-power optics. 
Proficient distance-goers not only 
demand capability-enhancing features 
but, in the course of practicing their 
craft, they impart punishment that 
can break down lesser-quality optics. 
Trustworthy manufacturers know that 
cutting corners to save costs isn't an 
option. An example of a premium, all- 
encompassing, long-range riflescope is 
the subject of this review. Vortex Optic's 
new Razor HD GEN II 3-18X 50 mm. 

Not unlike most current long- 
range riflescopes, the Japanese-made 

76 


Razor HD GEN II 3-18X has a one- 
piece, 34-mm main tube machined 
from aircraft-grade aluminum, which 
is then hard-coat-anodized with a 
low-glare finish. The large-diameter 
tube allows for increased adjustment 
range — 120 and 69 m.o.a. for eleva- 
tion and windage, respectively, or 35 
and 20 milliradians (mils). But, the 
additional material also contributes 
to the 14V8"-long scope's hefty 46.5 
oz. weight. Vortex provides aluminum, 
Picatinny-base rings with the scope. 
Considering that many 34-mm rings 
cost in excess of $200, that's no small 
"extra." However, they were too low 

December 2015 


to use on our selected test platform, 
a Lancer L30 Heavy Metal. Whereas 
the rear mounting section of the main 
tube is 2.2", the forward section is a 
mere 2.0" — leaving little wiggle room 
to account for proper eye relief. 

Vortex Optics wisely chose a 
50-mm objective lens diameter for the 
Razor HD GEN II 3-18X. Whereas larger 
objective lenses offer slight increases 
in light-gathering power and thus 
resolution, they also require rings at 
heights that make consistent chee- 
kweld difficult to achieve and main- 
tain. This is especially problematic on 
AR-style arms featuring a buttstock 
without an adjustable cheekpiece. 

But, as its name suggests, the Razor 
HD GEN II's index-matched lenses 
are made from high-density (HD), 
extra-low-dispersion glass, which 
enhances image sharpness, bright- 
ness and color fidelity, so bright- 
ness lost to the smaller objective 
is offset. Additionally, the lenses 
are fully multi- coated for maximum 
brightness and light transmission. 
The exterior lenses have ArmorTek, 
a scratch-, oil- and debris-resistant 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 



coating. 0-ring seals prevent water 
and particulates from entering, 
while argon purging removes oxygen 
to prevent internal fogging. 

The illuminated, glass-etched 
reticle is located in the first focal 
plane, therefore, the reticle's scale 
in proportion to the image remains 
unchanged throughout the entire 
magnification range. Constant sub- 
tensions permit accurate ranging, 
holdovers and wind-deflection cor- 
rections at all magnification settings. 
Moreover, the reticle appears thicker 
at high-magnification settings and 
thinner at lower ones. Powered by a 
CR2032 battery (included), reticle 
illumination is adjusted via an 
11-setting rheostat located on the 
parallax-adjustment turret. In 
between brightness settings are Off 
positions. To adjust, simply pull out 
the checkered dial, rotate it to the 
desired intensity (or Off) and push it 
back in. 

Two variants of the EBR-2C reticle 
are available; they differ only in that 
one employs m.o.a.-based subten- 
sion lines while the other uses mils. 
The reticle chosen will determine 
if turret adjustment "clicks" are 
valued at 1/4 m.o.a. or 0.1 mils 
each. Regardless of the EBR-2C 
reticle selected though, to utilize the 
scope to its fullest requires not only 
knowing the various subtensions, 
but also the ranging formulas, the 
firearm's exact ballistics (trajectory, 
wind deflection, etc.), and ability to 
accurately determine the wind speed, 
among other things. 




As is expected with a long-range, 
tactical-style riflescope approaching 
$3,000, the Razor HD GEN II 3-18X 
has a zero-stop feature coined L-Tec. 
Readying the system is simple; with 
the push/pull-style locking tur- 
rets' "0" indexed with the reference 
marks on the turret bodies, the turret 
caps are loosened and removed, and 
then the three setscrews on each 
cap perimeter are backed out. This 
frees the brass center screws to make 
adjustments. Unlimited zero-setting 
positions permit the zero to be set 
between clicks for optimal accuracy. 
Once sighted, the order is reversed 
and the return-to-zero feature is set. 
The turrets' large numbers and lines 
are easily read, and particularly help- 
ful are the "L" and "R" designations 
on the windage dial. Also beneficial 
is the external rotation indicator, 
which provides a quick visual and 
tactile index of the elevation turret's 
rotational position. A multi-tool is 
provided to make all of the aforemen- 
tioned adjustments. 

Company literature states that the 
erector tube system is machined from 
brass alloy to prevent galling, and the 
polished, chromium-vanadium erector 
spring withstands compression and 
has high fatigue resistance. Moreover, 
heat-treated, hardened steel pads on 
the turret screw interact with a hard- 
ened steel ring on the erector tube to 
prevent galling or deformation of the 
turret screw. 

As with the parallax-adjustment 
turret, which adjusts from 25 yds. 
to infinity, the machined-aluminum 
magnification band has sufficient 
tension to prevent unintended move- 
ment. A fast-focus eyepiece rounds 
out the scope. 

Testing of the Vortex Razor HD 
GEN II 3-18X 50 mm began by placing 



IMPORTER: VoRTEX Optics (Dept. AR), 
2120W. Greenview Drive, Middleton, 
Wl 53562; (800) 426-0048; 


vortexoptics.com 

RETICLE: FIRST-FOCAL-PLANE, ETCHED, 
ILLUMINATED EBR-2C (m.O.A. OR MILS) 

ADJUSTMENT: L-Tec turrets with 

ZERO-STOP 

MAINTUBE DIAMETER: 34 MM 

FIELD OF VIEW: 37.8 FT. (3X)- 
6.25 FT. (18X) @ 100 yds. 

EXIT PUPIL (MM): 9.5 (3X)-2.78 (18X) 

OBJECTIVE APERTURE: 50 MM 

EYE RELIEF: 3.7 " 

ELEVATION ADJUSTMENT: 120 M .O.A., 

35 MILS (tested) 

WINDAGE ADJUSTMENT: 69 M .O.A., 

20 MILS (tested) 

CLICK VALUE: 1/4 M.O.A., 

0.1 MILS (tested) 

LENGTH: 14.4" 

WEIGHT: 46.5 OZS. 

ACCESSORIES: OWNER'S manual, 
SUNSHADE, LENS CLOTH, LENS COVERS, 
ADJUSTMENT TOOL 

MSRP: $2,800 

the scope in the freezer overnight, 
followed by submersion in warm 
water. There was only minute internal 
fogging (purging cannot eliminate all 
oxygen) and, absent bubbles, there 
were no signs of leakage. This was to 
be expected. We then mounted the 
scope atop a Lancer L30 Heavy Metal 
in 34-mm Weaver rings and shot the 
square. We found the 0.1 -mil clicks 
to be correct in value and, equally 
important, the movements were 
consistent and repeatable. This is 
essential for applying ranging data 
and returning to zero. Adjustments 
were crisp with no play encountered 
between settings. Lastly, when com- 
pared to two other optics with com- 
parable price tags in differing light 
conditions, the Razor HD's superior 
brightness, resolution and color fidel- 
ity were apparent. Frankly, there was 
nothing about the scope that needed 
refinement or changing. The rings, 
however, need to be taller. 

In the optics marketplace, the 
high-dollar, premium long-range rifle- 
scope is assuredly among the smallest 
niches. In this small, crowded and 
demanding field, competition is fierce, 
but with products such as the Razor 
HD GEN II 3-18X 50, it's little wonder 
why Vortex Optics is among the few 
serious competitors. ^ 


Long-range shooters demand fu it control of their optics, and the Razor HD accommodates 
them with magnification and focal rings near the ocular lens (L). Three turrets allow for 
dialing windage and elevation, along with parallax and reticle intensity (top). 



AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


77 


HANDGUN OPTICS 


continued from p. 53 


rain, a red-dot sight may put you at a disadvantage." Also, 
for as durable and compact as MRSs have become, iron 
sights still lay the wood to them in both departments. 
Finally, until recently, mounting an MRS to a handgun 
meant taking a drill to your new baby. But that last point 
is well on its way to being a thing of the past. 

In 2013 Smith and Wesson released its M&P C.O.R.E. 
(Competition Optics Ready Equipment) models. Engineers 
added a couple steps into the CNC-machining process 
to cut out a 1.92 "-long notch in the rear portion of the 
slide, just ahead of the rear sight dovetail and aft of the 
ejection port. Then the slide is drilled and tapped to 
accommodate screws for the five included adaptor plates 
that match up to several different styles of reflex sights 
with various footprints and mounting points. The plates 
feature small studs, or posts, that correspond to holes in 
the slide and the optic to prevent the sight from shift- 
ing laterally. To mount an MRS, simply remove the slide 
cover, choose the correct plate, secure it to the slide 
with two included machine screws, then screw the sight 
onto the plate. Once mounted, the mini-reflex sight is 
recessed into the slide so it has a lower profile; mounting 
is quick and secure. Other companies, such as Glock, have 
emulated this plate adapter system. As a result, optics 
companies anticipate increased demand and are currently 
addressing the sights' aforementioned disadvantages. 

For example, Trijicon's Dual Illuminated RMR, with 
its Tritium backup light source, works regardless of a 
battery. Some units, like Bushnell's First Strike, fea- 
ture a solenoid that cuts the unit off when the cover 
is placed on it and dims it in low light, thereby saving 
battery life. Leupold's DeltaPoint features Motion Sensor 
Technology that turns itself off after five minutes of 
inactivity then immediately turns back on when jostled. 
Others like Burris' Fast Fire 3 fea- 
ture a button for auto-dimming, 
but on/off is manual. C-More's CTS 
features an innovative cover that 
is attached to a belt -mounted lan- 
yard. When the gun is drawn, the 
cover pops off, turning the sight 
on. Raindrops be damned. 

USES AND 
REAL-WORLD 
EXPERIENCE 

As Koenig has proven many times 
over, mini-reflex sights are superior 
for "open class" competition, but 
what about for other purposes? 

Using them for concealed carry 
isn't as far-fetched as it seemed a 
few years ago. I mounted an EOTech 
MRDS on an M&P9L (Longslide), and 
I was surprised at how concealable 

78 


it is. My preferred carry method is a small-of-the-back 
holster inside the waistband. The mini-reflex rests just 
above my waistband, and does not print under a T-shirt. 
Ignorantly, I removed the iron sights thinking it'd be 
one less thing to snag, but after shooting and carrying 
the gun I quickly learned that a necessity of carrying a 
reflex-equipped gun is having the ability to cowitness, or 
see the iron sights through the lens in order to aim if the 
sight goes down. 

I suspect sights will get smaller, and slide recesses will 
get deeper, allowing the sights to rest even lower to the 
bore and reducing the number of edges that could catch 
on clothing. Certainly, large, long-slide pistols such as 
the Glock G40 MOS are not the first choice of most CCW 
holders, but other models, such as SIG's P320 RX and the 
4. 2 5" -barreled M&P are well within the realm of concealed 
carry. Keep in mind, this is just the first wave of optics- 
ready guns. 

For hunting, I mounted a Burris Fast Fire 3 on a Glock 
G40 MOS. It doesn't require a special holster and only adds 
2 ozs. to the gun. With a solid rest, my 50-yd. groups 
shrunk from 4.5" to 2.5", and my 100-yd. groups were held 
within the 6" circle of a whitetail's vitals. With iron sights, 
my groups at that range could hardly be called groups. 

Despite these things, I still I had a few concerns. 

One, would it stay zeroed at all times? I have not had 
one break or lose zero yet, although the 10 mm Auto 
Glock G40 loosened the screws on a Trijicon RMR — now I 
always use Lock-Tite. I also found that the tiny machine 
screws that hold the optic onto the slide cannot go too 
deeply into the thin metal of the slide as they could 
strip out. So take great care not to overtighten them 
during installation. 

Many units feature an auto-brightness setting, and for 
most applications it's the way to go — 
but not always. Dimming the dot also 
makes it smaller, allowing more pre- 
cise aiming. So aiming in bright light 
(when you must make the dot big 
and bright) at long range is difficult. 

When shooting from the draw, at 
first it's rather easy to pull up, find 
the target in the optic, but not the 
red dot. Usually it's floating around 
higher than you think, and so you 
must push the barrel down to see it. 
After a few minutes of practice, I got 
it down; now it's natural. 

In time I believe that mini-reflex- 
ready slides on handguns will be as 
common as Picatinny rails on rifles. 
And that is a good thing, as it gives 
shooters more options. 

"There used to be professionals 
who were skeptical of the red-dot's 
speed and accuracy," Koenig said. "No 
one doubts them anymore." ^ 


MINI-REFLEX 
SIGHT MAKERS 

Trijicon RMR trijicon.com 
Bushnell First Strike bushnell.com 
Leopold DeltaPoint leupold.com 
Burris Fast Fire 3 burrisoptics.com 
Docter Sight C docter-germany.de 
Meopta M-RAD meoptasportsoptics.com 
Sight Mark Mini Shot sightmark.com 
Vortex Razor vortexoptics.com 
TruGlo Dual Color Open Red Dot 

TRUGLO.COM 

EoTECH MRDS EOTECHINC.COM 
JP Enterprises J Point jprifles.com 
Steiner MRS steiner-optics.com 
Redfield Accelerator redfield.com 
Insight 261 /PVS insighttechnology.com 
SIG Sauer Romeo 1, Romeo 3 

SIGSAUER.COM 

December 2015 


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Photos by NRA staff 


SPECIAL REPORT 



Safeguarding our 


By Laurie A. Luebbert, Managing Editor America’s P‘ Freedom 


NRA-backed team trains first class of school security 
assessors as part of National School Shield program 


N ot long after Williamson County 
schoolchildren started their 
academic year in Tennessee, a 
dozen or so nontraditional students — all 
experienced law enforcement officials — 
were also going back to school. 

But this class had a different agenda. 
These students were participating in 
a training seminar on ways to keep 


young people safe — safe from weather 
emergencies, safe from fire, safe from 
the remote chance that violence could 
erupt on campus. 

The four-day practicum, taught by 
an array of security experts, was the 
first official National School Shield 
(NSS) security assessor training class. It 
is one facet of the NSS program set up 
by the National Rifle Association in the 
aftermath of the December 2012 attack 
at Sandy Hook Elementary School as one 
way to keep our children more secure. 

"The training program was received 
with overwhelming success ... with law 
enforcement officers identifying critical 
vulnerabilities in the school's security pos- 
ture," said John Quattrone, a retired U.S. Air 
Force colonel and a security adviser who 
has been involved in the initiative since its 
inception. "Additionally, law enforcement 


officers were able to provide significant 
qualitative mitigation measures to en- 
hance the school's security environment." 

From Theoretical to the Practical 

The course covered all the bases, from 
teaching participants the fundamen- 
tals of school security assessments to 
conducting a live assessment at a local 


K-1 2 school. During their walk-through at 
the school, participants talk to teachers, 
students and school employees, and they 
visually inspect the building, all under the 
guiding eye of security experts who coach 
them regarding what to ask and how best 
to verify information that someone gives 
them about a potential vulnerability. 

"I felt the design of the course and the 
practical exercise was helpful in creating 
a consistent method of assessing schools. 
It provided great detail in the ways to 
organize an assessment that also included 
how to construct and present feedback 
to the school," said Michael Fletcher, 
safety and security director for Williamson 
County Schools and one of the trainees. 

That Williamson County — which 
encompasses the bucolic horse country 
south of Nashville — hosted the first asses- 
sor training course was no accident. The 


county has been proactive in stepping up 
school security ever since Sandy Hook. 

