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ARMY MEDICAL LIBRARY 

WASHINGTON 

Founded 1836 



.. 

Number 


e p o 3—10543 


Form 113c, W. D. f S. G. O. 
(Revised June 13, 1936) 










\ 


/ 






ft, $ i > ■hj' 

REVISED REGULATIONS 

L 

FOR THE 

ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES, 

1861. 


WITH A FULL 



IND 


by AHTHOE-ITY OF THE "W-A-IR, DEPAETME1TT. 


PHILADELPHIA: 

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO., PUBLISHERS, 


22 & 24 NORTH FOURTH STREET. 










06 

USZr 

mi 


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by 
ROBERT E. PETERSON, 

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of 
Pennsylvania. 





War Department, 
Washington, August 10 , 1861 . 

Whereas, it has been found expedient to revise the 
Regulations for the Army, and the same having been 
approved by the President of the United States, he com¬ 
mands that they be published for the information and 
government of the military service, and that, from and 
after the date hereof, they shall be strictly observed as 
the sole and standing authority upon the matter therein 
contained. 

Nothing contrary to the tenor of these Regulations 
will be enjoined in any part of the forces of the United 
States by any commander whatsoever. 

SIMON CAMERON, 

Secretary of War. 

























. 


















CONTENTS. 


A FULL INDEX WILL BE FOUND AT THE END OF THIS WORK. 


ARTICLE I. PAO* 

Military Discipline. 9 

ARTICLE II. 

Rank and Command. 9 

ARTICLE III. 

Succession in Command or Duty. 11 

ARTICLE IY. 

Appointment and Promotion of Commissioned Officers. 11 

ARTICLE Y. 

Resignations of Officers. 12 

ARTICLE VI. 

Exchange or Transfer of Officers. 12 

ARTICLE VII. 

Appointments on the Staff . 13 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Distribution of the Troops. 13 

ARTICLE IX. 

Care of Fortifications. 13 

ARTICLE X. 

Care of Armament of Fortifications. 15 

A 2 


5 














6 


CONTENTS. 


ARTICLE XI. , page 

Artillery Practice. 16 

ARTICLE XII. 

Regiments. 1^ 

ARTICLE XIII. 

Companies..... . 21 

ARTICLE XIV. 

Ordnance Sergeants. 24 

ARTICLE XV. 

Transfer of Soldiers. 27 

ARTICLE XVI. 

Deceased Officers. 28 

ARTICLE XVII. 

Deceased Soldiers . 28 

ARTICLE XVIII. 

Deserters. 29 

ARTICLE XIX. 

Discharges. 30 

ARTICLE XX. 

Traveling on Duty. 31 

ARTICLE XXI. 

Leaves of Absence to Officers. 31 

ARTICLE XXII. 

Furloughs to Enlisted Men. 34 

ARTICLE XXIII. 

Councils of Administration. 34 

ARTICLE XXIV. 

Chaplains . gg 

ARTICLE XXV. 

Sutlers . gy 

















CONTENTS. 


t 

ARTICLE XXYI. PAGE 

Military Discussions and Publications. 38 

ARTICLE XXVII. 

Arrests and Confinements. 38 

ARTICLE XXVIII. 

Hours of Service and Roll-Calls. 39 

ARTICLE XXIX. 

Honors to be paid by the Troops. 40 

ARTICLE XXX. 

Inspections of the Troops. 46 

ARTICLE XXXI. 

Musters. 49 

ARTICLE XXXII. 

Forms of Parade. 50 

ARTICLE XXXIII. 

Guards. 6 ] 

ARTICLE XXXIV. 

Orders and Correspondence. 66 

ARTICLE XXXV. 

Returns and Reports. 69 

ARTICLE XXXVI. 

Troops in Campaign. 71 

ARTICLE XXXVII. 

Troops on board of Transports. 120 

ARTICLE XXXVIII. 

Courts-Martial . 124 

ARTICLE XXXIX. 

Working-Parties. 127 

ARTICLE XL. 

Recruiting Service. 128 

















CONTENTS. 


4 

ARTICLE XLI. page 

Pcblic Property, Money, and Accounts. 147 

ARTICLE XLII. 

Quartermaster’s Department. 159 

ARTICLE XLIII. 

Subsistence Department. 241 

ARTICLE XLIV. 

Medical Department. 281 

ARTICLE XLY. 

Pay Department. 341 

ARTICLE XLVI. 

Corps of Engineers and Topographical Engineers. 3C9 

ARTICLE XLVII. 

Ordnance Department. 387 

ARTICLE XLVIII. 

Proceedings in Civil Courts. 474 

ARTICLE XLIX. 

Arms of the United States. 474 

ARTICLE L. 

Flags, Colors, Standards, Guidons. 475 

ARTICLE LI. 

Uniform, Dress, and Horse Equipments. 476 

ARTICLE LII. 

Volunteers and Militia in the Service of the United States. 495 

APPENDIX. 

Articles of War. 499 

Extracts from Acts of Congress. 517 

Army Pay Table. 526 

















REVISED 


REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY. 


ARTICLE I. 

MILITARY DISCIPLINE. 

1. All inferiors are required to obey strictly, and to execute with 
alacrity and good faith, the lawful orders of the superiors appointed over 
them. 

2. Military authority is to be exercised with firmness, but with kind¬ 
ness and justice to inferiors. Punishments shall be strictly conformable 
to military law. 

3. Superiors of every grade are forbidden to injure those under them 
by tyrannical or capricious conduct, or by abusive language. 


ARTICLE II. 

RANK AND COMMAND. 

4. Rank of officers and non-commissioned officers 


1st. Lieutenant-General. 
2d. Major-General. 

3d. Brigadier-General. 
4th. Colonel. 

5th. Lieutenant-Colonel. 
6th. Major. 

7th. Captain. 

8th. First Lieutenant. 
9th. Second Lieutenant. 


10th. Cadet. 

11th. Sergeant-Major. 

12th. Quartermaster-Sergeant of a 
Regiment. 

13th. Ordnance Sergeant and Hos¬ 
pital Steward 
14th. First Sergeant. 

15th. Sergeant. 


16th. Corporal. 

And in each grade by date of commission or appointment. 

5. When commissions are of the same date, the rank is to be decided, 
between officers of the same regiment or corps by the order of appoint¬ 
ment ; between officers of different regiments or corps: 1st. by rank in 
actual service when appointed; 2d. by former rank and service in the 

9 



10 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Rank.-Command. 


army or marine corps; 3d. by lottery among such as have not been in the 
military service of the United States. In case of equality of rank by 
virtue of a brevet commission, reference is had to commissions not brevet. 

6. Officers having brevets, or commissions of a prior date to those of 
the regiment in which they serve, may take place in courts-martial and 
on detachments, when composed of different corps, according to the ranks 
given them in their brevets or'dates of their former commissions; but in 
the regiment, troop, or company to which such officers belong, they shall 
do duty and take rank both in courts-martial and on detachments which 
shall be composed only of their own corps, according to the commissions 
by which they are mustered in the said corps.—(61st Art. of War.') 

7. If, upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps of the army 
shall happen to join, or do duty together, the officer highest in rank of 
the line of the army, marine corps, or militia, by commission, there on 
duty or in quarters, shall command the whole, and give orders for what 
is needful to the service, unless otherwise specially directed by the Presi¬ 
dent of the United States, according to the nature of the case.—(62c? Art. 
of War.) 

8. An officer not having orders from competent authority cannot put 
himself on duty by virtue of his commission alone. 

9. Officers serving by commission from any state of the Union take 
rank next after officers of the like grade by commission from the United 
States. 

10. Brevet rank takes effect only in the following cases: 1st. by spe¬ 

cial assignment of the President in commands composed of different 
corps; 2d. on courts-martial or detachments composed of different corps. 
Troops are on detachment, only when sent out temporarily to perform a 
special service. ' 

11. In regularly constituted commands, as garrisons, posts, depart¬ 
ments; companies, battalions, regiments; corps, brigades, divisions, army 
corps, or the army itself, brevet rank cannot be exercised except by spe¬ 
cial assignment. 

12. The officers of Engineers are not to assume nor to be ordered on 
any duty beyond the line of their immediate profession, except by the 
special order of the President. 

13. An officer of the Pay or Medical Department cannot exercise com¬ 
mand except in his own department; but, by virtue of their commissions, 
officers of these departments may command all enlisted men, like othei 
commissioned officers. 

14. Officers of the corps of Engineers or Ordnance, or of the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s, Inspector-General’s, Quartermaster-General’s, or Subsist¬ 
ence Department, though eligible to command according to the rank they 




FOR THE ARMY. 


11 


Succession in Duties.-Appointments. 

hold in the army of the United States, shall not assume the command of 
troops unless put on duty under orders which specially so direct by 
authority of the President. 


ARTICLE III. 

SUCCESSION IN COMMAND OR DUTY. 

15. The functions assigned to any officer in these regulations by title 
of office, devolve on the officer acting in his place, except as specially 
excepted. 

16. During the absence of the Adjutant-General, or of the chief of 
any military bureau of the War Department, his duties in the bureau, 
prescribed by law or regulations, devolve on the officer of his department 
empowered by the President to perform them in his absence. 

17. An officer who succeeds to any command or duty, stands in regard 
to his duties in the same situation as his predecessor. The officer relieved 
shall turn over to his successor all orders in force at the time, and all 
the public property and funds pertaining to his command or duty, and 
shall receive therefor duplicate receipts, showing the condition of each 
article. 

18. An officer in a temporary command shall not, except in urgent 
cases, alter or annul the standing orders of the regular or permanent 
commander without authority from the next higher commander. 


ARTICLE IV. 

APPOINTMENT AND PROMOTION OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

19. All vacancies in established regiments and corps, to the rank of 
Colonel, shall be filled by promotion according to seniority, except in 
case of disability or other incompetency. 

20. Promotions to the rank of Captain shall be made regimentally; to 
Major and Lieutenant-Colonel and Colonel, according to the arm, as infan¬ 
try, artillery, &c., and in the Staff Departments and in the Engineers, 
Topographical Engineers, and Ordnance, according to corps. 

21. Appointments to the rank of Brigadier-General and Major-General 
will be made by selection from the army. 

22. The graduates of the Military Academy are appointed to vacancies 
of the lowest grade, or attached by brevet to regiments or corps, not to 
exceed one brevet to each company; and meritorious non-commissioned 
ivfficers, examined by an Army Board, and found qualified for the duties 




1: 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Resignations.-Exchanges. 

of commissioned officers, will, in like manner, be attached to regiments 
as Brevet Second Lieutenants. 

23. Whenever the public service may require the appointment of any 
citizen to the army, a Board of Officers will be instituted, before which 
the applicant will appear for an examination into his physical ability, 
moral character, attainments, and general fitness for the service. If the 
Board report in favor of the applicant, he will be deemed eligible for a 
commission in the army. 


ARTICLE V. 

RESIGNATIONS OF OFFICERS. 

24. No officer will be considered out of service on the tender of his 
resignation, until it shall have been duly accepted by the proper authority. 
Any officer who, having tendered his resignation, shall, prior to due notice 
of the acceptance of the same by the proper authority, and, without leave, 
quit his post or proper duties with the intent to remain permanently 
absent therefrom, shall be registered as a deserter, and punished as such. 

25. Resignations will be forwarded by the commanding officer to the 
Adjutant-General of the army for decision of the War Department; and 
with them, where leave is given, the officer’s address. 

26. Resignations tendered under charges, when forwarded by any com¬ 
mander, will always be accompanied by a copy of the charges; or, in the 
absence of written charges, by a report of the case, for the information 
of the Secretary of War. 

27. Before presenting the resignation of any officer, the Adjutant- 
General will ascertain and report to the War Department the state of 
such officer’s accounts of money, as well as of public property, for which 
he may have been responsible. 

28. In time of war, or with an army in the field, resignations shall 
take effect within thirty days from the date of the order of acceptance. 

29. Leaves of absence will not be granted by commanding officers to 
officers on tendering their resignation, unless the resignation be uncondi¬ 
tional and immediate. 


ARTICLE VI. 

EXCHANGE OR TRANSFER OF OFFICERS. 

30. The transfer of officers from one regiment or corps to another will 
be made only by the War Department, on the mutual application of the 
parties desiring the exchange. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


13 


Staff Appointments.-Care of Fortifications. 

31. An officer shall not be transferred from one regiment or corps to 
another with prejudice to the rank of any officer of the regiment or corps 
to which he is transferred. 

32. Transfers will be seldom granted—never except for cogent reasons. 

ARTICLE VII. 

APPOINTMENTS ON THE STAFF. 

33. As far as practicable, all appointments and details on the staff will 
be equalized among the several regiments. 

34. General Officers appoint their own Aides-de-camp. 

35. Brevet Brigadier and Major Generals on duty as such, may, with 
the special sanction of the War Department, be allowed the aides-de-camp 
of their brevet grades. 

36. An officer shall not fill any staff appointment, or other situation, 
the duties of which will detach him from his company, regiment, or corps, 
until he has served at least three years with his regiment or corps •, nor 
shall any officer (aides-de-camp excepted) so remain detached longer than 
four years. 

37. An officer of a mounted corps shall not be separated from his 
regiment, except for duty connected with his particular arm. 

38. The senior Lieutenant present, holding the appointment of Assistant 
Commissary of Subsistence, is entitled to perform the duties. 


ARTICLE VIII. 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE TROOPS. 

39. The military geographical departments will be established by the 
War Department. In time of peace, brigades or divisions will not be 
formed, nor the stations of the troops changed, without authority from the 
War Department. 


ARTICLE IX. 

CARE OF FORTIFICATIONS. 

40. No person shall be permitted to walk upon any of the slopes of a 
fortification, excepting the ramps and glacis. If, in any case, it be neces¬ 
sary to provide for crossing them, it should be done by placing wooden 
steps or stairs against the slopes. The occasional walking of persons on a 
parapet will do no harm, provided it be not allowed to cut the surface into 
paths. 

B 




14 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Care of Fortifications. 

41. No cattle, horses, sheep, goat, or other animal, shall ever be per¬ 
mitted to go upon the slopes, the ramparts, or the parapets, nor upon the 
glacis, except within fenced limits, which should not approach the crest 
nearer than 80 feet. 

42. All grassed surfaces, excepting the glacis, will be carefully and 
frequently mowed (except in dry weather), and the oftener the better, 
while growing rapidly—the grass never being allowed to be more than a 
few inches high. In order to cut the grass even and close, upon small 
slopes a light one-handed scythe should be used; and in mowing the steep 
slopes, the mower should stand on a light ladder resting against the 
slope, and not upon the grass. Crops of hay may be cut on the glacis; 
or, if fenced, it may be used as pasture; otherwise it should be treated as 
other slopes of the fortification. On all the slopes, spots of dead grass will 
be cut out and replaced by fresh sods. All weeds will be eradicated. A 
very little labor, applied steadily and judiciously, will maintain the grassed 
surfaces, even of the largest of our forts, in good condition. 

43. The burning of grass upon any portion of a fortification is strictly 
forbidden. 

44. Particular attention is required to prevent the formation of gullies 
in the parade, terreplein, and ramps, and especially in slopes where grass 
is not well established. If neglected, they soon involve heavy expense. 

45. Earth, sand, or ashes must not be placed against wood-work; a free 
ventilation must be preserved around it; and all wooden floors, platforms, 
bridges, &c., will be kept clean swept. 

46. The machinery of draw-bridges, gates, and posterns must be kept 
in good working order by proper cleaning and oiling of the parts; the 
bridges will be raised, and the gates and posterns opened as often as once 
a week. 

47. The terrepleins of forts, the floors of casemates, caponniers, store¬ 
rooms, barracks, galleries, posterns, magazines, &c., and the sidewalks in 
fiont of quarters and barracks, as well as other walks, are sometimes paA r ed 
with bricks or stones, or formed of concrete. These surfaces must be pre¬ 
served from injury with great care. In transporting guns and carriages, 
and in mounting them, strong way-planks will be used, and neither the 
wheels nor any other part of the carriages, nor any machinery, such as 
shears, gins, &c., nor any handspike or other implements, will be allowed 
to touch those surfaces. Unless protected in a similar manner, no wheel¬ 
barrow or other vehicle, no barrels, hogsheads, &c., will be rolled upon 
these surfaces. No violent work will be suffered to be done upon them 
such as cutting wood, breaking coal, &c., and no heavy weight be thrown 
or permitted to fall thereon. In using machines, as gins, &c., in case¬ 
mates, care must be taken not to injure the arch or ceiling, as well as the 




FOR THE ARMY. 


1 «. 


Care of Armament of Fortifications. 

floor. Neglect of these precautions may cause injuries slight in appear¬ 
ance but serious in effect from the leaking of water into masonry and 
casemates, and expensive to repair. 

48. The doors and windows of all store-rooms and unoccupied ease- 
mates, quarters, barracks, &c., will be opened several times a week for 
thorough ventilation. 

49. The masonry shot-furnaces will be heated only on the approach of 
an enemy. For ordinary practice with hot shot, iron furnaces are provided. 

50. The foregoing matters involve but little expense; the labor is 
within the means of every garrison, and no technical knowledge is called 
for beyond what will be found among soldiers. Other repairs requiring 
small disbursements, such as repainting exposed wood or iron work, can 
be also executed by the garrison; but reports, estimates, and requisitions 
may be necessary to obtain the materials. 

51. No alteration will be made in any fortification, or in its casemates, 
quarters, barracks, magazines, store-houses, or any other building belong¬ 
ing to it; nor will any building of any kind, or work of earth, masonry, 
or timber be erected within the fortification, or on its exterior within half 
a mile, except under the superintendence of the Engineer Department, 
and by the authority of the Secretary of War. 

ARTICLE X. 

CARE OF ARMAMENT OF FORTIFICATIONS. 

52. At each permanent post with a fixed battery, and garrisoned by not 
more than one company, there will be kept mounted, for purposes of 
instruction and target practice, three heavy guns, and at posts garrisoned 
by more than one company, at the rate of two for each of the companies 
composing its garrison. The other guns dismounted will be properly 
placed (see page 21, Ordnance Manual for 1850) within their own traverse 
circles, and the carriages preserved from the weather. 

53. All guns should be sponged clean and their vents examined to see 
that they are clear. The chassis should be traversed and left in a different 
position, the top carriage moved backward and forward and left alter¬ 
nately over the front and rear transoms of the chassis; the elevating 
screws or machines wiped clean, worked and oiled if required, and the 
nuts of all bolts screwed up tight. This should all be done regularly once 
in every week. 

54. When tarpaulins, or pent houses, are placed over the guns, they 
should be removed once a week when the weather is fair, the carriages 
and guns brushed off, and, if damp, allowed to dry. 

55. An old sponge-staff and head should be used for drill. The new 




16 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Artillery Practice. 

sponges should never be used unless the gun is fired. The implements 
should be kept in store, under cover, and be examined, wiped clean or 
brushed at least once a month. In the case of leather equipments, the 
directions for the preservation of harness in the Ordnance Manual should 
be followed. 

56. The magazine should be frequently examined to see that the pow T der 
is well preserved. It should be opened every other day when the air is 
dry and clear. Barrels of powder should be turned and rolled occasionally. 
Under ordinary circumstances, only a few cartridges should be kept filled. 
If the paper body of the cartridge becomes soft or loses its sizing, it is 
certain that the magazine is very damp, and some means should be found 
to improve the ventilation. Cartridge bags may he kept in the magazine 
ready for filling; also port-fires, fuzes, tubes, and primers. Stands of 
grape, canisters, and wads for barbette guns, should be kept in store with 
the implements. For casemate guns, wads may be hung in bundles, and 
grape and canisters placed near the guns. Shot, well lacquered and clean, 
may be placed in piles near the guns. 

ARTICLE XI. 

ARTILLERY PRACTICE. 

57. At all posts with fixed batteries, the position of every gun, mounted 
or to be mounted, will have its number, and this number be placed on the 
gun when in position. 

58. For every such work a post-hook of record will be kept, under the 

direction of the commander of the post, in which will be duly entered_ 

the number of each mounted gun, its calibre, weight, names of founder 
and its inspector, and other marks; the description of its carriage and 
date of reception at the post; where from; and the greatest field of fire 
of the gun in its position. 

59. Every commander of a fort or other fixed battery will, before enter-, 
ing on artillery practice, carefully reconnoitre and cause to be sketched 
for his record-book, the water-channels with their soundings, and other 
approaches to the work. Buoys or marks will be placed at the extreme 
and intermediate ranges of the guns, and these marks be numerically 
noted on the sketch. A buoy at every five hundred yards may suffice. 

60. At the time of practice, a distinct and careful note will he made 
for the record-book of every shot or shell that may be thrown, designating 
the guns fired by their numbers, the charges of powder used, the times 
of flight of shots and shells, the ranges and ricochets, and the positions 
of guns in respect to the horizontal and vertical lines. 

61. The time of flight of a shell may he noted with sufficient accuracy 




FOR THE ARMY. 


17 


Artillery Practice. 

by a stop-watch, or by counting the beats (previously ascertaining their 
value) of other watches, and the range may sometimes be computed by the 
time of flight. Other modes of ascertaining the range will readily occur 
to officers of science. 

62. When charged shells with fuzes are thrown, the time of bursting 
will be noted. If they are intended to fall on land, only a blowing 
charge will be given to the shells, so that they may be picked up for 
further use. 

63. On filling from the barrel, the proof range of powder will be 
marked on the cartridges. 

64. The general objects of this practice are—to give to officers and 
men the ready and effective use of batteries; to preserve on record 
the more important results for the benefit of the same, or future com¬ 
manders, and to ascertain the efficiency of guns and carriages. 

65. Commanders of field artillery will also keep registers of their 
practice, so that not a, shot or shell shall be thrown in the Army, for 
instruction, without distinct objects, such as range, accuracy of aim, 
number of ricochets, time of bursting, in the case of shells, &c. 

66. Every company with a field battery will be allowed for annual 
practice as many blank cartridges for the instruction and drill as may be 
necessary for the purpose, on requisitions duly approved at the proper 
Departments. Companies with fixed batteries will be allowed 100 car¬ 
tridges each, with seventy-five shots or shells. This ammunition will be 
expended in equal parts in the three months designated below, and if the 
company be mounted, eight blank cartridges will be allowed for each of 
the other months in the year. This allowance is intended only for com¬ 
panies permanently serving with batteries. The firing with field-guns by 
other Artillery companies must be confined to blank cartridges. 

67. For all Artillery there will be annually three periods of practice in 
firing— April, June, and October for the latitude of Washington and 
south; and May, July, and September north of that latitude. 

68. At the termination of each period of practice, the commanding 
officers of posts will transmit to the Adjutant-General full reports of the 
results, in order that proper tabular statements may be prepared for the 
War Department. 

69. To determine accuracy of aim in firing shot and shell, butts or 
targets will be used. Where no natural butt presents itself, targets will 
be erected. A form for floating targets will be sent to the commanders 
of the several forts. 

70. As practice in gunnery is a heavy expense to government, com¬ 
manders of companies and their immediate superiors are charged with 

2 




18 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Regiments.—Non-Commissioned Officers. 

the strict execution of the foregoing details ; and all officers authorized 
to make tours of inspection will report, through the prescribed channels, 
on such execution. 


ARTICLE XII. 

REGIMENTS. 

71. On the organization of a regiment, the companies receive a per¬ 
manent designation by letters beginning with A, and the officers are 
assigned to companies ; afterward, company officers succeed to companies, 
as promoted to fill vacancies. Companies take place in the battalion ac¬ 
cording to the rank of their captains. 

72. Captains should be with their companies. Therefore, although 
subject to the temporary details of service, as for courts-martial, military 
boards, &c., they shall not, except for urgent reasons, be detailed upon 
any duty which may separate them for any considerable time from their 
companies. 

