Skip to main content

Full text of "Montana labor market"

See other formats


Montana 

State 
Library 



This cover sheet created by Internet Archive for formatting. 



MONTANA LABOR MARKET 

Monthly Review of iT^lCaVL-JcJ 

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK, LABOR SUPPLY, LABOR DEMAND, CURRENT EMPLOYMENT 



VEB 



MONTANA STATE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
Division of Unemployment Compensation Commission of Montana 



Albert F. Root, Commissioner 



Chadwick H. Smith, Chairman 
Mitchell Building — P. O. Box 1728 — Helena, Montana 



Paul R. McClurc, Commissioner 



FL-154 



DECEMBER 15, 1955 



November's Employment UPSURGE OF UNEMPLOYMENT IN NOVEMBER 
Clings to High Levels ACCOMPANIES ABNORMALLY SEVERE STORM 



Employment in Montana non-farm in- 
dustries as of mid-November numbered 
157,700 wage earners, decline of 2,700 from 
October, increase of 5,400 over a year ago, 
and virtually even with the level of two 
years ago, according to estimates compiled 
by the commission in cooperation with the 
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
This is the highest total of such employ- 
ment, for November, ever reached in Mon- 
tana. 

Timing Omits Storm Effects 

Timing of the sample reports on which 
estimates are based, regularly the week end- 
ing nearest the 15th of the month, served 
in this instance to omit any reflection of 
force reductions accompanying the storm 
period which began at the close of that 
week. The estimates therefore show little 
influence of that weather circumstance. 

• Seasonal Dip Moderate 

Seasonal dip from October to November 
levels was moderate, 2,700 in number and 
1.7 percent, only slightly greater than the 
experience in other recent years. It contrasts 
with a gain of 2,100 for the same October 
to November count a year ago, when work 
was resuming in the metals industry, after 
a work stoppage of two months. In 1953 
the November decrease was 2,000. 

Heavy Shrinkage, Construction 

Decreases from the October level in- 
cluded 1,600 in contract construction, 700 
in manufacturing, 600 in government em- 
ployment, 200 in service industries, and 100 
in finance and insurance. All of these are 
attributable to seasonal influences. Gains 
from the October count indicated 100 in 
metal mining, 200 in interstate railroads, 
and 200 in wholesale and retail trade. 

Exceeds Year Ago Figure 

The November employment figure is 5,400 
greater than for November of 1954, a com- 
parison which should be tempered by con- 
sideration of the labor market situation at 
that time — as it was emerging from a work 
stoppage affecting 10,000 wage-earners. 
The employment economy a year ago was 
still suffering to the extent of about 5,000 
from that influence. 

Manufacturing Figure Increases 

A firmer basis for interpreting trends is 
furnished by the employment levels of No- 
vember, 1953, in relation to those of the 
month just passed. The two year period 

^fcfhows a minor upward movement of 100. 

^Pn major industrial groups, however, the 
variations are quite revealing. Manufactur- 
ing is 1,300 higher this November than 
two years ago, while mining and construc- 
tion are each 1,000 below their level of 
that time. The finance, real estate and in- 
surance group shows a gain of 800. 



Seasonal release of workers in Montana industries was speeded up in November by 
prevalence of severe, wintry weather throughout the state. Virtually all outdoor work was 
curtailed or closed down completely about the middle of November, a process which con- 
tinued into the current month. Under normal weather conditions this layoff process is 
extended over both November and December, and into January. 

Reserve Supply More Than Doubles in Month 

Supply of available labor, as evidenced by active work-applications at offices of the 
employment service, rose from 3,348 the first of November to 6,968 at the end of the 
month. This is 1,300 above the jobseeker count a year earlier and 1,800 more than the 
average for December 1 in the years 1949 to 1954. Claims for unemployment insurance 
zoomed in proportion, from 1,889 for the week ending November 14 to 5,464 in the week 
of December 2. 

Work-Applicant Count in Review 



February 

April 

June 

August 

October 

November _ 
December _ 
* Estimated. 