"We've really grown our SRO (school 
resource officer) program since then," said 
Capt. Alan Laney of the county sheriff's of- 
fice, adding that the county reassigned an 
additional 32 officers to various schools, 
"and Sheriff Jeff Long gave the SRO pro- 
gram a new focus on security." 

Before, each school and its SRO were 
responsible for their individual schools; 
now, the county is trying for across- 
the-board uniformity in terms of school 
security. And having NSS security experts 
come in to teach gives them an outsid- 
er's view of the situation, Laney said. 

The pay-off can come pretty soon after 
the training program, too. Already, the 
Tennessee folks are preparing to send their 
newly trained assessors out in force to rate 
schools. Since all of them are on the same 
page in terms of approach, that will allow 
for a consistent end product, Fletcher said. 

Maximizing Local Resources 

The assessor training program is 
designed to empower localities to play a 
more active role in better protecting their 
children. While outside consultants can be 
hired to assess a school district, Laney said 
his county's experience showed that such 
companies provide generalized overviews 
of the whole school system. With hands- 
on assessments done by people with a 
greater local interest, teams can focus 
more on individual campuses. 


Learn more about how NSS protects schools. 
Visit nationalschoolshield.org 




Children, 
Investing in our 



Part of the National School Shield security 
assessor training program requires students 
to conduct an on-site security assessment at a 
school, as this participant Is doing. 

Additionally, by providing communi- 
ties direct access to trained assessors, 

NSS is able to help schools maximize 
already strained security budgets. 

"A lot of the schools do not have the re- 
sources. They can go out and get a private 
firm to do what we are offering to do for 
them but the assessment alone can cost 
anywhere from ten to twenty thousand 
dollars — and to a lot of schools, that is a lot 
of money. We are doing that for them for 
practically nothing," said David Keene, past 
president of the NRA and chairman of the 
NSS Advisory Council. 

Parameters of the Program 

One aspect of the training program 
is that the students learn how to make 
a persuasive argument to get what they 
need. "We might know the basics," Laney 
said, "but now we are learning how to 
fight for the improvements." 

The agenda for the inaugural assessor 
training course earned praise. 

"They now have the ability to conduct 
an unbiased fact-finding assessment," 
Quattrone said. "Many of the students 
commented afterward that, while they 
were familiar with much of the course 
material itself, the class gave them ... a 
keener ability to spot vulnerabilities and 
recommend appropriately scaled secu- 
rity enhancements." 

"Attending the National School Shield 
training gave me a new skill which I 
can use to help my community protect 


our children. By learning how to spot 
vulnerabilities, I can help all stakeholders 
in the safety of our children do our best 
to protect them. The training not only 
reminded me of things I had previously 
learned, but it gave me new resources 
that I can employ in assessments of any 
school facility," said CpI. Michael Johnson 
of the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, 
a participant in the training. 

After the students performed their 
walk-through at the host school, they 
went back to the classroom and learned 
how to create an effective presentation 
that identified strengths and potential 
vulnerabilities based on industry best 
practices. Sometimes that can be as 
simple as having a school maintenance 
worker fix a door that won't shut and 
lock easily or having landscapers trim 
trees so field of vision from inside the 
building is not obstructed; other times, 
mitigating the potential vulnerabilities 
requires more funding — which can be a 
challenge for cash-strapped districts. 

That's another area where the National 
School Shield program can help, thanks 
to a grant program designed to sup- 
port schools that want to make security 
improvements. 

"While the assessment is a corner- 
stone of the National School Shield 
program, the grant component is an 
equally important piece of the puzzle," 
said Sheila Brantley, NSS program direc- 
tor. "For schools that have identified 
areas in need of improvement but face 
a lack of available resources to address 
security needs, NSS grants fulfilled by 
The NRA Foundation serve as a vital 
resource. 

"That is what I believe makes the 
National School Shield program so attrac- 
tive — by providing tools and resources 
designed to help schools identify poten- 
tial security vulnerabilities, as well as the 
funding to implement necessary security 
improvements, the program helps re- 
move the barriers to information and/ 
or funding that have previously slowed 
progress in making our schools more 
secure. There is nothing more critical to 
our nation's well-being than our children's 
safety, and the National School Shield is 
our commitment to that effort."^ 




For a downloadable 
brochure go to 
nationalschoolshield.org 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG DECEMBER 2015 






Official journal 


I LA report: 


Latest legislative news from inside the NRA Institute for Legislative Action 


Politifact Flip-Flops to Advocate 
Anti-Gun Narrative 


A s weVe reported in the past, one of the more favored — 
yet discredited — claims made by gun control advocates 
is that 40 percent of firearm transfers take place without 
a background check. Fact checkers have routinely pointed 
out numerous problems with the 40 percent statistic, with the 
Washington Post's Glenn Kessler giving Obama three Pinocchios 
when the president cited the bogus claim back in 201 3. 

Unfortunately, it now appears that even the fact checkers need 
fact checkers. Linda Qui, writing for Politifact, wrote about the is- 
sue after Mark Kelly invoked the 40 percent claim during an Oct. 1 
appearance on CNN. In her write-up, Qui rightly points out all the 
reasons why the 40 percent claim has been repeatedly rebuked by 
fact-checking organizations in the past, including Politifact itself. 

The claim is based on a 1994survey of only 251 people 
who told researchers they were gun owners. As anyone who 
has ever read a surveyor poll knows, a sample size of 251 is 
insufficient to draw conclusions about the broader population 
under study. The researchers then asked of these 251 respon- 
dents how they came to have their firearms and whether or not 
a background check had been conducted. 

Even if the sample size had been sufficiently large to 
represent the broader population, there are obvious problems 
with this methodology. It doesn't take a statistician to know 


that of the 251 respondents, the researchers didn't actually 
verify whether or not they were actual firearm owners. Further, 
the researchers also relied on the memory of respondents to 
describe whether a background check had taken place. Many 
respondents likely couldn't remember the exact details the 
researchers were asking about. 

More broadly, even if the methodological deficiencies are 
ignored, it's important to recall that the survey was conducted 
in 1 994 and that the National Instant Criminal Background Check 
System wasn't operational at the national level until 1998. 

Even after recognizing these shortcomings, Qui shifts from an 
explanation of why the 40 percent claim is bogus to an explo- 
ration of all the reasons why it is the "best estimate" available. 

A litany of anti-gun advocates and researchers are quoted as 
essentially saying, "We don't have anything else, so this is good 
enough." For Qui, this somehow equates to bolstering the bogus 
40 percent claim's veracity and Qui rates the claim "half true." 

Remarkably, this is in direct contradiction to a "fact check" 
done by Politifact earlier in 201 5. Politifact's Sean Gorman rated 
the 40 percent claim as "mostly false" when Virginia Gov. Tim 
Kaine used the statistic during a political speech in April. It 
appears that neutral "fact checking," has followed "objective" 
reporting as a thing of the past. 


FBI: Crime Decreased in 2014 


I n October, the FBI reported that the na- 
tion's total violent crime rate decreased 
0.9 percent from 201 3 to 2014. The 
trend included decreases of 1 percent 
in murder and 6 percent in robbery, and 
increases of 2 percent in rape and 1 per- 
cent in aggravated assault. The percent- 
age of murders committed with firearms 
decreased 1 .6 percent. 

Violent crime peaked in 1 991 . Through 
2014, violent crime fell to a 44-year low, 
murder fell to likely an all-time low and 
robbery dropped to a 48-year low. Con- 
currently, Americans have acquired nearly 
half of the roughly 350 million privately 
owned firearms in the United States. 

Comparable to previous years, less 
than 6 percent of murders involved rifles 
and shotguns of a// types, while knives 
and other edged weapons were used in 
1 3 percent of murders, hands and feet 


in 6 percent, bludgeons in 4 percent and 
various other non-firearm weapons were 
used in smaller percentages. Neverthe- 
less, gun control supporters persist in 
demanding a ban on semi-automatic 
shotguns and detachable-magazine semi- 
automatic rifles, particularly America's 
most popular rifle, the AR-1 5. 

As in previous years, there was no 
correlation between states' crime rates 
and trends, and their gun control laws. 
Some states that have the most restric- 
tive gun control laws had high rates of 
violent crime, some had low rates; some 
had worse crime trends, some had better 
trends; and the same was true for states 
that have less-restrictive gun laws. Also, 
as in previous years, the FBI reported that 
various factors, not including gun owner- 
ship rates or gun control laws, determine 
the type and volume of crime in each state. 


Cities accounted for a disproportionate 
share of violent crime. For example, the 
murder rate for metropolitan areas was 4.7 
per 1 00,000 residents, as compared to 3.9 
for cities outside metropolitan areas, and 
3.0 for non-metropolitan counties. 

The murder rate in Detroit, which is 
subject to Michigan's handgun registration 
law, was nearly 1 0 times the rate for metro- 
politan areas generally, at 43.5 per 1 00,000 
residents. The rate in Baltimore, subject to 
Maryland's handgun registration and wait- 
ing period law, and its "assault weapon"and 
"large" magazine bans, was not far behind, 
at 33.8. By comparison, the murder rate 
in Jacksonville, the largest city in Florida, 
where the Right-to-Carry movement began 
in 1 987, was far behind, at 1 1 .2. Chicago 
accounted for the most murders of any 
city, followed by New York City, Detroit, Los 
Angeles and Philadelphia. ^ 


ILA Grassroots: (800) 392-8683 • NRA-ILA: (703) 267-1 1 70 • NRA-ILA website: nraila.org 


82 


December 2015 American rifleman 




IN MEMORY NRA-ILA 
CONTRIBUTIONS 

September 201 5 - September 30, 201 5 
Tom Harper, San Francisco, CA (from: Fred 
W. Davis); Jack Cousino, Dundee, Ml (from: 
Dundee Sportsman's Club); Christopher (Kit) 
Daniels, Dundee, Ml (from: Dundee Sports- 
man's Club); Ronald G. England, Monroe, VA 
(from: Vera W. England); Leonard Zitterman, 
Maple Shade, NJ (from: Maple Shade Sports- 
men's Club, Inc.) Greg Bovee, Springwater, NY 
(from: Springwater Rod and Gun Club, Inc.); 
Woodie Dixon, Greenville, PA (from: White 
Oak Shooting Club); Terry Maisey, Houston, 
TX (from: Richard & Melissa Messerly); Thomas 
Noto, South River, NJ (from: Aunt Josie & 
Cousin Diane); Jim Groseclose, Ellensburg, 
WA (from: Gloria J. Sharp); 

Ed Weber, Tucson, AZ (from: Daniel P. Dewey); 
J. R. Parker, Longview, TX (from: JackTejcek); 
Shird Riley Powell, Waco, KY (from: Mike & 
Petey Howard); Mr. Davidson, Tucson, AZ 
(from: Frieda May Davidson); George Alves 
(from: Warren & Vickie Alves); Richard T. Roth, 
Lacrosse, Wl (from: Michael Roach); Stanley 
Barron, Freeland, PA (from: Carol Barron); 
Robert Miller, Sheridan, Ml (from: The Porcu- 
pine Lodge); Richard B. Steward Sr., Mesa, 

AZ (from: Diana Bouse); Gilbert K. Petri, 
Houston, TX (from: Jeff & Bette Burkett). 


.1 


LOCASH is 


NRA 

COONTPy 


A ccording to nnany music insiders, 201 5 is shaping up to be the year for 

LOCASH. Their upbeat, contagious single "I Love This Life" marks their highest- 
charting single to date. LOCASH continues to build their brand through live 
performances, with more than 1 50 this year — including appearances on some of 
the most prestigious stages in the world with acts ranging from Tim McGraw to 
Hank Williams Jr., Florida Georgia Line, Miranda Lambert and Kiss. The duo's highly 
anticipated album, "I Love This Life," is available now. 

NRA Country's Vanessa Shahidi recently caught up with Chris Lucas and Preston 
Brust to talk about all things outdoors. 


VS: How would you spend a week off in Mother Nature? 

PB: "In the mountains with my wife." 

VS: Do you have a favorite personal firearm? 

CL: "All of my guns are my favorites, but I love my H&K 9 mm the most." 

VS: Please share your favorite outdoor memory. 

CL: "The Great Turkey Attack of 2009. 1 had never shot an animal. It was one of my 
first real hunts, and out of nowhere this turkey came out of the woods after me. He 
clearly didn't like me very much. I realized he was going to attack me, so I shot it — 
and that, folks, was my first turkey kill." 


NRA Country is a lifestyle and a bond between the country music community and 
hard-working Americans everywhere. It's powered by pride, freedom, love of country, 
respect for the military and the responsibilities of protecting the great American life. 


ILA CONTRIBUTIONS 

(The following contributed $1,000 or more to 
the NRA Institute for Legislative Action during 
August 26, 201 5 - September 25, 201 5.) 

G. D. Mohline, Doylestown, PA; Brownells 
Inc., Montezuma, lA; James E. Bricker, Strat- 
ford, lA; Emerson Glazer, Beverly Hills, CA; 
Richard Kubach, Wayne, PA; O. F. Mossberg 
& Sons Inc., North Haven, CT; David Levy, 
Fort Washington, PA; John Palaschak, Miami, 
FL; Jerry A. Allen, Irvine, CA; C. Burdick, 
Spring Valley, CA; Brett Cosor, Gaithersburg, 
MD; Kathleen Haase, Oklahoma City, OK; 
John W. Janssen, Chadwick, IL; James A. 
Remington, Henrico, VA; R.W. Crockett, 
Waynesboro, GA; J. A. Curtis, Sun City, FL; 

Jim Bane, Golden, CO; Jasmine I. Ledbetter, 
Norman, OK; Sandra K. Habets, Blairsville, PA; 
E. Eileen Keen, Saint Georges, DE; Lawrence 
Edwards, Brick, NJ; Charles McCauley, 
Tarrytown, NY; James Thorne, Tonganoxie, 

KS; Douglas B. Davenport, Arlington, VA; 
Walter Luptowitz, San Pedro, CA; Daniel 
Temianka, Pasadena, CA; Regis J. Synan, 
Export, PA; John R. Hill, Centerville, VA; Karen 
Lien, Perkasie, PA; G. Verrengio,Teaneck, 

NJ; Joe Verde, Laguna Niguel, CA; Johnny 
Chilton, Dallas, TX; Deborah A. Cheeseman, 
Cinnaminson Township, NJ; Philip Bender, 
Reno, NV; Milton Grove Sportsmen's Club, 
Elizabethtown, PA; Rink's Gun & Sport 
Inc., Lockport, IL; Cape Radiology Group 
Care, Girardeau, MO; Estate of Ronald E. 
Machovec, Richland Center, Wl; Jeffrey 
G. Radke, Anacortes, WA; Gordon Fisher, 
Pittsburgh, PA; Richard Hansen, Grandville, 
Ml; Mark McCray, Corona Del Mar, CA; Glenn 
Adams, Evergreen, CO; Domenico Flavoni, 
Massapequa, NY; Edward F.Thieme, Boulder, 
CO; Mark A. Youngren, Portland, OR. 


For more information visit nracountry.com, follow on Twitter 
@NRACountry, and NRA_Country on Instagram and Pinterest. 



Photo by Jake Harsh 



Official journal 



regional report • central 


2016 NRA ANNUAL MEETINGS • MAY 20-22 • LOUISVILLE, KY 


For hotel accommodations at the NRA Annual Meetings, visit nraam.org 



W hether you're a hunter, competitive 
shooter or just a proud gun owner. 
Friends of NRA has something for everyone. 
The format is simple — food, fun, family 
and fundraising! At every Friends of NRA 
banquet you'll have the opportunity to 
participate in games, raffles, live and silent 
auctions, and more. You'll also find many 
unique items, including limited-edition 
firearms, wildlife art, jewelry and outdoor 
gear. These items are only available at 
Friends of NRA events. To learn more about 
events in your area, visit friendsofnra.org, 
contact your local field representative or call 
(800) 672-3888, ext. 1351. 