73. The commander of a regiment will appoint the adjutant from the 
subalterns of the regiment. He will nominate the regimental quarter¬ 
master to the Secretary of War for appointment if approved. He will 
appoint the non-commissioned staff of the regiment; and, upon the re¬ 
commendation of the company commanders, the sergeants and corporals 
of companies. 

74. In cases of vacancy, and till a decision can be had from regimental 
head-quarters, the company commanders may make temporary appoint¬ 
ments of non-commissioned officers. 

75. Commanders of regiments are enjoined to avail themselves of 
every opportunity of instructing both officers and men in the exercise and 
management of field artillery; and all commanders ought to encourage 
useful occupations, and manly exercises and diversions among their men, 
and to repress dissipation and immorality. 

76. Regiments serving on foot, being usually employed as light troops, 
will be habitually exercised in the system of U. S. Tactics for light in¬ 
fantry and riflemen adopted by the War Department, May 1, 1861. 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

77. A board, to consist of the Professors of Mathematics and Ethics 
and the Commandant of Cadets, will convene at the Military Academy, 
on the first Monday of September in every year, for the examination of 
such non-commissioned officers, for promotion, as have already passed the 
regimental examination prescribed in General Orders No. 17, of October 
4, 1854. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


19 


Non-Commissioned Officers. 

78. It is enjoined upon all officers to be cautious in reproving non¬ 
commissioned officers in the presence or bearing of privates, lest tbeir 
authority be weakened; and non-commissioned officers are not to be sent 
to the guard-room and mixed with privates during confinement, but to be 
considered as placed in arrest, except in aggravated cases, where escape 
may be apprehended. 

79. Non-commissioned officers may be reduced to the ranks by the 
sentence of a court-martial, or by order of the commander of the regiment 
on the application of the company commander. If reduced to the ranks 
by garrison courts, at posts not the head-quarters of the regiment, the 
company commander will immediately forward a transcript of the order 
to the regimental commander. 

80. Every non-commissioned officer shall be furnished with a certificate 
or warrant of his rank, signed by the colonel and countersigned by the 
adjutant. Blank warrants, on parchment, are furnished from the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s office. The first, or orderly sergeant, will be selected by 
the captain from the sergeants. 

81. When it is desired to have bands of music for regiments, there 
will be allowed for each, sixteen privates to act as musicians, in addition 
to the chief musicians authorized by law, provided the total number of 
privates in the regiment, including the band, does not exceed the legal 
standard. Regimental commanders will without delay designate the pro¬ 
portion to be subtracted from each company for a band, and the “number 
of recruits required” will be reported accordingly. The companies from 
which the non-commissioned officers of bands for artillery regiments shall 
be deducted, will in like manner be designated, and vacancies left ac¬ 
cordingly. At the artillery school, Fort Monroe, the non-commissioned 
officers and privates of the band, will be apportioned among the companies 
serving at the post 

82. The musicians of the band will, for the time being, be dropped 
from company muster-rolls, but they will be instructed as soldiers, and 
liable to serve in the ranks on any occasion. They will be mustered in 
a separate squad under the chief musician, with the non-commissioned 
staff, and be included in the aggregate in all regimental returns. 

83. When a regiment occupies several stations, the band will be kept 
at the head-quarters, provided troops (one or more companies) be serving 
tnere. The field music belonging to companies not stationed at regimental 
head-quarters will not be separated from their respective companies. 

84. No man, unless he be a carpenter, joiner, carriage-maker, black¬ 
smith, saddler, or harness-maker, will be mustered as an “ artificer.” 

85. Every article, excepting arms and accoutrements, belonging to the 
regiment, is to be marked with the number and name of the regiment. 





20 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Non-Commissioned Officers.—Post Books. 

86. Such articles as belong to companies are to be marked with tbe 
letter of tbe company, and number and name of tbe regiment ) and sucb 
as belong to men, with their individual numbers, and tbe letter of tbe 
company. 

87. All orders and circulars from general, department, division, or 
brigade head-quarters, will be tied together in book form, and propeily 
indexed as they are received j and afterwards bound in volumes of con¬ 
venient size. 

88. The books for each regiment shall be as follows: 

1. Regimental Order Boole, of three quires of paper, 16 inches by 
10£ inches, to contain regimental orders, with an index. 

2. Letter Boole , of three quires of paper, 16 inches by 10j inches, 
to contain the correspondence of the commanding officer on regi¬ 
mental subjects, with an index. 

3. An index of letters required to be kept on file, in the following 
form: 


No. 

Name of writer. 

Date. 

Subject. 

1 

Captain A. B. 

July 15, 1860 

Appointm’t of non-com. officers. 

2 

Adjt. Gen. R. J.. 

Sept. 4, 1860 

Recruiting service. 

3 

Captain F. G. 

Oct. 11,1860 

Error in company return. 

4 

Lieutenant C. D. 

Nov. 2, 1860 

Application for leave. 


The date of receipt should be indorsed on all letters. They should 
be numbered to correspond with the index, and filed in regular order, 
for easy reference. 

4. Descriptive Boole, of five quires of paper, 16 inches by 10£ 
inches, to contain a list of the officers of the regiment, with their 
rank, and dates of appointment, and promotions; transfers, leaves 
of absence, and places and dates of birth. To contain, also, the 
names of all enlisted soldiers, entered according to priority of 
enlistments, giving their description, the dates and periods of 
their enlistment •, and, under the head of remarks, the cause of 
discharge, character, death, desertion, transfer, actions in which en¬ 
gaged, &c.; in short, every thing relating to their military history. 
This book to be indexed, and when filled, and no longer needed 
with the company, to be forwarded to the Adjutant-General’s office. 

One copy of the monthly returns will be filed. 

POST BOOKS. 

89. The following books will be kept at each post: a Morning Report 
Rook, a Guard Report Book, an Order Book, a Letter Book, each two 
quires foolscap also copies of the monthly post returns. 
















FOR THE ARM?. 


21 


Companies. 


ARTICLE XIII. 

COMPANIES. 

90. The captain will cause the men of the company to be numbered, 
in a regular series, including the non-commissioned officers, and divided 
into four squads, each to be put under the charge of a non-commissioned 
officer. 

91. Each subaltern officer will be charged with a squad for the super¬ 
vision of its order and cleanliness; and captains will require their lieu¬ 
tenants to assist them in the performance of all company duties. 

92. As far as practicable, the men of each squad will be quartered 
together. 

93. The utmost attention will be paid by commanders of companies to 
the cleanliness of their men, as to their persons, clothing, arms, accoutre¬ 
ments, and equipments, and also as to their quarters or tents. 

94. The name of each soldier will be labeled on his bunk, and his com¬ 
pany number will be placed against his arms and accoutrements. 

95. The arms will be placed in the arm-racks, the stoppers in the 
muzzles, the cocks let down, and the bayonets in their scabbards; the 
accoutrements suspended over the arms, and the swords hung up by the 
belts on pegs. 

96. The knapsack of each man will be placed on the lower shelf of 
his bunk, at its foot, packed with his effects, and ready to be slung; the 
great-coat on the same shelf, rolled and strapped; the coat, folded inside 
out, and placed under the knapsack; the cap on the second or upper 
shelf; and the boots well cleaned. 

97. Dirty clothes will be kept in an appropriate part of the knapsack; 
no article of any kind to be put under the bedding. 

98. Cooking utensils and table equipage will be cleaned and arranged 
in closets or recesses; blacking and brushes out of view; the fuel in 
boxes. 

99. Ordinarily the cleaning will be on Saturdays. The chiefs of 
squads will cause bunks and bedding to be overhauled; floors dry rubbed; 
tables and benches scoured; arms cleaned; accoutrements -whitened and 
nolished, and every thing put in order. 

100. Where conveniences for bathing are to be had, the men should 
bathe once or twice a week. The feet to be washed at least twice a 
week. The hair kept short, and beard neatly trimmed. 

101. Non-commissioned officers, in command of squads, will be held 
more immediately responsible that their men observe what is prescribed 
above; that they wash their hands and faces daily; that they brush or 




22 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Companies. 

^omb their beads ; that those who are to go on duty put their arms, ac¬ 
coutrements, dress, &c., in the best order, and that such as have permis¬ 
sion to pass the chain of sentinels are in the dress that may be ordered. 

102. Commanders of companies and squads will see that the arms and 
accoutrements in possession of the men are always kept in good order, 
and that proper care be taken in cleaning them. 

103. When belts are given to a soldier, the captain will see that they 
are properly fitted to the body; and it is forbidden to cut any belt with¬ 
out his sanction. 

104. Cartridge-boxes and bayonet-scabbard3 will be polished with 
blacking; varnish is injurious to the leather, and will not be used. 

105. All arms in the hands of the troops, whether browned or bright, 
will be kept in the state in which they are issued by the Ordnance De¬ 
partment. Arms will not be taken to pieces without permission of a 
commissioned officer. Bright barrels will be kept clean and free from 
rust without polishing them; care should be taken in rubbing not to 
bruise or bend the barrel. After firing, wash out the bore; wipe it dry, 
and then pass a bit of cloth, slightly greased, to the bottom. In these 
operations, a rod of wood with a loop in one end is to be used instead of 
the rammer. The barrel, when not in use, will be closed with a stopper. 
For exercise, each soldier should keep himself provided with a piece of 
sole leather to fit the cup or countersink of the hammer. 

(For care of arms in service, see Ordnance Manual, page 185, &c.) 

106. Arms shall not be left loaded in quarters or tents, or when the 
men are off duty, except by special orders. 

107. Ammunition issued will be inspected frequently. Each man will 
be made to pay for the rounds expended without orders, or not in the 
way of duty, or which may be damaged or lost by his neglect. 

108. Ammunition will be frequently exposed to the dry air, or sunned. 

109. Special care shall be taken to ascertain that no ball-cartridges are 
mixed with the blank cartridges issued to the men. 

110. All knapsacks are to be painted black. Those for the artillery 
will be marked in the centre of the cover with the number of the re°i- 

O 

ment only, in figures of one inch and a half in length, of the character 
called full face, with yellow paint. Those for the infantry will be marked 
in the same way, in white paint. Those for the ordnance will be marked 
with two cannon, crossing; the cannon to be seven and a half inches in 
length, in yellow paint, to resemble those on the cap. The knapsack 
straps will be black. 

111. The knapsacks will also be marked upon the inner side with the 
letter of the company and the number of the soldier, on such part as may 
be readily observed at inspections. 







FOR THE ARMY. 


23 


Soldiers’ Mess. 

112. Haversacks will be marked upon the flap with the number and 
name of the regiment, the letter of the company, and number of the 
soldier, in black letters and figures. And each soldier must, at all times, 
be provided with a haversack and canteen, and will exhibit them at all 
inspections. It will be worn on the left side on marches, guard, and 
when paraded for detached service—the canteen outside the haversack. 

113. The front of the drums will be painted with the arms of the 
United States, on a blue field for the infantry, and on a red field for the 
artillery. The letter of the company and number of the regiment, under 
the arms, in a scroll. 

114. Officers at their stations, in camp or in garrison, will always wear 
their proper uniform. 

115. Soldiers will wear the prescribed uniform in camp or garrison, 
and will not be permitted to keep in their possession any other clothing. 
When on fatigue parties, they will wear the proper fatigue dress. 

116. In camp or barracks, the company officers must visit the kitchen 
daily and inspect the kettles, and at all times carefully attend to the 
messing and economy of their respective companies. The commanding 
officer of the post or regiment will make frequent inspections of the 
kitchens and messes. These duties are of the utmost importance not to 
be neglected. 

117. The bread must be thoroughly baked, and not eaten until it is 
cold. The soup must be boiled at least five hours, and the vegetables 
always cooked sufficiently to be perfectly soft and digestible. 

118. Messes will be prepared by privates of squads, including private 
musicians, each taking his tour. The greatest care will be observed in 
washing and scouring the cooking utensils ) those made of brass and 
copper should be lined with tin. 

119. The messes of prisoners will be sent to them by the cooks. 

120. No persons will be allowed to visit or remain in the kitchens, ex¬ 
cept such as may come on duty, or be occupied as cooks. The kitchen 
should always be under tbe particular charge of a non-commissioned 
officer. 

121. Those detailed for duty in the kitchens will also be required to 
keep the furniture of the mess-room in order. 

122. On marches and in the field, the only mess furniture of the 
soldier will be one tin plate, one tin cup, one knife, fork, and spoon, to 
each man, to be carried by himself on the march. 

123. Tradesmen may be relieved from ordinary military duty to make, 
to alter, or to mend soldiers’ clothing, &c. Company commanders will 
fix the rates at which work shall be done, and cause the men, for whose 
benefit it is done, to pay for it at the next pay day. 




24 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Employment of Soldiers as Clerks, &c. 

124. Each company officer, serving with his company, may take from 
it one soldier as waiter, with his consent and the consent of his captain. 
No other officer shall take a soldier as a waiter. Every soldier so em¬ 
ployed shall be so reported and mustered. 

125. Soldiers taken as officers’ waiters shall be acquainted with their 
military duty, and at all times be completely armed and clothed, and in 
every respect equipped according to the rules of the service, and have 
all their necessaries complete and in good order. They are to fall in with 
their respective companies at all reviews and inspections, and are liable to 
such drills as the commanding officer shall judge necessary to fit them for 
service in the ranks. 

126. Non-commissioned officers will, in no case, be permitted to act as 
waiters; nor are they, or private soldiers, not waiters, to be employed in 
any menial office, or made to perform any service not military, for the 
private benefit of any officer or mess of officers. 

COMPANY BOOKS. 

127. The following books are allowed to each company: one descrip¬ 
tive book, one clothing book, one order book, one morning report book, 
each one quire, sixteen inches by ten. One page of the descriptive book 
will be appropriated to the list of officers; two to the non-commissioned 
officers; two to the register of men transferred •, four to register of men 
discharged ; two to register of deaths ) four to register of deserters—the 
rest to the company description list. 

LAUNDRESS. 

128. Four women will be allowed to each company as washerwomen, 
and will receive one ration per day each. 

129. The price of washing soldiers’ clothing, by the month, or by the 
piece, will be determined by the Council of Administration. 

130. Debts due the laundress by soldiers, for washing, will be paid, or 
collected at the pay-table, under the direction of the captain. 

ARTICLE XIV. 

ORDNANCE SERGEANTS. 

131. The Secretary of War selects from the sergeants of the line of 
the army, who may have faithfully served eight years (four years in the 
grade of non-commissioned officer), as many Ordnance Sergeants as the 
service may require, not exceeding one to each military post. 

132. Captains will report to their colonels such sergeants as, by their 
conduct and service, merit such appointment, setting forth the descrip- 




FOR THE ARMY. 


25 


Ordnance Sergeants. 

tion, length of service of the sergeant, the portion of his service he was a 
non-commissioned officer, his general character as to fidelity and sobriety, 
his qualifications as a clerk, and his fitness for the duties to be performed 
by an ordnance sergeant, These reports will be forwarded to the Adju¬ 
tant-General, to be laid before the Secretary of War, with an application 
in the following form: 

Head- Quarters, &c. 

To the Adjutant- General: 

Sir :—I forward, for consideration of the proper authority, an appli¬ 
cation for the appointment of Ordnance Sergeant. 


Name and Regiment. 

Letter of Company. 

Length of Service. 

Remarks. 

As non-commissioned Officer. 

In the Army. 

Years. 

Months. 

Years. 

Months. 









Inclosed herewith you will receive the report of -, the officer com¬ 

manding the company in which the sergeant has been serving, to which I 
add the following remarks : 

-, Commanding — Regiment. 

133. When a company is detached from the head-quarters of the regi¬ 
ment, the reports of the commanding officer in this matter will pass to the 
regimental head-quarters through the commanding officer of the post or 
detachment, and be accompanied by his opinion as to the fitness of the 
candidate. 

134. Ordnance Sergeants will be assigned to posts when appointed, 
and are not to be transferred to other stations except by orders from the 
Adjutant-General’s office. 

135. At the expiration of their term of service, Ordnance Sergeants 
may be re-enlisted, provided they shall have conducted themselves in a 
becoming manner, and performed their duties to the satisfaction of the 
commanding officer. If the commanding officer, however, shall not think 
proper to re-enlist the Ordnance Sergeant of his post, he will communi- 























REVISED REGULATIONS 


2G 

Ordnance Sergeants. 

cate to the Adjutant-General his reasons for declining to re-enlist him, in 
time to receive the decision of the War Department before the Sergeant 
may lawfully claim to re-enlist. 

136. The officers interested must be aware, from the nature of the duties 
assigned to Ordnance Sergeants, that the judicious selection of them is 
of no small importance to the interests of the service; and that while 
the law contemplates, in the appointment of these non-commissioned 
officers, the better preservation of the ordnance and ordnance stores in 
deposit in the several forts, there is the further motive of offering a re¬ 
ward t,o those faithful and well-tried sergeants who have long served their 
country, and of thus giving encouragement to the soldier in the ranks to 
emulate them in conduct, and thereby secure substantial promotion. 
Colonels and Captains cannot, therefore, be too particular in investigating 
the characters of the candidates, and in giving their testimony as to their 
merits. 

137. The appointment and removal of Ordnance Sergeants, stationed 
at military posts, in pursuance of the above provisions of law, shall he 
reported by the Adjutant-General to the chief of the Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment. 

138. When a non-commissioned officer receives the appointment of 
Ordnance Sergeant, he shall be dropped from the rolls of the regiment or 
company in which he may be serving at the time. 

139. The duty of Ordnance Sergeants relates to the care of the ord¬ 
nance, arms, ammunition, and other military stores at the post to which 
they may be attached, under the direction of the commanding officer, 
and according to the regulations of the Ordnance Department. 

140. If a post be evacuated, the Ordnance Sergeant shall remain on 
duty at the station, under the direction of the chief of the Ordnance 
Department, in charge of the ordnance and ordnance stores, and of such 
other public property as is not in charge of some officer or agent of 
other departments; for which ordnance stores and other property he 
will account to the chiefs of the proper departments until otherwise 
directed. 

141. An Ordnance Sergeant in charge of ordnance stores at a post 
where there is no commissioned officer shall be held responsible for the 
safe-keeping of the property, and he shall be governed by the regulations 
of the Ordnance Department in making issues of the same, and in pre¬ 
paring and furnishing the requisite returns. If the means at his dis¬ 
posal are not sufficient for the preservation of the property, he shall re¬ 
port the circumstances to the chief of the Ordnance Department. 

142. Ordnance Sergeants are to be considered as belonging to the non¬ 
commissioned staff of the post, under the orders of the commanding 






FOR THE ARMY. 


27 


Ordnance Sergeants.-Transfers. 

officer. They are to wear the uniform of the Ordnance Department, with 
the distinctive badges prescribed for the non-commissioned staff of 
regiments of artillery; and they are to appear under arms with the 
troops at all reviews and inspections, monthly and weekly. 

143. When serving at any post which may be the head-quarters of a 
regiment, Ordnance Sergeants shall be reported by name on the post 
returns, and mustered with the non-commissioned staff of the regiment; 
and at all other posts they shall be mustered and reported in some com • 
pany stationed at the post at which they serve; be paid on the muster 
roll, and be chai-ged with the clothing and all other supplies previousl}' 
received from any officer, or subsequently issued to them by the com¬ 
manding officer of the company for the time being. Whenever the com¬ 
pany may be ordered from the post, the Ordnance Sergeant will be 
transferred to the rolls of any remaining company, by the order of the 
commanding officer of the post. 

144. In the event of the troops being all withdrawn from a post at 
which there is an Ordnance Sergeant, he shall be furnished with his 
descriptive roll and account of clothing and pay, signed by the proper 
officer last in command, accompanied by the remarks necessary for his 
military history; and on his exhibiting such papers to any Paymaster, 
with a letter from the Ordnance Office acknowledging the receipt of his 
returns, and that they are satisfactory, he will be paid on a separate 
account the amount which may be due him at the date of the receipt of 
the returns mentioned in such letter, together with commutation of 
rations, according to the regulations of the Subsistence Department. A 
certified statement of his pay account will be furnished the Ordnance 
Sergeant by the Paymaster by whom he may be last paid. When there 
are no troops at the post, the Ordnance Sergeant will report to the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s office, by letter, on the last day of every month. 

ARTICLE XV. 

TRANSFER OF SOLDIERS. 

145. No non-commissioned officer or soldier will be transferred from one 
regiment to another without the authority of the commanding general. 

146. The colonel may, upon the application of the captains, transfer 
a non-commissioned officer or soldier from one company to another of his 
regiment—with consent of the department commander in case of change 
of post. 

147. When soldiers are authorized to be transferred, the transfer will 
take place on the first of a month, with a view to the more convenient 
settlement of their accounts. 




28 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Deceased Officers and Soldiers. 

148. In all cases of transfer, a complete descriptive roll will accompany 
the soldier transferred, which roll will embrace an account of his pay, 
clothing, and other allowances; also, all stoppages to be made on account 
of the government, and debts due the laundress, as well as such other 
facts as may be necessary to show his character and military history. 


ARTICLE XVI. 

DECEASED OFFICERS. 

149. Whenever an officer dies, or is killed at any military post or 
station, or in the vicinity of the same, it will be the duty of the com¬ 
manding officer to report the fact direct to the Adjutant-General, with 
the date, and any other information proper to be communicated. If an 
officer die at a distance from d military post, any officer having intelli¬ 
gence of the same will in like manner communicate it, specifying the 
day of his decease; a duplicate of the report will be sent to Department 
Head-Quarters. 

150. Inventories of the effects of deceased officers, required by the 
94th Article of War, will be transmitted to the Adjutant-General. 

151. If a legal administrator or family connection be present, and take 
charge of the effects, it will be so stated to the Adjutant-General. 

ARTICLE XVII. 

DECEASED SOLDIERS. 

152. Inventories of the effects of deceased non-commissioned officers 
and soldiers, required by the 95th Article of War, will be forwarded to 
the Adjutant-General, by the commander of the company to which the 
deceased belonged, and a duplicate of the same to the colonel of the regi¬ 
ment. Final statements of pay, clothing, &c., will be sent with the 
inventories. When a soldier dies at a post or station absent from his 
company, it will be the duty of his immediate commander to furnish the 
required inventory, and, at the same time, to forward to the commanding 
officer of the company to which the soldier belonged, a report of his death, 
specifying the date, place, and cause; to what time he was last paid, and 
the money or other effects in his possession at the time of his decease; 
which report will be noted on the next muster-roll of the company to 
which the man belonged. Each inventory will be indorsed, “ Inventory 

of the effects of -, late of company (—)-regiment of 

-, who died at-, the-day of-, 186-If a legal 

representative receive the effects, it will be stated in the report. If the 
soldier leave no effects, the fact will be reported. 

153. Should the effects of a deceased non-commissioned officer or 











FOR THE ARMY. 


29 


Deserters. 

soldier not be administered upon within a short period after his decease, 
they shall be disposed of by a Council of Administration, under the 
authority of the commanding officer of the post, and the proceeds depo¬ 
sited with the Paymaster, to the credit of the United States, until they 
shall be claimed by the legal representatives of the deceased. 

154. In all such cases of sales by the Council of Administration, a 
statement in detail, or account of the proceeds, duly certified by the 
Council and commanding officer, accompanied by the Paymaster’s receipt 
for the proceeds, will be forwarded by the commanding officer to the 
Adjutant-General. The statement will be endorsed, “Report of the 

proceeds of the effects of- -, late of company (—) - 

regiment of-, who died at-, the-day of-, 186—.” 

ARTICLE XVIII. 

DESERTERS. 

155. If a soldier desert from, or a deserter be received at, any post 
other than the station of the company or detachment to which he be¬ 
longed, he shall be promptly reported by the commanding officer of such 
post to the commander of his company or detachment. The time of de¬ 
sertion, apprehension, and delivery will be stated. If the man be a 
recruit, unattached, the required report will be made to the Adjutant- 
General. When a report is received of the apprehension or surrender 
of a deserter at any post other than the station of the company or detach¬ 
ment to which he belonged, the commander of such company or detach¬ 
ment shall immediately forward his description and account of clothing 
to the officer making the report. 