1955 


1954 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


12,304 


12,455 


10,995 


10,136 


12,336 


18,556 


9,227 


8,945 


6,043 


5,705 


7,048 


11,435 


5,274 


5,403 


3,910 


2,957 


4,240 


5,809 


2,458 


3,519 


2,069 


1,619 


2,370 


2,898 


3,348 


4,038 


2,688 


1,955 


2,572 


3,179 


6,968 


5,617 


5,048 


4,135 


4,341 


5,340 


8,800* 


8,613 


7,932 


7,517 


6,694 


8,329 



December Effects Uncertain 

Effect of the sudden upsurge in unem- 
ployment on the year-round employment 
situation will be more clearly discernible a 
month hence. Usual experience is for an 
upward movement in number of persons 
seasonally unemployed amounting to about 
sixty percent from November to December. 
If most of that normal increase has been 
chalked up this year in November, the in- 
crease in December should be on a much 
more moderate scale. A twenty percent up- 
ward movement during this month would 
put the labor supply at the turn of the year 
in line with experience of recent years. 

Construction and Logging Curtailed 

Construction employment has suffered 
most in the present force reduction situa- 
tion, since it is distributed into all areas. 
Lumber and logging employment took a 
severe setback, but is confiined to the tim- 
bered areas in the western portion of the 
state. Oil field work likewise has been cut 
to a minimum during the storm period. 
Completion of refinery season in the sugar 
industry is adding to the force reduction ef- 
fects, one factory is already closed, two 
others in December, and the fourth about 
the first of the year. Railroad track crews 
were cut abruptly in November to winter 
size and some force reduction invaded the 
operating and shop divisions of railroad 
work. 

Highway Crews Down 500 

In the state highway system work was 
continuing in early December on construc- 
tion of 113 miles of road, four bridges, and 
two gravel projects, employing 383 men on 
22 contracts. Maintenance crews comprised 
a force of 731. The total of 1,114 was 100 
less than in November of 1954 and 500 less 



than in October last. Six road jobs on 41 
miles were completed during November. 
Many Projects Await Spring 

Effect of the November storm period is 
reflected in suspension of work on 17 road 
jobs involving 107 miles of construction, 
most of which will await spring for re- 
sumption. Contracts are ready but no work 
begun on 26 additional miles and four 
bridges which will cost $350,000. An addi- 
tional 70 miles of road and $861,000 worth 
of bridges were temporarily suspended and 
may resume with more moderate weather. 

Some Inside Construction Continues 

Large scale employment resumption in 
construction, lumber, and railroad fields 
during the winter is not anticipated. Usual 
experience is that once down these indus- 
tries remain dormant until milder weather 
permits operations to go forward with much 
less interruption than they would be subject 
to in midwinter. Buildings which are at or 
near an enclosed stage will furnish some 
employment, but will affect the aggregate 
only slightly. Projects which were just start- 
ing or ready to start will likely await more 
favorable weather prospects. 

Labor Demand Is At Minimum 

Labor demand, in the face of all the ex- 
tensive layoffs, is extremely limited. Retail 
trade establishments account for temporary 
sales jobs during the holiday and inventory 
season but in no sense offset the seasonal 
curtailment in other lines. Postal services 
require many extras for the heavy mail sea- 
son during December. Hard-rock miners are 
still in demand and some increase in em- 
ployment results at those plants where 
miners are returning from summer work 
outdoors. Farm employment is at its low 
point of the year and will offer but few 
jobs until spring opens. 



lllllllllllllll 



Pagt ' Two 3 0864 1004 4895 3 

Along the Hiring Line- 
Field Summary Dec. 1 

ANACONDA. Deer Lodge, Philipsburg— 

i 9Y jobseekers; 53 men, 56 women; 23 men 
.nid 14 women over 45) All outdoor work 
cut to minimum, severe weather; demand 
low. Smelter has resumed hiring replace 
ments after absorbing those laid off with 
change to six-dav week Some hiring of live- 
stock feeders has begun, weeks earlier than 
normal. 