Central Region Director — Chad Franklin 

cfranklin@nrahq.org 


lA, NE — ^Tim Bacon 

tbacon@nrahq.org 

Northern IL — Mike Huber 

mhuber@nrahq.org 

Southern IL — Donald Higgs 

dhiggs@nrahq.org 

IN — Craig Haggard 

chaggard@nrahq.org 

Ml — Allan Herman 

aherman@nrahq.org 

Wl— Scott Taetsch 

staetsch@nrahq.org 

Northern MO — ^Travis Scott 

tscott@nrahq.org 

Southern MO — Gregg Pearre 

gpearre@nrahq.org 

KY — John LaRowe 

jlarowe@nrahq.org 


TRAINING 


Crime Prevention 

T he NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® 
program provides men and women 


with crime prevention and personal 
safety strategies. To learn more about the 
program, visit refuse.nra.org. The most 
up-to-date schedule is available on the 
Internet at nrainstructors.org, by email 
at refuse@nrahq.org or by phone at 
(800) 861-1166. 

DEC. 8— LAFAYETTE, IN 

(Seminar) 

Arthur Burk (765) 838-0700 

DEC. 1 2— LAKE VILLA, IL 

(Seminar) 

Michel Rioux (847) 603-1966 

DEC. 16— ANN ARBOR, Ml 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Steven Reed (734) 761-5860 

DECEMBER— ONLINE 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Visit nraonlinetraining.org for more 
information. 


STATE ASSOCIATIONS 

RA-affiliated state associations 
promote and support the purposes, 
objectives, policies and programs of the 
NRA. For more information, contact your 
state association listed here, or log on to 
clubs.nra.org. 

Illinois State Rifle Ass'n Inc. 

Richard Pearson, Executive Director 
(815) 635-3198 
executive@isra.org 

Indiana State Rifle and Pistol Ass'n Inc. 

Jerry Wehner, Executive Vice President 

(812) 534-3258 

vp@isrpa.org 


areashoots 


PISTOL 


HIGHLAND, IL 

DEC. 13 

HIGH POWER RIFLE 


FREEDOM, IN 

DEC. 6 

SILHOUETTE 


EFFINGHAM, IL 

DEC 19-20 


For more information, contact Shelly Kramer 
at (703) 267-1459 or mkramer@nrahq.org. For a complete 
listing, see shootingsportsusa.com. 






This Stars and Stripes Guitar autographed 
by Ted Nugent is one of the items available 
exclusively at Friends of NRA banquets. 


Member information & benefits 

MEMBERSHIP ACCOUNT INFORMATION: (877) 672-2000 


NRA Headquarters: (703) 267-1000 
INTERNET ADDRESS: nra.org 


MEMBER SERVICE 
NRAstore.com 


(800) 672-3888 
(888) 607-6007 


MEMBER PROGRAMS 

Hertz Car Rental CDP# 1 66609 (800) 654-2200 

AVIS Car Rental AWD# A8321 00 (800) 225-7094 

NRA Endorsed Insurance Programs (877) 672-3006 

NRA Endorsed Prescription Plan (888) 436-3700 

NRA Endorsed Check Program (888) 331-6767 

NRA VISA Card (866) NRA-VISA 

NRA Real Estate/Relocation Services (800) 593-2526 

NRA Endorsed Moving Program 
North American Van Lines (800) 524-5533 

Allied Van Lines (800) 871 -8864 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

Grassroots/Legislative Hotline (800) 392-8683 


OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT/ 

GIFT PLANNING 877-NRA-GIVE 

THE NRA FOUNDATION 800-423-6894 

NRA INSTRUCTOR/ 

COACH FIREARM TRAINING 703-267-1 500 

EDDIE EAGLE GUNSAFE PROGRAM 800-231-0752 
REFUSETOBEAVICTIM 800-861-1166 

RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS 703-267-151 1 

NRA AFFILIATED CLUBS 800-NRA-CLUB 

RANGE SERVICES 877-672-7264 

COMPETITIVE SHOOTING 877-672-6282 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 703-267-1640 

FRIENDS OF NRA 703-267-1342 

NRA MUSEUMS/ 

GUN COLLECTOR PROGRAMS 703-267-1 600 

SHOWS & EXHIBITS 866-343-1 805 

MEDIA RELATIONS 703-267-1595 


The "NRA Regional Report," a service for NRA members, appears in every issue of American Rifleman, American Hunter and 
America's Ist Freedom. The Regional Report is an up-to-date listing of NRA conducted and/or sponsored events scheduled 
in your region for the current month. Call to verify event dates and locations before traveling. 



84 


December 2015 American rifleman 






KALASHNIKOV 

USA 


Iowa State Rifle and Pistol Ass'n 

Bill Besgrove, Secretary 
(319) 626-2710 
billb@iasrpa.org 

League of Kentucky Sportsmen, Inc. 

Tom Mansfield, NRA Liaison 
(859) 858-0135 

thomasjmansfield@gmail.com 

Michigan Rifle and Pistol Ass'n 

Leo Cebula, President 
(269) 781-1223 
lcebula@hotmail.com 


Missouri Sport Shooting Ass'n 

Kevin Jamison, President 
(314) 440-3811 
kljamisonlaw@earthlink.net 

Nebraska Marksmanship Ass'n 

Bill Keil, President 
(402) 933-4881 
hpinne@cox.net 

Wisconsin Firearm Owners, Ranges, 

Clubs and Educators 
Jeff Mass, Executive Director 
(920) 687-0505 
jeff@wisconsinforce.org 


g unshows 


DEC.1 BEAVER DAM, Wl 

Bayside Supper Club, Beaver Dam Chamber of 
Commerce (920) 887-8879 

DEC. 4-6 ROCK ISLAND, IL 

Rock Island Auction Company, Rock Island Auction 
Co. (800) 238-8022 

DEC 4-6 COUNCIL BLUFFS, lA 

Mall of the Bluffs, Pioneer Shows (712) 388-8520 

DEC. 4-6 JEFFERSON, Wl 

Jefferson County Fair Park, Marv Kraus Promotions 
(563) 608-4401 

DEC. 4-6 OSHKOSH, Wl 

Sunnyview Exposition Center, Bob & Rocco's Gun 
Shows (608) 752-6677 

DEC. 4-6 AUBURN, IN 

National Military History Center, Gun Slinger 
Promotions USA (260) 624-5996 

DEC. 4-6 MOUNT CLEMENS, Ml 

GibraltarTrade Center, Angela Neargarder-Gibraltar 
Trade Center (586) 465-6400 

DEC. 5-6 TIPTON, IN 

Tipton County Fairgrounds, Tipton Gun Shows LLC 
(765) 675-6886 

DEC. 5-6 EVANSVILLE, IN 

Vanderburgh County 4-H Center, Central Indiana 
Gun Shows (765) 855-3836 

DEC. 5-6 SEYMOUR, IN 

National Guard Armory, Tri-State Gun & Knife 
Collectors LLC (812) 521-9367 

DEC. 5-6 ASHLAND, KY 

El Hasa Shrine Temple, R.K. Shows Inc (563) 927-81 76 

DEC. 5-6 SPRINGFIELD, MO 

Ozark Empire Fairgrounds, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176 

DEC. 11-13 WAVERLY,IA 

The Centre Hall, Marv Kraus Promotions 
(563) 608-4401 

DEC. 11-13 CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO 

Cape Girardeau Arena Park, SEMO Gun Shows 
(573) 649-2848 

DEC. 11-13 WAUKESHA, Wl 

Waukesha County Expo Center, Bob & Rocco's Gun 
Shows (608) 752-6677 

DEC. 11-13 SHIPSHEWANA, IN 

Trading Place Auction Building, Gun Slinger 
Promotions USA (260) 624-5996 


DEC. 12-13 COLLINSVILLE, IL 

Gateway Genter, EGA Hunting &Trade Shows 
(618) 495-2572 

DEC. 12-13 COLUMBIA, MO 

Elks Lodge, Pro-mo-tions (573) 338-1 524 

DEC. 12-13 CROWN POINT, IN 

Lake County Fairgrounds, Central Indiana Gun 
Shows (765) 855-3836 

DEC. 12-13 LOUISVILLE, KY 

Kentucky Exposition Center, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176^ 

DEC. 13 WEST BRANCH, Ml 

Quality Inn Forwards Conference Center, PJS 
Promotions LLC (989) 798-8709 

DEC. 13 FORT WAYNE, IN 

Allen Indiana County Fairgrounds, Midwest Gun 
Traders Inc. (260) 749-6509 

DEC. 13 ST. CHARLES, I L 

Kane County Fairgrounds, Kane County Sportsman's 
Show (815) 758-2773 

DEC. 18-20 ALTOONA, lA 

Adventureland Park, Midwest Arms Collectors LLC 
(660) 341-7908 

DEC. 18-20 FRANKLIN, Wl 

Milwaukee County Sports Complex, Bob & Rocco's 
Gun Shows (608) 752-6677 

DEC. 18-20 EVANSVILLE, IN 

Evansville National Guard Armory, Tri-State Gun & 
Knife Gollectors, LLC (812) 521-9367 

DEC. 19-20 LAFAYETTE, IN 

Tippecanoe County Fairgrounds, Central Indiana 
Gun Shows (765) 855-3836 

DEC. 19-20 SOMERSET, KY 

The Center, R.K. Shows Inc. (563) 927-81 76 

DEC. 19-20 KANKAKEE, I L 

Kankakee County Fairgrounds, The Cloe Group LLC 
(815) 263-2810 

DEC. 1 9-20 KANSAS CITY, MO 

KCI-Expo Center, R.K. Shows Inc. (563) 927-81 76 

DEC. 20 CRYSTAL LAKE, I L 

Holiday Inn Convention Center, DJ Guns 
(815) 385-1982 

DEC. 26 DAVIDSON, Ml 

Knights of Columbus Hall, PJS Promotions LLC 
(989) 798-8709 

DEC. 27 ANTIOCH, IL 

Antioch VFW Hall, Lake County Gun Shows 
(847) 548-0433 


Dates and locations subject to change — contact the show before traveling. Discounted NRA membership sold through NRA 
recruiters. *Some shows may offer free admission for new membership and renewals. To become an NRA Recruiter call (703) 267-3776. 



(I'elerfitv 


SEE YOUR 
DEALER TODAY! 


RUSS.f\Ng,£^j;Ti\g^i 

I Aivi ERl C AN I N fsTo VAf I O N 


US132SS 


www.kalashnikov-usaxom 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG DECEMBER 2015 


85 






Official journal 




W hether you're a hunter, competitive 
shooter or just a proud gun owner. 
Friends of NRA has something for everyone. 
The format is simple — food, fun, family 
and fundraising! At every Friends of NRA 
banquet you'll have the opportunity to 
participate in games, raffles, live and silent 
auctions, and more. You'll also find many 
unique items, including limited-edition 
firearms, wildlife art, jewelry and outdoor 
gear. These items are only available at 
Friends of NRA events. To learn more about 
events in your area, visit friendsofnra.org, 
contact your local field representative or call 
(800) 672-3888, ext. 1351. 

Eastern Region Director — Bryan Hoover 

bhoover@nrahq.org 

Northern OH — Marc Peugeot 

mpeugeot@nrahq.org 

Southern OH — Andrew Root 

aroot@nrahq.org 

ME,VT,NH— Brian Smith 

bsmith@nrahq.org 

NJ, MA, Rl, CT, Southern NY — Jim Reardon 

jreardon@nrahq.org 

NY— Jay Rusnock 

jrusnock@nrahq.org 


Eastern PA, DE — Kory Enck 

kenck@nrahq.org 

Western PA — ^Tom Baldrige 

tbaldrige@nrahq.org 

Eastern VA, Eastern MD, Washington, DC — 
David Wells 

dwells@nrahq.org 

Western VA, Western MD, WV — Jim Kilgore 

jkilgore@nrahq.org 


TRAINING 


Crime Prevention 

T he NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® 
program provides men and women 
with crime prevention and personal 
safety strategies. To learn more about the 
program, visit refuse.nra.org. The most 
up-to-date schedule is available on the 
Internet at nrainstructors.org, by email 
at refuse@nrahq.org or by phone at 
(800) 861-1166. 

DEC. 1— DUBLIN, OH 

(Seminar) 

Maria Clemens (614) 397-3958 

DEC. 4— MANCHESTER, VT 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Brian Kukon (802) 293-5986 


DEC. 6— ALEXANDRIA, VA 

(Seminar) 

Howard Hall (949) 2 1 2-229 1 

DEC. 6— RANSON,WV 

(Seminar) 

Dennis Stoika (732) 620-231 1 

DEC.11— PEEKSKILL,NY 

(Seminar) 

keven Donahoo (914) 471-5632 

DEC.12— PEEKSKILL,NY 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
keven Donahoo (914) 471-5632 

DEC. 12— ALEXANDRIA, VA 

(Seminar) 

Howard Hall (949)212-8561 

DEC.13— ASHAWAY,RI 

(Seminar) 

Lyd Neugent (401) 377-8184 

DEC. 18— HOPEWELL JUNCTION, NY 

(Seminar) 

MarkBendel (845)418-3671 

DEC. 19— QUAKERTOWN, PA 

(Seminar) 

Wayne Downs (610) 754-1185 

DEC. 19— PEEKSKILL, NY 

(Seminar) 

keven Donahoo (914) 471-5632 

DEC. 27— MANCHESTER, VT 

(Seminar) 

Brian Kukon (802) 293-5986 

DECEMBER— ONLINE 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Visit nraonlinetraining.org for more 
information. 


areashoots 


PISTOL 

NEW CASTLE, DE 

DEC. 5-6 

NEWYORK,NY 

DEC 13 

HIGH POWER RIFLE 

NEW TRIPOLI, PA 

DEC 6 

SILHOUETTE 

STATEN ISLAND, NY 

DEC. 1 

SUEEOLK,VA 

DEC 6 

MONTPELIER, VA 

DEC 12 

SUDDLERSVILLE, MD 

DEC 19 


For more information, contact Shelly Kramer 
at (703) 267-1459 or mkramer@nrahq.org. For a complete 
listing, see shootingsportsusa.com. 


Member information & benefits 

MEMBERSHIP ACCOUNT INFORMATION: (877) 672-2000 


NRA Headquarters: (703) 267-1000 
INTERNET ADDRESS: nra.org 


MEMBER SERVICE 
NRAstore.com 


(800) 672-3888 
(888) 607-6007 


MEMBER PROGRAMS 

Hertz Car Rental CDP# 1 66609 (800) 654-2200 

AVIS Car Rental AWD# A8321 00 (800) 225-7094 

NRA Endorsed Insurance Programs (877) 672-3006 

NRA Endorsed Prescription Plan (888) 436-3700 

NRA Endorsed Check Program (888) 331-6767 

NRA VISA Card (866) NRA-VISA 

NRA Real Estate/Relocation Services (800) 593-2526 

NRA Endorsed Moving Program 
North American Van Lines (800) 524-5533 

Allied Van Lines (800) 871 -8864 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

Grassroots/Legislative Hotline (800) 392-8683 


OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT/ 

GIFT PLANNING 877-NRA-GIVE 

THE NRA FOUNDATION 800-423-6894 

NRA INSTRUCTOR/ 

COACH FIREARM TRAINING 703-267-1 500 

EDDIE EAGLE GUNSAFE PROGRAM 800-231-0752 
REFUSETOBEAVICTIM 800-861-1166 

RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS 703-267-151 1 

NRA AFFILIATED CLUBS 800-NRA-CLUB 

RANGE SERVICES 877-672-7264 

COMPETITIVE SHOOTING 877-672-6282 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 703-267-1640 

FRIENDS OF NRA 703-267-1342 

NRA MUSEUMS/ 

GUN COLLECTOR PROGRAMS 703-267-1 600 

SHOWS & EXHIBITS 866-343-1 805 

MEDIA RELATIONS 703-267-1595 


The "NRA Regional Report," a service for NRA members, appears in every issue of American Rifleman, American Hunter and 
America's Ist Freedom. The Regional Report is an up-to-date listing of NRA conducted and/or sponsored events scheduled 
in your region for the current month. Call to verify event dates and locations before traveling. 