156. A reward of five^ dollars will be paid for the apprehension and 

delivery of a deserter to an officer of the army at the most convenient 
post or recruiting station. Rewards thus paid will be promptly reported 
by the disbursing officer to the officer commanding the company in which 
the deserter is mustered, and to the authority competent to order his 
trial. The reward of five dollars will include the remuneration for 
all expenses incurred for apprehending, securing, and delivering a de¬ 
serter. i 

157. When non-commissioned officers or soldiers are sent in pursuit 
of a deserter, the expenses necessarily incurred will be paid whether he 
be apprehended or not, and reported as in case of rewards paid. 

158. Deserters shall make good the time lost by desertion, unless dis¬ 
charged by competent authority. 

159. No deserter shall be restored to duty without trial, except by 
authority competent to order the trial. 











80 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Discharges. _ 

160. Rewards and expenses paid for apprehending a deserter will be 
set against his pay, when adjudged hy a court-martial , or when he is 
restored to duty without trial on such condition. 

161. In reckoning the time of service, and the pay and allowances of 
a deserter, he is to be considered as again in service when delivered up 
as a deserter to the proper authority. 

162. An apprehended deserter, or one who surrenders himself, shall 
receive no pay while waiting trial, and only such clothing as may be 
actually necessary for him. 

ARTICLE XIX. 

DISCHARGES. 

163. No enlisted man shall be discharged before the expiration of 
his term of enlistment without authority of the War Department, ex¬ 
cept by sentence of a general court-martial, or by the commander of 
the Department or of an army in the field, on certificate of disability, 
or on application of the soldier after twenty years’ service. 

164. When an enlisted man is to be discharged, his company com¬ 
mander shall furnish him certificates of his account, usually called final 
statements, according to Form 4, Pay Department. And to ensure his 
being at the post to get these, no leave of absence, terminating with his 
service, will be given to him. He may, however, be discharged in ad¬ 
vance of the latter, under the circumstances and conditions described 
in General Orders No. 24, from the War Department, of November 30, 
1859. 

165. Blank discharges on parchment will be furnished from the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s office. No discharge shall be made in duplicate, nor any 
certificate given in lieu of a discharge. 

166. The cause of discharge will be stated in the body of the dis¬ 
charge, and the space at foot for character cut off, unless a recommenda¬ 
tion is given. 

167. Whenever a non-commissioned officer or soldier shall be unfit for 
the military service in consequence of wounds, disease, or infirmity, his 
captain shall forward to the commander of the Department or of the 
army in the field, through the commander of the regiment or post, a 
statement of his case, with a certificate of his disability signed by the 
senior surgeon of the hospital, regiment, or post, according to the form 
prescribed in the Medical Regulations. 

168. If the recommendation for the discharge of the invalid be ap¬ 
proved, the authority therefor will be indorsed on the “ certificate of dis¬ 
ability,” which will be sent back to be completed and signed hy the 





FOR THE ARMY. 


31 


Traveling on Duty.-Leaves of Absence to Officers. 

commanding officer, who will then send the same to the Adjutant-Gene¬ 
ral’s office. 

169. Insane soldiers will not he discharged, hut sent, under proper 
protection, by the Department commander to Washington for the order 
of the War Department for their admission into the Government Asylum. 
The history of the cases, with the men’s descriptive list, and accounts 
of pay and clothing, will be sent with them. 

170. The date, place, and cause of discharge of a soldier absent from 
his company will be reported by the commander of the post to his com¬ 
pany commander. 

171. Company commanders are required to keep the blank discharges 
and all certificates relating to discharge carefully in their own custody. 

172. No volunteer will be discharged upon Surgeon’s certificate of dis¬ 
ability until the certificate shall have been submitted to the Medical Di¬ 
rector, and shall have been approved and countersigned by him 

ARTICLE XX. 

TRAVELING ON DUTY. 

173. Whenever an officer traveling under orders arrives at his post, 
he will submit to the commanding officer a report, in writing, of the 
time occupied in the travel, with a copy of the orders under which 
the journey was performed, and an explanation of any delay in the 
execution of the orders; which report the commanding officer shall 
transmit, with his opinion on it, to Department Head-Quarters. If the 
officer be superior in rank to the commander, the required report will 
be made by the senior himself. 

174. Orders detaching an officer for a special duty, imply, unless 
otherwise stated, that he is thereafter to join his proper station. 

ARTICLE XXL 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO OFFICERS. 

175. In no case will leaves of absence he granted, so that a com¬ 
pany be left without one of its commissioned officers, or that a gar¬ 
risoned post be left without two commissioned officers and competent 
medical attendance; nor shall leave of absence he granted to an officer 
during the season of active operations, except on urgent necessity. 

176. When not otherwise specified, leaves of absence will he con¬ 
sidered as commencing on the day that the officer is relieved from duty 
at his post. He will report, monthly, his address for the next thirty 
days, to the commander of his post and of his regiment or corps, and to 




32 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Leaves of Absence to Officers. 


the Adjutant-General, together with every change of address; and in his 
first report state the day when his leave of absence commenced. The 
expiration of his leave must find him at his station. 

177. In time of peace, commanding officers may grant leaves of ab¬ 
sence as follows: the commander of a post not to exceed seven days at 
one time, or in the same month; the commander t)f a geographical de¬ 
partment not to exceed sixty days. Applications for leaves of absence 
for more than four months, or to officers of engineers, ordnance, or of the 
general staff, or serving on it (aides-de-camp excepted), for more than thirty 
days, must be referred to the Adjutant-General for the decision of the Sec¬ 
retary of War. In giving a permission to apply for the extension of a 
leave of absence, the term of the extension should be stated. The term 
of the extension approved by the Department commander will be regu¬ 
lated by the season and the usual opportunities for reaching the officer’s 
station, so that he may not be absent during the time for active opera¬ 
tions. 

178. The War Department will not grant leaves to officers on applica¬ 
tions made out of the proper military channel; or longer extensions of 
leave than are recommended by the competent authority. 

179. The immediate commander of the officer applying for leave of 
absence, and all intermediate commanders, will indorse their opinion on 
the application before forwarding it. 

180. The commander of a post may take leave of absence not to ex¬ 
ceed seven days at one time, or in the same month, reporting the fact to 
his next superior. 

181. Three months’ leave of absence will be allowed to graduates, from 
the time of quitting (as cadet) the Military Academy. 

182. No leave of absence exceeding seven days, except on extraordi¬ 
nary occasions, when the circumstances must be particularly stated (and 
except as provided in the preceding paragraph), shall be granted to any 
officer until he has joined his regiment or corps, and served therewith at 
least two years. 

183. Officers will not leave the United States, to go beyond sea, with¬ 
out permission from the War Department. 

184. All leaves of absence to Chaplains and Schoolmasters employed 
at military posts will be granted by the commanding officer, on the re¬ 
commendation of the post Council of Administration, not to exceed four 
months. 

185. An application for leave of absence on account of sickness must 
be accompanied by a certificate of the senior medical officer present in 
the following form: 




FOR THE ARMY. 


33 


Leaves of Absence to Officers. 

-, of the - regiment of -, having applied for a 

certificate on which to ground an application for leave of absence, I do 
hereby certify that I have carefully examined this officer , and find that — 
[Here the nature of the disease, wound, or disability is to be fully stated, 
and the period during which the officer has suffered under its effects.] 
And that, in consequence thereof, he is, in my opinion, unfit for duty. 1 
further declare my belief that he will not be able to resume his duties in 

a less period than -[Here state candidly and explicitly the opinion 

as to the period which will probably elapse before the officer will be able 
to resume his duties. When there is no reason to expect a recovery, or 
when the prospect of recovery is distant and uncertain, or when a change 

of climate is recommended, it must be so stated.] Dated at -, 

this - day of -. 

Signature of the Medical Officer. 

1 « 

186. Leaves of absence on account of sickness will not be granted to 
officers to go beyond the limits of the Military Department within which 
they are stationed, unless the certificate of the medical officer shall ex¬ 
plicitly state that a greater change is necessary to save life, or prevent 
permanent disability. Nor will sick leaves to go beyond the Department 
limits be given in any case, except of immediate urgency, without the 
previous sanction of the War Department. 

187. On the expiration of a leave of absence given on account of sick¬ 
ness, if the officer be able to travel, he will forthwith proceed to his post, 
although his disability may not have been removed. Exceptions to this 
general rule must be made in each case by the War Department on full 
and explicit medical certificates setting forth the reasons for delay and 
the length of time delay is considered necessary. 

188. When an officer is prevented by sickness from joining his station, 
he will transmit certificates in the above form monthly, to the command¬ 
ing officer of his post and regiment or corps, and to the Adjutant-Gene¬ 
ral ; and when he cannot procure the certificates of a medical officer of 
the army, he will substitute his own certificate on honor to his condition, 
and a full statement of his case. If the officer’s certificate is not satis¬ 
factory, and whenever an officer has been absent on account of sickness 
for one year, he shall be examined by a medical board, and the case 
specially reported to the President. 

189. In all reports of absence, or applications for leave of absence on 
account of sickness, the officer shall state how long he has been absent 
already on that account, and by whose permission. 


3 












34 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Furloughs to Enlisted Men.-Councils of Administration. 


ARTICLE XXII. 

FURLOUGHS TO ENLISTED MEN. 

190. Furloughs will be granted only by the commanding officer of the 
post, or the commanding officer of the regiment actually quartered with 
it. Furloughs may be prohibited at the discretion of the officer in com¬ 
mand, and are not to be granted to soldiers about to be discharged. 

191. Soldiers on furlough shall not take with them their arms or ac¬ 
coutrements. 

192. Form of furlough: 

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. 

The hearer hereof \ -, a Sergeant ( corporal, or private, 

as the case may he') of Captain - company ,- regiment 

of -, aged — years , — feet — inches high, - complexion, - 

eyes, - hair, and by profession a -; horn in the - of 

-, and enlisted at -, in the - of -, on the — day of 

-, eighteen hundred and - -, to serve for the period of -, is 

hereby permitted to go to -, in the county of -, State of -, 

he having received a Furlough from the — day of -, to the — day of 

-, at which period he will rejoin his company or regiment at -, or 

wherever it then may he, or he considered a deserter. 

Subsistence has been furnished to said - to the — day of 

-, and pay to the — day of -, both inclusive. 

Given under my hand, at -, this — day of -, 18—. 

Signature of the officer ] -. 

giving the furlough. ) 


ARTICLE XXIII. 

COUNCILS OF ADMINISTRATION. 

193. The commanding officer of every post shall, at least once in every 
two months, convene a Post Council of Administration, to consist of the 
three regimental or company officers nest in rank to himself; or, if there 
be but two, then the two next; if but one, the one next; and if there be 
none other than himself, then he himself shall act. 

194. The junior member will record the proceedings of the Council in 
a book, and submit the same to the commanding officer. If he disap¬ 
prove the proceedings, and the Council, after a reconsideration, adhere to 
its decision, a copy of the whole shall be sent by the officer commanding 
to the next higher commander, whose decision shall be final, and entered 





































FOR THE ARMY. 


35 


Council of Administration.-Post Fund. 

in the Council book, and the whole be published in orders for the informa¬ 
tion and government of all concerned. 

195. The proceedings of Councils of Administration shall be signed by 
the president and recorder, and the recorder of each meeting, after en¬ 
tering the whole proceedings, together with the final order thereon, shah 
deposit the book with the commanding officer. In like manner, the ap¬ 
proval or objections of the officer ordering the Council will be signed with 
his own hand. 

196. The Post Council shall prescribe the quantity and kind of cloth¬ 
ing, small equipments, and soldiers’ necessaries, groceries, and all articles 
which the sutlers may be required to keep on hand; examine the sutler’s 
books and papers, and fix the tariff of prices of the said goods or commo¬ 
dities; inspect the sutler’s weights and measures; fix the laundress’ 
charges, and make regulations for the post school. 

197. Pursuant to the 30th Article of War, commanding officers review¬ 
ing the proceedings of the Council of Administration will scrutinize the 
tariff of prices proposed by them, and take care that the stores actually 
furnished by the sutler correspond to the quality prescribed. 

POST FUND. 

198. A Post Fund shall be raised at each post by a tax on the sutler, 
not to exceed 10 cents a month for every officer and soldier of the com¬ 
mand, according to the average in each month to be ascertained by the 
Council, and from the saving on the flour ration, ordinarily 33 per cent., 
by baking the soldiers’ bread at a post bakery. Provided, that when 
want of vegetables or other reasons make it necessary, the commanding 
officer may order the flour saved, or any part of it, issued to the men, 
after paying expenses of baking. 

199. The commanding officer shall designate an officer to be post 
treasurer, who shall keep the account of the fund, subject to the inspec¬ 
tion of the Council and commanding officer, and disburse the fund on the 
warrants of the commanding officer, drawn in pursuance of specific re¬ 
solves of the Council. 

200. The following are the objects of expenditure of the post fund:— 
1st. Expenses of the bake-house; 2d. support of a band; 3d. the post 
school for soldiers’ children; 4th. for formation of a library. 

201. On the last day of April, August, and December, and when re¬ 
lieved from the duty, the treasurer shall make out his account with the 
fund since his last account, and submit it, with his vouchers, to the 
Council of Administration, to be examined by them, and recorded in the 
Council book, and then forwarded by the commanding officer to Depart¬ 
ment Head-Quarters. 




36 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Company Fund.-Chaplains. 

202. At each settlement of the treasurer’s account, the Council shall 
distribute the unexpended balance of the post fund to the several com¬ 
panies and other troops in the ratio of their average force during the 
period. 

203. When a company leaves the post, it shall then receive its distri¬ 
butive share of the accrued fund. 

204. The regulations in regard to a post fund will, as far as practi¬ 
cable, be applied in the field to a regimental fund, to be raised, admi¬ 
nistered, expended, and distributed in like manner, by the regimental 
commander and a regimental council. 

COMPANY FUND. 

205. The distributions from the post or regimental fund, and the 
savings from the company rations, constitute the Company Fund, to be 
disbursed by the captain for the benefit of the enlisted men of the com¬ 
pany, pursuant to resolves of the Company Council, consisting of all the 
company oflicers present. In case of a tie vote in the Council, the com¬ 
mander of the post shall decide. The Council shall be convened once in 
two months by the captain, and whenever else he may think proper. 

206. Their proceedings shall be recorded in a book, signed by all the 
Council, and open at all times to the inspection of the commander of the 
post. Every four months, and whenever another officer takes command 
of the company, and when the company leaves the post, the account of the 
company fund shall be made up, audited by the Council, recorded in the 
Council book, and submitted, with a duplicate, to the post commander, who 
shall examine it and forward the duplicate to Department Head-Quarters. 

207. The supervision of the company fund by the post commander herein 
directed shall, in the field, devolve on the commander of the regiment. 

ARTICLE XXIY. 

CHAPLAINS. 

208. One chaplain shall be allowed to each regiment of the army, to 
be appointed by the colonel, on the nomination of the company commanders. 
None but regularly ordained ministers of some Christian denomination, 
however, shall be eligible to appointment; and the wishes and wants of 
the soldiers of the regiment shall be allowed their full and due weight in 
making the selection. The proceedings in each case will be immediately 
forwarded to the Adjutant-Gfeneral’s office, the name and denomination of 
the chaplain being in every case reported. Chaplains will only be allowed 

to regiments which are embodied and serving together as one whole_not 

to regiments of which the companies are serving at different stations. 

209. Chaplains, not to exceed thirty in number, are also allowed to 




FOR THE ARMY. 


37 


Sutlers. 

posts. The posts at which chaplains may be employed will be announced 
by the War Department, but the appointment will be made by the Coun 
cil of Administration. 

210. The Council of the post will, however, report to the Adjutant- 
General, for the approval of the Secretary of War, the rate of pay allowed 
to the person selected to officiate as Chaplain and perform the duties of 
Schoolmaster; the decision of the Secretary on this point will be notified 
to the commanding officer of the post by the Adjutant-General. 

ARTICLE XXV. 

SUTLERS. 

211. Every military post may have one Sutler, to be appointed by the 
Secretary of War. 

212. A Sutler shall hold his office for a term of three years, unless 
sooner removed; but the commanding officer may, for cause, suspend a 
Sutler’s privilege until a decision of the War Department is received in 
the case. 

213. In case of vacancy, a temporary appointment may be made by 
the commanding officer upon the nomination of the Council of Adminis¬ 
tration. 

214. Troops in campaign, on detachment, or on distant service, will be 
allowed Sutlers, at the rate of one for every regiment, corps, or separate 
detachment; to be appointed by the commanding officer of such regi¬ 
ment, corps, or detachment, upon the recommendation of the Council of 
Administration, subject to the approval of the general or other officer in 
command. 

215. No tax or burden in any shape, other than the authorized assess¬ 
ment for the post fund, will be imposed on the Sutler. If there be a 
spare building, the use of it may be allowed him, he being responsible 
that it is kept in repair. If there be no such building, he may be allowed 
to erect one; but this article gives the Sutler no claim to quarters, trans¬ 
portation for himself or goods, or to any military allowance whatever. 

216. The tariff of prices fixed by the Council of Administration shall 
be exposed in a conspicuous place in the Sutler’s store. No difference 
of prices will be allowed on cash or credit sales. 

217. No Sutler shall sell to an enlisted man on credit to a sum exceed¬ 
ing one-tliird of his monthly pay, within the same month , without the writ¬ 
ten sanction of the company commander, or the commanding officer of 
the post or station, if the man does not belong to a company; and not 
exceeding one-half of the monthly pay with such permission. 

218. Three days before the last of every month the Sutler shall render, 




38 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Military Discussions and Publications.-Arrests and Confinements. 

for verification, to the company commander, or to the commanding officer, 
as the case may be, according to the meaning of the preceding paragraph, 
a written and separate account in each case of any charges he may have 
against enlisted men for collection, and the officer shall submit the ac¬ 
count to the soldier for acknowledgment and signature, and witness the 
same. In the case of death, desertion, or removal from the post (of the 
soldier), the account will he rendered immediately. If the soldier dis¬ 
pute the account and the Sutler insist, and in the case of death and deser¬ 
tion, the Sutler will be required to establish the account by affidavit in¬ 
dorsed on it before any officer authorized to administer an oath. Debts 
thus veriSed as due the Sutler are to be noted on the Muster Rolls, and 
will be paid by the Paymaster out of the arrearages due to the soldier at 
the time of death, desertion, discharge, or sentence of court-martial: the 
sums due the Government and laundress being first paid. Every facility 
will be afforded to the Sutler in the collection of the just debts contracted 
with him. He will, to this end, be allowed to take his place at the pay- 
table with his books and accounts. 

219. Sutlers shall not farm out or underlet the business and privileges 
granted by their appointment. 

ARTICLE XXVI. 

MILITARY DISCUSSIONS AND PUBLICATIONS. 

220. Deliberations or discussions among any class of military men, 
having the object of conveying praise, or censure, or any mark of appro¬ 
bation toward their superiors or others in the military service; and all 
publications relative to transactions between officers of a private or per¬ 
sonal nature, whether newspaper, pamphlet, or hand-bill, are strictly 
prohibited. 

ARTICLE XXVII. 

ARRESTS AND CONFINEMENTS. 

221. None but commanding officers have power to place officers under 
arrest except for offenses expressly designated in the 27th Article of War. 

222. Officers are not to be put in arrest for light offenses. For these 
the censure of the commanding officer will, in most cases, answer the 
purposes of discipline. 

223. An officer in arrest may, at the discretion of his commanding 
officer, have larger limits assigned him than his tent or quarters, on 
written application to that effect. Close confinement is not to be resorted 
to unless under circumstances of an aggravated character. 

224. In ordinary cases, and where inconvenience to the service would 




FOR THE ARMY. 


39 


Hours of Service and Roll-Calls.-Signals. 

result from it, a medical officer will not be put iu arrest until tlie court- 
martial for bis trial convenes. 

225. The arrest of an officer, or confinement of a soldier, will, as soon 
as practicable, be notified to bis immediate commander. 

226. All prisoners under guard, without written charges, will be re¬ 
leased by the officer of the day at guard-mounting, unless orders to the 
contrary be given by the commanding officer. 

227. On a march, company officers and non-commissioned officers in 
arrest will follow in the rear of their respective companies, unless other¬ 
wise particularly ordered. 

228. Field officers, commissioned and non-commissioned staff officers, 
under the same circumstances, will follow in the rear of their respective 
regiments. 

229. An officer under arrest will not wear a sword, or visit officially 
his commanding or other superior officer, unless sent for ; and in case of 
business, he will make known his object in writing. 

ARTICLE XXVIII. 

HOURS OF SERVICE AND ROLL-CALLS. 

230. In garrison, reveille will be sounded immediately after day-break; 
and retreat at sunset; the troop, surgeon’s call, signals for breakfast and din¬ 
ner at the hours prescribed by the commanding officer, according to cli¬ 
mate and season. In the cavalry, stable-calls immediately after reveille, 
and an hour and a half before retreat; water-calls at the hours directed 
by the commanding officer. 

231. In camp, the commanding officer prescribes the hours of reveille, 
reports, roll-calls, guard-mounting, meals, stable-calls, issues, fatigues, &c. 

232. SIGNALS. 

1. To go for fuel— poing stroke and ten-stroke roll. 

2. To go for water— two strokes and a flam. 

3. For fatigue party— pioneer’s march. 

4. Adjutant’s call— first part of the troop. 

5. First sergeant’s call— one roll and four taps. 

6. Sergeant’s call— one roll and three taps. 

7. Corporal’s call— one roll and tivo taps. 

8. For the drummers— the drummer’s call. 

233. The drummer’s call shall be beat by the drums of the police 
guard five minutes before the time of beating the stated calls, when the 
drummers will assemble before the colors of their respecti\ e regiments, 




REVISED REGULATIONS 


40 

Roll-Calls.-Honors to "be paid by the Troops. 

and as soon as the beat begins on the right, it will be immediately taken 
up along the line. 

ROLL-CALLS. 

234. There shall be daily at least three roll-calls, viz., at reveille , retreat , 
and tattoo. They will be made on the company parades by the first ser¬ 
geants, superintended by a commissioned officer of the company. The 
captains will report the absentees without leave to the colonel or com¬ 
manding officer. 

235. Immediately after reveille roll-call (after stable-duty in the 
cavalry), the tents or quarters, and the space around them, will be put 
in order by the men of the companies, superintended by the chiefs of 
squads, and the guard-house or guard-tent by the guard or prisoners. 

236. The morning reports of companies, signed by the captains and 
First Sergeants, will be handed to the Adjutant before eight o’clock in 
the morning, and will he consolidated by the Adjutant within the next 
hour, for the information of the Colonel; and if the consolidation is to 
he sent to higher authority, it will be signed by the Colonel and the 
Adjutant. 

ARTICLE XXIX. 

HONORS TO BE PAIL BY THE TROOPS. 

237. The President or Vice-President is to he saluted with the highest 
honors—all standards and colors dropping, officers and troops saluting, 
drums heating and trumpets sounding. 

238. A General commanding-in-chief is to be received—by cavalry, 
with sabres presented, trumpets sounding the march, and'all the officers 
saluting, standards dropping; by infantry, with drums beating the march, 
colors dropping, officers saluting, and arms presented. 

239. A Major-General is to be received—by cavalry, with sabres pre¬ 
sented, trumpets sounding twice the trumpet-flourish, and officers salut¬ 
ing; by infantry, with three ruffles, colors dropping, officers saluting, and 
arms presented. 

240. A Brigadier-General is to he received—by cavalry, with sabres 
presented, trumpets sounding once the trumpet-flourish, and officers salut¬ 
ing; by infantry, with two ruffles, colors dropping, officers saluting, and 
arms presented. 