BIL LINGS, Columbus, Hardin, llvsham. 
laurel. Red Lodge, Roundup — (775 job- 
seekers; 605 men. 170 women; 184 men and 
45 women over 45) Surplus of nearly all 
labor skills developed during Novembei as 
storms closed down construction. Further 
additions will follow closing of season run 
at two sugar factories, releasing 500. Hiriiv; 
in retail trade for holidays only partially 
compensates. Railroad crews reduced except 
for emergency intervals. Farm hiring vir- 
tually at standstill, except for experienced 
livestock feeders. 

BOZEMAN, Knnis, Three Forks, Trident 
— (257 jobseekers; 179 men, 58 women; 17 
men and 1 woman over 45) Seasonal lay- 
offs occurred four to six weeks earlier than 
usual. Woods work nearly all halted, road 
construction mostly closed for the winter, 
cement plant crew trimmed to normal winter 
pattern. No labor demand, few construction 
projects that will resume will do so on 
call-back basis. Contract for new high 
school awarded. Abundance of labor in- 
creased by college students seeking part- 
lime work. 

Ill I IF. Virginia City, Whitehall— (458 
jobseekers; 284 men, 174 women; 124 men 
and 70 women over 45) Railroad work and 
construction encountered earlier than nor- 
mal layoffs in November, mostly to con- 
tinue through the winter season. Motels 
and drive-ins also reduced forces Mining 
hiring is at moderate pace, largely consisting 
of workers returning from summer in out- 
door jobs, an annual pattern. Holiday trade 
hiring delayed until December. 

( I I BANK— (124 jobseekers; 100 men, 
24 women; 24 men and 2 women over 45) 
Though heavy layoffs occurred in construc- 
tion and oil drilling in November, some re- 
sumption has been noted. Inside work on 
new school, postal building and clinic will 
continue, other jobs shut down until spring. 
Present surplus expected to continue for 90 
da\s Some holiday hiring in trade and 
service. Stockmen are hiring feeders earlier 
than normal. 

1)111 OS -(97 jobseekers; 55 men, 42 
women; 24 men and 22 women over 45) 
I ivettock feeding has begun, early winter. 
Power line construction in south end of 
county and sewer work in Dillon halted by 
i Several small mining projects closed 
for the winter. Work on residences and 
buildings idled 20 construction workers, a 



DNTANA LABOR MARKET 



DECEMBER 15, 1955 



LABOR MARKET REFLEC 


TORS 

1954 
Nov. 




1955 
Employment — Nov. 


1955 
Oct 


Nov. Avg.' 
1950-1954 


Industrial Employment 157,700 
New Job Applicants 4,330 
Job Applicants, end of month 6,968 


160,400 
2.866 
3,348 


152,300 
3,410 
5,617 


153,700 
3,180 
4,898 


Dec. 9 
Insured Unemployment — 1955 


Nov. 4 
1955 


Dec. 10 
1954 


Avg. 1st 
Dec. Wk. 
1950-1954 


New and Renewal Claims 1,258 
Unemployed Weeks Filed 4,634 
Total Unemployment Claims 5,892 


604 
1,285 
1,889 


1,348 
3,356 
4,704 


1,185 
2,645 
3,830 



few retained for inside work. One commer- 
cial structure finished. 

GLASGOW, Fort Peck, Malta, Ophcim 

— (261 jobseekers; 204 men, 57 women; 
50 men and 18 women over 45) Nearly 
all outdoor work ceased in November, 
with severe weather. About 225 laid 
off by airport construction contractors, with 
likelihood that 50 will be put back to work 
until winter intervenes. Some Glasgow con- 
tractors continuing on inside work and re- 
duced crews. No demand of consequence 
expected until spring opens. Farmers are 
already feeding stock and some hires for 
that purpose have been recorded. 