84 


December 2015 American rifleman 






LAW ENFORCEMENT 


P ublic and private officers interested in 
becoming firearm instructors should 
attend one of NRA's Law Enforcement 
Firearms Instructor Development Schools, 
designed to enhance the instructors' 
firearm knowledge and handling skills, 
as well as prepare them to develop 
effective training programs, instruct 
in a professional manner, and conduct 


practical training exercises. Restricted to 
law enforcement officers only. 

TUITION-FREE ARMORER CLASSES** 

(Register at: http://le.nra.org/training/ 
tuition-free-schools.aspx) 

DEC. 14— FAIRFAX, VA 

(SIG P Series Pistol) 

DEC. 15— FAIRFAX, VA 

(Active Threat Mitigation) 

Contact Erica Buchanan at ebuchanan@ 
nrahq.org or (703) 267-1 638 


g unshows 


DEC. 4-6 ALLENTOWN, PA DEC. 12-13 JEFFERSON, OH 

Allentown Fairgrounds Agri-Plex, Forks Of the Ashtabula County Fairgrounds, LG Firearms 

Delaware Flistorical Arms Society Inc. (610)438-9006 Productions (216) 338-1271 


DEC. 5-6 LIMA, OH 

Allen County Fairgrounds, Tri-State Gun Collectors 
(41 9) 647-0067 

DEC. 5-6 TALLMADGE, OH 

Summit County Fairgrounds, Ohio Gun Shows 
(330) 539-4247 

DEC. 5-6 ZANESVILLE, OH 

Muskingum County Fairgrounds, Front Sight 
Promotions LLC (740) 667-0412 

DEC. 5-6 CLARENCE, NY 

Clarence Event Building, Niagara Frontier Gun 
Shows (716) 542-9929 

DEC. 5-6 GETTYSBURG, PA 

All Star Events Complex, Eagle Arms Productions 
(610) 393-3047 

DEC. 5-6 NASHUA, NH 

Floliday Inn, Northeast Expositions (603) 621-0700 

DEC. 5-6 MANASSAS, VA 

Prince William County Eairgrounds, SGKGun Shows 
(757) 483-5385 

DEC. 5-6 FAIRMONT, WV 

Marion County National Guard Armory, C&E Gun 
Shows Inc. (540) 953-0016 

DEC. 12-13 DAYTON, OH 

Dayton Flara Arena, Bill Goodman's Gun & Knife 
Shows (502) 538-3900 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 LAKE HARMONY, PA 

Split Rock Resort, Eagle Arms Productions 
(610) 393-3047 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 HARRISBURG, PA 

PA Earm Show Complex- Expo Flail, Showmasters 
and C&E Gun Shows Inc. (540) 953-0016 * 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 WEST SPRINGFIELD, MA 

Eastern State Exposition, Mid-Fludson Promotions 
Inc. (914) 248-1000 

DEC. 12-13 MARIETTA, OH 

Washington County Eairgrounds, Eront Sight 
Promotions LLC (740) 667-0412 


DEC. 1 2-1 3 LANCASTER, OH 

Eairfield County Eairgrounds, 1100 Events LLC 

opssshows@yahoo.com 

DEC. 12-13 MEDINA, OH 

Medina County Eairgrounds, Conrad & Dowdell 
Productions (330) 948-4400 

DEC. 12-13 FISHERSVILLE,VA 

Augusta Expo Center, Showmasters and C&E Gun 
Shows Inc. (540) 953-0016 

DEC. 18-20 OAKS, PA 

Greater Philadelphia Oaks Expo Center, Eagle Arms 
Productions (610) 393-3047 

DEC. 1 9-20 SHARONVILLE, OH 

Sharonville Convention Center, Bill Goodman's Gun 
& Knife Shows (502) 538-3900 

DEC. 1 9-20 MONTPELIER, OH 

Williams County Eairgrounds, D&K Enterprises 
(419) 737-2801 

DEC. 1 9-20 COLUMBUS, OH 

Westland Mall, Showmasters and C&E Gun Shows 
Inc (540) 953-0016 

DEC. 1 9-20 WELLINGTON, OH 

Lorain Gounty Eairgrounds, Bill-Mar Promotions 
(440) 986-5004 

DEC. 19-20 NILES, OH 

Eastwood Expo Center, Ohio Gun Shows 
(330) 539-4247 

DEC. 19-20 YORK, PA 

York Eairgrounds, Appalachian Promotions 
(717) 697-3088 

DEC. 1 9-20 CHILICOTHE, OH 

Ross County Eairgrounds, Eront Sight Promotions 
LLC (740) 667-0412 

DEC. 19-20 SALEM, VA 

The Salem Civic Center, C&G Gun Shows Inc. 

(540) 953-0016^ 


DEC. 1 2-1 3 CHEEKTOWAGA, NY DEC. 26-27 MONROE, OH 

The Knights Golumbus Hall, Niagara Erontier Gun Aisles Elea Market, Patriot Gun & Knife Show 

Shows (7 1 6) 524-9929 ( 5 1 3 ) 638-8688 


Dates and locations subject to change — contact the show before traveling. Discounted NRA membership sold through NRA 
recruiters. *Some shows may offer free admission for new membership and renewals. To become an NRA Recruiter call (703) 267-371 4. 



KALASHNIKOV 

USA 


RLlSS.f\Ng,£^j;TAg^i 

I AM ERl C AN I N fsTo VAf I O N 


MODERN 
SKELETONIZED 
RIFLE 


US132SS 

7.62 X 39 


i'elerAitv 


SEE YOUR 
DEALER TODAY! 


www.kalashnikov-usa.com 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG DECEMBER 2015 


85 







Official journal 



regional report • midwest 


2016 NRA ANNUAL MEETINGS • MAY 20-22 • LOUISVILLE, KY 


For hotel accommodations at the NRA Annual Meetings, visit nraam.org 



W hether you're a hunter, competitive 
shooter or just a proud gun owner. 
Friends of NRA has something for everyone. 
The format is simple — food, fun, family 
and fundraising! At every Friends of NRA 
banquet you'll have the opportunity to 
participate in games, raffles, live and silent 
auctions, and more. You'll also find many 
unique items, including limited-edition 
firearms, wildlife art, jewelry and outdoor 
gear. These items are only available at 
Friends of NRA events. To learn more about 
events in your area, visit friendsofnra.org, 
contact your local field representative or call 
(800) 672-3888, ext. 1351. 


AR— Erica Willard 

ewillard@nrahq.org 


CO — Brad Dreier 

bdreier@nrahq.org 


NM — Kevin Post 

kpost@nrahq.org 


OK — Darren DeLong 

ddelong@nrahq.org 


Northern TX — ^Terry Free 

tfree@nrahq.org 


Southern TX — Liz Foley 

efoley@nrahq.org 


Midwest Region Director — ^Tom Ulik 

tulik@nrahq.org 


Western TX — Jack Cannon 

jcannon@nrahq.org 


TRAINING 


Crime Prevention 

T he NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® 
program provides men and women 
with crime prevention and personal 
safety strategies. To learn more about the 
program, visit refuse.nra.org. The most 
up-to-date schedule is available on the 
Internet at nrainstructors.org, by email 
at refuse@nrahq.org or by phone at 
(800) 861-1166. 

DEC. 5— COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 

(Seminar) 

Paul Pucci (719) 332-1949 


DEC. 6— COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Paul Pucci (719) 332-1949 



This Stars and Stripes Guitar autographed 
by Ted Nugent is one of the items available 
exclusively at Friends of NRA banquets. 


Member information & benefits 

MEMBERSHIP ACCOUNT INFORMATION: (877) 672-2000 


NRA Headquarters: (703) 267-1000 
INTERNET ADDRESS: nra.org 


MEMBER SERVICE 
NRAstore.com 


(800) 672-3888 
(888) 607-6007 


MEMBER PROGRAMS 

Hertz Car Rental CDP# 1 66609 (800) 654-2200 

AVIS Car Rental AWD# A8321 00 (800) 225-7094 

NRA Endorsed Insurance Programs (877) 672-3006 

NRA Endorsed Prescription Plan (888) 436-3700 

NRA Endorsed Check Program (888) 331-6767 

NRA VISA Card (866) NRA-VISA 

NRA Real Estate/Relocation Services (800) 593-2526 

NRA Endorsed Moving Program 
North American Van Lines (800) 524-5533 

Allied Van Lines (800) 871 -8864 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

Grassroots/Legislative Hotline (800) 392-8683 


OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT/ 

GIFT PLANNING 877-NRA-GIVE 

THE NRA FOUNDATION 800-423-6894 

NRA INSTRUCTOR/ 

COACH FIREARM TRAINING 703-267-1 500 

EDDIE EAGLE GUNSAFE PROGRAM 800-231-0752 
REFUSETOBEAVICTIM 800-861-1166 

RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS 703-267-151 1 

NRA AFFILIATED CLUBS 800-NRA-CLUB 

RANGE SERVICES 877-672-7264 

COMPETITIVE SHOOTING 877-672-6282 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 703-267-1640 

FRIENDS OF NRA 703-267-1342 

NRA MUSEUMS/ 

GUN COLLECTOR PROGRAMS 703-267-1 600 

SHOWS & EXHIBITS 866-343-1 805 

MEDIA RELATIONS 703-267-1595 


The "NRA Regional Report," a service for NRA members, appears in every issue of American Rifleman, American Hunter and 
America's Ist Freedom. The Regional Report is an up-to-date listing of NRA conducted and/or sponsored events scheduled 
in your region for the current month. Call to verify event dates and locations before traveling. 


DECEMBER— ONLINE 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Visit nraonlmetrainmg.org for more 
information. 


areashoots 


PISTOL 

DENVER, CO 

DEC. 19 

MANOR, TX 

DEC 20 

SMALLBORE RIFLE 

PINE BLUER, AR 

DECS 

HOUSTON, TX 

DECS 

HIGH POWER RIFLE 

WICHITA EALLS,TX 

DECS 

N. LITTLE ROCK, AR 

DEC. S-6 

ARCADIA, OK 

DEC 13 

HOUSTON, TX 

DEC 13 

DONNA,TX 

DEC 13 

BRAZORIA, TX 

DEC 19 

SILHOUETTE 

MANSFIELD, TX 

DECS 

BYERS, CO 

DEC 6 

EL PASO,TX 

DEC 6 

HALTOM CITYTX 

DEC 12 

FRIENDWOOD,TX 

DEC 19 


For more information, contact Shelly Kramer 
at (703) 267-1 459 or mkramer@nrahq.org. For a complete 
listing, see shootingsportsusa.com. 


84 


December 2015 American rifleman 





g unshows 


DEC5-6 FORTSMITH,AR DEC 12-13 JOURDANTON,TX 

Kay Rogers Park Expo, Ft. Smith Gun Show Jourdanton American Legion, Eagle Outfitters 

(479)522-0169 (210)371-3001 


DEC. 5-6 TULSA, OK 

Tulsa Fairgrounds, Grand American Arms Shows 
(405)612-0223 

DEC 5-6 ABILENE, TX 

Taylor County Expo, Silver SpurTrade Shows 
(806) 253-1322 

DEC. 5-6 DENVER, CO 

Denver Merchandise Mart, Tanner Gun Shows 
(303) 756-3467 

DEC. 5-6 ALAMOGORDO, NM 

Tays Event Center, Western Frontier Gun Shows 
(575) 430-8681 

DEC. 5-6 ARANSAS PASS, TX 

Aransas Pass Civic Center, Gulf Coast Gun Shows 
(254) 485-2770 

DEC. 5-6 FORT WORTH, TX 

Texas Motor Speedway, Dan's Five Star Gun Shows 
(214) 862-3905 

DEC. 5-6 GLEN ROSE, TX 

Somervell County Expo, Whipp Farm Productions 
(817) 929-1816 

DEC. 5-6 HOUSTON, TX 

NRG Center, Eligh Caliber Gun & Knife Show 
(281)489-1741 

DEC. 5-6 HUGHES SPRINGS, TX 

Legacy Event Center, GGA Productions 
(817) 659-9249 

DEC. 5-6 MESQUITE, TX 

Big Town Exhibition Flail, Premier Gun Shows 
(817) 732-1194 

DEC. 5-6 PASADENA, TX 

Pasadena Convention Center, Premier Gun Shows 
(817) 732-1194 

DEC. 5-6 SAN ANTONIO, TX 

San Antonio Events Center, Saxet Gun Shows 
(361)289-2256 

DEC. 5-6 WICHITA FALLS, TX 

Wichita Falls Multi-Purpose Event Center, Texas Col- 
lectors Gun Show (940) 692-3766 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 

Freedom Financial Services Expo Center, Gun 
Shows of the Rockies (563) 927-81 76 

DEC. 12-13 TOPEKA, KS 

Kansas Expocentre, US Weapon Collectors 
(563) 927-8176 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 ALBUQUERQUE, NM 

Expo New Mexico, Silver SpurTrade Shows 
(806) 253-1322 

DEC. 12-13 DEWEY, OK 

Washington County Fairgrounds, Badshot Gun 
Show EEC (405) 503-3665 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 

Oklahoma State Fair Park, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 CORPUS CHRISTI, TX 

Richard M. Bouchard Regional Fairgrounds, Saxet 
Gun Shows (361)289-2256 


DEC. 12-13 LEWISVILLE, TX 

Lakeland Plaza, Premier Gun Shows (81 7) 732-1 1 94 

DEC. 12-13 ORANGE, TX 

Orange County Expo Center, Real Texas Gun Shows 
(713) 724-8881 

DEC. 12-13 TYLER, TX 

Flarvey Flail Convention Center, Lone Star Gun 
Shows (214) 635-2009 

DEC. 1 9-20 SPRINGDALE, AR 

Convention Center Northwest Arksansas, R.K. 
Shows Inc. (563) 927-8176 

DEC. 19-20 DENVER, CO 

Denver Merchandise Mart, Tanner Gun Shows 
(303) 756-3467 

DEC. 1 9-20 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 

Oklahoma State Fair Park, OKC Gun Show Inc. 