241. An Adjutant-General or Inspector- General, if under the rank of 
a General officer, is to be received at a review or inspection of the troops 
under arms—by cavalry, with sabres presented, officers saluting; by in¬ 
fantry, officers saluting and arms presented. The same honors to he paid 





FOR THE ARMY. 


41 


Honors to be paid by the Troops. 

to any field-officer authorized to review and inspect the troops. When 
the inspecting officer is junior to the officer commanding the parade, no 
compliments will be paid: he will be received only with swords drawn 
and arms shouldered. 

242. All guards are to turn out and present arms to General officers as 
often as they pass them, except the personal guards of General officers, 
which turn out only to the Generals whose guards they are, and to officers 
of superior rank. 

243. To commanders of regiments, garrison, or camp, their own guard 
turn out, and present arms once a day; after which, they turn out with 
shouldered arms. 

244. To the members of the Cabinet; to the Chief Justice, the President 
of the Senate, and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United 
States; and to Governors, within their respective States and Territories 
—the same honors will be paid as to a General commanding-in-chief. 

245. Officers of a foreign service may be complimented with the honors 
due to their rank. 

246. American and Foreign Envoys or Ministers will be received with 
the compliments due to a Major-General. 

247. The colors of a regiment passing a guard are to be saluted, the 
trumpets sounding, and the drums beating a march. 

248. When General officers, or persons entitled to salute, pass in the 
rear of a guard, the officer is only to make his men stand shouldered, and 
not to face his guard about, or beat his drum. 

249. When General officers, or persons entitled to a salute, pass guards 
while in the act of relieving, both guards are to salute, receiving the 
word of command from the senior officer of the whole. 

250. All guards are to be under arms when armed parties approach 
their posts; and to parties commanded by commissioned officers, they are 
to present their arms, drums beating a march, and officers saluting. 

251. No compliments by guards or sentinels will be paid between 
retreat and reveille, except as prescribed for grand rounds. 

252. All guards and sentinels are to pay the same compliments to the 
officers of the navy, marines, and militia, in the service of the United 
States, as are directed to be paid to the officers of the army, according to 
their relative ranks. 

253. It is equally the duty of non-commissioned officers and soldiers, 
at all times and in all situations, to pay the proper compliments to officers 
of the navy and marines, and to officers of other regiments, when in uni¬ 
form, as to officers of their own particular regiments and corps. 

254. Courtesy among military men is indispensable to discipline. Re¬ 
spect to superiors will not be confined to obedience on duty, but will be 




42 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Salutes. 

extended to all occasions. It is always the duty of the inferior to accost 
or to offer first the customary salutation, and of the superior to return 
such complimentary notice. 

255. Sergeants, with swords drawn, will salute by bringing them to a 
present—with muskets, by bringing the left hand across the body, so as 
to strike the musket near the right shoulder. Corporals out of the ranks, 
and privates not sentries, will carry their muskets at a shoulder as ser¬ 
geants, and salute in like manner. 

25C. When a soldier without arms, or with side-arms only, meets an 
officer, he is to raise his hand to the right side of the visor of his cap, 
palm to the front, elbow raised as high as the shoulder, looking at the 
same time in a respectful and soldier-like manner at the officer, who will 
return the compliment thus offered. 

257. A non-commissioned officer or soldier being seated, and without 
particular occupation, will rise on the approach of an officer, and make 
the customary salutation. If standing, he will turn toward the officer for 
the same purpose. If the parties remain in the same place or on the 
same ground, such compliments need not be repeated. 

SALUTES. 

258. The national salute is determined by the number of States com¬ 
posing the Union, at the rate of one gun for each State. 

259. The President of the United States alone is to receive a salute of 
twenty-one guns. 

260. The Vice-President is to receive a salute of seventeen guns. 

261. The Heads of the great Executive Departments of the National 
Government ; the General commanding the army ; the Governors of 
States and Territories, _ within their respective jurisdictions, fifteen guns. 

262. A Major-General , thirteen guns. 

263. A Brigadier-General, eleven guns. 

264. Foreign ships of war will be saluted in return for a similar com¬ 
pliment, gun for gun, on notice being officially received of such intention. 
If there be several posts in sight of, or within six miles of each other, 
the principal only shall reciprocate compliments with ships passing. 

265. Officers of the Navy will be saluted according to relative rank* 

266. Foreign Officers invited to visit a fort or post may be saluted 
according to their relative rank. 

267. Envoys and? Ministers of the United States and foreign powers 
are to be saluted with thirteen guns. 

268. A General officer will be saluted but once in a year at each post 
and only when notice of his intention to visit the post has been given. 

269. Salutes to individuals are to be fired on their arrival only. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


43 


Escorts of Honor.-Funeral Honors. 

270. A national salute will be fired at meridian on the anniversary of 
the Independence of the United States, at each military post and camp' 
provided with artillery and ammunition. 

ESCORTS OF HONOR. 

271. Escorts of honor may be composed of cavalry or infantry, or both, 
according to circumstances. They are guards of honor for the purpose 
of receiving and escorting personages of high rank, civil or military. 
The troops for this purpose will be selected for their soldierly appearance 
and superior discipline. 

272. The escort will be drawn up in line, the centre opposite to the 
place where the personage presents himself, with an interval between the 
wings to receive him and his retinue. On his appearance, he will be re¬ 
ceived with the honors due to his rank. When he has taken his place in 
the line, the whole will be wheeled into platoons or companies, as the case 
may be, and take up the march. The same ceremony will be observed, 
and the same honors paid, on his leaving the escort. 

273. When the position of the escort is at a considerable distance 
from the point where he is expected to be received, as, for instance, where 
a court-yard or wharf intervenes, a double line of sentinels will be posted 
from that point to the escort, facing inward, and the sentinels will suc¬ 
cessively salute as he passes. 

274. An officer will be appointed to attend him, to bear such commu¬ 
nications as he may have to make to the commander of the escort. 

FUNERAL HONORS. 

275. On the receipt of official intelligence of the death of the Presi¬ 
dent of the United States, at any post or camp, the commanding officer 
shall, on the following day, cause a gun to be fired at every half hour, 
beginning at sunrise, and ending at sunset. When posts are contiguous, 
the firing will take place at the post only commanded by the superior 
officer. 

276. On the day of the interment of a General commanding-in-chief, a 
gun will be fired at every half hour, until the procession moves, beginning 
at sunrise. 

277. The funeral escort of a General commanding-in-chief shall con¬ 
sist of a regiment of infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and six pieces of 
artillery. 

278. That of a Major-General, a regiment of infantry, a squadron of 
cavalry, and four pieces of artillery. 

279. That of a Brigadier-General, a regiment of infantry, one com. 
pany of cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. 




u 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Funeral Honors. 

280 That of a Colonel , a regiment. 

281. That of a Lieutenant-Colonel, six companies. 

282 That of a Major, four companies. 

283 That of a Captain, one company. 

284. That of a Subaltern, half a company. 

285. The funeral escort shall always be commanded by an officer of the 
same rank with the deceased; or, if none such be present, by one of the 
next inferior grade. 

286. The funeral escort of a non-commissioned staff officer shall consist 
of sixteen rank and file, commanded by a Sergeant. 

287. That of a Sergeant, of fourteen rank and file, commanded by a 
Sergeant. 

288. That of a Corporal, of twelve rank and file, commanded by a 
Corporal; and, 

289. That of a private, of eight rank and file, commanded by a 
Corporal. 

290. The escort will be formed in two ranks, opposite to the quarters 
or tent of the deceased, with shouldered arms and bayonets unfixed; the 
artillery and cavalry on the right of the infantry. 

291. On the appearance of the corpse, the officer commanding the 
escort will command, 

Present — Arms ! 

when the honors due to the deceased will be paid by the drums and 
trumpets. The music will then play an appropriate air, and the coffin 
will then be taken to the right, where it will be halted. The commander 
will next order, 

1. Shoulder — Arms! 2. By company (or platoon), left wheel. 3. March ! 

4. Reverse — Arms! 5. Column, forward. 6. Guide right. 7. March! 

The arms will be reversed at the order by bringing the firelock under 
the left arm, butt to the front, barrel downward, left hand sustaining the 
lock, the right steadying the firelock behind the back; swords are 
reversed in a similar manner under the right arm. 

292. The column will be marched in slow time to solemn music, and, 
on reaching the grave, will take a direction so as that the guides shall be 
next to the grave. When the centre of the column is opposite the grave, 
the commander will order, 

1. Column. 2. Halt ! 3. Right into line, wheel. 4. March ! 

The coffin is then brought along the front, to the opposite side of the 
grave, and the commander then orders, 




FOR THE ARMY. 


45 


Funeral Honors. 

1. Shoulder — Arms ! 2. Present — Arms ! 

And when the coffin reaches the grave, he adds, 

1. Shoulder — Arms! 2. Rest on — Arms! 

The rest on arms is done by placing the muzzle on the left foot, both 
hands on the butt, the head on the hands or bowed, right knee bent. 

293. After the funeral service is performed, and the coffin is lowered 
into the grave, the commander will order, 

1. Attention! 2. Shoulder — Arms! 3. Load at will. 4. Load! 

When three rounds of small arms will he fired by the escort, taking care 
to elevate the pieces. 

294. This being done, the commander will order, 

1. By company (or platoon ), right wheel. 2. MARCH ! 3. Column , 

forward. 4. Guide left. 5. Quick — March ! 

The music will not begin to play until the escort is clear of the inclosure. 

295. When the distance to the place of interment is considerable, the 
escort may march in common time and in column of route, after leaving 
the camp or garrison, and till it approaches the burial-ground. 

296. The pall-bearers, six in number, will be selected from the grade 
of the deceased, or from the grade or grades next above or below it. 

297. At the funeral of an officer, as many in commission of the army, 
division, brigade, or regiment, according to the rank of the deceased, as 
can conveniently he spared from other duties, will join in the procession 
in uniform, and with side-arms. The funeral of a non-commissioned 
officer or private will be attended, in like manner, by the non-com¬ 
missioned officers or privates of the regiment or company, according to 
the rank of the deceased, with side-arms only. 

298. Persons joining in the procession follow the coffin in the inverse 
order of their rank. 

299. The usual badge of military mourning is a piece of black crape 
around the left arm, above the elbow, and also upon the sword-hilt; and 
will be worn when in full or in undress. 

300. As family mourning, crape will be worn by officers (when in 
uniform) only around the left arm. 

301. The drums of a funeral escort will be covered with black crape, 
or thin black serge. 




46 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Inspections of tlie Troops.-Form of Inspection. 

802. Funeral honors will be paid to deceased officers without military 
rank, according to their assimilated grades. 

ARTICLE XXX. 

INSPECTIONS OF THE TROOPS. 

308. The inspection of troops, as a division, regiment, or other body 
composing a garrison or command, not less than a company, will generally 
be pi'eceded by a review. 

304. There will be certain periodical inspections, to wit: 

1. The commanders of regiments and posts will make an inspection of 
their commands on the last day of every month. 

2. Captains will inspect their companies every Sunday morning. No 
soldier will be excused from Sunday inspection except the guard, 
the sick, and the necessary attendants in the hospital. 

3. Medical officers having charge of hospitals will also make a 
thorough inspection of them every Sunday morning. 

4. Inspection when troops are mustered for payment. 

305. Besides these inspections, frequent visits will be made by the 
commanding officer, company and medical officers, during the month, to 
the men’s quarters, the hospital, guard-house, &c. 

FORM OF INSPECTION. 

306. The present example embraces a battalion of infantry. The 
inspecting officer and the field and staff officers will be on foot. 

307. The battalion being in the order of battle, the Colonel will cause 
it to break into open column of companies, right in front. He will next 
order the ranks to be opened, when the color-rank and color-guard, under 
the direction of the Adjutant, will take post ten paces in front, and the 
band ten paces in rear of the column. 

308. The Colonel, seeing the ranks aligned, will command, 

1. Officers and Sergeants, to the front of your companies. 2. March! 

The officers will form themselves in one rank, eight paces, and the non¬ 
commissioned officers in one rank, six paces, in advance, along the whole 
fronts of their respective companies, from right to left, in the order of 
seniority; the pioneers and music of each company, in one rank, two 
paces behind the non-commissioned officers. 

309. The Colonel will next command, 


Field and staff, to the front — March ! 






FOR THE ARMY. 


47 


Form of Inspection. 

The commissioned officers thus designated will form themselves in one 
rank, on a line equal to the front of the column, six paces in front of the 
colors, from right to left, in the order of seniority; and the non-commis¬ 
sioned staff, in a similar manner, two paces in rear of the preceding rank. 
The Colonel, seeing the movement executed, will take post on the right 
of the Lieutenant-Colonel, and wait the approach of the inspecting officer 
But such of the field officers as may be superior in rank to the Inspector 
will not take post in front of the battalion. 

310. The Inspector will commence in front. After inspecting the 
dress and general appearance of the field and commissioned staff under 
arms, the Inspector, accompanied by these officers, will pass down the 
open column, looking at every rank in front and rear. 

311. The Colonel will now command, 

1. Order Arms. 2. Rest! 

when the Inspector will proceed to make a minute inspection of the 
several ranks or divisions, in succession, commencing in front. 

312. As the Inspector approaches the non-commissioned staff, color- 
rank, the color-guard, and the hand, the Adjutant will give the necessary 
orders for the inspection of arms, boxes, and knapsacks. The colors will 
be planted firm in the ground, to enable the color-hearers to display the 
contents of their knapsacks. The non-commissioned staff may be dis¬ 
missed as soon as inspected; but the color-rank and color-guard will 
remain until the colors are to be escorted to the place from which they 
were taken. 

313. As the Inspector successively approaches the companies, the Cap¬ 
tains will command, 

1. Attention. 2. Company. 3. Inspection — Arms! 

The inspecting officer will then go through the whole company, and 
minutely inspect the arms, accoutrements, and dress of each soldier. 
After this is done, the Captain will command, 

Open — Boxes ! 

when the ammunition and the boxes will be examined. 

314. The Captain will then command, 


1. Shoulder — Arms! 

2. Close order. 


3. March! 

4. Order — Arms! 




48 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Form of Inspection. 

5. Stack — Arms! 8. Front rank — About — Face! 

6. To the rear, open order. 9. Unsling — Knapsacks. 

7. March ! 10. Open — Knapsacks. 

315. The Sergeants will face inward at the 2d command, and close 
upon the centre at the 3d, and stack their arms at the 5th command; at 
the 6th command they face outward, and resume their positions at the 
7th. When the ranks are closed, preparatory to take arms, the Sergeants 
will also close upon the centre, and at the word, take their arms and 
resume their places. 

316. The knapsacks will be placed at the feet of the men, the flaps 
from them, with the great-coats on the flaps, and the knapsacks leaning 
on the great-coats. In this position the Inspector will examine their 
contents, or so many of them as he may think necessary, commencing 
with the non-commissioned officers, the men standing at attention. 

317. When the Inspector has passed through the company, the Cap¬ 
tain will command, 

' Repack — Knapsacks,; 

when each soldier will repack and buckle up his knapsack, leaving it on 
the ground, the number upward, turned from him, and then stand at rest. 

318. The Captain will then command, 

1. Attention. 2. Company. 3. Sling — Knapsacks. 

At the word sling, each soldier will take his knapsack, holding it by the 
inner straps, and stand erect; at the last word he will replace it on his 
back. The Captain will continue, 

4. Frontrank —About—Face ! 8. Shoulder —Arms ! 

5. Close order. 9. Officers and Sergeants, to your 

6. March ! posts. 

7. Take — Arms ! 10. March ! 

and will cause the company to file off to their tents or quarters, except 
the company that is to re-escort the colors, which will await the further 
orders of the Colonel. 

319. In an extensive column, some of the rearmost companies may, 
after the inspection of dress and general appearance, be permitted to stack 
arms until just before the Inspector approaches them, when they will be 
directed to take arms and resume their position. 

320. The inspection of the troops being ended, the field and staff will 




FOR THE ARMY. 


49 


Form of Inspection.-Musters. 

next accompany the Inspector to the hospital, magazine, arsenal, quarters, 
sutler’s shop, guard-house, and such other places as he may think proper 
to inspect. The Captains and subalterns repair to their companies ana 
sections to await the Inspector. 

321. The hospital being at all times an object of particular interest, it 
will be critically and minutely inspected. 

322. The men will be formed in the company quarters in front of their 
respective bunks, and on the entrance of the Inspector the word Atten¬ 
tion! will be given by the senior non-commissioned officer present, when 
the whole will salute with the hand, without uncovering. 

323. The Inspector, attended by the company officers, will examine the 
general arrangement of the interior of the quarters, the bunks, bedding, 
cooking and table utensils, and such other objects as may present them¬ 
selves ; and afterward the exterior. 

324. The Adjutant will exhibit to the Inspector the regimental books 
and papers, including those relating to the transactions of the Council of 
Administration. The company books and papers will also be exhibited, 
the whole together, generally at the Adjutant’s office, and in the presence 
of the officers not otherwise particularly engaged. 

325. The Inspector will examine critically the books and accounts of 
the administrative and disbursing officers of the command, and the money 
and property in their keeping. 

326. The inspection of cavalry and artillery will conform to the prin¬ 
ciples laid down in the foregoing paragraphs, regard being had to the 
system of instruction for those arms of service respectively. 

ARTICLE XXXI. 

MUSTERS. 

. 327. Troops will be mustered for pay on the last day of February, 
April, June, August, October, and December. The musters will be made 
by an Inspector-General, if present, otherwise by an officer specially desig¬ 
nated by the Commander of the Army, Division, or Department; and in 
absence of either an Inspector-General or officer specially designated, the 
muster will be made by the commander of the post. 

328. When one inspecting officer cannot muster all the troops himself 
on the day specified, the commanding officer will designate such other 
competent officers as may be necessary, to assist him. 

329. All stated musters of the troops shall be preceded by a minute 
and careful inspection in the prescribed mode; and if the command be of 
more than a company, by a review , before inspection. 

330. The mustering officer having inspected the companies in succession, 

4 





50 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Forms of Parade. 

beginning on the right, returns to the first company to muster it. The 
company being at ordered arms, with open ranks, as when inspected, the 
Captain will, as the mustering officer approaches, command, 

1. Attention. 2. Company l 3 .Shoulder — Arms! 4. Support — Arms! 

The mustering officer will then call over the names on the roll, and 
each man, as his name is called, will distinctly answer, Here! and bring 
his piece to a carry and to an order. 

331. After each company is mustered, the Captain will order it to be 
marched to the company parade, and there dismissed to quarters to await 
the Inspector’s visit. 

332. After mustering the companies, the mustering officer, attended 
by the company commanders, will visit the guard and hospital, to verify 
the presence of the men reported there. 

333. The muster and pay rolls will be made on the printed forms fur¬ 
nished from the Adjutant-General’s office, and according to the direc¬ 
tions given on them. On the muster-rolls companies are designated by 
the name of the Captain, whether present or absent. The pay-roll is left 
blank, to be filled by the Paymaster. 

334. One copy of each muster-roll will be transmitted by the mustering 
officer to the Adjutant-General’s office in the War Department within 
three days after the muster. 

ARTICLE XXXII. 

FORMS OF PARADE. 

335. On all parades of ceremony, such as Reviews, Guard-mounting, 
at Troop or Retreat parades, instead of the word “Rest ” which allows 
the men to move or change the position of their bodies, the command 
will be “ Parade—Rest !” At the last word of this command, the 
soldier will carry the right foot six inches in rear of the left heel, the 
left knee slightly bent, the body upright upon the right leg ; the musket 
resting against the hollow of the right shoulder, the hands crossed in 
front, the backs of them outward, and the left hand uppermost. At the 
word “ Attention !” the soldier will resume the correct position at 
ordered arms. In the positions here indicated, the soldier will remain 
silent and motionless; and it is particularly enjoined upon all officers to 
cause the commands above given, on the part of the soldier, to be exe¬ 
cuted with great briskness and spirit. 

336. Officers on all duties under arms are to have their swords drawn, 
without waiting for any words of command for that purpose. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


51 


Dress Parade. 


I. DRESS PARADE. 

337. There shall be daily one dress parade, at troop or retreat, as the 
commanding officer may direct. 

338. A signal will be beat or sounded half an hour before troop or 
retreat, for the music to assemble on the regimental parade, and each 
company to turn out under arms on its own parade, for roll-call and 
inspection by its own officers. 

339. Ten minutes after that signal, the Adjutant's call will be given, 
when the Captains will march their companies (the band playing) to the 
regimental parade, where they take their positions in the order of battle. 
When the line is formed, the Captain of the first company, on notice 
from the Adjutant, steps one pace to the front, and gives to his company 
the command, “ Order — Arms ! Parade—Rest which is repeated 
by each Captain in succession to the left. The Adjutant takes post two 
paces on the right of the line; the Sergeant-major two paces on the left. 
The music will be formed in two ranks on the right of the Adjutant. 
The senior officer present will take the command of the parade, and 
will take post - at a suitable distance in front, opposite the centre, facing 
the line. 

340. When the companies have ordered arms, the Adjutant will order 
the music to beat off, when it will commence on the right, beat in front 
of the line to the left, and back to its place on the right. 

341. When the music has ceased, the Adjutant will step two paces to 
the front, face to the left, and command, 

1 .Attention! 2. Battalion. 3. Shoulder — Arms! 4. Prepare to open 
ranks l 5. To the rear, open order l 6. March ! 

At the sixth command, the ranks will be opened according to the system 
laid down in the Infantry Tactics, the commissioned officers marching to 
the front, the company officers four paces, field officers six paces, opposite 
to their positions in the order of battle, where they will halt and dress. 
The Adjutant, seeing the ranks aligned, will command, 

Front! 

and march along the front to the centre, face to the right, and pass the 
line of company officers eight or ten paces, where he will come to the 
right-about, and command, 

Present — Arm's ! 
when arms will be presented, officers saluting. 




52 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Dress Parade. 

342. Seeing this executed, he will face about to the commanding 
officer, salute, and report, “ Sir, the parade is formed.” The Adjutant 
will then, on intimation to that effect, take his station three paces 
on the left of the commanding officer, one pace retired, passing found 
his rear. 

343. The commanding officer, having acknowledged the salute of the 
line by touching his hat, will, after the Adjutant has taken his post, 
draw his sword, and command, 

1. Battalion. 2. Shoulder — Arms ! 
and add such exercises as he may think proper, concluding with 

Order — Arms ! 

then return his sword, and direct the Adjutant to receive the reports. 

344. The Adjutant will now pass round the right of the commanding 
officer, advance upon the line, halt midway between him and the line of 
company officers, and command, 

1. First Sergeants, to the front and centre. 2. March ! 

At the first command, they will shoulder arms as Sergeants, march two 
paces to the front, and face inward. At the second command, they will 
march to the centre, and halt. The Adjutant will then order, 

1. Front — Face. 2. Report. 

At the last word, each in succession, beginning on the right, will salute 
by bringing the left hand smartly across the breast to the right shoulder, 
and report ‘the result of the roll-call previously made on the company 
parade. 

345. The Adjutant again commands, 

1. First Sergeants, outward — Face! 2. To your posts — March! 

when they will resume their places, and order arms. The Adjutant will 
now face to the commanding officer, salute, report absent officers, and 
give the result of the First Sergeants’ reports. The commanding officer 
will next direct the orders to be read, when the Adjutant will face about 
and announce, 

Attention to Orders. 


He will then read the orders. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


53 


Dress Parade.—Review. 

346. The orders having been read, the Adjutant will face to the com¬ 
manding officer, salute, and report; when, on an intimation from the 
commander, he will face again to the line, and announce, 

Parade is dismissed. 

All the officers will now return their swords, face inward, and close on 
the Adjutant, he having taken position in their line, the field officers on 
the flanks. The Adjutant commands, 

1. Front — Face ! 2. Forward — March ! 

when they will march forward, dressing on the centre, the music playing, 
and when within six paces of the commander, the Adjutant will give the 
word, 

Halt! 