GLENDIVE, Circle, Wibaux— (115 job- 
seekers; 77 men, 38 women; 23 men and 9 
women over 45) Construction ceased ab- 
ruptly about the middle of November, prob- 
ably until spring. Oil operations were dras- 
tically cut at the same time, owing to severe 
weather. Livestock feeding has begun and 
slight demand felt for feeders. Surplus of 
applicants in nearly all fields. 

GREAT FALLS, Choteau, Fort Benton, 

Stanford— (839 jobseekers; 738 men, 201 
women; 261 men and 42 women over 45) 
Winter arrived three weeks early, stopping 
most construction projects more or less 
permanently for the winter season. Rail- 
roads called in their outdoor crews. Five 
day week has increased demand for train 
operators, supply adequate. Manufacturing 
employment is at a minimum, with abun- 
dance of qualified applicants. Inside work is 
some building contracts is resuming with 
small crews. Agricultural demand limited 
to livestock feeders. 

HAMILTON, Stciensville — (209 job- 
seekers; 177 men. 32 women; 66 men and 
12 women over 45) Three sawmills closed 
during severe November weather, logging 
crews curtailed at same time -aid hauling 
virtually ceased. Labor demand extremely 
low, and will continue so through the win- 
ter months. Holiday demand for extra help 
all filled. Some hiring of livestock feeders 
in farm areas. 

HAVRE, Chinook, Harlem— (196 job- 
seekers; 156 men, 40 women; 24 men and 7 
women over 45) Heavy flow of new joh 
applicants resulted fiom early winter clos- 



ing ol all outdoor jobs, especialy in con- 
struction and railroad maintenance. Em- 
ployment outlook poor until spring. Feed- 
ing of cattle has resulted in a minor de- 
mand for experienced feeders. Holiday trade 
requires some extra help in retail circles. 

HELENA, Boulder, Garrison, Townsend, 
White Sulphur Springs — (373 jobseekers; 
258 men, 115 women; 109 men and 31 
women over 45) Employment picture was 
normal or better up to early November, 
when severe cold wave closed nearly all out- 
door jobs, some of them for the full winter 
season. Idleness increased about 200 over- 
night. Some holiday hiring in trade and 
postal circles eased the tension, but a solid 
surplus in nearly all skills remains. Nearly 
all construction projects are expected to re- 
main dormant until spring. 

KALISPELL, Columbia Falls, Eureka, 
Libby, Whitefish— (835 jobseekers; 710 
men, 125 women; 288 men and 40 women 
over 45) Labor supply is about double that^B^ 
of a month earlier, due to sudden stoppage^^J 
of outdoor activities with the onslaught of 
early winter. Logging and lumbering, con- 
struction, forestry, and railroad employ- 
ment all figure in the seasonal layoffs that 
have occurred and are imminent. About 500 
additional will be released in December, 
including the completion of Christmas tree 
marketing. Trade and service, and further 
reduction of lumber forces in January, will 
add another 700 to the applicant roll. 

LEWISTOWN, Harlowton, Ryegate, Win- 
nett — (131 jobseekers; 82 men, 49 women; 
29 men and 12 women over 45) Outdoor 
construction was halted, and nearly all 
other outdoor work curtailed several weeks 
early by storm and cold conditions in mid- 
November. Resumption of some employ- 
ment is expected, on limited scale. Pros- 
pects for spring are heightened by a pro- 
gram of residence building, road and bridge 
jobs, construction of a new store structure, 
and completion of a telephone building. 

LIVINGSTON, Big Timber— (260 job- 
seekers; 177 men, 83 women; 72 men and 
28 women over 45) Construction employ- 
ment is at the low level of the year, due to 
early and severe winter. Projects in the park 
(Continued on Page Three) 



EIGHT YEARS OF MONTANA INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT TOTALS, BY MONTHS (in Thousands) 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



Aver. 