(405) 842-3277 

DEC. 19-20 BELTON, TX 

Bell County Expo Center, Real Texas Gun Shows 
(713) 724-8881 

DEC. 19-20 BURLESON, TX 

SPJST Lodge #1 80, Whipp Farm Productions 
(817) 929-1816 

DEC. 19-20 BURNET, TX 

Burnet Veterans of Foreign Wars Flail, Wild Weasel 
Productions (210) 827-6302 

DEC. 1 9-20 FREDERICKSBURG, TX 

Gillespie County Fairgrounds, Silver SpurTrade 
Shows (806)253-1322 

DEC. 19-20 FT. WORTH, TX 

Will Rogers Center, Lone Star Gun Shows 
(214) 635-2009 

DEC. 1 9-20 GRAPEVINE, TX 

Grapevine Convention Center, Dan's Five Star Gun 
Shows (214) 862-3905 

DEC. 19-20 MCALLEN, TX 

McAllen Convention Center, Saxet Gun Shows 
(361)289-2256 

DEC. 19-20 NEW BRAUNFELS, TX 

New Braunfels Civic Center, Liberty Gun Shows 
(512) 774-0486 

DEC. 1 9-20 PASADENA, TX 

Pasadena Convention Center, Fligh Caliber Gun & 
Knife Show (281)489-1741 

DEC. 19-20 SAN ANTONIO, TX 

Freeman Coliseum, Premier Gun Shows 
(817) 732-1194 

DEC. 19-20 SCHERTZ,TX 

Schertz Civic Center, Texas Gun Shows (21 0) 872-7469 


DEC. 26-27 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 

Oklahoma State Fair Park, Metcalf Gun Shows 
(918) 272-1119 


Dates and locations subject to change — contact the show before traveling. Discounted NRA membership sold through NRA 
recruiters. *Some shows may offer free admission for new membership and renewals. To become an NRA Recruiter call (703) 267-3776. 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 



December 2015 



KALASHNIKOV 

USA 


RUSS ] £^l TiAG £; 

AMERICAN INtioVAtiON 


MODERN 
SKELETONIZED 
RIFLE 


US132SS 

7.62 X 39 


Xiq’lleT’ 1 


SEE YOUR 
DEALER TODAY! 


www.kalashnikov-usa.com 


85 






Official journal 



regional report • south 


2016 NRA ANNUAL MEETINGS • MAY 20-22 • LOUISVILLE, KY 


For hotel accommodations at the NRA Annual Meetings, visit nraam.org 


[FRIENDS DFl 


W hether you're a hunter, competitive 
shooter or just a proud gun owner. 
Friends of NRA has something for everyone. 
The format is simple — food, fun, family 
and fundraising! At every Friends of NRA 
banquet you'll have the opportunity to 
participate in games, raffles, live and silent 
auctions, and more. You'll also find many 
unique items, including limited-edition 
firearms, wildlife art, jewelry and outdoor 
gear. These items are only available at 
Friends of NRA events. To learn more about 
events in your area, visit friendsofnra.org, 
contact your local field representative or call 
(800) 672-3888, ext. 1351. 

Southern Region Director — Al Hammond 

ahammond@nrahq.org 


LA — Chad Bowen 

cbowen@nrahq.org 

AL, MS — Gene Newman 

snewman@nrahq.org 

Northern FL — Bret Eldridge 

peldridge@nrahq.org 

Southern FL — ^Tom Knight 

tknight@nrahq.org 

GA — Neely Raper 

nraper@nrahq.org 

Eastern NC — Lloyd Edwards 

ledwards@nrahq.org 

Western NC — Doug Merrill 

rmerrill@nrahq.org 

TN— Mike Webb 

mwebb@nrahq.org 

SC-Freeman Coleman 

fcoleman@nrahq.org 



This Stars and Stripes Guitar autographed 
by Ted Nugent is one of the items available 
exclusively at Friends of NRA banquets. 


Member information & benefits 

MEMBERSHIP ACCOUNT INFORMATION: (877) 672-2000 


NRA Headquarters: (703) 267-1000 
INTERNET ADDRESS: nra.org 


MEMBER SERVICE 
NRAstore.com 


(800) 672-3888 
(888) 607-6007 


MEMBER PROGRAMS 

Hertz Car Rental CDP# 1 66609 (800) 654-2200 

AVIS Car Rental AWD# A8321 00 (800) 225-7094 

NRA Endorsed Insurance Programs (877) 672-3006 

NRA Endorsed Prescription Plan (888) 436-3700 

NRA Endorsed Check Program (888) 331-6767 

NRA VISA Card (866) NRA-VISA 

NRA Real Estate/Relocation Services (800) 593-2526 

NRA Endorsed Moving Program 
North American Van Lines (800) 524-5533 

Allied Van Lines (800) 871 -8864 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

Grassroots/Legislative Hotline (800) 392-8683 


OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT/ 

GIFT PLANNING 877-NRA-GIVE 

THE NRA FOUNDATION 800-423-6894 

NRA INSTRUCTOR/ 

COACH FIREARM TRAINING 703-267-1 500 

EDDIE EAGLE GUNSAFE PROGRAM 800-231-0752 
REFUSETOBEAVICTIM 800-861-1166 

RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS 703-267-151 1 

NRA AFFILIATED CLUBS 800-NRA-CLUB 

RANGE SERVICES 877-672-7264 

COMPETITIVE SHOOTING 877-672-6282 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 703-267-1640 

FRIENDS OF NRA 703-267-1342 

NRA MUSEUMS/ 

GUN COLLECTOR PROGRAMS 703-267-1 600 

SHOWS & EXHIBITS 866-343-1 805 

MEDIA RELATIONS 703-267-1595 


The "NRA Regional Report," a service for NRA members, appears in every issue of American Rifleman, American Hunter and 
America's Ist Freedom. The Regional Report is an up-to-date listing of NRA conducted and/or sponsored events scheduled 
in your region for the current month. Call to verify event dates and locations before traveling. 


LAW ENFORCEMENT 

P ublic and private officers interested in 
becoming firearm instructors should 
attend one of NRA's Law Enforcement 
Firearms Instructor Development Schools, 
designed to enhance the instructors' 
firearm knowledge and handling skills, 
as well as prepare them to develop 
effective training programs, instruct 
in a professional manner, and conduct 
practical training exercises. Restricted to 
law enforcement officers only. 

DEC 7-1 1— FLORENCE, AL 

(Select-Fire) 

Contact Rudis Amaya at ramaya@nrahq.org 
or (703) 267-1636. 


TRAINING 


Crime Prevention 

T he NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® 
program provides men and women 


areashoots 


PISTOL 

BLOUNTSTOWN, FL 

DEC 12 

JACKSONVILLE, FL 

DEC. 20 

BROOKSVILLE, FL 

DEC 27 

SMALLBORE RIFLE 

ORLANDO, FL 

DECS 

RIDGEVILLE, SC 

DEC 19 

HIGH POWER RIFLE 

COVINGTON, GA 

DECS 

DONALDSONVILLE, LA 

DECS 

SUNRISE, FL 

DECS 

BELTON, SC 

DEC 6 

CHARLOTTE, NC 

DEC 12 

LAKELAND, TN 

DEC 12 

HOOVER, AL 

DEC 27 

SILHOUETTE 

HOOVER, AL 

DECS 

DAWSONVILLE, GA 

DEC 6 

NEW HOLLAND, SC 

DEC 12 

CHULUOTA,FL 

DEC 13 

ROXBORO, NC 

DEC 19 

PEARLINGTON, MS 

DEC 19 

BRUNSWICK, GA 

DEC 19 


For more information, contact Shelly Kramer 
at (703) 267-1 459 or mkramer@nrahq.org. For a complete 
listing, see shootingsportsusa.com. 


84 


December 2015 American rifleman 







with crime prevention and personal 
safety strategies. To learn more about the 
program, visit refuse.nra.org. The most 
up-to-date schedule is available on the 
Internet at nrainstructors.org, by email 
at refuse@nrahq.org or by phone at 
( 800 ) 861 - 1166 . 

DEC. 19— STONE MOUNTAIN, GA 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Matthew Schwab 
(678) 260-8318 


DEC. 21— FORT MYERS, FL 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 

W Dean 

DEC. 5— LAKE PARK, FL 

(239) 357-3437 

(Seminar) 

David D'Eugenio (561 ) 844-1 381 

DECEMBER— ONLINE 

DEC. 19— STONE MOUNTAIN, GA 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 

(Seminar) 

Visit nraonlmetrammg.org for more 

Matthew Schwab (678) 260-8318 

information. 

g unshows 


DEC 5-6 NASHVILLE, TN 

Tennessee State Fairgrounds, Bill Goodman's Gun & 
Knife Shows (502) 538-3900 

DEC 5-6 DOTHAN, AL 

National Peanut Festival Facility, Collectors & 
Shooters Club (334) 322-8818 

DEC. 5-6 FAYETTEVILLE, NC 

Crown Center, C&E Gun Shows (540) 953-0016 

DEC 5-6 DELAND, FL 

Volusia County Fairgrounds, Sport Show Specialists 
(321)777-7455 

DEC. 5-6 BROOKSVILLE, FL 

Flernando County Fairgrounds, Flernando 
Club (352) 799-3605 

DEC. 5-6 MINNEOLA, FL 

Minneola City Flail, New Florida Gun Shows 
(407) 568-3365 

DEC. 5-6 TAMPA, FL 

Florida State Fairgrounds, Florida Gun Shows 
(407)410-6870 

DEC. 5-6 GRAY,TN 

Appalachian Fairgrounds, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176 

DEC. 5-6 BOSSIER CITY, LA 

Bossier Civic Center, Classic Arms Productions 
(985) 624-8577 

DEC. 5-6 ATLANTA, GA 

Atlanta Expo Center, R.K. Shows Inc. (563) 927-81 76 

DEC. 5-6 MOUTAIN CITY, GA 

Golden Memories Auction Flouse, North Georgia 
Gun Shows (828)557-1543 

DEC. 5-6 CAPE CORAL, FL 

German American Social Club, EBL Venues 
(239) 223-3370 

DEC. 5-6 GREENVILLE, NC 

Greenville Convention Center, S&D Show 
Promotions (252) 745-5647 

DEC. 11-13 TUPELO, MS 

Tupelo Eurniture Market, Tupelo Gun Show 
(662) 871-3619 


DEC. 12-13 EUSTIS,FL 

Lake County Eairgrounds, Sport Show Specialists 
(321)777-7455 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 GERMANTOWN, TN 

Argicenter International, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176 

DEC. 12-13 FT. MYERS, FL 

Lee Civic Center, Florida Gun Shows (407) 41 0-6870 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 CHARLOTTE, NC 

Metrolina Expo Center, Dixie Gun & Knife Show 
(919) 781-1287 

DEC. 12-13 KNOXVILLE, TN 

Chilhowee Park & Expo Center, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176^ 

DEC. 12-13 LAFAYETTE, LA 

Lafayette Event Center, Classic Arms Productions 
(985) 624-8577 

DEC. 12-13 NORCROSS,GA 

North Atlanta Trade Center, Eastman Gun Shows 
(229) 423-4867 

DEC. 1 9-20 VALDOSTA, GA 

Rainwater Conference Center, R.K. Shows Inc. 

(563) 927-8176 

DEC. 1 9-20 HUNTSVILLE, AL 

Cahaba Shrine Center, VPI Gun Shows (256) 381-0506 * 

DEC. 19-20 BILOXI, MS 

Mississippi Coast Coliseum & Convention Center, 
Classic Arms Productions (985) 624-8577 

DEC. 19-20 MARIETTA, GA 

Jim Miller Park, Eastman Gun Shows (229) 423-4867 * 

DEC. 1 9-20 WEST PALM BEACH, FL 

South Elorida Eairgrounds, Sport Show Specialists 
(321)777-7455 

DEC. 19-20 RALEIGH, NC 

North Carolina State Fairgrounds, Showmasters and 
C&E Gun Shows (540) 953-0016 

DEC. 19-20 SARASOTA, FL 

Robarts Sports Arena, 2 Guys Shows (727) 776-3442 

DEC. 19-20 KENNER, LA 

Pontchartrain Center, Great Southern Gun & Knife 
Shows (865) 671-4757 


Dates and locations subject to change — contact the show before traveling. Discounted NRA membership sold through NRA 
recruiters. *Some shows may offer free admission for new membership and renewals. To become an NRA Recruiter call (703) 267-3772. 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


KALASHNIKOV 

USA 


RLI S sM'Kf.gT’RtTAgii 

I AM ERIC AN I N fsTovATlO N 


MODERN 
SKELETONIZED 
RIFLE 


US132SS 

7.62 X 39 


il'elerfftv 

ii 


SEE YOUR 
DEALER TODAY! 


www.kalashnikov-usa.com 






Official journal 



regional report • southwest 


2016 NRA ANNUAL MEETINGS • MAY 20-22 • LOUISVILLE, KY 


For hotel accommodations at the NRA Annual Meetings, visit nraam.org 



W hether you're a hunter, competitive 
shooter or just a proud gun owner. 
Friends of NRA has something for everyone. 
The format is simple — food, fun, family 
and fundraising! At every Friends of NRA 
banquet you'll have the opportunity to 
participate in games, raffles, live and silent 
auctions, and more. You'll also find many 
unique items, including limited-edition 
firearms, wildlife art, jewelry and outdoor 
gear. These items are only available at 
Friends of NRA events. To learn more about 
events in your area, visit friendsofnra.org, 
contact your local field representative or call 
(800) 672-3888, ext. 1351. 

Southwest Region Director — Jason Quick 

jquick(5)nrahq.org 


AZ — Winston Pendleton 

wpendleton@nrahq.org 

Mid CA — Bob Anderson 

randerson@nrahq.org 

Central CA — Paul Rodarmel 

prodarmel@nrahq.org 

Northern CA — Dan Wilhelm 

dwilhelm@nrahq.org 

Southern CA — Mike Davis 

mdavis@nrahq.org 

Eastern CA — Cole Beverly 

cbeverly@nrahq.org 

NV — Steve Wilson 

swilson@nrahq.org 

UT — John Kendall 

jkendall@nrahq.org 



This Stars and Stripes Guitar autographed 
by Ted Nugent is one of the items available 
exdusively at Friends of NRA banquets. 


Member information & benefits 

MEMBERSHIP ACCOUNT INFORMATION: (877) 672-2000 


NRA Headquarters: (703) 267-1000 
INTERNET ADDRESS: nra.org 


MEMBER SERVICE 
NRAstore.com 


(800) 672-3888 
(888) 607-6007 


MEMBER PROGRAMS 

Hertz Car Rental CDP# 1 66609 (800) 654-2200 

AVIS Car Rental AWD# A8321 00 (800) 225-7094 

NRA Endorsed Insurance Programs (877) 672-3006 

NRA Endorsed Prescription Plan (888) 436-3700 

NRA Endorsed Check Program (888) 331-6767 

NRA VISA Card (866) NRA-VISA 

NRA Real Estate/Relocation Services (800) 593-2526 

NRA Endorsed Moving Program 
North American Van Lines (800) 524-5533 

Allied Van Lines (800) 871 -8864 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

Grassroots/Legislative Hotline (800) 392-8683 


OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT/ 

GIFT PLANNING 877-NRA-GIVE 

THE NRA FOUNDATION 800-423-6894 

NRA INSTRUCTOR/ 

COACH FIREARM TRAINING 703-267-1 500 

EDDIE EAGLE GUNSAFE PROGRAM 800-231-0752 
REFUSETOBEAVICTIM 800-861-1166 

RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS 703-267-151 1 

NRA AFFILIATED CLUBS 800-NRA-CLUB 

RANGE SERVICES 877-672-7264 

COMPETITIVE SHOOTING 877-672-6282 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 703-267-1640 

FRIENDS OF NRA 703-267-1342 

NRA MUSEUMS/ 

GUN COLLECTOR PROGRAMS 703-267-1 600 

SHOWS & EXHIBITS 866-343-1 805 

MEDIA RELATIONS 703-267-1595 


The "NRA Regional Report," a service for NRA members, appears in every issue of American Rifleman, American Hunter and 
America's Ist Freedom. The Regional Report is an up-to-date listing of NRA conducted and/or sponsored events scheduled 
in your region for the current month. Call to verify event dates and locations before traveling. 


TRAINING 


Crime Prevention 

T he NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® 
program provides men and women 
with crime prevention and personal 
safety strategies. To learn more about the 
program, visit refuse.nra.org. The most 
up-to-date schedule is available on the 
Internet at nramstructors.org, by email 
at refuse@nrahq.org or by phone at 
(800) 861-1166. 