The officers will then salute the commanding officer by raising the hand 
to the cap, and there remain until he shall have communicated to them 
such instructions as he may have to give, or intimates that the ceremony 
is finished. As the officers disperse, the First Sergeants will close the 
ranks of their respective companies, and march them to the company 
parades, where they will be dismissed, the band continuing to play until 
the companies clear the regimental parade. 

347. All field and company officers and men will be present at dress 
parades, unless especially excused, or on some duty incompatible with 
such attendance. 

348. A dress parade once a day will not be dispensed with, except on 
extraordinary and urgent occasions. 

II. REVIEW OP A BATTALION OF INFANTRY. 

349. Preparatory to a review, the Adjutant will cause a camp-color to 
be placed 80 or 100 paces, or more, according to the length of the line, 
in front of, and opposite to, where the centre of the battalion will rest, 
where the reviewing officer is supposed to take his station; and, although 
he may choose to quit that position, still the color is to be considered as 
the point to which all the movements and formations are relative. 

350. The Adjutant will also cause points to be marked, at suitable 
distances, for the wheelings of the divisions; so that their right flanks, 
in marching past, shall only be about four paces from the camp-color, 
where it is supposed the reviewing officer places himself to receive the 
salute. 




54 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Review. 

351. The battalion being formed in the order of battle, at shouldered 
arms, the Colonel will command, 

1. Battalion,prepare for review ! 2. To the rear, open order. 3. March! 

At the word March, the field and staff officers dismount; the company 
officers and the color-rank advance four paces in front of the front rank, 
and place themselves opposite to their respective places, in the order of 
battle. The color-guard replace the color-rank. The staff officers place 
themselves, according to rank, three paces on the right of the rank of 
company officers, and one pace from each other; the music takes post as 
at parade. The non-commissioned staff take post one pace from each 
other, and three paces on the right of the front rank of the battalion. 

352. When the ranks are aligned, the Colonel will command, 

Front! 

and place himself eight paces, and the Lieutenant-Colonel and Major will 
place themselves two paces, in front of the rank of company officers, and 
opposite to their respective places in the order of battle, all facing to the 
front. 

353. When the reviewing officer presents himself before the centre, 
and is fifty or sixty paces distant, the Colonel will face about, and com¬ 
mand, 

Present — Arms ! 

and resume his front. The men present arms, and the officers salute, so 
as to drop their swords with the last motion of the firelock. The non¬ 
commissioned staff salute by bringing the sword to a poise, the hilt rest¬ 
ing on the breast, the blade in front of the face, inclining a little outward. 
The music will play, and all the drums beat, according to the rank of the 
reviewing officer. The colors only salute such persons as, from their rank, 
and by regulation (see Article XXIX.), are entitled to that honor. If 
the reviewing officer be junior in rank to the commandant of the parade, 
no compliment will be paid to him, but he will be received with arms 
carried, and the officers will not salute as the column passes in review. 

354. The reviewing officer having halted, and acknowledged the salute 
of the line by touching or raising his cap or hat, the Colonel will face 
about and command, 

Shoulder — Arms ! 

when the men shoulder their pieces; the officers and non-commissioned staff 
recover their swords with the last motion, and the Colonel faces to the front. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


55 


Review. 

355. The reviewing officer will then go toward the right, the whole re¬ 
maining perfectly steady, without paying any further compliment, whilt. 
he passes along the front of the battalion, and proceeds round the left 
flank, and along the rear of the file-closers, to the right. While the re¬ 
viewing officer is going round the battalion, the band will play, and will 
cease when he has returned to the right flank of the troops. 

356. When the reviewing officer turns off, to place himself by the 
camp-color in front, the Colonel will face to the line and command, 

1. Close Order. 2. March! 

At the first command, the field and company officers will face to the 
right-about, and at the second command, all persons, except the Colonel, 
will resume their places in the order of battle; the field and staff officers 
mount. 

357. The reviewing officer having taken his position near the camp- 
color, the Colonel will command, 

1. By company, right wheel. 2. Quick — March! 3. Pass in review. 

4. Column,forward. 5. Guide right. 6. March! 

The battalion, in column of companies, right in front, will then, in 
common time, and at shouldered arms, he put in motion; the Colonel four 
paces in front of the Captain of the leading company; the Lieutenant- 
Colonel on a line with the leading company; the Major on a line with the 
rear company; the Adjutant on a line with the second company; the 
Sergeant-Major on a line with the company next preceding the rear—each 
six paces from the flank (left) opposite to the reviewing officer; the staff 
officers in one rank, according to the order of precedency, from the right, 
four paces in rear of the column; the music, preceded by the princi¬ 
pal musician, six paces before the Colonel; the pioneers, preceded by a 
Corporal, four paces before the principal musician; and the Quartermaster- 
Sergeant two paces from the side opposite to the guides, and in line with 
the pioneers. 

358. All other officers and non-commissioned officers will march past 
in the places prescribed for them in the march of an open column. The 
guides and soldiers will keep their heads steady to the front in passing in 
review. 

359. The color-bearer will remain in the ranks while passing and 
saluting. 

360. The music will begin to play at the command to march, and after 
passing the reviewing officer, wheel to the left out of the column, and 






56 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Review. 

take a position opposite and facing him, and will continue to play until 
the rear of the column shall have passed him, when it will cease, and 
follow in the rear of the battalion, unless the battalion is to pass in quick 
time also, in which case it will keep its position. 

361. The officers will salute the reviewing officer when they arrive 
within six paces of him, and recover their swords when six paces past 
him. All officers, in saluting, will cast their eyes toward the reviewing 
officer. 

362. The Colonel, when he has saluted at the head of the battalion, 
will place himself near the reviewing officer, and will remain there until 
the rear has passed, when he will rejoin the battalion. 

363. The colors will salute the reviewing officer, if entitled to it, when 
within six paces of him, and be raised when they have passed by him 
an equal distance. The drums will beat a march, or ruffle, according 
to the rank of the reviewing officer, at the same time that the colors 
salute. 

364. When the column has passed the reviewing officer, the Colonel 
will direct it to the ground it marched from, and command, 

Guide left, 

in time for the guides to cover. The column having arrived on its 
ground, the Colonel will command, 

1. Column. 2. Halt ! 

form it in order of battle, and cause the ranks to be opened as in para¬ 
graph 351. The review will terminate by the whole saluting as at the 
beginning. 

365. If, however, instructions have been previously given to march the 
troops past in quick time also, the Colonel will, instead of changing the 
guides, halting the column, and wheeling it into line, as above directed, 
give the command, 

1. Quick time. 2. March ! 

In passing the reviewing officer again, no salute will be offered by either 
officers or men. The music will have kept its position opposite the review¬ 
ing officer, and at the last command will commence playing, and as the 
column approaches, will place itself in front of, and march off with the 
column, and continue to play until the battalion is halted on its original 
o-round of formation. The Review will terminate in the same manner as 

O 

prescribed above. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


57 


Review. 

366. The Colonel will afterward cause the troops to perform' such 
exercises and manoeuvres as the reviewing officer may direct. 

367. When two or more battalions are to be reviewed, they will he 
formed in parade order, with the proper intervals, and will also perform 
the same movements that are laid down for a single battalion, observing 
the additional directions that are given for such movements when applied 
to the line. The Brigadier-General and his staff, on foot, will place them¬ 
selves opposite the centre of the brigade; the Brigadier-General two paces 
in front of the rank of Colonels; his aid two paces on his right, and one 
retired; and the other brigade staff officers, those having the rank of field 
officers, in the rank of Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors; and those below 
that rank, in the rank of company officers. 

368. In passing in review, a Major-General will be four paces in front 
of the Colonel of the leading battalion of his division; and the Brigadier- 
General will be on the right of the Colonels of the leading battalions of 
their brigades; staff officers on the left of their Generals. 

369. When the line exceeds two battalions, the reviewing officer may 
cause them to march past in quick time only. In such cases the mounted 
officers only will salute. 

370. A number of companies less than a battalion will be reviewed as 
a battalion, and a single company as if it were with the battalion. In the 
latter case, the company may pass in column of platoons. 

371. If several brigades are to be reviewed together, or in one line, 
this further difference will be observed : the reviewing personage, joined 
by the General of the division, on the right of his division, will proceed 
down the line, parallel to its front, and when near the Brigadier-Generals 
respectively, will be saluted by their brigades in succession. The music 
of each, after the prescribed salute, will play while the reviewing person¬ 
age is in front, or in rear of it, and only then. 

372. In marching in review, with several battalions in common time, 
the music of each succeeding battalion will commence to play when the 
music of the preceding one has ceased, in order to follow its battalion. 
When marching in quick time, the music will begin to play when the 
rear company of the preceding battalion has passed the reviewing 
officer. 

373. The reviewing officer or personage will acknowledge the salute by 
raising, or taking off, his cap or hat, when the commander of the troops 
salutes him; and also when the colors pass. The remainder of the time 
occupied by the passage of the troops he will be covered. 

374. The review of Cavalry and Artillery will be conducted on similar 
principles, and according to the systems of instruction for those arms of 
service. 




58 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Guard-Mounting. 


III. GUARD-MOUNTING. 

375. Camp and garrison guards will be relieved every twenty-four 
hours. The guards at outposts will ordinarily be relieved in the same 
manner, but this must depend on their distances from camp, or other 
circumstances, which may sometimes require their continuing on duty 
several days. In such cases, they must be previously warned to provide 
themselves accordingly. 

376. At the first call for guard-mounting, the men warned for duty turn 
out on their company parades for inspection by the First Sergeants; and 
at the second call, repair to the regimental or garrison parade, conducted 
by the First Sergeants. Each detachment, as it arrives, will, under the 
direction of the Adjutant, take post on the left of the one that preceded it, 
in open order, arms shouldered, and bayonets fixed; the supernumeraries 
five paces in the rear of the men of their respective companies; the First 
Sergeants in rear of them. The Sergeant-Major will dress the ranks, 
count the files, verify the details, and when the guard is formed, report to 
the Adjutant, and take post two paces on the left of the front rank. 

377. The Adjutant then commands Front, when the officer of the guard 
takes post twelve paces in front of the centre, the Sergeants in one rank, 
four paces in the rear of the officers; and the Corporals in one rank, four 
paces in the rear of the Sergeants—all facing to the front. The Adju¬ 
tant then assigns their places in the guard. 

378. The Adjutant will then command, 

1. Officer and non-commissioned officers. 2. About—Face. 

3. Inspect your guards — March ! 

The non-commissioned officers then take their posts. The commander 
of the guard then commands, 

1. Order — Arms. 2. Inspection — Arms. 

and inspects his guard. When there is no commissioned officer on the 
guard, the Adjutant will inspect it. During inspection the band will play. 

379. The inspection ended, the officer of the guard takes post as though 
the guard were a company of a battalion, in open order, under review °at 
the same time, also, the officers of the day will take post in front of \he 
centre of the guard; the old officer of the day three paces on the right 
of the new officer of the day, one pace retired. 

380. The Adjutant will now command, 




FOR THE ARMY. 


59 


Guard-Mounting. 

1. Parade — Rest! 2. Troop—Beat off! 

when the music, beginning on the right, will beat down the line in froni. 
of the officer of the guard to the left, and back to its place on the right, 
where it will cease to play. 

381. The Adjutant then commands, 

1. Attention! 2. Shoulder — Arms! 3. Close order — March! 

At the word “ close order,” the officer will face about; at “march,” resume 
his post in line. The Adjutant then commands, 

Present — Arms ! 

At which he will face to the new officer of the day, salute, and report, 
“Sir, the guard is formed .” The new officer of the day, after acknow¬ 
ledging the salute, will direct the Adjutant to march the guard in review, 
or by flank to its post. But if the Adjutant be senior to the officer of 
the day, he will report without saluting with the sword then, or when 
marching the guard in review. 

382. In review, the guard march past the officer of the day, according 
to the order of review, conducted by the Adjutant, marching on the left 
of the first division; the Sergeant-Major on the left of the last division. 

383. When the column has passed the officer of the day, the officer of 
the guard marches it to its post, the Adjutant and Sergeant-Major retiring. 
The music, which has wheeled out of the column, and taken post opposite 
the officer of the day, will cease, and the old officer of the day salute, and 
give the old or standing orders to the new officer of the day. The super¬ 
numeraries, at the same time, will be marched by the First Sergeants to 
their respective company parades, and dismissed. 

384. In bad weather, or at night, or after fatiguing marches, the cere¬ 
mony of turning off may be dispensed with, but not the inspection. 

385. Grand guards, and other brigade guards, are organized and 
mounted on the brigade parade by the staff officer of the parade, under 
the direction of the field officer of the day of the brigade, according to 
the principles here prescribed for the police guard of a regiment. The 
detail of each regiment is assembled on the regimental parade, verified by 
the Adjutant, and marched to the brigade parade by the senior officer of 
the detail. After inspection and review, the officer of the day directs the 
several guards to their respective posts. 

386. The officer of the old guard, having his guard paraded, on the 
approach of the new guard commands, 

Present — Arms ! 




60 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Guard-Mounting. 

387. The new guard will march, in quick time, past the old guard, at 
shouldered arms, officers saluting, and take post four paces on its right, 
where, being aligned with it, its commander will order, 

Present — Arms ! 

The two officers will then approach each other, and salute. They will 
then return to their respective guards, and command, 

1. Shoulder —Arms! 2. Order — Arms! 

388. The officer of the new guard will now direct the detail for the 
advanced guard to be formed and marched to its post, the list of the 
guard made and divided into three reliefs, experienced soldiers placed 
over the arms of the guard and at the remote and responsible posts, and 
the young soldiers in posts near the guard for instruction in their duties, 
and will himself proceed to take possession of the guard-house or guard- 
tent, and the articles and prisoners in charge of the guard. 

389. During the time of relieving the sentinels and of calling in the 
small posts, the old commander will give to the new all the information 
and instructions relating to his post. 

390. The first relief having been designated and ordered two paces to 
the front, the Corporal of the new guard will take charge of it, and go 
to relieve the sentinels, accompanied by the Corporal of the old guard, 
who will take command of the old sentinels, when the whole are relieved. 

391. If the sentinels are numerous, the Sergeants are to be employed, 
as well as the Corporals, in relieving them. 

392. The relief, with arms at a support, in two ranks, will march by a 
flank, conducted by the Corporal on the side of the leading front-rank 
man; and the men will be numbered alternately in the front and rear 
rank, the man on the right of the front rank being No. 1. Should an 
officer approach, the Corporal will command carry arms , and resume the 
support arms when the officer is passed. 

393. The sentinels at the guard-house or guard-tent will be the first 
relieved and left behind: the others are relieved in succession. 

394. When a sentinel sees the relief approaching, he will halt and face 
to it, with his arms at a shoulder. At six paces, the Corporal will 
command, 

1. Relief. 2. Halt! 

when the relief will halt and carry arms. The Corporal will then add 
''No. 1,” or “No. 2,” or “No. 3,” according to the number of the post ,' 




FOR THE ARM1 


61 


Guard-Mounting.-Guards. 

Arms — Port ! 

The two sentinels will, with arms at port, then approach each other, when 
the old sentinel, under the correction of-the Corporal, will whisper the 
instructions to the new sentinel. This done, the two sentinels will 
shoulder arms, and the old sentinel will pass, in quick time, to his place 
in rear of the relief. The Corporal will then command, 

1. Support — Arms! 2. Forward. 3. March! 

and the relief proceeds in the same manner until the whole are relieved. 

395. The detachments andsentinels from the old guard having come in, 
it will be marched, at shouldered arms, along the front of the new guard, 
in quick time, the new guard standing at presented arms; officers salut¬ 
ing, and the music of both guards beating, except at the outposts. 

396. On arriving at the regimental or garrison parade, the commander 
of the old guard will send the detachments composing it, under charge 
of the non-commissioned officers, to their respective regiments. Before 
the men are dismissed, their pieces will be drawn or discharged at a 
target. On rejoining their companions, the chiefs of squads will examine 
the arms, &c., of their men, and cause the whole to be put away in good 
order. 

397. When the old guard has marched off fifty paces, the officer of the 
new guard will order his men to stack their arms, or place them in the 
arm-racks. 

398. The commander of the guard will then make himself acquainted 
with all the instructions for his post, visit the sentinels, and question 
them and the non-commissioned officers relative to the instructions they 
may have received from other persons of the old guard. 


ARTICLE XXXIII. 

GUARDS. 

399. Sentinels will be relieved every two hours, unless the state of the 
weather, or other causes, should make it necessary or proper that it be 
done at shorter or longer intervals. 

400. Each relief, before mounting, is inspected by the commander of 
the guard or of its post. The Corporal reports to him, and presents the 
old relief on its return. 

401. The countersign, or watchword, is given to such persons as are 
entitled to pass during the night, and to officers, non-commissioned 




62 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Sentinels. 

officers, and sentinels of the guard. Interior guards receive the counter¬ 
sign only when ordered by the commander of the troops. 

402. The parole is imparted to such officers only as have a right to 
visit the guards, and to make the grand rounds; and to officers com¬ 
manding guards. 

403. As soon as the new guard has been marched off, the officer of the 
day will repair to the office of the commanding officer and report for 
orders. 

404. The officer of the day must see that the officer of the guard is 
furnished with the parole and countersign before retreat. 

405. The officer of the day visits the guards during the day at such 
times as he may deem necessary, and makes his rounds at night at least 
once after 12 o’clock. 

406. Upon being relieved, the officer of the day will make such 
remarks in the report of the officer of the guard as circumstances require, 
and present the same at head-quarters. 

407. Commanders of guards leaving their posts to visit their sentinels, 
or on other duty, are to mention their intention, and the probable time 
of their absence, to the next in command. 

408. The officers are to remain constantly at their guards, except while 
visiting their sentinels, or necessarily engaged elsewhere on their proper 
duty. 

409. Neither officers nor soldiers are to take off their clothing or 
accoutrements while they are on guard. 

410. The officer of the guard must see that the countersign is duly 
communicated to the sentinels a little before twilight. 

411. When a fire breaks out, or any alarm is raised in a garrison, all 
guards are to be immediately under arms. 

412. Inexperienced officers are put on guard as supernumeraries, for 
the purpose of instruction. 

413. Sentinels will not take orders or allow themselves to be relieved, 
except by an officer or non-commissioned officer of their guard or party, 
the officer of the day, or the commanding officer; in which case the 
orders will be immediately notified to the commander of the guard by 
the officer giving them. 

414. Sentinels will report every breach of orders or regulations they 
are instructed to enforce. 

415. Sentinels must keep themselves on the alert, observing every 
thing that takes place within sight and hearing of their post. They will 
carry their arms habitually at support, or on either shoulder, but will 
never quit them. In wet weather, if there be no sentry-box, they will 
secure arms. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


63 


Form of Guard. Report. 


FORM OF GUARD REPORT. 


Report of a Guard mounted at —, on the —, and relieved on the —. 


Parole. 

Lieutenants. 

Sergeants. 

Corporals. f 

Musicians. 

GA 

a> 

"3 

> 

£ 

Total. 

| Aggregate. 

Articles in 
Charge. 

Received the fore¬ 

going articles. 

A. B- 

Lieut. 1st In¬ 

fantry. 

Countersign. 





' 

Detail. 














LIST OF THE GUARD. 


Reliefs, and when posted. 

Where posted. 

Remarks 

1st Relief. 
From — to - 
and — to — 


2d Relief. 
From — to — 
and — to — 

3d Relief. 
From — to — 
and — to — 

No. 

Name. 

Co. 

Rt. 

Name. 

Co. 

Rt. 

Name. 

Co. 

Rt. 



1 

C. D. 

A 

1st 

I. J. 

D 

3d 

0. P. 

G 

j8th 

Guard-House. 


2 

E. F. 

B 

4th 

K. L. 

E 

2d 

Q. R. 

H 

9th 

Magazine. 


3 

G. H. 

C 

6th 

M. N. 

F 

6th 

S. T. 

I 

10 th 

Quarm’r Store. 


1 

Sergeant W. V., Co. A 

1st Artillery. 



Serg’t Guard. 


2 

Corporal W. X 

, Co. B 

1st Infantry. 



Corp’l “ 


3 

Corporal Y. Z. 

Co. C, 

3d Infantry. 



(6 (( 



LIST OF PRISONERS. 


No. 

Names. 

Company. 

Regiment. 

Confined. 

Charges. 

Sentences. 

Remarks 

When. 

By whom. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

6 










A. B. C., 

Lieut. — Regt.-, 

Commanding the Guard. 
















































































64 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Duties of Sentinels. 

416. No sentinel shall quit his post or hold conversation not necessary 

to the proper discharge of his duty. 

417. All persons, of whatever rank in the service, are lequiicd to 

observe respect toward sentinels. 

418. In case of disorder, a sentinel must call out the guard and if a 
fire take place, he must cry—“ Fire!” adding the number of his post. 
If in either case the danger be great, he must discharge his firelock 
before calling out. 

419. It is the duty of a sentinel to repeat all calls made from posts 
more distant from the main body of the guard than his own, and no sen¬ 
tinel will be posted so distant as not to be heard by the guard, either 
directly or through other sentinels. 

420. Sentinels will present arms to general and field officers, to the 
officer of the day, and to the commanding officer of the post. To all 
other officers they will carry arms. 

421. When a sentinel in his sentry-box sees an officer approaching, 
he will stand at attention, and as the officer passes will salute him, by 
bringing the left hand briskly to the musket, as high as the right 
shoulder. 

422. The sentinel at any post of the guard, when he sees any body of 
troops, or an officer entitled to compliment, approach, must call—“ Turn 
out the guard!” and announce who approaches. 

423. Guards do not turn out as a matter of compliment after sunset; 
but sentinels will, when officers in uniform approach, pay them proper 
attention, by facing to the proper front, and standing steady at shouldered 
arms. This will be observed until the evening is so far advanced that 
the sentinels begin challenging. 

424. After retreat (or the hour appointed by the commanding officer), 
until broad daylight, a sentinel challenges every person who approaches 
him, taking, at the same time, the position of arms port. He will suffer 
no person to come nearer than within reach of his bayonet, until the 
person has given the countersign. 

425. A sentinel, in challenging, will call out— “ Who comes there?” 
If answered — 11 Friend, with the countersign,” and he be instructed to 
pass persons with the countersign, he will reply—“ Advance, friend, with 
the countersign !” If answered—“ Friends !” he will reply— “ Halt, 
friends ! Advance one with the countersign !” If answered— “ Relief,” 
“ Patrol,” or “ Grand rounds,” he will reply— “ Halt! Advance, Ser¬ 
geant (or Corporal), with the countersign!” and satisfy himself that the 
party is what it represents itself to be. If he have no authority to pass 
persons with the countersign, if the wrong countersign be given, or if 








FOR THE ARMY. 


65 


Duties of Sentinels. 

the persons have not the countersign, he will cause them to stand, and 
call— “ Corporal of the guard !” 

426. In the daytime, when the sentinel before the guard sees the 
officer of the day approach, he will call—“ Turn out the guard! officei 
of the day.” The guard will be paraded, and salute with presented arms. 

427. When any person approaches a post of the guard at night, the 
sentinel before the post, after challenging, causes him to halt until 
examined by a non-commissioned officer of the guard. If it be the 
officer of the day, or any other officer entitled to inspect the guard and tc 
make the rounds, the non-commissioned officer will call —“ Turn out the 
guard 1” when the guard will be paraded at shouldered arms, and the 
officer of the guard, if he thinks necessary, may demand the countersign 
and parole. 

428. The officer of the day, wishing to make the rounds, will take an 
escort of a non-commissioned officer and two men. When the rounds are 
challenged by a sentinel, the Sergeant will answer— “ Grand rounds !” 
and the sentinel will reply—“ Balt, grand rounds ! Advance, Sergeant, 
with the countersign !” Upon which the Sergeant advances and gives 
the countersign. The sentinel will then cry— “ Advance, rounds !” and 
stand at a shoulder till they have passed. 