1948 


134.4 


132.0 


133.2 


137.1 


140.6 


145.8 


148.9 


150.3 


151.4 


1949 


137.1 


135.5 


137.7 


144.0 


147.3 


1510 


150.0 


150.1 


149.8 


1950 


133.2 


132.2 


135.2 


142.1 


147.3 


153.6 


154.9 


157.1 


156.8 


1951 


141.9 


139.4 


140.3 


145.9 


149.4 


154.1 


153.5 


154ri 


154.3 


1952 


140.5 


140.7 


143.0 


1497 


154.8 


159.0 


159.5 


161.2 


160.4 


1953 


145.8 


144.5 


146.3 


1497 


153.1 


158.0 


158.5 


160.6 


160.3 


1954 


146.6 


145.4 


147.1 


150.7 


155.1 


160.3 


161.3 


161.4 


152.3 


1955 


143.6 


143.2 


144.2 


148.3 


154.1 


I60.fi 


162.4 


164.0 


162.7 



149.6 149.4 147.7 143.4 

148.2 146.1 143.3 145.1 

152.2 150.7 148.8 147.1 

152.4 151.7 150.6 149.0' 

157.9 156.0 154.9 153.2 

159.6 157.6 156.4 154.2 

152.3 150.6 152.8 

160.4 157.7 



DECEMBER 15, 1955 



MONTANA LABOR MARKET 



Page Three 



Along the Hiring Line — 
I Field Summary Dec. 1 

(Continued from Page Two) 



are all closed. A new bank building will 
finish in December. Farmwork at a stand- 
still, except stock feeding. Railroad employ- 
ment prospects continue dark. Lumber mills 
all closed, some may reopen in December, 
logging and hauling halted. 

MILES CITY, Baker, Broad us, Ekalaka, 
Colstrip, Forsyth, Terry — (151 jobseekers; 
126 men, 25 women; 50 men and 9 women 
over 45) All outdoor employment curtailed 
early in November; two small construction 
projects, a bridge and school building, may 
re-open if weather permits. Layoff of 24 
shopmen in railroad car department adds to 
labor surplus. Not much change expected 
until spring. 

MISSOULA, Drumruond, Arlee, Superior 
— (708 jobseekers; 508 men, 200 women; 
136 men and 46 women over 45) About 
60 percent of construction employment in 
the area laid off in November, some re- 
hires will result if weather severity relents. 
Sugar factory ended season run, releasing 
225. Christmas tree operations halted by 
the severe cold, hired extras to recover lost 
production. Labor surplus in nearly all oc- 
cupational groups. 

POLSON— (381 jobseekers; 330 men, 51 
women; 58 men and 16 women over 45) 
Plywood plant and sawmill closed during 
cold weather, adding 100 to surplus. Mill 
will resume as weather permits, plywood 
plant adjusting to avoid future shutdowns 
because of cold. Construction and other out- 
1 side work all adversely affected. The storm 
halted addition of third shift in plywood. 

SHELBY, Chester, Conrad, Tiber Dam 

— (169 jobseekers; 124 men, 45 women; 
12 men over 45) Main construction con- 
tracts on Tiber dam completed. Cold 
weather stopped work on new oil refinery 
at Kevin. Building projects also shut down 
in Shelby but will resume as weather per- 
mits. Labor demand at a minimum, no sub- 
stantial improvement until spring. Practi- 
cally no farm hiring; holiday demand for 
extra help not apparent up to November 
30. 

SIDNEY— (102 jobseekers; 88 men, 14 
women; 24 men and 3 women over 45) 
Early November hiring was active; halted 
abruptly as wintry weather arrived. Most 
construction nearly completed; Fairview 
bridge and two road projects will resume 
in spring. A school clinic, and several resi- 
dences to be completed this winter if weather 
permits. Hiring for holiday trade fairly ac- 
tive, farm hiring at low ebb and less stock 
feeding than usual in prospect. 

THOMPSON FALLS, Hot Springs— (196 

jobseekers; 163 men, 33 women; 48 men 
and 10 women over 45) Employment in 
clearing for the Noxon dam dwindled in 
November's cold, one contract may resume 
upon moderation. Some work continuing on 
railroad bridge relocation. Logging and saw- 
mills nearly all shut down, some hope to 
resume on winter scale. 