DEC. 5— TEMECULA, CA 

(Seminar) 

Luis Lopez (888) 892-1 767 

DEC. 13— SACRAMENTO, CA 

(Seminar) 

Donnette Larson (916) 844-2486 

DECEMBER— ONLINE 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Visit nraonlmetrammg.org for more 
information. 


areashoots 


PISTOL 

SLOUGHHOUSE, CA 

DEC 6 

OJAI, CA 

DEC 6 

ESCONDIDO, CA 

DEC 13 

PHOENIX, AZ 

DEC. 20 

DULZURA, CA 

DEC. 26 

HIGH POWER RIFLE 

PHOENIX, AZ 

DEC. 4-6 

ESCONDIDO, CA 

DEC 6 

YUMA, AZ 

DEC 13 

BOULDER CITY, NV 

DEC 13 

LINCOLN, CA 

DEC 19 

MARICOPA, CA 

DEC. 20 

SILHOUETTE 

CUPERTINO, CA 

DEC 9 

SYLMAR, CA 

DEC 12-13 

MESA, AZ 

DEC 19 

CONCORD, CA 

DEC. 20 

PHOENIX, AZ 

DEC. 20 

YUMA, AZ 

DEC. 26 


For more information, contact Shelly Kramer 
at (703) 267-1459 or mkramer@nrahq.org. For a complete 
listing, see shootingsportsusa.com. 


84 


December 2015 American rifleman 





KALASHNIKOV 

USA 




g unshows 


www»kalashnil<ov-usa,com 


MODERN 
SKELETONIZED 
RIFLE 


US132SS 

7.62 X 39 


R-U S G B ■ 

AlVi E R1 CAN I N VAf lO N 


LAW ENFORCEMENT 

P ublic and private officers interested in 
becoming firearm instructors should 
attend one of NRA's Law Enforcement 
Firearms Instructor Development Schools, 
designed to enhance the instructors' 
firearm knowledge and handling skills, 
as well as prepare them to develop 
effective training programs, instruct 
in a professional manner, and conduct 
practical training exercises. Restricted to 
law enforcement officers only. 

DEC 7-1 1— LAS VEGAS, NV 

(Precision Rifle) 

DEC 7-1 1 —RICHMOND, CA 

(Tactical Shotgun) 

Mary Shine at mshine@nrahg.org, or 
(703) 267-1628. 


STATE ASSOCIATIONS 

N RA-affiliated state associations 
promote and support the purposes, 
objectives, policies and programs of the 
NRA. For more information, contact your 
state association listed here, or log on to 
clubs.nra.org. 

Arizona State Rifle & Pistol Ass'n 

Noble Hathaway, President 
(623) 687-4251 
president@asrpa.com 

California Rifle & Pistol Ass'n 

(714) 992-2772 
contact@crpa.org 

Nevada Firearms Coalition 

Don Turner, President 
(702) 373-5935 
don@nvfac.org 

Utah State Rifle & Pistol Ass'n 

Elwood Powell, President 
(801)499-9763 
1 dpowell@sisna.com 


DEC. 4-6 PHOENIX, AZ 

Arizona State Fairgrounds, Crossroads of the West 
Gun Shows (801)544-9125 

DEC. 5-6 BAKERSFIELD, CA 

Kern County Fairgrounds, Central Coast Gun 
Shows (805) 481-6726 

DEC. 5-6 RED BLUFF, CA 

Tehama County Fairgrounds, Phoenix Productions 
(530) 360-6896 

DEC. 5-6 VALLEJO, CA 

Solano County Fairgrounds, Code of the West 
Productions (530) 676-8762 

DEC. 12-13 KINGMAN, AZ 

Mohave County Fairgrounds, Fligh Desert Events 
(928) 279-5406 

DEC. 12-13 TUCSON, AZ 

Tucson Expo, Arizona Gun Radio (650) 520-6002 

DEC. 12-13 DEL MAR, CA 

Del Mar Fairgrounds, Crossroads ofthe West Gun 
Shows (801) 544-9125 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 PASO ROBLES, CA 

Paso Robles Event Center, Central Coast Gun 
Shows (805) 481-6726 

DEC. 12-13 LAS VEGAS, NV 

The Sport Center, OKC Gun Show Inc. 

(405) 842-3277 

DEC. 12-13 RENO,NV 

Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Crossroads ofthe 
West Gun Shows (801) 544-9125 

DEC. 18-19 LAS VEGAS, NV 

South Point Casino, Rocky Mountain Gun Shows 
(801)589-0975 

DEC. 19-20 PHOENIX, AZ 

Ben Avery Shooting Eacility, Arizona Gun Radio 
(650) 520-6002 

DEC. 1 9-20 PRESCOTT VALLEY, AZ 

Tim's Toyota Center, Arizona Peacemakers 
(520) 747-5709 

DEC. 19-20 YUMA,AZ 

Yuma Civic Center, Yuma Territorial Gun Shows 
(928) 920-0837 

DEC. 19-20 ROSEVILLE, CA 

Placer County Eairgrounds, Code of the West 
Productions (530) 676-8762 

DEC. 19-20 VENTURA, CA 

Ventura County Fairgrounds, Crossroads ofthe 
West Gun Shows (801) 544-9125 

DEC. 19-20 LAS VEGAS, NV 

Cashman Field Center, Crossroads ofthe West Gun 
Shows (801) 544-9125 


Dates and locations subject to change— contact the show 
before traveling. Discounted NRA membership 
sold through NRA recruiters. *Some shows may offer free 
admission for new membership and renewals. 

To become an NRA Recruiter call (703) 267-3784. 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 





Official journal 



regional report • west 


2016 NRA ANNUAL MEETINGS • MAY 20-22 • LOUISVILLE, KY 


For hotel accommodations at the NRA Annual Meetings, visit nraam.org 



W hether you're a hunter, competitive 
shooter or just a proud gun owner. 
Friends of NRA has something for everyone. 
The format is simple — food, fun, family 
and fundraising! At every Friends of NRA 
banquet you'll have the opportunity to 
participate in games, raffles, live and silent 
auctions, and more. You'll also find many 
unique items, including limited-edition 
firearms, wildlife art, jewelry and outdoor 
gear. These items are only available at 
Friends of NRA events. To learn more about 
events in your area, visit friendsofnra.org, 
contact your local field representative or call 
(800) 672-3888, ext. 1351. 

Western Region Director — Brad Kruger 

bkruger(5)nrahq.org 

MN — Eric Linder 

elinder@nrahq.org 

ND, SD — Clay Pederson 

cpederson@nrahq.org 

Northern AK — Josh Toennessen 

jtoennessen@nrahq.org 

Southern AK — Greg Stephens 

gstephens@nrahq.org 


ID — Steve Vreeland 

svreeland@nrahq.org 

MT — Joe Crismore 

jcrismore@nrahq.org 

OR, HI — Mike Carey 

mcarey@nrahq.org 

WA — Michael Herrera 

mherrera@nrahq.org 

WY — Dave Manzer 

dmanzer@nrahq.org 


LAW ENFORCEMENT 


Police Competition 

N RA Police Pistol Combat competition 
is intended to be used as an extension 
of an officer's training. See PPC Rulebook 
(Rule 2.4) for eligibility requirements. 

DEC. 19— ARLINGTON, WA 

(Approved) 

Contact Tiffany King attking@nrahq.org, 
or (703) 267-1621. 


TRAINING 


Crime Prevention 

T he NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® 
program provides men and women 


Member information & benefits 

MEMBERSHIP ACCOUNT INFORMATION: (877) 672-2000 


NRA Headquarters: (703) 267-1000 
INTERNET ADDRESS: nra.org 


MEMBER SERVICE (800) 672-3888 

NRAstore.com (888) 607-6007 

MEMBER PROGRAMS 

Hertz Car Rental CDP# 1 66609 (800) 654-2200 

AVIS Car Rental AWD# A8321 00 (800) 225-7094 

NRA Endorsed Insurance Programs (877) 672-3006 

NRA Endorsed Prescription Plan (888) 436-3700 

NRA Endorsed Check Program (888) 331-6767 

NRA VISA Card (866) NRA-VISA 

NRA Real Estate/Relocation Services (800) 593-2526 

NRA Endorsed Moving Program 
North American Van Lines (800) 524-5533 

Allied Van Lines (800) 871 -8864 

INSTITUTE FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

Grassroots/Legislative Hotline (800) 392-8683 


OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT/ 

GIFT PLANNING 877-NRA-GIVE 

THE NRA FOUNDATION 800-423-6894 

NRA INSTRUCTOR/ 

COACH FIREARM TRAINING 703-267-1 500 

EDDIE EAGLE GUNSAFE PROGRAM 800-231-0752 
REFUSETOBEAVICTIM 800-861-1166 

RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS 703-267-151 1 

NRA AFFILIATED CLUBS 800-NRA-CLUB 

RANGE SERVICES 877-672-7264 

COMPETITIVE SHOOTING 877-672-6282 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 703-267-1640 

FRIENDS OF NRA 703-267-1342 

NRA MUSEUMS/ 

GUN COLLECTOR PROGRAMS 703-267-1 600 

SHOWS & EXHIBITS 866-343-1 805 

MEDIA RELATIONS 703-267-1595 


The "NRA Regional Report," a service for NRA members, appears in every issue of American Rifleman, American Hunter and 
America's Ist Freedom. The Regional Report is an up-to-date listing of NRA conducted and/or sponsored events scheduled 
in your region for the current month. Call to verify event dates and locations before traveling. 


with crime prevention and personal 
safety strategies. To learn more about 
the program, visit refuse.nra.org. The 
most up-to-date schedule is available 
on the Internet at nramstructors.org, 
by email at refuse@nrahq.org or by 
phone at (800) 861-1166. 

DECEMBER— ONLINE 

(Instructor Development Workshop) 
Visit nraonlmetrammg.org for more 
information. 


STATE ASSOCIATIONS 

N RA-affiliated state associations 
promote and support the purposes, 
objectives, policies and programs of 
the NRA. For more information, contact 
your state association listed here, or log 
on to clubs.nra.org. 

Alaska Outdoor Council Inc. 

Rod Arno, Executive Director 
(907) 264-6645 

aoc@alaskaoutdoorcouncil.org 

Hawaii Rifle Ass'n 

Flarvey Gerwig, President 

(808)306-7194 

hghawaii@gmail.com 

Idaho State Rifle and Pistol Ass'n 

Neill Goodfellow, President 
(208) 452-0293 
president@idahosrpa.org 


areashoots 


PISTOL 

BOISE, ID 

DEC. 19-20 

SILHOUETTE 

BOISE, ID 

DECS 

SHERWOOD, OR 

DECS 

PUYALLUP WA 

DEC 13 

SNOHOMISH, WA 

DEC 19 


For more information, contact Shelly Kramer 
at (703) 267-1 459 or mkramer@nrahq.org. For a complete 
listing, see shootingsportsusa.com. 


84 


December 2015 American rifleman 






KALASHNIKOV 

USA 



:ielerfftv 


g unshows 


www.kalashnikov-usaxom 


MODERN 
SKELETONIZED 
RIFLE 


US132SS 

7.62 X 39 


SEE YOUR 
DEALER TODAY! 


DEC 12-13 BURLINGTON, WA 

American Legion Post #91, Falcon Gun Shows 
(360) 202-7336 


DEC. 20 PORTLAND, OR 

Jackson Armory, Oregon Arms Collectors 

oregonarmscol lectors.com 


Dates and locations subject to change — contact the show before traveling. Discounted NRA membership sold through NRA 
recruiters. *Some shows may offer free admission for new membership and renewals. To become an NRA Recruiter call (703) 267-3784. 


AMERICANRIFLEMAN.ORG 


December 2015 


Minnesota Rifle and Revolver Ass'n Inc. 

George Minerich, President 
(320) 968-6898 
mrrapresident(5)gmail.com 


Washington State Rifle & Pistol Ass'n Inc. 

Duane Hatch, Vice President 
(253) 853-7533 
vicepresident(5)wsrpa.org 


Montana Rifle and Pistol Ass'n 

Jamey Williams, President 
(406) 868-4181 
jameydan@gmail.com 

North Dakota Shooting Sports Ass'n 

Eric Pueppke, Executive Officer 

(701)967-8450 

Cpueppke@polarcomm.com 

Oregon State Shooting Ass'n 

Nelson Shew, President 

(541)409-3358 

bnshew@centurylink.net 


Wyoming State Shooting Ass'n Inc. 

Mark Spungin, President 
(307) 335-9323 
mspungin@ymail.com 

South Dakota Shooting Sports Ass'n 

Tom Raines, President 
(605) 428-5488 
tom@sdshootingsports.org 


DEC. 4-6 KALISPELL, MT 

Flathead County Fairgrounds, Up In Arms Gun 
Shows (208) 241-4005 

DEC. 5-6 CAN BY, OR 

Clackamas County Fairgrounds, Collectors West 
(800) 659-3440 

DEC. 5-6 KLAMATH FALLS, OR 

Klamath County Fairgrounds, Jefferson State 
Shooting Association (541) 880-3870 

DEC. 5-6 MONROE, WA 

Evergreen State Fairgrounds, Washington Arms 
Collectors (425) 255-8410 

DEC. 5-6 SPOKANE, WA 

Spokane County Fair & Expo, Lewis ClarkTrader 
(208) 746-5555 

DEC. 11-13 BOZEMAN, MT 

Gallatin County Fairgrounds, Weapons Collector 
Society of Montana (406) 580-5458 

DEC. 12 VANCOUVER, WA 

Clark County Sguare Dance Center, Arms Collectors 
of Southwest Washington (360) 263-751 1 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 COEUR D'ALENE, ID 

Kootenai County Fairgrounds, Sports Connection 
(406) 633-9333 

DEC. 12-13 DICKINSON, ND 

Astoria Flotel & Event Center, Dakota Territory Gun 
Collectors Association (701) 361-9215 

DEC. 1 2-1 3 GRANTS PASS, OR 

Josephine County Fairgrounds, Collectors West 
(800) 659-3440 

DEC. 12-13 RICKREALUOR 

Rickreall Fairgrounds & Events Center, Polk County 
Eairgrounds & Events Center (503) 623-3048 


RUSSlANimTAg^, 

Aiyi ERl C AN I N VAf I o N 


DEC. 12-13 PUYALLUP, WA 

Western Washington Eairgrounds, Washington 
Arms Collectors (425) 255-841 0 

DEC. 12-13 TACOMA, WA 

Marymount Event Center, Big Top Promotions 
(206) 753-7956 

DEC. 12-13 ST. PAUL, MN 

St. Paul River Centre, Minnesota Weapons Collectors 
Association (612) 721-8976 

DEC. 1 8-20 PORTLAND, OR 

Portland Metropolitan Exposition Center, Collectors 
West (800) 659-3440 

DEC. 18-20 CASPER, WY 

Central Wyoming Eairgrounds, Up In Arms Gun 
Shows (208) 241-4005 

DEC. 19-20 POST FALLS, ID 

Greyhound Park & Event Center, Lewis ClarkTrader 
(208) 746-5555 

DEC. 19-20 BRAINERD,MN 

Brainerd National Guard Armory Building, Russ 
Bowers Gun Shows (21 8) 845-2530 

DEC. 19-20 DULUTH, MN 

Duluth Entertainment Convention Center, 
Greysolon Arms (218) 724-8387 

DEC. 19-20 MEDFORD, OR 

Medford Armory, Wes Knodel Gun Shows 
(503) 363-9564 

DEC. 1 9-20 RIDGEFIELD, WA 

Clark County Event Center, Big Top Promotions 
(206) 753-7956 

DEC. 19-20 TACOMA, WA 

Tacoma Dome, Wes Knodel Gun Shows 
(503) 363-9564 


DEC. 4-6 HAMILTON, MT 

Ravalli County Fairgrounds, Sports Connection 
(406) 633-9333 


DEC. 1 2-1 3 CENTRALIA, WA 

Southwest Washington Fairgrounds, Wes Knodel 
Gun Shows (503) 363-9564 






Official journal 


programs & services 

"America's Rifle" Exhibit Opens at 
National Firearms Museum 

T he National Firearms Museum proudly announces the 
opening of America's Rifle, a new exhibit that examines 
the evolution and popularity of AR-pattern modern 
sporting rifles. 