429. When the sentinel before the guard challenges, and is answered 
—“ Grand rounds,” he will reply—“ Halt, grand rounds! Turn out 
the guard) grand roundsl” Upon which the guard will be drawn up 
at shouldered arms. The officer commanding the guard will then order 
a Sergeant and two men to advance; when within ten paces, the Sergeant 
challenges. The Sergeant of the grand rounds answers— “ Grand 
rounds!” The Sergeant of the guard replies—“ Advance, Sergeant, 
with the countersign!” The Sergeant of the rounds advances alone, gives 
the countersign, and returns to his round. The Sergeant of the guard 
calls to his officer—“ The countersign is right!” on which the officer of 
the guard calls—“ Advance, rounds!” The officer of the rounds then 
advances alone, the guard standing at shouldered arms. The officer of 
the rounds passes along the front of the guard to the officer, who keeps 
his post on the right, and gives him the parole. He then examines the 
<mard orders back his escort, and, taking a new one, proceeds in the 
same manner to other guards. 

430. All material instructions given to a sentinel on post by persons 
entitled to make grand rounds, ought to be promptly notified to the com¬ 
mander of the guard. 

431. Any General officer, or*the commander of a post or garrison, 
may visit the guards of his command, and go the grand rounds, and be 
received in the same manner as prescribed for the officer of the day. 

5 




66 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Orders and Correspondence. 


ARTICLE XXXIV. 

ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE. 

432. The orders of commanders of armies, divisions, brigades, regi¬ 
ments, are denominated orders of such army, division, &c., and are either 
general or special. Orders are numbered, general and special, in separate 
series, each beginning with the year. 

433. General orders announce the time and place of issues and pay¬ 
ments ; hours for roll-calls and duties; the number and kind of orderlies, 
and the time when they shall be relieved; police regulations, and the 
prohibitions required by circumstances and localities; returns to be 
made, and their forms; laws and regulations for the army; promotions 
and appointments; eulogies or censures to corps or individuals, and gene¬ 
rally, whatever it may be important to make known to the whole com¬ 
mand. 

434. Special orders are such as do not concern the troops generally, 
and need not be published to the whole command; such as relate to the 
march of some particular corps, the establishment of some post, the 
detaching of individuals, the granting requests, &c., &c. 

435. A general order, and an important special order, must be read 
and approved by the officer whose order it is, before it is issued by the 
staff officer. 

436. An order will state at the head the source, place, and date, and 
at the foot, the name of the commander who gives it; as for example: 

Head-Quarters of the First Brigade , Second Division. 

Camp at -, ls£ June, 1860. 

General Orders, ") 

No.-. } 

By command of Brigadier-General A. B. 

C. D., Assistant Adjutant-General. 

437. Orders may be put in the form of letters, but generally in the 
strict military form, through the office of the Adjutant or Adjutant- 
General of the command. 

438. Orders are transmitted through all the intermediate commanders 
in the order of rank. When an intermediate commander is omitted, the 
officer who gives the order shall inform him, and he who receives it shall 
report it to his immediate superior. 

439. Orders for any body of troops will be addressed to the commander, 
and will be opened and executed by the commander present, and published 






FOR THE ARMY. 


67 


Orders and Correspondence. 

or distributed by him when necessary ; printed orders, however, are gene¬ 
rally distributed direct to posts from the head-quarters where issued. 

440. Orders assigning the stations of officers of engineers, ordnance^ 
and of the staff departments, except as provided in the regulations for 
troops in the campaign, will be given by the Secretary of War, through 
the Adjutant-General’s office, or by commanders of geographical depart¬ 
ments, under the special authority of the War Department. The cgie- 
mander of a department, who, in consequence of the movement of troops 
or other necessity of the service, removes an officer from the station 
assigned to him by the Secretary of War, shall promptly report the case 
to the Adjutant-General. 

441. A file of the printed orders will be kept with the head-quarters 
of each regiment, with each company, and at each military post, and will 
be regularly turned over by the commander, when relieved, to his successor. 

442. If general orders are not received in regular succession, com¬ 
manding officers will report the missing numbers to the proper head¬ 
quarters. 

443. The orderly hours being fixed at each head-quarters, the staff 
officers and chiefs of the special services either attend in person, or send 
their assistants to obtain the orders of the day; and the first sergeants of 
companies repair for that purpose to the regimental or garrison head¬ 
quarters. 

444. During marches and active operations, and when the regular 
orderly hours cannot be observed, all orders will be either sent direct to 
the troops, or the respective commanders of regiments or corps will be 
informed when to send to head-quarters for them. Under the same cir¬ 
cumstances, orders will be read to the troops during a halt, without wait¬ 
ing for the regular parades. 

445. Orders to any officer to make a tour of travel on duty, as for the 
inspection or payment of troops, &c., shall designate the troops and posts 
he shall visit, and the order in which he shall visit them, and the route 
of travel. 

446. Every commander who gives an order involving an expenditure 
of public money, shall send a copy, without delay, to the bureau of the 
War Department to which the expenditure appertains, and if such com¬ 
mander be serving in a military department, he shall send a copy of the 
order to the head-quarters of the Department. 

447. If a military commander shall give to a disbursing officer any 
order in conflict with orders received by him from the officer in charge 
of his department, at any superior head-quarters, such commander shall 
forthwith transmit the order to such head-quarters, with explanation of 
the necessity which justifies it. 




68 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Orders and Correspondence. 

448. Copies of all orders of the commanders of armies, departments, 
divisions, and detached brigades, and of the Superintendent of the re¬ 
cruiting service, will he forwarded at their dates, or as soon thereafter as 
practicable, in separate series, on full sheets of letter paper, or as printed, 
to the Adjutant-G-eneral’s office. 

449. Written communications from a commander to those under his 
command may he made by his staff officer. In all other cases by the 
officer himself. 

450. In signing an official communication, the writer shall annex to 
his name his rank and corps. When he writes by order, he shall state 
by whose order. 

451. All official correspondence between the heads of the different 
departments of the staff of any command, and its commander, must 
pass through the Adjutant-General, Assistant Adjutant-General, or Adju¬ 
tant of the command, as the case may be. Communications to or from 
a commander, and those under his command, must pass through the 
Adjutant-General, Assistant Adjutant-General, or Adjutant on duty with 
it; excepting only such communications between a disbursing officer and 
the chief of his particular branch of the staff, as relate exclusively to the 
ordinary routine of business in their own department. All communica¬ 
tions, whether from an inferior to a superior, or vice versa, are, as a gene¬ 
ral rule, to be passed through the intermediate commanders. The same 
rule governs in verbal applications : for example, a Lieutenant seeking an 
indulgence must apply through his Captain, the Captain through the 
Adjutant, and so on. 

452. Copies of all important communications from the bureaus of the 
War Department to disbursing officers, relating to the service in a mili¬ 
tary department, shall be sent from the bureau to the department com¬ 
mander. 

453. Rolls and returns will he accompanied by a letter of transmittal, 
enumerating them, and referring to no other subject. 

454. Generally, officers who forward communications indorse on them 
their remarks or opinion, without other letters of transmittal. 

455. Official letters should generally refer to one matter only. In re¬ 
gard to an enlisted man, the company and regiment must be stated. 

456. Letters on letter paper will be folded in three folds, parallel with 
the writing. 

457. All communications on public service are to be marked on the 
cover, “ Official Business.” 





FOR THE ARMY. 


69 


Returns and Reports.-Annual Returns. 


ARTICLE XXXV. 

RETURNS AND REPORTS. 

MONTHLY RETURNS. 

458. Commanders of regiments, corps, and posts, will make to the 
Adjutant-Generals office of the War Department monthly returns of 
their respective regiments, corps, and posts, on the forms furnished from 
that office, and according to the directions expressed on them. In like 
manner, Captains make monthly company returns to regimental head¬ 
quarters. All monthly returns will be forwarded on the 1st day of the 
next month, except regimental returns, which are forwarded as soon as 
all the company returns are received. 

459. In campaign, monthly returns of divisions and detached brigades, 
and, generally, of all detached commands (see General Orders No. 1, of 
February 10, 1855), will be made to the Adjutant-General’s office. They 
will exhibit separately the several regiments, and detachments, and staff 
corps, and the strength of each garrison within the command. These 
returns, and those of regiments, corps, and posts, in campaign, will, unless 
otherwise ordered, be transmitted through the intermediate commanders. 

460. The established printed forms and blanks of all returns required 
from the commanders of divisions, brigades, regiments, corps, companies, 
and posts, will be furnished from the Adjutant-General’s office, on their 
requisitions annually made, or oftener, if necessary. The receipt of these 
forms and blanks will be immediately acknowledged, and afterward ac¬ 
counted for on the next monthly returns. 

461. Manuscript returns, rolls, certificates, and other documents, are 
prohibited, unless the proper printed forms have not been received in 
time. Regimental returns must be made out in the name of the Colonel, 
whether he be present or absent. 

ANNUAL RETURNS—CASUALTIES. 

462. This return will exhibit the various changes and alteration? 
which may have taken place in the regiment during the preceding twelve 
months: that is to say—a statement of the number of resignations, 
transfers, deaths, &c., of commissioned officers; the number of men 
joined by enlistment, transferred, and discharged; the number tried by 
Courts-Martial or by the civil law, and the nature of their offenses; the 
number of discharges, deaths, dismissals, and desertions; number joined 
from desertion, pardoned, &c., &c. 








70 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Return of Deceased Soldiers.-Reports. 


RETURN OF DECEASED SOLDIERS. 

403. To be forwarded to the Adjutant-General, by tbe Colonels of 
regiments, quarterly. Also a duplicate to the Second Auditor of the 
Treasury. 

FIELD RETURNS. 

464. Besides tbe stated returns of tbe troops, such other field returns 
and reports will be made as may be necessary to keep the government 
informed of the condition and strength of the forces. 

465. After any action or affair, a return of the killed, wounded, and 
missing will be made, in which the name, rank, and regiment of each 
officer and soldier will be specified, with such remarks and explanations 
as may be requisite for the records of the Department of War, or be 
necessary to establish the just claims of any individual who may have 
been wounded, or of the heirs and representatives of any killed in action 
(taking care to specify the nature of the wound , the time and place of its 
occurrence, the company, regiment, or corps, and the name of the Captain, 
Colonel, or other commanding officer). 

REPORTS. 

466. The date of appointment, of detail, and of removal of all staff 
officers, or of officers selected for duty in staff departments, w r hich may 
entitle them to receive additional pay, will be immediately reported by 
the officer making such appointment, detail, or removal, to tbe Adjutant- 
General, and to the Paymaster of the department or command to which 
such officers belong. 

467. Whenever any change takes place in the position or location of 
troops, the fact will be immediately reported by the commanding officer 
to general, division, and department head-quarters, specifying the date 
of departure of the whole or any part of the troops, or of the arrival of 
any detachment; as well as all other circumstances connected with such 
changes in the command. These special reports will always be accom¬ 
panied by an exact return of the troops according to the established 
printed forms. A similar report will be noted on the next monthly 
return of the post or station. If a new post or position be established, 
its situation, and the nearest post-office and proper route to it, should be 
reported. 

468. Officers on detached duty will report, monthly, to the com¬ 
manders of their posts, of their regiments or corps, and to the Adjutant- 
General, their stations, the nature of their duties, and the authority 
placing them thereon—likewise each change of address. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


71 


Prisoners.-Troops in Campaign. 


PRISONERS OF WAR—CAPTURED PROPERTY. 

469. A return of prisoners, and a report of the number and descrip¬ 
tion of the killed and wounded of the enemy, will be forwarded to the 
Adjutant-General’s office, Washington. 

470. A return of all property captured will be made by the command¬ 
ing officer of the troops by whom such capture was made, to the Adjutant- 
General, at Washington, in order that it may be disposed of according to 
the orders of the War Department. 

INSPECTION REPORTS. 

471. Inspection reports will show the discipline of the troops; their 
instruction in all military exercises and duties: the state of their arms, 
clothing, equipments, and accoutrements of all kinds; of their kitchens 
and messes; of the barracks and quarters at the post; of the guard¬ 
house, prisons, hospital, bake-house, magazines, store-houses, and stores 
of every description; of the stables and horses; the CQndition of the 
post school; the management and application of the post and company 
funds; the state of the post, and regimental, and company books, papers, 
and files; the zeal and ability of the officers in command of troops; the 
capacity of the officers conducting the administrative and staff services, 
the fidelity and economy of their disbursements; the condition of all 
public property, and the amount of money in the hands of each disburs¬ 
ing officer; the regularity of issues and payments; the mode of enforcing 
discipline by courts-martial, and by the authority of the officers; the 
propriety and legality of all punishments inflicted; and any information 
whatsoever concerning the service, in any matter or particular that may 
merit notice, or aid to correct defects or introduce improvements. 

472. Inspectors are required particularly to report if any officer is of 
intemperate habits, or unfit for active service by infirmity or any other 
cause. 


ARTICLE XXXYI. 

TROOPS IN CAMPAIGN. 

ORGANIZATION OF AN ARMY IN THE FIELD. 

473. The formation by divisions is the basis of the organization and 
administration of armies in the field. 

474. A division consists usually of two or three brigades, either of in¬ 
fantry or cavalry, and troops of other corps in the necessary proportion. 

475. A brigade is formed of two or more regiments. The first number 
takes the right. 





REVISED REGULATIONS 


Organization of an Army in the Field. 

476. Mixed brigades are sometimes formed of infantry and light cav¬ 
alry, especially for the advanced guards. 

477. As the troops arrive at the rendezvous, the general commanding- 
in-chief will organize them into brigades and divisions. 

478. The light cavalry is employed as flankers and partisans, and gene¬ 
rally for all service out of the line. 

479. Heavy cavalry belongs to the reserve, and is covered, when neces¬ 
sary, in marches, camps, or bivouacs, by light troops, or infantry of the 
line. 

480. The arrangement of the troops on parade and in order of battle 
is—1st, the light infantry; 2d, infantry of the line; 3d, light cavalry; 
4th, cavalry of the line; 5th, heavy cavalry. The troops of the artillery 
and engineers are in the centre of the brigades, divisions, or corps to 
which they are attached; marines take the left of other infantry; volun¬ 
teers and militia take the left of regular troops of the same arm, and 
among themselves, regiments of volunteers or militia of the same arm 
take place by lot. This arrangement is varied by the general command¬ 
ing-in-chief, as the circumstances of war render expedient. 

481. Brigades in divisions, and divisions in the army, are numbered 
ffom right to left; but in reports of military operations, brigades and 
divisions are designated by the name of the general commanding them. 

482. The order of regiments in brigades and of brigades in divisions 
may be changed by the commander of the division for important reasons, 
such as the weakness of some corps, or to relieve one from marching too 
long at the rear of the column. Such changes must be reported to the 
general commanding-in-chief. 

483. The general commanding-in-chief assigns the generals of divi¬ 
sions and of brigades to their respective commands, when the assignment 
is not made by the Department of War. 

484. The general of brigade inspects his troops in detail, by companies, 
when he takes the command and at the opening of the campaign, and as 
often as may be necessary to ascertain exactly their condition. The 
general of division makes similar inspections when he thinks proper. At 
these inspections the generals examine the arms, clothing, equipments, 
harness, horses, &c., direct the necessary repairs, and designate the men 
and horses to remain in depot, or march with the train. 

485. Reports of inspections are made by the general of brigade to the 
general of division, and by the general of division to the general com¬ 
manding-in-chief. 

486. During marches and all active operations, generals of brigade 
keep themselves exactly informed, by reports of corps and by their in¬ 
spections, of the actual strength of the regiments, so as always, and 







FOR THE ARMY. 


73 


Contributions.-Orderlies. 

especially after an engagement, to make accurate returns to the general 
of division. 

487. Staff officers, and officers of engineers, ordnance, and artillery, ac¬ 
cording to the nature of the service, are assigned to the head-quarters of 
armies and divisions, and detached brigades, by order of the general com¬ 
manding-in-chief, when the distribution of these officers has not been 
regulated by the War Department. The necessary staff will be assigned 
to commanders of brigades. 

488. When an Engineer or other officer is charged with directing an 
expedition or making a reconnoissance, without having command of the 
escort, the commander of the escort shall consult him on all the arrange- 
ments necessary to secure the success of the operation. 

489. Staff officers, and commanders of engineers, ordnance, and artil¬ 
lery, report to their immediate commanders the state of the supplies and 
whatever concerns the service under their direction, and receive their 
orders, and communicate to them those they receive from their superiors 
in their own corps. 

490. The senior officer of engineers, of ordnance, and the departments 
of the general staff serving at the chief head-quarters in the field, will 
transmit to the bureau of his department at Washington, at the close of 
the campaign, and such other times as the commander in the field may 
approve, a full report of the operations of his department, and whatever 
information to improve its service he may be able to furnish. 

The report of the officer of engineers will embrace plans of military 
works executed during the campaign, and, in case of siege, a journal of 
the attack or defense. 


CONTRIBUTIONS. 

491. When the wants of the army absolutely require it, and in other 
cases, under special instructions from the War Department, the general 
commanding the army may levy contributions in money or kind on the 
enemy’s country occupied by the troops. No other commander can levy 
such contributions without written authority from the general command- 
‘ng-in-chief. 

ORDERLIES. 

492. At the opening of a campaign, the commander of an army de¬ 
termines and announces in orders the number of orderlies, mounted or 
foot, for the Generals, and the corps or regiments by which they are to 
be supplied, and the periods at which they shall be relieved. 

493. In marches, the mounted orderlies follow the Generals, and per¬ 
form the duty of escorts, or march with orderlies on foot at the head of 
the division or brigade. 






74 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Depots and Camps. 

494. The staff officer who distributes the orderlies to their posts sends 
with them a note of the time and place of departure; those relieved re¬ 
ceive a like note from the staff officer at the head-quarters. 

495. Mounted soldiers are to be employed to carry dispatches only in 
special and urgent cases. (See par. 557.) 

496. The precise time when the dispatch is sent off, and the rate at 
which it is to be conveyed, are to be written clearly on the covers of all 
letters transmitted by a mounted orderly, and the necessary instructions 
to him, and the rate of travel going and returning, are to be distinctly 
explained to him. 

DEPOTS. 

497. The grand depots of an army are established where the military 
operations would not expose them to be broken up. Smaller depots are 
organized for the divisions and the several arms. They are commanded 
by officers temporarily disabled for field service, or by other officers when 
necessary, and comprise, as much as possible, the hospitals and depots 
for convalescents. When conveniently placed, they serve as points for 
the halting and assembling of detachments. They receive the disabled 
from the corps on the march; and the officers in command of the depots 
send with the detachments to the army those at the depots who have be¬ 
come fit for service. 

CAMPS. 

498. A camp is the place where troops are established in tents, in 
huts, or in bivouac. Cantonments are the inhabited places which troops 
occupy for shelter when not put in barracks. The camping-party is a 
detachment detailed to prepare a camp. 

499. Keconnoissances should precede the establishment of the camp. 
For a camp of troops on the march, it is only necessary to look to the 
health and comfort of the troops, the facility of the communications, the 
convenience of wood and water, and the resources in provisions and 
forage. The ground for an intrenched camp, or a camp to cover a coun¬ 
try, or one designed to deceive the enemy as to the strength of the army, 
must be selected, and the camp arranged for the object in view. 

500. The camping-party of a regiment consists of the regimental 
Quartermaster and Quartermaster-Sergeant, and a Corporal and two men 
per company. The General decides whether the regiments camp separately 
or together, and whether the police guard shall accompany the camping 
party, or a larger escort shall be sent. 

501. Neither baggage nor led horses are permitted to move with the 
camping-party. 

502. When the General can send in advance to prepare the camp, he 





FOR THE ARMY. 


75 


Camps. 

gives his instructions to the chief of the Quartermaster’s Department, wha 
calls on the regiments for their camping-parties, and is accompanied, if 
necessary, by an Engineer to propose the defenses and communications. 

503. The watering-places are examined, and signals placed at those 
that are dangerous. Any work required to make them of easier accn.'s is 
done by the police guard or Quartermaster’s men. Sentinels, to he re¬ 
lieved by the guards of the regiment when they come up, are placed by 
the camping-party over the water if it is scarce, and over the houses and 
stores of provisions and forage in the vicinity. 

504. If the camping-party does not precede the regiment, the Quarter¬ 
master attends to these things as soon as the regiment reaches the 
camp. 

505. On reaching the ground, the infantry form on the color front; 
the cavalry in rear of its camp. 

506. The Generals establish the troops in camp as rapidly as possible, 
particularly after long, fatiguing marches. 

507. The number of men to he furnished for guards, pickets, and 
orderlies; the fatigue parties to be sent for supplies; the work to be 
done, and the strength of the working parties; the time and place for 
issues; the hour of marching, &c., are then announced by the Brigadier- 
Generals to the Colonels, and by them to the field officers—the Adju¬ 
tant and Captains formed in front of the regiment, the First Sergeants 
taking post behind their Captains. The Adjutant then makes the 
details, and the First Sergeants warn the men. The regimental officer of 
the day forms the picket, and sends the guards to their posts. The 
colors are then planted at the centre of the color line, and the arms are 
stacked on the line; the fatigue parties to procure supplies, and the 
working parties, form in rear of the arms; the men not on detail pitch 
the tents. 

508. If the camp is near the enemy, the picket remains under arms 
until the return of the fatigue parties, and, if necessary, is re-enforced 
by details from each company. 

509. In the cavalry, each troop moves a little in rear of the point at 
which its horses are to be secured, and forms in one rank; the men then 
dismount; a detail is made to hold the horses; the rest stack their arms 
and fix the picket rope; after the horses are attended to, the tents are 
pitched, and each horseman places his carbine at the side from the 
weather, and hangs his sabre and bridle on it. 

510. The standard is then carried to the tent of the Colonel. 

511. The terms front, flank, right, left, file, and rank, have the same 
meaning when applied to camps as to the order of battle. 

512. The front of the camp is usually equal to the front of the troops. 




76 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Camp of Infantry. 

The tents are arranged in ranks and files. The number of ranks varies 
with the strength of the companies and the size of the tents. 

513. No officer will be allowed to occupy a house, although vacant and 
on the ground of his camp, except by permission of the commander of 
the brigade, who shall report it to the commander of the division. 

514. The staff officer charged with establishing the camp will designate 
the place for the shambles. The offal will be buried. 

CAMP OF INFANTRY. 

515. Each company has its tents in two files, facing on a street per¬ 
pendicular to the color line. The width of the street depends on the 
front of the camp, but should not be less than 5 paces. The interval 
between the ranks of tents is 2 paces; between the files of tents of 
adjacent companies, 2 paces; between regiments, 22 paces. 

516. The color line is 10 paces in front of the front rank of tents. 
The kitchens are 20 paces behind the rear rank of company tents; the 
non-commissioned staff and sutler, 20 paces in rear of the kitchens; the 
company officers, 20 paces farther in rear; and the field and staff, 20 
paces in rear of the company officers. 

517. The company officers are in rear of their respective compa¬ 
nies ; the Captains on the right. 

518. The Colonel and Lieutenant-Colonel are near the centre of the 
line of field and staff; the Adjutant, a Major and Surgeon, on the right; 
the Quartermaster, a Major and Assistant Surgeon, on the left. 

519. The police guard is at the centre of the line of the non-com¬ 
missioned staff, the tents facing to the front, the stacks of arms on the 
left. 

520. The advanced post of the police guard is about 200 paces in front 
of the color line, and opposite the centre of the regiment, or on the best 
ground; the prisoners tent about 4 paces in rear. In a regiment of the 
second line, the advanced post of the police guard is 200 paces in rear of 
the line of its field and staff. 

521. The horses of the staff officers and of the baggage train are 25 
paces in rear of the tents of the field and staff; the wagons are parked 
on the same line, and the men of the train camped near them. 