WOLF POINT, Plenrywood, Scobey— 
(132 jobseekers; 105 men, 27 women; 19 
i men and 7 women over 45) Cold weather 
in November curtailed construction em- 
ployment and prevented hiring of rock 
pickers for farms. Local surplus augmented 
by skilled workers returning from employ- 
ment in other areas. Less hiring in trade 
and service than usual pre-holiday experi- 
ence. Oil field hiring at minimum. 



ESTIMATED EMPLOYMENT IN NON-AGRICULTURAL 
INDUSTRIES IN MONTANA (1) 

(Produced in co-operation with United States Bureau of Labor Statistics) 



INDUSTRY 



NONAGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Lumber and timber products 

Primary metals 

Other (4) 

Nondurable goods 

Food and kindred products 

Printing and publishing 

Petroleum refining 

Other (5) _ 

Mining 

Metal mining 

Coal, quarrying and nonmetallic 

Petroleum-natural gas production 

Contract Construction 

Contractors, building construction 

Contractors, other than building 

Contractors, special trade 

Transportation and utilities 

Interstate railroads 

Transportation except railroads 

Utilities including communication 

Trade 

Wholesale trade 

Retail trade 

General merchandise and apparel 

Food stores 

Eating and drinking establishments 

Automotive and filling stations 

Retail trade not elsewhere classified- 
Finance, insurance and real estate 

Services and miscellaneous 

Hotels, rooming houses, camps, etc 

Personal services 

Other (6) „ 

Government 

Federal 

State and local 

Great Falls Area (Cascade County) 

Manufacturing 

Contract construction 

Transportation and utilities 

Trade, wholesale and retail 

Services and miscellaneous (7) 

Government 



EMPLOYMENT 


Net ( 

Oct. '55~ 


hango 


Nov. 


1 Oct. 


Nov. 


Nov. '54 


1955 (2) 


1 1955 (3) 


1954 


to 
Nov. '55 


to 
Nov. '55 


157,700 


160,400 


152,300 


—2,700 


5,400 


20,300 


21,000 


19,700 


— 700 


600 


11,700 


11,900 


11,100 


— 200 


600 


6,200 


6,400 


6,100 


— 200 


100 


4,200 


4,200 


3,800 





400 


1,300 


1,300 


1,200 





100 


8,600 


9,100 


8,600 


— 500 





4,800 


5,100 


4,600 


— 300 


200 


1,500 


1,700 


1,700 


— 200 


— 200 


1,300 


1,300 


1,300 








1,000 


1,000 


1,000 








11,300 


11,200 


11,000 


100 


300 


7,900 


7,800 


7,700 


100 


200 


800 


800 


900 





— 100 


2,600 


2,600 


2,400 





200 


9,700 


11,300 


9,900 


—1,600 


— 200 


3,700 


4,600 


4,100 


— 900 


— 400 


2,800 


3,300 


2,700 


— 500 


100 


3,200 


3,400 


3,100 


— 200 


100 


22,300 


22,100 


21,200 


200 


1,100 


13,200 


13,000 


12,400 


200 


800 


3,500 


3,500 


3,500 








5,600 


5,600 


5,300 





300 


40,000 


39,800 


38,800 


200 


1,200 


9,000 


9,100 


8,700 


— 100 


300 


31,000 


30,700 


30,100 


300 


900 


5.800 


5,600 


5,700 


200 


100 


4,500 


4,500 


4,700 





— 200 


7,400 


7,500 


7,400 


— 100 





6,400 


6,300 


5,900 


100 


500 


6,900 


6,800 


6,400 


100 


500 


5,600 


5,700 


5,100 


— 100 


500 


19,500 


19,700 


19.300 


— 200 


200 


2,600 


2,800 


2,600 


— 200 





2,300 


2,300 


2,200 





100 


14,600 


14,600 


14,5001 





100 


29.000 


29,600 


27,300 


— 600 


1,700 


6,100 


6,300 


6,200 


— 200 


— 100 


22,900 


23,300 


21,1001 


— 400 


1,800 


18.300 


18,800 


17,900 


— 500 


400 


2,700 


2,800 


2,7001 


— 100 





1.600 


1,800 


1,500 


— 200 


100 


2,500 


2,600 


2.400' 


— 100 


100 


5,900 


5.900 


5,800! 