The exhibit follows the history of AR-pattern rifles from their 
development to their uses today in competition, hunting, recre- 
ational shooting and personal defense. Featuring more than a 
dozen rifles, Amer/ca's /?/Y/e highlights influential predecessors 
like the Ml 4, G3, FN-FAL and AK-47. 

This educational exhibit illustrates the significant differ- 
ences between the select-fire military-type rifles capable of full- 
automatic and the semi-automatic AR-pattern sporting rifles 
owned by millions of civilians. 



"America's Rifle explores the advancements in firearms 
technology that paved the way for this rifle to be so safe, reli- 
able and adaptable to almost any situation," said NRA Museums 
Director Jim Supica. 

America's Rifle will be on exhibit in the National Firearms 
Museum in Fairfax, Va., until July 201 6. 


woman's outlook 

NRA Announces 201 5 Women's Awards Recipients 


he National Rifle Association re- 
cently selected the recipients of its 
201 5 Women's Awards, which rec- 
ognize exceptional accomplishments in 
the preservation of the Second Amend- 
ment and the shooting sports through 
education, advocacy and volunteerism. 

Carolyn Meadows of Marietta, Ga., 
received the 2015 Sybil Ludington 
Women's Freedom Award. The award, 
first given in 1 995 and named for a hero- 
ine of the American Revolution, recog- 
nizes women who have demonstrated an 
extraordinary dedication to preserving 
the Second Amendment on the national 
stage and advancing the goals of the 


NRA through volunteerism and legisla- 
tive activism. 

Meadows, an active member of the 
NRA Board of Directors since 2003, is 
an experienced political leader whose 
effective lobbying of U.S. and Georgia 
legislators has been felt both locally 
and nationally. A passionate shooter 
and hunter. Meadows also volunteers 
her time to arrange gun safety courses, 
including the annual Jett Williams Law 
Enforcement Shootout and the Lock- 
heed-Martin Gun Club. 

The 201 5 Marion P. Hammer Woman 
of Distinction Award, named after the 
first woman president of the NRA, went 


to Linda Gilbertson of Concho, Ariz. 
Created in 2004, the award is presented to 
women who, like Hammer, exemplify ac- 
tivism and influence many in their fight to 
preserve Second Amendment freedoms. 

Gilbertson, a former Oregon state po- 
lice officer and U.S. Treasury Department 
Special Agent, has volunteered count- 
less hours as an NRA Certified Instructor 
to help women become comfortable 
and confident with firearms. Along with 
her husband, Gilbertson co-hosts "The 
Gun Locker," a weekly radio show that 
explores firearm-related topics. She also 
has cofounded several gun clubs and 
worked as a pistol instructor at the NRA 
Women's Wilderness Escape. 

"Carolyn Meadows and Linda Gil- 
bertson are two remarkable women who 
have helped so many people discover 
the fun of safe firearm ownership and 
usage," said Executive Director of NRA 
General Operations Kyle Weaver. "We 
are so grateful for their contributions to 
the Second Amendment, and the lasting 
impact of their volunteerism will be felt 
for generations to come."^ 

To learn more about 
the Women's Awards and other 
programs for women offered by the 
NRA, visit women.nra.org 
or call ( 800 ) 861 - 1166 . 



Linda Gilbertson, of Concho, Ariz., shown teaching some women about proper handling of a firearm, 
received the 201 5 Marion P. Hammer Woman of Distinction Award. She and her husband also co-host 
"The Gun Locker," a weekly radio show on firearm-related topics. 


86 



December 2015 American rifleman 


I 


Photo by Andrew Dalton 




AND HELP US RAISE 

FORTHEHRA-U. 



IN SPONSORSHIP OF THE 


NRA-ILA 


Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. has pledged to donate $2 for each new Roger® firearm sold 
between the 2015 and 2016 NRA Annual Meetings, with the goal of giving $4,000,000. Roger’s 
donation will benefit the NRA Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA). Established in 1975, NRA-ILA is committed to preserving the right of all law- 
abiding individuals to purchase, possess and use firearms for legitimate purposes as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. 


RUGER.COM/2MILLION 




MILLION 

GUN CHALLENGE 



©2015 Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. 


060915 





THE THOMPSON 



Donaid Bateman Hope Coates, shown here 
firing an Ml 921 Thompson submachine gun 
on a trip to Mexico in the 1950s, claimed to 
be the first man ever fired at by someone 
armed with a Thompson. However, in his 
initial report, he said that someone who 
was armed with a "select-fire M1911 
Colt pistol" had shot at him. 


Photo courtesy of Ashley Coates 


it in his tale. The leader of this effort, Michael Fitzpatrick, 
recalled years later in Dublin's Fighting Story, 1916-21, By 
The Men Who Made It that, after the battle, the "British 
reported that they had captured ... a machine gun, [but] 
this was propaganda, as we had no ... machine gun." In 
reality, there were, at the time, at least two TSMGs available 
to the IRA for operational use in Dublin, and in the hands of 
two men who knew how to use them. 

The interesting point is that James Dineen was not only 
a former U.S. Army officer, but a detective sergeant and 
firearm instructor with the Chicago police force when he 
took leave to deliver the Tommy guns to the IRA. According 
to all whom he taught, Dineen was well-versed in all types 
of firearms. There are very few known examples of select- 
fire M1911S, and the two most famous ones were those con- 
verted by Hyman Lehman in the 1930s for John Dillinger 
and "Baby Face" Nelson — both gangsters in Chicago. 

Given the incredible rarity of the arms, and the coin- 
cidence of their discovery by Coates in Dublin, could the 
pistols described by Coates have belonged to Dineen? Of 
anyone at that time in Dublin, Dineen would have been 
the most likely person to have access to such pistols. 
Moreover, Dineen was a recognized marksman and arms 
expert. Could it have been with those two pistols that 
someone (most likely Dineen) had opened fire on Coates 
that night, instead of a Thompson gun, as Coates later 
assumed? Or, was it indeed one of the Tommy guns that 
were later used in the Drumcondra ambush that had been 
fired at him? Fearing detection and exposure by the dis- 
covery of his distinctive and unusual pistols, could Dineen 


have actually targeted Coates? We will probably never 
know the answers to these queries. 

Worse yet, after an exhaustive search of the British 
National Archives (former Public Records Office) in London, 
neither Coates' alleged report, nor the supposed British 
report about the captured machine gun can be found. As of 
June 11, 1921, there is a list of rifles, shotguns and hand- 
guns (presumably including semi-automatic pistols) that the 
British forces had captured from the IRA during the previous 
six months in Ireland, but there are no machine guns listed. 
The IRA was not even keeping detailed records of its mem- 
bership, much less of its arms, during those chaotic times, so 
there is little likelihood that there are any extant records in 
Irish archives that would confirm the story. 

Because of these conflicting accounts, and the pos- 
sibility that it may have been select-fire .45 pistols, and 
not submachine guns, being fired on the night of June 9, 
1921, there is no way to verify that anyone was firing a 
TSMG at anyone else in Ireland, prior to the Drumcondra 
ambush. At any rate, the West Virginia State Police used 
Thompson guns to "sprinkle the mountainside" while 
firing at armed striking coal miners at Lick Creek on June 
13, 1921, fighting a running gun battle with the miners 
(which resulted in the death of one miner) some three 
days before the attack in Dublin at Drumcondra railway 
station (see "Guns of the Battle of Blair Mountain," March 
2014, p. 64; americanriflman.org/blair). That means the 
first documented use of the Thompson gun in combat was 
not in Ireland, but in the hills of West Virginia. 

continued on p. 95 



December 2015 


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2015 ANNUAL INDEX— AMERICAN RIFLEMAN, VOLUME 163 


Handguns, Description and Performance 

A Pair Of Les Baer Ml 91 Is, Nov., p. 68 
"Conditions" Of Readiness For The Ml 91 1 , June, p. 38 
Exceeding Expectations: S&W's X-Frames, July, p. 52 
Exploded View: Walther PP Pistol, Feb., p. 52 
Fashion & Function: EAA's Witness Pavona, March, p. 46 
Fashionably Late: Glock's 043, Aug., p. 62 
Getting The Facts On A Military & Police, Feb., p. 44 
Give It The Gas: Walther's CCP Compact 9 mm, July, p. 60 
Glock Covers The Spread, Feb., p. 54 
In The Zone: Springfield's Mod.2 Sub-Compact, June, p. 40 
Magazine Disconnect, Sept., p. 42 
Mastering The Lightest Of Rifles, Sept. p. 58 
New Guns And Gear: Top Performers For 201 5, 

April, p. 70 

Power And Majesty: The Magnum Research 
Stainless Desert Eagle, March, p. 68 
Preserving Our Rights One Gun At A Time: American 
Legacy Firearms, Jan., p. 88 
Running The Gun: The Double-Action Revolver 
Revisited, May, p. 52 
Taurus Pitches A Curve, Oct., p. 58 
Tomorrow's SIGs Today, April, p. 64 
Total Reset: FIK's VP9, Jan., p. 68 

Rifles & Shotguns, Description and Performance 

5.56x45 mm NATO In Early Colt Sporters, Feb., p. 44 
An "Interesting" Development: The Ruger Precision 
Rifle, Aug., p. 50 

Breaking With Tradition: The Benelli 8280, Nov., p. 62 
Colt's New 1918 BAR, Sept., p. 75 
Downsizing: DPMS Gil ARs, Jan., p. 78 
Eastern Lightweight: Kimber's Adirondack, July, p. 48 
More Center-Fire For The Money, Dec., p. 54 
Flow To Shoot Big Guns: "A Man's Got To Know Flis 
Limitations," Oct., p. 76 

New Guns And Gear: Top Performers For 201 5, April, p. 70 
Next-Gen Deer Slayers: Winchester's XPR and Deer 
Season XP, Sept., p. 52 

Old School: Springfield Armory's MIA, Feb., p. 66 

Rebirth Of The Rock-Ola Ml Carbine, June, p. 34 

Savage Package Rifles, Jan., p. 62 

Small Wonder: The Savage A17, Oct., p. 52 

Taking The Fleat: PDF's P41 5 Carbine, May, p. 66 

The AR: A Flalf-Dozen Takes, Aug., p. 70 

The AR For Flome Defense: One Expert's Choice, June, p. 44 

Rifles For Left-Out Lefties, Aug., p. 76 

The FICAR Turns A New Page In BAR Flistory, Sept, p. 77 

Ammunition and Reloading 

A Premium Trap Load: 12-ga., 2%", Oct., p. 47 
A Swift Compromise: .220 Swift, Aug., p. 46 
Federal Premium 3rd Degree Turkey Loads, April, p. 54 
Federal Premium Personal Defense FIST .380 ACP, 
Nov., p. 42 

Flandloading The 6.5x54 mm Mannlicher- 
Schoenauer, May, p. 42 

Little Recoil, Big Performance: .300 Whisper, Jan., p. 55 
Loading The .260 Rem., Jan., p. 48 
New Guns And Gear: Top Performers For 201 5, April, p. 70 
Next-Gen Deer Slayers: Winchester's XPR and Deer 
Season XP, Sept., p. 52 
No Quarter. . . Bore: .25-'06 Rem., Nov., p. 51 
Pushing The Envelope: The PolyCase ARX Bullet, 

Nov., p. 74 

Resurgent: The 10 mm Auto, July, p. 36 
Screamin': .204 Ruger, May, p. 90 
SIG Launches Loads For Pistols And . . . Rifles, Oct, p. 42 
Short And Stout .44 Rem. Mag., Feb., p. 45 
Subsonic Slugger: 12 Gauge, July, p. 46 
Switching Things Up: .300 Win. Mag., March, p. 45 
The .300 Winchester Magnum, Sept, p. 46 
The Gold Standard: .45 ACP, Dec., p. 38 
The Original Weatherby, March, p. 50 
The Unsung Forty-One: .41 Rem. Mag., Sept., p. 40 
Vietnam-Era Military Shotshells, July, p. 44 
What's In A Gauge?, Jan., p. 44 

Optics and Accessories 

Are Your Guns Tired And Stressed?, March, p. 64 
Flow Scope Adjustments Work, Dec., p. 64 
New Guns And Gear: Top Performers For 201 5, April, p. 70 
Optics Ready: The Mini-Reflex Revolution, Dec., p. 48 
Steiner Optics, June, p. 56 

go 


Historical & Antique Arms 

'03 Springfield Bayonet Serial Numbers, Oct., p. 40 
An Unusual Colt Woodsman, Oct, p. 40 
Belt-Fed .30 Carbine? Nov., p. 38 
Colt Frontier Scout, Single-Action .22, Jan., p. 1 1 2 
El Tigre Rifle, April, p. 124 
Elmer Keith's Single Action Army, Nov., p. 104 
First Fired In Anger? The Thompson, Dec., p. 60 
French RSC 1917 Rifle, Oct, p. 104 
Mauser Model 1914 Pistol, Dec., p. 42 
Model 1895 Lee Navy, Feb., p. 104 
Montgomery Ward's Western Field Model 1 0, May, p. 92 
Pattern 1853 Enfield Rifle-Musket, Sept, p. 104 
"RA-P" Stamp On Ml Garand, April, p. 48 
Smith & Wesson M&P Revolver, June, p. 80 
Smith & Wesson Model 49 Bodyguard, March, p. 92 
Smith & Wesson Triple Lock, Aug., p. 1 00 
Snake Venom Epidemic Paralyzes Colt Collectors, 
Sept, p. 62 

Tecumseh's Northwest Trade Gun, July, p. 56 

Terry Carbine, July, p. 96 

The East German Makarov: A Cold War Classic, 

Aug., p. 66 

The Genesis Of Sniping: Accuracy & Optics, Aug., p. 56 
The Guns of 1865: The Spencer Comes Of Age, 
March, p. 56 

The Most Famous Rifle Of D-Day, May, p. 38 
Upside Down Colt's Patent?, April, p. 46 
U.S. Air Force Combat Masterpieces, Aug., p. 48 
U.S. Semi-Automatic Rifle Caliber .30 Ml , Nov., p. 53 
Wartime Remington Ml 903s?, March, p. 44 
Whitworth Rifle, Dec., p. 96 

Biography & History 

Blue-Collar Guns: Fli-Point Firearms, June, p. 60 
Bucket List: L.C. Smith, Nov., p. 80 
Cold War Warrior: The IFIC Ml Garand, Nov., p. 54 
Deep Behind Enemy Lines: Weapons Of Vietnam's 
Covert Warriors, April, p. 86 
Fabrique Nationale: The First 125 Years, Jan., p. 56 
Frontier Lawman: Bass Reeves, Feb., p. 60 
Grande Puissance: 80 Years Of The Belgian Military 
Fligh Power, Oct, p. 80 

Ithaca Earns Its Stripes: The Model 37 In U.S. 