522. The sinks of the men are 150 paces in front of the color line— 
those of the officers 100 paces in rear of the train. Both are concealed 
by bushes. When convenient, the sinks of the men may be placed in 
rear or on a flank. A portion of the earth dug out for sinks to be thrown 
back occasionally. 

523. The front of the camp of a regiment of 1000 men in two ranks 
will be 400 paces, or one-fifth less paces than the number of files, if the 




481 p aces. 


Plate 1. 


Camp of a Kegiment of Infantry. 


Cl. — Colonel. 

LI. Cl. — Lieut. Colonel. 
M. — Major. 

Surg.—Surgeon. 


Ast. Surg .—Asst. Surgeon. 
Adjt. — Adjutant. 

Q. M .— Quarter Master. 
n-o-s.— Non.- Com.-Staff. 


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d^lPrisoners. 


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78 





































FOR THE ARMY. 


79 


Camp pf Cavalry. 

camp is to have the same front as the troops in order of battle. But the 
front may be reduced to 190 paces by narrowing the company streets to 
5 paces; and if it be desirable to reduce the front still more, the tents of 
companies maybe pitched in single file—those of a division facing on the 
same street. 


CAMP OF CAVALRY. 

524. In the cavalry, each company has one file of tents—the tents 
opening on the street facing the left of the camp. 

525. The horses of each company are placed in a single file, facing the 
opening of the tents, and are fastened to pickets planted firmly in the 
ground, from 3 to 6 paces from the tents of the troops. 

526. The interval between the file of tents should be such that, the 
regiment being broken into column of companies [as indicated in plate], 
each company should be on the extension of the line on which the horses 
are to be picketed. 

527. The streets separating the squadrons are wider than those between 
the companies by the interval separating squadrons in line; these intervals 
are kept free from any obstruction throughout the camp. 

528. The horses of the rear rank are placed on the left of those of 
their file-leaders. 

529. The horses of the Lieutenants are placed on the right of their 
platoons; those of the Captains on the right of the company. 

530. Each horse occupies a space of about 2 paces. The number of 
horses in the company fixes the depth of the camp, and the distance 
between the files of tents; the forage is placed between the tents. 

531. The kitchens are 20 paces in front of each file of tents. 

532. The non-commissioned officers are in the tents of the front rank. 
Camp-followei’S, teamsters, &c., are in the rear rank. The police guard 
in the rear rank, near the centre of the regiment. 

533. The tents of the Lieutenants are 30 paces in rear of the file of 
their company; the tents of the Captains 30 paces in rear of the Lieu¬ 
tenants. 

534. The Colonel’s tent 30 paces in rear of the Captains’, near the 
centre of the regiment; the Lieutenant-Colonel on his right; the Adju¬ 
tant on his left; the Majors on the same line, opposite the 2d company 
on the right and left; the Surgeon on the left of the Adjutant. 

535. The field and staff have their horses on the left of their tents, on 
the same line with the company horses; sick horses are placed in one 
line on the right or left of the camp. The men who attend them have 
a separate file of tents; the forges and wagons in rear of this file. The 
horses of the train and of camp-followers are in one or more files extending 




80 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Camp of Artillery.-Bivouacs. 

to the rear, behind the right or left squadron. The advanced post of 
the police guard is 200 paces in front, opposite the centre of the regiment; 
the horses in one or two files. 

536. The sinks for the men are 150 paces in front—those for officers 
100 paces in rear of the camp. 

CAMP OF ARTILLERY. 

537. The artillery is encamped near the troops to which it is attached, 
so as to be protected from attack, and to contribute to the defense of the 
camp. Sentinels for the park are furnished by the artillery, and, when 
necessary, by the other troops. 

538. For a battery of 6 pieces the tents are in three files—one for each 
section; distance between the ranks of tents 15 paces; tents opening to 
the front. The horses of each section are picketed in one file, 10 paces 
to the left of the file of tents. In the horse artillery, or if the number 
of horses makes it necessary, the horses are in two files on the right and 
left of the file of tents. The kitchens are 25 paces in front of the front 
rank of tents. The tents of the officers are in the outside files of company 
tents, 25 paces in rear of the rear rank—the Captain on the right, the 
Lieutenants on the left. 

539. The park is opposite the centre of the camp, 40 paces in rear of 
the officers’ tents. The carriages in files 4 paces apart; distance between 
ranks of carriages sufficient for the horses when harnessed to them; the 
park guard is 25 paces in rear of the park. The sinks for the men 150 
paces in front; for the officers 100 paces in rear. The harness is in the 
tents of the men. 


BIVOUACS. 

540. A regiment of cavalry being in order of battle, in rear of the 
ground to be occupied, the Colonel breaks it by platoons to the right. 
The horses of each platoon are placed in a single row, and fastened as 
prescribed for camps; near the enemy, they remain saddled all night, 
with slackened girths. The arms are at first stacked in rear of each row 
of horses; the sabres, with the bridles hung on them, are placed against 
the stacks. 

541. The forage is placed on the right of each row of horses. Two 
stable-guards for each platoon watch the horses. 

542. A fire for each platoon is made near the color line, 20 paces to 
the left of the row of horses. A shelter is made for the men around the 
fire, if possible, and each man then stands his arms and bridle against the 
shelter. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


81 


Cantonments. 

543. The fires and shelter for the officers are placed in rear of the line 
of those for the men. 

544. The interval between the squadrons must be without obstruction 
throughout the whole depth of the bivouac. 

545. The interval between the shelters should be such that the platoonu 
can take up a line of battle freely to the front or rear. 

546. The distance from the enemy decides the manner in which the 
horses are to be fed and led to water. When it is permitted to unsaddle, 
the saddles are placed in the rear of the horses. 

547. In infantry, the fires are made in rear of the color line, on the 
ground that would be occupied by the tents in camp. The companies 
are placed around them, and, if possible, construct shelters. When 
liable to surprise, the infantry should stand to arms at daybreak, 
and the cavalry mount until the return of the reconnoitring parties. If 
the arms are to be taken apart to clean, it must be done by detachments, 
successively. 


CANTONMENTS. 

548. The cavalry should be placed under shelter whenever the distance 
from the enemy, and from the ground where the troops are to form for 
battle, permit it. Taverns and farm-houses, with large stables and free 
access, are selected for quartering them. 

549. The Colonel indicates the place of assembling in case of alarm. 
It should generally be outside the cantonment; the egress from it should 
be free; the retreat upon the other positions secure, and roads leading to 
it on the side of the enemy obstructed. 

550. The necessary orders being given, as in establishing a camp, the 
picket and grand guards are posted. A sentinel may be placed on a 
steeple or high house, and then the troops are marched to the quarters. 
The men sleep in the stables, if it is thought necessary. 

551. The above applies in the main to infantry. Near the enemy, 
companies or platoons should be collected, as much as possible, in the 
same houses. If companies must be separated, they should be divided 
by platoons or squads. All take arms at daybreak. 

552. When cavalry and infantry canton together, the latter furnish 
the guards by night, and the former by day. 

553. Troops cantoned in presence of the enemy should be covered by 
advanced guards and by natural or artificial obstacles. Cantonments taken 
during a cessation of hostilities should be established in rear of a line of 
defense, and in front of the point on which the troops would concentrate 
to receive an attack. The General commanding-in-chief assigns the limits 
of their cantonments to the divisions, the commanders of divisions to 

6 





82 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Military Exercises.—Watchwords. 

brigades, and the commanders of brigades post their regiments. The 
position for each corps in case of attack is carefully pointed out by the 
Generals. 

HEAD-QUARTERS. 

554. Generals take post at the centre of their commands, on the main 
channels of communication. If troops bivouac in presence of the enemy, 
the Generals bivouac with them. 

MILITARY EXERCISES. 

555. When troops remain in camp or cantonment many days, the 
Colonels require them to be exercised in the school of the battalion and 
squadron. Regiments and brigades encamped by division are not united 
for drills without the permission of the General of division. The troops 
must not be exercised at the firings without the authority of the General 
commanding-in-chief. The practice of the drums must never begin with 
the “general,” or the “march of the regiment;” nor the trumpets with 
the sound “ to horse.” The hour for practice is always announced. 

ORDERS. 

556. In the field, verbal orders and important sealed orders are carried 
by officers, and, if possible, by staff officers. When orders are carried by 
orderlies, the place and time of departure will be marked on them, and 
place and time of delivery on the receipt. 

DISPATCHES. 

557. Dispatches, particularly for distant corps, should be intrusted 
only to officers to whom their contents can be confided. In a country 
occupied by the enemy, the bearer of dispatches should be accompanied 
by at least two of the best mounted men; should avoid towns and 
villages, and the main roads; rest as little as possible, and only at out-of- 
the-way places. Where there is danger, he should send one of the men 
in advance, and be always ready to destroy his dispatches. He should be 
adroit in answering questions about the army, and not to be intimidated 
by threats. 

WATCHWORDS. 

558. The parole and countersign are issued daily from the principal 
head-quarters of the command. The countersign is given to the sentinels 
and non-commissioned officers of guards; the parole to the commissioned 
officers of guards. The parole is usually the name of a general, the 
countersign that of a battle. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


83 


Issues.-Roster. 

559. When the parole and countersign cannot be communicated daily 
to a post or detachment which ought to use the same as the main body, a 
series of words may be sent for some days in advance. 

560. If the countersign is lost, or one of the guard deserts with it, the 
commander on the spot will substitute another, and report the case at once 
to the proper superior, that immediate notice may be given to head-quarters. 

ISSUES. 

561. At what time and for what period issues are made, must depend 
on circumstances, and he regulated in orders. When an army is not 
moving, rations are generally issued for four days at a time. Issues to the 
companies of a regiment, and the fatigues to receive them, are superin¬ 
tended by an officer detailed from the regiment. Issues are made from 
one end of the line to the other, beginning on the right and left, alter¬ 
nately. An issue commenced to one regiment will not be interrupted for 
another entitled to precedence if it had been in place. 

THE ROSTER, OR DETAILS FOR SERVICE. 

562. The duties performed by detail are of three classes. Theirs? 
class comprises, 1st. grand guards and outposts; 2d. interior guards, as 
of magazine, hospital, &c.; 3d. orderlies; 4th. police guards. 

The second class comprises, 1st. detachments to protect laborers on 
military works, as field works, communications, &c.; 2d. working parties 
on such works; 3d. detachments to protect fatigues. 

The third class are all fatigues, without arms, in or out of camp. 

In the cavalry, stable-guards form a separate roster, and count before 
fatigue. 

563. The rosters are distinct for each class. Officers are named on 
them in the order of rank. The details are taken in succession in the 
order of the roster, beginning at the head. 

564. Lieutenants form one roster, and first and second Lieutenants are 
entered on it alternately. The senior first Lieutenant is the first on the 
roster- the senior second Lieutenant is the second, &c. The Captains 
form one roster, and are exempt from fatigues, except to superintend 
issues. A Captain commanding a battalion temporarily is exempt from 
detail and duty falling to him passes. Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors 
are on one roster. They may he detailed for duties of the first and second 
classes, when the importance of the guards and detachments requires it. 
Their roster is kept at division and brigade head-quarters. In the com¬ 
pany, sergeants, corporals, and privates form distinct rosters. 

565. Officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers take duties of the 
first class in the order stated, viz., the first, for the detail, takes the grand 





84 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Roster.-Police Guard. 

guards; the next, the interior guards; the last, the police guard; and 
the same rule in regard to the details and duties of the second class. In 
the details for the third class, the senior officer takes the largest party. 
The party first for detail takes the service out of camp. 

566. When the officer whose tour it is, is not able to take it, or is not 
present at the hour of marching, the next after him takes it. When a 
guard has passed the chain of sentinels, or an interior guard has reached 
its post, the officer whose tour it was cannot then take it. He takes the 
tour of the officer who has taken his. When an officer is prevented by 
sickness from taking his tour, it passes. These rules apply equally to 
non-commissioned officers and soldiers. 

567. Duties of the first and second classes are credited on the roster 
when the guards or detachments have passed the chain of sentinels, or an 
interior guard has reached its post; fatigue duties when the parties have 
passed the chain or begun the duties in camp. 

568. Every officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, on duty of the 
first class, or who is of the next detail for such duty, takes, when relieved, 
the duty of the second or third class that has fallen to him during that 
time, unless he has marched for detachment of more than twenty-four 
hours. 

569. Soldiers march with knapsacks on all duties of the first class; and 
with arms and equipments complete on all working parties out of the 
camp, unless otherwise ordered. In the cavalry, horses are packed for all 
mounted service. 

570. In the cavalry, dismounted men, and those whose horses are not 
in order, are preferred for the detail for dismounted service. Those who 
are mounted are never employed on those services, if the number of the 
other class are sufficient. 

571. Every non-commissioned officer and soldier in the cavalry detailed 
for dismounted service must, before he marches, take to the First Sergeant 
of the troop, or Sergeant of his squad, his horse equipments and his 
valise ready packed. In case of alarm, the First Sergeant sees that the 
horses of these men are equipped and led to the rendezvous. 

572. These rules in regard to the roster apply also to service in garrison. 

POLICE GUARD. 

573. In each regiment a police guard is detailed every day, consisting 
of two sergeants, three corporals, two drummers, and men enough to 
furnish the required sentinels and patrols. The men are taken from all 
the companies, from each in proportion to its strength. The guard is 
commanded by a Lieutenant, under the supervision of a Captain, as 
regimental officer of the day. It furnishes ten sentinels at the camp: 




FOR THE ARMY. 


85 


_ Police Guard. 

one over the arms of the guard; one at the Colonel’s tent; three on the 
color front, one of them over the colors; three, fifty paces in rear of the 
field officers’ tents; and one on each flank, between it and the next regi¬ 
ment. If it is a flank regiment, one more sentinel is posted on the outer 
flank. 

574. An advanced post is detached from the police guard, composed 
of a sergeant, a corporal, a drummer, and nine men to furnish sentinels 
and the guard over the prisoners. The men are the first of the guard 
roster from each company. The men of the advanced post must not 
leave it under any pretext. Their meals are sent to the post. The 
advanced post furnishes three sentinels; two a few paces in front of the 
post, opposite the right and left wing of the regiment, posted so as to see 
as far as possible to the front, and one over the arms. 

575. In the cavalry, dismounted men are employed in preference on 
the police guard. The mounted men on guard are sent in succession, a 
part at a time, to groom their horses. The advanced post is always 
formed of mounted men. 

576. In each company, a corporal has charge of the stable-guard. His 
tour begins at retreat, and ends at morning stable-call. The stable-guard 
is large enough to relieve the men on post every two hours. They sleep 
in their tents, and are called by the corporal when wanted. At retreat 
he closes the streets of the camp with cords, or uses other precautions to 
prevent the escape of loose horses. 

577. The officer of the day is charged with the order and cleanliness 
of the camp : a fatigue is furnished to him when the number of prisoners 
is insufficient to clean the camp. He has the calls beaten by the drummer 
of the guard. 

578. The police guard and the advanced post pay the same honors as 
other guards. They take arms when an armed body approaches. 

579. The sentinel over the colors has orders not to permit them to he 
moved except in presence of an escort; to let no one touch them but the 
color-bearer, or the sergeant of the police guard when he is accompanied 
by two armed men. 

580. The sentinels on the color front permit no soldier to take arms 
from the stacks, except by order of some officer, or a non-commissioned 
officer of the guard. The sentinel at the Colonel’s tent has orders to 
warn him, day or night, of any unusual movement in or about the camp. 

581. The sentinels on the front, flanks, and rear, see that no soldier 
leaves camp with horse or arms unless conducted by a non-commissioned 
officer. They prevent non-commissioned officers and soldiers from passing 
out at night, except to go to the sinks, and mark if they return. The) 
arrest, at any time, suspicious persons prowling about the camp, and at 





86 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Police Guard. 

flight, every one who attempts to enter, even the soldiers of other corps. 
Arrested persons are sent to the officer of the guard, who sends them, if 
necessary, to the officer of the day. 

582. The sentinels on the front of the advanced post have orders to 
permit neither non-commissioned officers nor soldiers to pass the line, 
without reporting at the advanced post; to warn the advanced post of 
the approach of any armed body, and to arrest all suspicious persons. 
The sergeant sends persons so arrested to the officer of the guard, and 
warns him of the approach of any armed body. 

583. The sentinel over the arms at the advanced post guards the pri¬ 
soners and keeps sight of them, and suffers no one to converse with them 
without permission. They are only permitted to go to the sinks one at a 
time, and under a sentinel. 

584. If any one is to be passed out of camp at night, the officer of 
the guard sends him under escort to the advanced post, and the sergeant 
of the post has him passed over the chain. 

585. At retreat, the officer of the guard has the roll of his guard 
called, and inspects arms, to see that they are loaded and in order; and 
visits the advanced post for the same purpose. The sergeant of the police 
guard, accompanied by two armed soldiers, folds the colors and lays them 
on the trestle in rear of the arms. He sees that the sutler’s stores are 
then closed, and the men leave them, and that the kitchen fires are put 
out at the appointed hour. 

586. The officer of the day satisfies himself frequently during the 
night, of the vigilance of the police guard and advanced post. He pre¬ 
scribes patrols and rounds to be made by the officer and non-commissioned 
officers of the guard. The officer of the guard orders them when he 
thinks necessary. He visits the sentinels frequently. 

587. At reveille, the police guard takes arms; the officer of the guard 
inspects it and the advanced post. The Sergeant replants the colors in 
place. At retreat and reveille the advanced post takes arms; the Sergeant 
makes his report to the officer of the guard when he visits the post. 

588. When necessary, the camp is covered at night with small out¬ 
posts, forming a double chain of sentinels. These posts are under the 
orders of the commander of the police guard, and are visited by his patrols 
and rDunds. 

589. The officer of the guard makes his report of his tour of service, 
including the advanced post, and sends it, after the guard is marched off, 
to the officer of the day. 

590. When the regiment marches, the men of the police guard return 
to their companies, except those of the advanced post. In the cavalry, at 
the sound “boot and saddle,” the officer of the guard sends one-half the 





FOR THE ARMY. 


87 


The Picket. 

men to saddle and pack; when the regiment assembles, all the meE 
join it. 

591. When the camping-party precedes the regiment, and the new 
police guard marches with the camping-party, the guard, on reaching the 
camp, forms in line thirty paces in front of the centre of the ground 
marked for the regiment. The officer of the guard furnishes the sentinels 
required hy the commander of the camping-party. The advanced post 
takes its station. 

592. The advanced post of the old police guard takes charge of the 
prisoners on the march, and marches, bayonets fixed, at the centre of the 
regiment. On reaching camp, it turns over the prisoners to the new 
advanced post. 

THE PICKET. 

593. The detail for the picket is made daily, after the details for duty 
of the first class, and from the next for detail on the roster of that class. 
It is designed to furnish detachments and guards unexpectedly called for 
in the twenty-four hours; it counts as a tour of the first class to those 
who have marched on detachment or guard, or who have passed the night 
in bivouac. 

594. The officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers of the picket 
are at all times dressed and equipped; the horses are saddled, and knap¬ 
sacks and valises ready to be put on. 

595. Detachments and guards from the picket are taken from the head 
of the picket-roll in each company, and, if possible, equally from each 
company. The picket of a regiment is composed of a Lieutenant, two 
Sergeants, four Corporals, a drummer, and about forty privates. For a 
smaller force, the picket is in proportion to the strength of the detach¬ 
ment. 

596. Officers and men of the picket who march on detachment or guard 
before retreat will be replaced. 

597. The picket is assembled by the Adjutant at guard-mounting; it is 
posted twelve paces in rear of the guard, and is inspected by its own com¬ 
mander. When the guard has marched in review, the commandant of 
the picket marches it to the left of the police guard, where it stacks its 
arms, and is dismissed; the arms are under charge of the sentinel of the 
police guard. 

598. The picket is only assembled by the orders of the Colonel or officer 
of the day. It forms on the left of the police guard. 

599. The officer of the day requires the roll of the picket to be called 
frequently during the day; the call is sounded from the police guard. At 
roll-calls and inspections, infantry pickets assemble with knapsacks on, 
cavalry on foot. The picket is assembled at retreat; the officer has the 




88 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Grand Guards and other Outposts. 

roll called, and inspects the arms. The picket sleep in their tents, but 
without undressing. 

600. The picket does not assemble at night except in cases of alarm, 
or when the whole or a part is to march; then the officer of the day calls 
the officers, the latter the non-commissioned officers, and these the men, 
for which purpose each ascertains the tents of those he is to call; they 
are assembled without beat of drum or other noise. At night, cavalry 
pickets assemble mounted. 

601. Pickets rejoin their companies whenever the regiment is under 
arms for review, drill, march, or battle. 

GRAND GUARDS AND OTHER OUTPOSTS. 

602. Grand guards are the advanced posts of a camp or cantonment, 
and should cover the approaches to it. Their number, strength, and posi¬ 
tion are regulated by the commanders of brigades; in detached corps, by 
the commanding officer. When it can be, the grand guards of cavalry 
and infantry are combined, the cavalry furnishing the advanced sentinels. 
When the cavalry is weak, the grand guards are infantry, but furnished 
with a few cavalry soldiers, to get and carry intelligence of the enemy. 

603. The strength of the grand guard of a brigade will depend on its 
object and the strength of the regiments, the nature of the country, the 
position of the enemy, and the disposition of the inhabitants. It is usually 
commanded by a Captain. 

604. Under the supervision of the Generals of Division and Brigade, 
the grand guards are specially under the direction of a field officer of the 
day in each brigade. In case of necessity, Captains may be added to the 
roster of Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors for this detail. 

605. Staff officers, sent from division head-quarters to inspect the posts 
of grand guards, give them orders only in urgent cases, and in the ab¬ 
sence of the field officer of the day of the brigade. 

606. Grand guards usually mount at the same time as the other guards, 
but may mount before daybreak if the General of Brigade thinks it neces- 
sary to double the outposts at that time. In this case they assemble and 
march without noise, and during their march throw out scouts; this pre¬ 
caution should always be taken in the first posting of a grand guard. 
The doubling of guards weakens the corps and fatigues the men, and 
should seldom be resorted to, and never when preparing to march or fight. 

607. A grand guard is conducted to its post, in the first instance?by 
the field officer of the day, guided by a staff officer who accompanied the 
General in his reconnoissance. After the post has been established, the 
commander sends to the field officer of the day, when necessary, a soldier 
of the guard to guide the relieving guard to the post. He also sends to 





FOR THE ARMY. 


89 


Grand Guards and other Outposts. 

him in the evening a corporal or trusty man of the guard for the note 
containing the parole and countersign, and sends them before dark to the 
detached posts. He will not suffer his guard to be relieved except by a 
guard of the brigade, or by special orders. 

608. If there is no pass to be observed or defended, the grand guards 
are placed near the centre of the ground they are to observe, on sheltered, 
and, if possible, high ground, the better to conceal their strength and 
observe the enemy; they ought not to be placed near the edge of a wood. 
When, during the day, they are placed very near or in sight of the enemy, 
they fail back at night on posts selected farther to the rear. 

609. In broken or mountainous countries, and particularly if the in¬ 
habitants are ill disposed, intermediate posts must be established when it 
is necessary to post the grand guard distant from the camp. 

610. Grand guards are chiefly to watch the enemy in front; their 
flanks are protected by each other, and the camp must furnish posts to 
protect their rear and secure their retreat. 

611. Grand guards are seldom intrenched, and never without the 
orders of the General, except by a barricade or ditch when exposed in a 
plain to attacks of cavalry. 

612. The General of Division, if he thinks proper, changes the stations 
and orders of these guards, and establishes posts to connect the brigades 
or protect the exterior flanks. 