100 


3,400 


3,500 


3,300 


— 100 


100 


2,200 


2,200 


2,200) 









I 



(1) Estimates Include all full and part-time wage and salary workers who worked or received 
pay during the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the month. Proprietors, firm members, 
personnel of the armed forces, domestic servants, and self-employed persons are excluded. 

(2) Preliminary estimates based on return from sample of 717 selected Montana establishments. 

(3) Figures previously released have been revised on returns from 1,058 such establishments. 

(4) Includes fabricated metal products, machinery except electrical, furniture, stone and clay 
products. 
Includes apparel, chemicals, and miscellaneous manufacturing products. 



(5) 
(6) 



Includes commercial trade schools, auto repair services and garages, miscellaneous repair 
services and hand trades, motion pictures, amusements and recreation, medical and health, 
law offices and professional services, nonprofit membership organizations and business not 
otherwise classified. 



(7) Same as (6) above, alto Includes finance, insurance, real estate and mining. 



Page Four 



MONTANA LABOR MARKET 



Dl-.CKMBF.R 15, 1955 



COMPARISON OF BASIC LABOR MARKET TRANSACTIONS IN NOVEMBER, 1955, AND NOVEMBER, 1954 



Employment 


New Job Applicants 


Jobaeekers in Pile 


Job Placements 


U.I.C 

Wk. 


Claims 


Service 


Nov. 


1955 


Nov. 


1954 


Nov. 


1955 


Nov. 


1954 


November 1955 


November 1954 


12-9 


Office 


Tot. 


Vet. 


Tot. 


Vet 


Tot. 


Vet. 


Tot. 


Vet 


Ind.|Af. | 


Tot.| 


Vet. 


Ind. | Ag. 


Tot. 


Vet. 


1955 1 


Anaconda 


50 
732 

14.' 

303 

190 
125 

4;; 

98 

140 

221 

4(M 

92 

157 
473 
137 
109 

80 

93 


20 

43 
100 
24 
25 
46 

41 

182 

41 
54 
69 
96 
33 
37 
58 
178 
53 
20 
26 
18 
47 


52 
534 

160 

355 

61 

71 

125 

1(14 

466 

91 

58 

241 

246 

78 

131 

104 

228 

45 

83 

75 

102 


.2 
184 
43 
65 
36 
29 

31 
37 

108 
27 
17 
73 
50 
32 
50 
45 
53 
13 
28 
24 

5 


99 

775 
257 
458 
124 
97 
261 
115 
939 
209 
196 
373 
835 
131 
260 
151 
708 
381 
169 
102 
196 
132 


2S 

281 

84 

98 

49 

31 

94 

37 

359 

67 

78 

130 

287 

43 

82 

62 

238 

158 

51 

37 

63 

'^7 


118 

711 
235 
534 

76 

65 
200 

59 
915 
150 
139 
297 
458 
125 
225 
239 
556 
175 
128 

92 

120 


13 

228 
49 

119 
30 
22 
57 
15 

285 
40 
51 

1(>8 

102 
39 
73 
% 

177 
56 
42 
33 

53 


28 

505 

165 

363 

37 

45 

129 

86 

369 

16 

102 

135 

121 

44 

39 

32 

203 

34 

66 

41 

33 

34 


35 

122 
31 
22 
18 
53 

11 

39 
58 

5 
21 
14 
17 
16 

1 

9 
91 

3 
32 
30 

15 


03 

627 

196 

385 

55 

98 

14u 

125 

427 

21 

123 

140 

138 

60 

40 

41 

294 

37 

98 

71 

33 

49 


10 
340 

52 
180 
23 
52 
77 
59 
158 
8 
48, 
83 
54 
30 
14 
21 
125 
15 
44 
32 
20 
21 