Military Service, May, p. 60 
John Browning's Automatic Rifle: Retrospective & 
Resurgence, Sept., p. 72 
Small Arms Of The Vietnam War, Oct, p. 62 
The Belgian Model 1889 Mauser, Feb., p. 72 
The Magpul Way, Sept, p. 66 
The Men And Guns Of The Battle Of The Bulge, 

Jan., p. 72 

Winchester Lever-Actions Go To War, June, p. 50 
Workshop Warriors: A Second Career For America's 
Fleroes, April, p. 94 

Legislation and Laws 

Advancing The Fundamental Right To Self-Defense 
From Coast To Coast, July, p. 1 8 
Armed Self-Defense "Rare?" Flardly., Nov., p. 18 
For Sound Governance, Character Matters, Feb., p. 18 
Freedom's On Fire!, Dec., p. 44 
Green Means "Go" To Ban All Rifle Ammo, May, p. 46 
"Green Tip" Survives Ban, May, p. 18 
NRA In The Courts: As Always, Leading The Fight, 
June, p. 18 

Obama Bureaucrats Target The Second Amendment, 
Oct., p. 18 

State of Play, Dec. p. 18 

Still Fighting, Still Winning . . . Still Taking Nothing For 
Granted: ILA Celebrates 40 Years, March, p. 18 
The Most Dangerous 700 Days America Flas Ever 
Faced, Feb., p. 50 

The "Security Of A Free State"? Not If Bloomberg 
Flas Flis Way, April, p. 20 
The Wizard Of Deception, Sept., p. 18 
When Bureaucrats Make "Sport" Of Fundamental 
Liberties, Congress Must Act, Aug., p. 1 8 
Your Self-Defense Rights In The Crosshairs Again, 
Jan., p. 18 

NRA Official 

2015 Golden Bullseye Awards, April, p. 80 
A Culture Of Freedom: Allan Cors, Oct., p. 70 

December 2015 


Coming to Music City, March, p. 78 

Great American Outdoor Show 201 5, Feb., p. 84 

NRA Annual Meetings Nashville, July, p. 66 

NRA Mentor Program, April, p. 62 

NRA's 2016 Challenge Coin, Oct., p. 50 

NRA-ILA 201 5 Leadership Forum, July, p. 68 

Safeguarding Our Children: School Shield, Dec., p. 80 

Dope Bag 

AirForce Airguns Condor SS, March, p. 76 
ARES Defense SCR, Jan., p. 94 
Beretta A400 Xplor Action 28 Gauge, May, p. 72 
Beretta Pico, Feb., p. 78 
Bond Arms Backup, Jan., p. 92 
Burris XTRI1 158, Feb., p. 82 
Caesar Guerini Invictus, Feb., p. 80 
CMMG Mk47 Mutant, Oct., p. 84 
Coonan Compact, Sept., p. 84 
Flornady RAPiD Safe, Feb., p. 83 
LaserLyte Score Tyme Target And Trigger Tyme 
Trainers, May, p. 77 

Lewis Machine & Tool LM8MRPSC (SLK8), April, p. 98 

Magnum Research MLR .22 WMR Barracuda, Dec., p. 74 

Redfield Rebel 8x 32 mm Binocular, July, p. 76 

Rigby Big Game .416 Rigby Rifle, Nov., p. 84 

Rock River Arms LAR-47 X-1 , June, p. 64 

Ruger GP100 Match Champion, Jan., p. 90 

Ruger SRI 91 1 Lightweight Commander, Aug., p. 80 

SMG Guns FG42, Aug., p. 82 

Smith & Wesson M&P9L Pro Series C.O.R.E., June, p. 66 

Stevens Model 555 Over-Under 20-Ga., March, p. 74 

Steyr AUG/A3 Ml 5.56x45 mm NATO Rifle, July, p. 74 

Swarovski Z6i 2.5-1 5X 44 mm, Oct., p. 86 

Thompson/Center Pro Flunter FX 209X50, May, p. 74 

Trijicon VCOG 1-6X 24 mm, June, p. 68 

TriStar Setter S/T, Sept., p. 86 

Vortex Razor FID GEN II 3-18X 50 mm, Dec., p. 76 

Weatherby Orion Over-Under 12-Ga. Shotgun, Nov., p. 86 

Weaver Tactical 6-30X 56 mm Scope, Aug., p. 84 

Winchester Rooster XR, May, p. 76 

Authors 
Barsness, John 

Flandloading The 6.5x54 mm M-S, May, p. 42 
Flow Scope Adjustments Work, Dec., p. 64 
Steiner Optics, June, p. 56 

Ballou, James L 

John Browning's Automatic Rifle: Retrospective & 
Resurgence, Sept, p. 72 

Bilby, Joseph G. 

The Guns of 1865, March, p. 56 

Boddington, Craig 

Flow To Shoot Big Guns: "A Man's Got To Know 
Flis Limitations", Oct., p. 76 
Rifles For Left-Out Lefties, Aug., p. 76 

Canfield, Bruce N. 

Cold War Warrior: The IFIC Ml Garand, Nov., p. 54 
Ithaca Earns Its Stripes: The Model 37 In U.S. 
Military Service, May, p. 60 

Carter, Aaron 

Federal Premium Personal Defense FIST .380 ACP, 
Nov., p. 42 

The Original Weatherby, March, p. 50 

Clapp, Wiley 

Give It The Gas: Walther's CCP Compact 9 mm, 
July, p. 60 

In The Zone: Springfield's Mod.2 Sub-Compact, 
June, p. 40 

Tomorrow's SIGs Today, April, p. 64 
Total Reset FIK's VP9, Jan., p. 68 

Detty, Mike 

Power And Majesty: The Magnum Research 
Stainless Desert Eagle, March, p. 68 

Dye, Dale & Laemlein, Tom 

Small Arms Of The Vietnam War, Oct, p. 62 

Fjestad, S.P. 

Snake Venom Epidemic Paralyzes Colt Collectors, 
Sept, p. 62 

Hacker, Rick 

Bucket List L.C. Smith, Nov., p. 80 

Rebirth Of The Rock-Ola Ml Carbine, June, p. 34 

Haviland, John 

Loading The .260 Rem., Jan., p. 48 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


The .300 Winchester Magnunn, Sept., p. 46 

Heggenstaller, Adam 

Eastern Lightweight: Kimber's Adirondack, July, p. 48 

Herman, B. Gil 

Fashionably Late; Clock's G43, Aug., p. 62 
Glock Covers The Spread, Feb., p. 54 
Pushing The Envelope; The PolyCase ARX Bullet, 
Nov., p. 74 

Taurus Pitches A Curve, Oct., p. 58 

James, C. Rodney 

Blue-Collar Guns: Hi-Point Firearms, June, p. 60 

Johnston, Gary Paul 

Colt's New 1918 BAR, Sept., p. 75 

Johnston, Jeff 

Optics Ready; The Mini-Reflex Revolution, Dec., p. 48 

Keefe, Mark A., IV 

Fabrique Nationale; The First 125 Years, Jan., p. 56 
Small Wonder: The Savage A17, Oct., p. 52 

Kontis, George E. 

Are Your Guns Tired And Stressed?, March, p. 64 
HCAR; A New Page In BAR History, Sept., p. 77 

Kuleck,Walt 

The AR; A Half-Dozen Takes, Aug., p. 70 

Kurtenhach, Joseph L 

Exceeding Expectations: S&W's X-Frames, July, p. 52 

Lamh, Kyle 

The AR For Home Defense; One Expert's Choice, 
June, p. 44 

Mann, Richard 

Savage Package Rifles, Jan., p. 62 

Mercaldo, Luke & Vanderlinden, Anthony 

Winchester Lever-Actions Go To War, June, p. 50 

Miniter, Frank 

The Magpul Way, Sept., p. 66 

Morgan, Martin K.A. 

The Men And Guns Of The Battle Of The Bulge, 
Jan., p. 72 

Norell, James O.E. 

A Culture Of Freedom; Allan Cors, Oct., p. 70 
Green Means "Go" To Ban All Rifle Ammo, May, p. 46 

Pegler, Martin 

The Genesis Of Sniping; Accuracy & Optics, Aug., p. 56 

Plaster, Maj. John L. 

Deep Behind Enemy Lines: Weapons Of Vietnam's 
Covert Warriors, April, p. 86 

Sheetz, Brian 

Breaking With Tradition; The Benelli 828U, Nov., p. 62 

Simpson, Layne 

Resurgent; The 10 mm Auto, July, p. 36 

Old School: Springfield Armory's MIA, Feb., p. 66 

Sage, Mark 

Tecumseh's Northwest Trade Gun, July, p. 56 

Smith, Ann Y. 

Fashion & Function: EAA's Witness Pavona, 
March, p. 46 

Smith-Christmas, Kenneth L 

First Fired In Anger? The Thompson, Dec., p. 60 

Towsley, Bryce 

Downsizing: DPMS Gil ARs, Jan., p. 78 

Vanderlinden, Anthony 

The Belgian Model 1889 Mauser, Feb., p. 72 

Vanderpool, Bill 

Running The Gun: The Double-Action Revolver 
Revisited, May, p. 52 

Van Brunt, Dwight 

Mastering The Lightest Of Rifles, Sept. p. 58 

White, Cameron S. 

The East German Makarov; A Cold War Classic, 
Aug., p. 66 

Wilson, Jim 

A Pair Of Les Baer Ml 91 1 s, Nov., p. 68 
Frontier Lawman: Bass Reeves, Feb., p. 60 

Wood, Keith 

Taking The Heat: PDF's P41 5 Carbine, May, p. 66 
Workshop Warriors; A Second Career For 
America's Heroes, April, p. 94 

Young, Kelly 

An "Interesting" Development: The Ruger 
Precision Rifle, Aug., p. 50 

Zent, John 

More Center-Fire For The Money, Dec., p. 54 
Next-Gen Deer Slayers: Winchester's XPR and Deer 
Season XP, Sept., p. 52 




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94 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 

















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THE THOMPSON 

continued from p. 88 


POSTSCRIPT: Both Dineen and 
Cronin returned to the United States 
after serving in the army of the 
Irish Free State during the 1922-23 
Irish Civil War, and after a few years, 
Dineen rejoined the Chicago police 
department, serving on the force until 
the mid-1930s. According to a descen- 
dant, James Dineen maintained his 
keen interest in firearms throughout 
later life. Donald Coates led a fasci- 
nating life and he, too, continued 
to be involved in firearms. 

(For more on that, see "The Pistolero," 
americanrifleman.org/pistolero.) fT 


The author thanks Kirk Kellogg, 
Fernande Ingram, Stephen M. 
Smith, Michael Parker, Stephen 
Wood, Michael Curran, David Grant, 
Allan Cars, Thomas Nelson, Robert 
McDonough, Brian McCleaf, Joseph 
Dineen, Deborah Jann, and Ashley 
Coates for their wholehearted and 
enthusiastic assistance in investi- 
gating this story. 


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The "Auxies" were armed with revolvers 
and rifles, and sometimes, as shown here, 
with Model 1897 Winchester not shotguns. 




Civil War Gold Survives 
at Historic Mint 


On the battlefield, the British-made Whitworth rifle 
was a favorite weapon of Yankee and Confederate 
sharpshooters during the Civil War. On the home 
front, hard money - especially gold coinage - would 
have enjoyed similar popularity with civilians ... if 
they could have gotten it. Coins of all kinds virtually 
vanished from view in both the North and the South 
because of widespread hoarding during the war. 


The Union and Confederacy both issued paper money 
to keep the wheels of commerce turning and pay 
their large armies, but almost no one trusted it. 
Many remembered hearing the phrase "not worth a 
Continental" to describe the colonies' nearly worthless 
currency during the American Revolution. 


Gold coins were minted during the Civil War, but few 
found their way into people's pockets and purses 
until hostilities ended. Some turned out to be quite 



pieces - issued during the War Between the States. 
Heightening their historical significance, all had been 
stored for many years at the old San Francisco Mint, 
one of the few major buildings to survive that city's 
calamitous earthquake in 1906. That building, now 
a museum, is affectionately known as "The Granite 
Lady" because it withstood the quake and the fires 
that followed. 


This collection contains original double eagles dated 
between 1862 and 1865, many bearing the coveted 
"S" mint mark, showing they were made at the San 
Francisco Mint. We immediately submitted them 
to the respected Professional Coin Grading Service, 
which certified their authenticity and grade and 
sealed them in protective holders displaying their 
Granite Lady pedigree. 


NRA members can obtain these coveted 
Civil War coins, each containing nearly 
an ounce of gold, at a special price. 

Call 1.800.877.3273 

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Beaumont, Tx 

NRAK K 





Technical I i have this old gun 



Gl/A/: Whitworth Military Target Rifle 

MANUFACTURER:\NH\-moRTH Rifle Co., Manchester, England 
CONDITION: NRA Excellent (Antioue Gun Standards) 

MANUFACTURED: 1863 
VALUE: $6,500 



A sk the average Civil War buff to name 
a Yankee or Confederate sharpshooter's 
rifle and invariably the answer is "the 
Whitworth." To be fair, the Whitworth probably 
wasn't the most widely used long-range rifle 
during the War Between the States, but it was 
certainly one of the best and most sought-after 
by combatants on both sides. 

Designed by eminent English engineer 
Joseph Whitworth in response to a British Board 
of Ordnance desire for a universal rifle with 
which to equip its troops, his unique, smallbore 
(.451), hexagonal-bored longarm, with a pitch 
of one turn in 20", fired a proprietary 530-gr., 
six-sided projectile that fit mechanically within 
the grooves. 

Several thousand were built for trials as early 
as 1858. Pitted against the issue .577 Pattern 
1853 Enfield, the Whitworth showed promise, 
and different styles were ultimately tried. The 
gun performed extremely well accuracy-wise, 
especially at longer ranges. Within 500 yds. the 
Enfield and Whitworth were considered equals — 
past that range, the Whitworth excelled. But 
extreme bore fouling by blackpowder residue, 
the expense of building the guns and the 
increasing popularity of breechloaders elimi- 
nated the possibility of government contracts. 

Meanwhile, Whitworth rifles had been 
eagerly accepted by target shooters, and a 
number of different models were produced by 
Whitworth's firm. The guns employed a variety 
of open sights, as well as sophisticated tele- 
scopic sights developed by David Davidson. 

It didn't take long to discover that conical 
bullets fired in Whitworths, because of set- 
back, provided accuracy as good as hexagonal 
rounds, and subsequently the two types were 
used interchangeably. 

Whitworth's rifle received a consider- 
able boost when, in 1860, Queen Victoria 
opened the new Wimbledon target 


ranges by pulling a silk cord attached to the 
trigger of a pre-sighted and machine-rested 
Whitworth rifle, hitting an iron target just off- 
center at 400 yds. Most shooters agreed that, 
because of its accuracy, the Whitworth had an 
effective range of between 800 and 1,000 yds. — 
a long shot indeed by the standards of the day. 

Whitworths were prized sharpshooter arms 
during the Civil War, some numbers of them 
being run through the blockade by the rebels 
and selectively issued. The most common 
Confederate guns were marked "2nd QUALITY." 
This did not mean they were inferior to 
other Whitworths, but that they had sim- 
pler sights, were less complex and employed 
Enfield-pattern locks without external slide-on 
safeties. They featured 33" barrels and check- 
ered fore-ends and wrists. Other styles with 
Davidson scopes were also occasionally seen in 
the southern ranks. 

Probably the most famous Whitworth shot 
occurred during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court 
House on May 9, 1864, when Union Maj. Gen. 
John Sedgwick and his staff became the targets 
of Confederate sharpshooters at a distance 
later estimated to be between 500 and 1,000 
yds. After admonishing his subordinates for 
ducking — "I'm ashamed of you dodging that 
way. They couldn't hit an elephant at this 
distance" — a Whitworth bullet struck him in the 
head, just below his left eye. He was the most 
senior Union officer killed during the war. 

The rifle shown here is a superb-condition, 
military-style, target model with two bands 
and a 33" barrel. The rear sight is a ladder-style 
graduated to 1,200 yds., and the front is a very 
sophisticated, adjustable-style post-and-globe. 
Possessed of a pristine bore, it also has a scraper 
ramrod with swiveling head to help clear fouling 
between shots. Because of its condition, style 
and features, the gun is worth $6,500. 

— Garry James 


IW 


I 


96 


December 2015 


AMERICAN RIFLEMAN 


Photos by Jill Marlow 





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3-dot tritium night sights. Carry 
Melt™ treatment on frame and 
slide, and front strap checkering. 



The Micro Raptor Stainless 
incorporates all of the popular 
Raptor features such as slide 
scaling, front strap scale 
serrations, tritium night 
sights, ambidextrous safety 
and zebrawood grips. 


( 888 ) 243-4522 

KIMBERAMERICA.COM 


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