45 

325 

194 

229 

28 

27 

134 

278 

261 

47 

78 

142 

168 

42 

32 

121 

244 

10 

51 

80 

38 


62 

10 

48 

22 

45 

162 

9 
12 
29 

3 

18 
10 
29 
26 

3 
% 
34 

88 


52 

407 

256 

229 

38 

75 

156 

323 

423 

56 

90 

171 

171 

60 

42 

150 

270 

13 

147 

114 

126 


J 

213 
83 

101 
16 
33 

41 

145 

193 

29 

29 

95 

73 

34 

16 

68 

132 

5 

35 

34 

39 


•1 
72 
658 
144 
371 
113 
52 
237 
74 
714 
200 
182 
312 
859 
129 
242 
149 
492 
298 
109 
112 
224 
159 


153 
598 


Bozeman 
Butte... 


114 
576 


Cut Bank 
Dillon 


64 

37 
93 




59 


Great Fai 

Hamilton 

Havre 


494 
125 
113 


Helena 


247 


Kalispell. 

Lewistown 

Livingston. ... 
Miles City 


542 
118 
184 
177 
505 


Poison 

Shelby 


208 
87 




82 


Thomp. Fls.»* 
Wolf Point 


128 


TOTALS ... 


4,330 


1,480 


3.410 


1,000 


6,968 


2,411 


5.617 


1,688 


2,627 


643 


3,270 


1,466 


i 2,574 


795 


3,369 


1.428 


S.892 


4.704 



Includes 201 claims of Federal Employees L ; C program instituted January 1, 1955. ** Office re-opened June 1. 

AVERAGE HOURS AND EARNINGS IN SELECTED MONTANA INDUSTRIES 

(Produced in co-operation with United States Bureau of Labor Statistics) 
(Hours and earnings data exclude administrative and salaried personnel) 





Average 


Weekly Earnings 


Average Weekly 


Hours 


Average 


Hourly Earnings 


INDUSTRY 


Nov. (1) 
1955 


Oct. (2) 
1955 


Nov. 
1954 


Nov. (1) 
1955 


Oct. (2) 
1955 


Nov. 
1954 


Nov. (1) 
1955 


Oct. (2) 
1955 


Nov. 
1954 




$88.26 

91.07 
98.34 

83.22 
76.22 

100.38 

99.69 

79.67 

94.39 
72.53 


$90.31 

93.12 
98.08 

86.26 

77.15 

100.25 

99.69 

80.20 

96.10 
72.50 


$80.20 

78.17 
75.00 

83.12 
74.78 

1 
84.51 


42.3 


43.5 


40.0 

39.0 

38.8 

41.5 
43.7 

39.1 

37.9 
1 

39.4 


$2.09 

2.15 
2.16 

2.00 

u. 

2.37 
1.84 


$2.08 

2.16 
2.16 

1.97 
1.67 

2.37 

2.35 

_ 

_ 
1.84 


$2.01 




42.7 

45.6 

41.6 

44.3 

42.3 


43.2 

45.4 

43.8 
46.2 

42.2 

42.4 
_ 

39 4 


2.01 




1.94 
2.00 


Food and kindred products 


1.71 
2.16 


Transportation and Utilities (except railrds.) 


(1 
79.58 42.4 

1 
78.53 — 

71 79 39.4 


2.10 
1.82 




II 




(1) Preliminary estimates. (2) Figures prev 


ously rele; 


ised have 


been revised on more compl 


etc return 


s. 







UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

COMMISSION OF MONTANA 

MITCHELL BUILDING 

P. O. Box 1728 
HELENA, MONTANA 



EMPLOYMENT SECURITY MAIL 

United States Postage 

Accounted for Undtr 

Act of Conortu 



OFFICIAL BUSINISS 



President 

Montana School of Klnoa 
Butte, Montana 



Montana 

State 
Library 



his cover sheet created by Internet Archive for formatting.