613. After a grand guard is posted, the first care of the commander 
and of the field officer of the day is to get news of the enemy; then to 
reconnoitre his position, and the roads, bridges, fords, and defiles. This 
reconnoissance determines the force and position of the small posts and 
their sentinels day and night. These posts, according to their import¬ 
ance, are commanded by officers or non-commissioned officers; the cavalry 
posts may be relieved every four or eight hours. 

014. The commander of a grand guard receives detailed instructions 
from the General and field officer of the day of the brigade, and instructs 
the commanders of the small posts as to their duties and the arrangements 
for defense or retreat. The commanders of grand guards may, in urgent 
cases, change the positions of the small posts. If the small posts are to 
change their positions at night, they wait until the grand guard have got 
into position and darkness hides their movements from the enemy; then 
march silently and rapidly under the charge of an officer. 

615. In detached corps, small posts of picked men are at night sent 
forward on the roads by which the enemy may attack or turn the position. 
They watch the forks of the roads, keep silence, conceal themselves, light 
no fires, and often change place. They announce the approach of the 




90 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Grand Guards and other Outposts. 

enemy by signals agreed upon, and retreat, by routes examined during 
tbe day, to places selected, and rejoin tbe guard at daybreak. 

616. G-rand guards have special orders in each case, and the following 
in all cases: to inform the nearest posts and the field officer of the day, 
or the General of Brigade, of the march and movements of the enemy, 
and of the attacks they receive or fear; to examine every person passing 
near the post, particularly those coming from without; to arrest suspicious 
persons, and all soldiers and camp-followers who try to pass out without 
permission, and to send to the General, unless otherwise directed, all 
country people who come in. 

617. All out-guards stand to arms at night on the approach of patrols, 
rounds, or other parties; the sentinel over the arms has orders to call 
them out. 

618. Advanced posts will not take arms for inspection or ceremony 
when it would expose them to the view of the enemy. 

619. Grand guards are often charged with the care and working of 
telegraphic signals. 

620. The sentinels and vedettes are placed on points from which they 
can see farthest, taking care not to break their connection with each other 
or with their posts. They are concealed from the enemy as much as 
possible by walls, or trees, or elevated ground. It is generally even of 
more advantage not to be seen than to see far. They should not be 
placed near covers, where the enemy may capture them. 

621. A sentinel should always be ready to fire; vedettes carry their 
pistols or carbines in their hands. A sentinel must be sure of the 
presence of an enemy before he fires; once satisfied of that, he must fire, 
though all defense on his part be useless, as the safety of the post may 
depend on it. Sentinels fire on all persons deserting to the enemy. 

622. If the post must be where a sentinel on it cannot communicate 
with the guard, a Corporal and three men are detached for it, or the 
sentinels are doubled, that one may communicate with the guard. During 
the day the communication may be made by signals, such as raising a 
cap or handkerchief. At night sentinels are placed on low ground, the 
better to see objects against the sky. 

623. To lessen the duty of rounds, and keep more men on the alert 
at night, sentinels are relieved every hour. To prevent sentinels from 
being surprised, it is sometimes well to precede the countersign by 
signals, such as striking the musket with the hand, striking the hands 
together, &c. 

624. On the approach of any one at night, the sentinel orders_ 

“ Halt!” If the order is not obeyed after once repeated, he fires. If 
obeyed, he calls — “Who goes there?” If answered — “ Rounds” 


01 




FOR THE ARMY. 


91 


Grand Guards and other Outposts. 

u Patrol” he says— “Stand: Advance one with the countersign.” If 
more than one advance at the same time, or the person who advances 
fails to give the countersign or signal agreed on, the sentinel fires, and 
falls back on his guard. The sentinel over the arms, as soon as his hail 
is answered, turns out the guard, and the Corporal goes to reconnoitre. 
When it is desirable to hide the position of the sentinel from the enemy, 
the hail is replaced by signals; the sentinel gives the signal, and those 
approaching the counter signal. 

625. With raw troops, or when the light troops of the enemy are 
numerous or active, and when the country is broken or wooded, the night 
stormy or dark, sentinels should be doubled. In this case, while one 
watches, the other, called a flying sentinel, moves about, examining the 
paths and hollows. 

626. The commandants of grand guards visit the sentinels often; 
change their positions when necessary; make them repeat their orders; 
teach them under what circumstances and at what signals to retire, and 
particularly not to fall back directly on their guard if pursued, but to 
lead the enemy in a circuit. 

627. At night, half the men of the grand guard off post watch under 
arms, while the rest lie down, arms by their side. The horses are always 
bridled; the horsemen hold the reins, and must not sleep. 

628. When a grand guard of cavalry is so placed as not to be liable 
to a sudden attack from the enemy, the General may permit the horses 
to be fed during the night, unbridling for this purpose a few at a time— 
the horsemen being vigilant to prevent them from escaping. 

629. An hour before break of day, infantry grand guards stand to 
arms, and cavalry mount. At the advanced posts, some of the infantry 
are all night under arms, some of the cavalry on horseback. 

630. The commander of a grand guard regulates the numbers, the 
hours, and the march of patrols and rounds, according to the strength 
of his troop and the necessity for precaution; and, accompanied by those 
who are to command the patrols and rounds during the night, he will 
reconnoitre all the routes they are to follow. 

681. Patrols and rounds march slowly, in silence, and with great pre¬ 
caution; halt frequently to listen and examine the ground. The rounds 
consist of an officer or non-commissioned officer, and two or three men. 

632. Toward break of day the patrols ought to be more frequent, and 
sent to greater distances. They examine the hollow-ways and ground 
likely to conceal an enemy, but with great caution, to avoid being cut off, 
or engaged in an unequal combat; if they meet the enemy, they fire and 
attempt to stop his march. While the patrols are out, the posts are 
under arms. 




92 


REVISED REGULATIONS 
Grand Guards and other Outposts. 

633. Cavalry patrols should examine the country to a greater distance 
than infantry, and report to the infantry guard every thing they observe. 
The morning patrols and scouts do not return until broad daylight; and 
when they return, the night sentinels are withdrawn, and the posts for 
the day resumed. 

634. When patrols are sent beyond the advanced posts, the posts and 
sentinels should be warned. 

635. On their return, commanders of patrols report in regard to the 
ground and every thing they have observed of the movements of the 
enemy, or of his posts, and the commandant of the grand guard reports 
to the field officer of the day. 

636. The fires of grand guards should be hidden by a wall, or ditch, 
or other screen. To deceive the enemy, fires are sometimes made on 
ground not occupied. Fires are not permitted at small posts liable to 
surprise. 

637. The horses of cavalry guards are watered or fed by detachments; 
during which the rest are ready to mount. 

638. If a body of troops attempt to enter the camp at night, unless 
their arrival has been announced, or the commander is known to, or is 
the bearer of a written order to the commander of the grand guard, he 
stops them, and sends the commander under escort to the field officer 
of the day, and warns the posts near him. 

639. Bearers of flags are not permitted to pass the outer chain of sen¬ 
tinels ; their faces are turned from the post or army; if necessary, their 
eyes are bandaged; a non-commissioned officer stays with them to pre¬ 
vent indiscretion of the sentinels. 

640. The commandant of the grand guard receipts for dispatches, and 
sends them to the field officer of the day or General of Brigade, and dis¬ 
misses the bearer; but if he has discovered what ought to be concealed 
from the enemy, he is detained as long as necessary. 

641. Deserters are disarmed at the advanced posts, and sent to the 
commander of the grand guard, who gets from them all the information 
he can concerning his post. If many come at night, they are received 
cautiously , a few at a time. They are sent in the morning to the field 
officer of the day, or to the nearest post or camp, to be conducted to the 
General of the brigade. All suspected persons are searched by the com¬ 
manders of the posts. 

642. When an enemy advances to attack, unless he is in too great 
force, or the grand guard is to defend an intrenched post or a defile, it 
will take the positions and execute the movements to check the enemy, 
acting as skirmishers, or fighting in close or open order, as may b j best. 







FOIl THE ARMY. 


93 


Intrenched Posts.-Detachments. 

The guard joins its corps when in line, or when a sufficient number of 
troops have reached the ground it defends. 

INTRENCHED POSTS. 

643. Unless the army be acting on the defensive, no post should be 
intrenched, except to cover the weak parts of the line, or at points which 
the enemy cannot avoid, or in mountain warfare, or to close a defile, or 
cover winter quarters. 

644. Posts connected with the operations of an army are intrenched 
only by order of the General commanding-in-chief or a General of Divi¬ 
sion. 

645. Any intrenchment that requires artillery is considered as a post, 
and a guard or garrison and commander are assigned to it. 

646. The General who establishes an intrenched post gives to its com¬ 
mander detailed instructions in regard to its defense, and the circum¬ 
stances under which the defense should cease. 

647. The commander reconnoitres his post; distributes the troops; 
posts the officers and non-commissioned officers; forms a reserve; gives 
orders for all contingencies he can foresee; supposes an attack, and 
arranges his troops for defense, so as to prepare them for attack, day or 
night. 

648. In dark weather he redoubles his vigilance, and changes the 
hours and direction of the rounds and patrols. He permits no flags of 
truce, deserters, or strangers to enter. If a flag ought to pass his post, 
he bandages his eyes. He refuses admittance to a relief or any other 
party until he has carefully examined them. In case of an attack, he 
does not wait for orders or hold a council. Having defended his post to 
the last extremity, or till the purpose of the defense, according to his in¬ 
structions, is answered, he may then spike his guns and rejoin the army 
under cover of night, or by cutting his way through the enemy. 

DETACHMENTS. 

649. When a detachment is to be formed from the different regiments 
of a brigade, the Assistant Adjutant-General of the brigade assembles it, 
and turns it over to the commander. 

650. When a detachment is to be formed from different brigades, the 
Assistant Adjutant-General in each forms the contingent of the brigade, 
and sends it to the place of assembling. 

651. Detachments are generally formed by taking battalions, squad¬ 
rons, companies, platoons in turn, according to the roster for such detail. 

652. When the detachment is to consist of men from every company 
or troop, the first on the roster for guard are taken. 







94 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Reconnoissances. 

653. Officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers, whose tour it is 
to go on detachment, if employed otherwise at the time, are relieved from 
the duty they are on, if they can reach camp in time to march with the 
detachment. 

654. When detachments meet, the command is regulated while they 
serve together as if they formed one detachment. But the senior officer 
cannot prevent the commander of any detachment from moving, when he 
thinks proper, to execute the orders he has received. 

655. On the return of a detachment, the commander reports to the 
head-quarters from which he received his orders. 

RECONNOISSANCES. 

656. Near an enemy, daily reconnoissances are made to observe the 
ground in front, and to discover whether the advanced guards of the 
enemy have been increased or put in motion, or any other sign of his 
preparation for march or action. 

657. They are made by small parties of cavalry and infantry, from the 
brigade, under direction of the General of Division or the General of a 
separate brigade, and to less distance by the patrols of the grand guard, 
and are not repeated at the same hour or by the same route. On the 
plain, reconnoissances are made by cavalry; among mountains, by infan¬ 
try, with a few horsemen to carry intelligence. 

658. Reconnoitring parties observe the following precautions : to leave 
small posts, or sentinels at intervals, to transmit intelligence to the 
advanced posts of the army, unless the return is to be by a different 
route; to march with caution, to avoid fighting; and see, if possible, 
without being seen; to keep an advanced guard; to send well-mounted 
men ahead of the advanced guard, and on the flank of the party; to in¬ 
struct the scouts that no two should enter a defile or mount a hill 
together, but to go one at a time, while one watches to carry the news if 
the other is taken. 

659. Before daybreak the advanced guard and scouts are drawn closer; 
the party then march slowly and silently, stop frequently to listen, and 
keep the horses that neigh in the rear. The party should enter no wood, 
defile, village, or inclosure, until it has been fully examined by the scouts. 

660. Special reconnoissances are made under the instruction of the 
General in command, by such officers and with such force as he may 
direct. 

661. Offensive or forced reconnoissances are to ascertain with certainty 
points in the enemy’s position, or his strength. They are sometimes pre¬ 
ludes to real actions, and sometimes only demonstrations. They drive in 
his outposts, and sometimes engage special corps of his line. They are 




FOR THE ARMY. 


95 


__ Partisans and Flankers. 

only made by the order of the General commanding-in-chief, or the com¬ 
mander of an isolated corps. 

662. In all reports of reconnoissances, the officer making them shall 
distinguish expressly what he has seen from the accounts he has not been 
able to verify personally. 

663. In special and offensive reconnoissances, the report must be 
accompanied by a field-sketch of the localities, the dispositions and de¬ 
fenses of the enemy. 


PARTISANS AND FLANKERS. 

664. The operations of partisan corps depend on the nature and theatre 
of the war; they enter into the general plan of operations, and are con¬ 
ducted under the orders of the General commanding-in-chief. 

665. The composition and strength of partisan corps and detachments 
of flankers depend on the object, the difficulties, the distance, and the 
probable time of the expedition. 

666. The purpose of these isolated corps is to reconnoitre at a distance 
on the flanks of the army, to protect its operations, to deceive the enemy, 
to interrupt his communications, to intercept his couriers and his corre¬ 
spondence, to threaten or destroy his magazines, to carry off his posts and 
his convoys, or, at all events, to retard his march by making him detach 
largely for their protection. 

667. While these corps fatigue the enemy and embarrass his opera¬ 
tions, they endeavor to inspire confidence and secure the good will of the 
inhabitants in a friendly country, and to hold them in check in an enemy’ 
country. 

668. They move actively, appear unexpectedly on different points in 
such a manner as to make it impossible to estimate their force, or to tell 
whether they are irregular forces or an advanced guard. 

669. These operations require vigilance, secrecy, energy, and prompt¬ 
ness. The partisan commander must frequently supply by stratagem and 
audacity what he wants in numbers. 

670. These detachments are sometimes composed of different arms, but 
the service belongs more particularly to the light cavalry, which can move 
to a distance by rapid marches, surprise the enemy, attack unexpectedly, 
and retire as promptly. 

671. Stormy weather, fogs, extreme heat, and the night above all, are 
favorable to the success of ambuscades; when the enemy are careless, the 
break of day is the best time. A partisan commander should communi¬ 
cate to his second in command his secret orders, the direction and object 
of the expedition, and the different points of junction with the army. 

672. Guides of the country and spies are often necessary to the parti- 






96 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Partisans and Flankers.-Marches. 

san. They are examined separately, and confronted if their accounts 
differ. When there is but one guide, he marches with the advanced 
guard, guarded by two men, and bound if necessary. Peddlers and 
smugglers are specially suitable for spies. 

673. A fit time to attack a convoy is at a halt, or when they begin to 
park, cr when they are watering, or passing a wood or a defile; at a bend 
of the road, a bridge, or steep ascent. 

674. The attacking party may be principally cavalry, with some in¬ 
fantry. The first object is to disperse the escort. A part of the detach¬ 
ment attacks the main body of the escort, another the wagons, and a third 
is in reserve; skirmishers line the road, and try to cut the traces, and to 
seize the front and rear wagons, and turn them across the road, to prevent 
the train from advancing or retreating. 

675. If the convoy is parked, the cavalry surrounds it, assails the 
escort, and tries to draw it away from the train. The infantry then 
engage the troops remaining at the park, slip under the wagons, and get 
into the park. When the cavalry is alone and the enemy are shaken, 
they dismount a portion of the men to supply the want of infantry. 

676. If it is a large convoy, the principal attack is made on the centre; 
the most valuable wagons are also selected, and additional horses are put 
to them if the attack is successful. Those that cannot be carried off 
are burned. 

MARCHES. 

677. The object of the movement and the nature of the ground de¬ 
termine the order of march, the kind of troops in each column, and the 
number of columns. 

678. The force is divided into as many columns as circumstances 
permit, without weakening any one too much. They ought to preserve 
their communications, and be within supporting distance of each other. 
The commander of each column ought to know the strength and direction 
of the others. 

679. The advance and rear guards are usually light troops; their 
strength and composition depend on the nature of the ground and the 
position of the enemy. They serve to cover the movements of the army, 
and to hold the enemy in check until the General has time to make his 
arrangements. 

680. The advance guard is not always at the head of the column; in a 
march to a flank,’it takes such positions as cover the movement. Sappers 
are attached to the advanced guard if required. 

681. The “general,” sounded one hour before the time of marching, 
is the signal to strike tents, to load the wagons, and pack horses, and send 
them to the place of assembling. The fires are then put out, and care taken 


% 




FOR THE ARMY. 


97 


Marches. 

to avoid burning straw, &c., or giving to the enemy any other indication 
of the movement. 

682. The u march ” will be beat in the infantry, and the u advance ” 
sounded in the cavalry, in succession, as each is to take its place in the 
column. 

683. When the army should form suddenly to meet the enemy, the 
“long roll” is beat, and u to horse” sounded. The troops form rapidly 
in front of their camp. 

684. Batteries of artillery and their caissons move with the corps to 
which they are attached; the field train and ambulances march at the rear 
of the column j and the baggage with the rear guard. 

685. Cavalry and infantry do not march together, unless the proximity 
of the enemy makes it necessary. 

686. In cavalry marches, when distant from the enemy, each regiment, 
and, if possible, each squadron, forms a separate column, in order to keep 
up the same gait from front to rear, and to trot, when desirable, on good 
ground. In such cases, the cavalry may leave camp later, and can give 
more rest to the horses, and more attention to the shoeing and harness. 
Horses are not bridled until the time to start. 

687. When necessary, the orders specify the rations the men are to 
carry in their haversacks. The field officers and Captains make inspec¬ 
tions frequently during the march; at halts they examine the knapsacks, 
valises, and haversacks, and throw away all articles not authorized. The 
officers and non-commissioned officers of cavalry companies attend per¬ 
sonally to the packs and girths. 

688. When it can be avoided, troops should not be assembled on high¬ 
roads or other places where they interrupt the communication. 

689. Generals of Division and commanders of detached corps send a 
staff officer to the rendezvous, in advance, to receive the troops, who, on 
arriving, take their place in the order of battle, and form in close column, 
unless otherwise ordered. Artillery, or trains halted on the roads, form 
in file on one side. 

690. The execution of marching orders must not be delayed. If the 
commander is not at the head of his troops when they are to march, the 
next in rank puts the column in motion. 

691. If possible, each column is preceded by a detachment of sappers, 
to remove obstacles to the march, aided, when necessary, hy infantry, or 
the people of the country. The detachment is divided into two sections: 
one stops to remove the first obstacle, the other moves on to the next. 

692. In night marches, and at bad places, and at cross-roads, when 
necessary, intelligent non-commissioned officers are posted to show the 
way, and are relieved by the regiments as they come up. 




98 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Marches. 

693. On tlie march no one shall fire a gun, or cry “halt” or 11 march” 
without orders. 

694. Soldiers are not to stop for water; the canteens should be filled 
before starting. 

695. It is better to avoid villages; but, if the route lies through them, 
officers and non-commissioned officers are to be vigilant to prevent strag¬ 
gling. Halts should not take place at villages. 

696. Besides the rear guard, the General sometimes takes a detach¬ 
ment from the last regiment, and adds to it non-commissioned officers 
from each regiment, to examine villages and all hiding-places on the 
route, to bring up stragglers and seize marauders. 

697. In night marches, the Sergeant-Major of each regiment remains 
at the rear with a drummer, to give notice when darkness or difficulty 
stops the march. In cavalry, a trumpet is placed in rear of each squad¬ 
ron, and the signal repeated to the head of the regiment. 

698. The General and field officers frequently stop, or send officers to 
the rear, to see that the troops march in the prescribed order, and keep 
their distances. To quicken the march, the General warns the Colonels, 
and may order a signal to be beat. It is repeated in all the regiments. 

699. In approaching a defile, the Colonels are warned; they close their 
regiments as they come up; each regiment passes separately, at an accele¬ 
rated pace, and in as close order as possible. The leading regiment 
having passed, and left room enough for the whole column in close order, 
then halts, and moves again as soon as the last regiment is through. In 
the cavalry, each squadron, before quickening the pace to rejoin the column, 
takes its original order of march. 

700. When the distance from the enemy permits, each regiment, after 
closing up in front and rear of the defile, stacks arms. 

701. Halts to rest and re-form the troops are frequent during the day, 
depending on the object and length of the march. They are made in 
preference after the passage of defiles. 

702. No honors are paid by troops on the march or at halts. 

703. The sick march with the wagons. 

704. Led horses of officers, and the horses of dismounted men, follow 
their regiment. The baggage wagons never march in the column. When 
the General orders the field train and ambulances to take place in the 
column, he designates the position they shall take. 

*05. If two corps meet on the same road, they pass to the right, and 
both continue their march, if the road is wide enough; if it is not, the 
first in the order of battle takes the road, the other halts. 

706. A corps in march must not be cut by another. If two corps 
meet at cross-roads, that which arrives last halts if the other is in motion. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


99 


Directions for Keeping the Journal. 

A corps in march passes a corps at a halt, if it has precedence in the 
order of battle, or if the halted corps is not ready to move at once. 

707. A column that halts to let another column pass resumes the 
march in advance of the train of this column. If a column has to pass 
a train, the train must halt, if necessary, till the column passes. The 
column which has precedence must yield it if the commander, on seeing 
the orders of the other, finds it for the interest of the service. 

JOURNAL. 

708. Commanding officers of troops marching through a country little 
known, will keep journals of their marches according to the form and 
directions hereto annexed. At the end of the march a copy of the 
journal will he retained at the station where the troops arrive, and the 
original will be forwarded to the head-quarters of the Department, or 
corps d’armie. Thence, after a copy has been taken, it will be trans¬ 
mitted, through the head-quarters of the army, to the Adjutant-General, 
for the information of the War Department. 

709. The object of the journal is to furnish data for maps, and inform¬ 
ation which may serve for future operations. Every point of practical 
importance should therefore be noted, even though not indicated in these 
directions. 


DIRECTIONS FOR KEEPING THE JOURNAL. 

710. The journal should be kept in a pocket note book; or, if one 
cannot be obtained, in a book made of sheets of paper folded to half the 
letter size. 

711. The record is to run from the bottom to the top of each page. 

712. The horizontal divisions in the column headed “Route” represent 
portions of a day’s march. The distance, in miles, between each of the 
horizontal divisions, will be noted in the column headed “Distance,” 
which will be summed up at the top of each column, and the sum carried 
to the bottom of the next column. 

713. The notes within each horizontal division are to show the general 
direction of the march, and every object of interest observed in its course. 
All remarkable features of the country, therefore, such as hills, streams, 
fords, springs, houses, villages, forests, marshes, &c., and the places of 
encampment, will be sketched in their relative positions, as well as noted 
by name. 

714. The “Remarks” corresponding to each division will be upon the 
soil, productions, quantity and quality of timber, grass, water, fords, 
nature of the roads, &c., and important incidents. They should show 
where provisions, forage, fuel, and water can be obtained; whether the 






100 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Journal. 


FORM OF 

Journal of the march of [here insert the names of the regiments 
from [here insert the point of departure ] to [the stopping-place']. 






















FOR THE ARMY. 


101 


Journal. 


JOURNAL. 

or companies composing the column ], commanded by- 

pursuant to [here give the No. and date of order for the march ]. 


Remarks. 


Road rocky ; but little grass; good water. Plenty of timber on sum 
mit of hills, extending three miles; road to right of hills. 


Good shelter for camp at foot of peak ; fuel plenty. Springs of sweet 
water, with good grass near. Road to this point rather more sandy. 


Road runs through a canon £ mile long, to right of a small stream; 
marsh on left of stream; water sweet; grass excellent. Halted to graze 
two hours. No Indian signs. 


Companies F, G, and I, 3d-, detached at Mount P-, under 

command of-(see par. 3, General Orders No.-), to take 

road to-. 

A small creek, easily forded. 


Road turns short to right at top of hill after crossing river; crossing 
good, but a little boggy on the right bank. This bottom shows signs of 
recent overflow, when it must have been impassable; banks low; water 
sweet; no wood near crossing; road hard and good up to river. 

















102 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Journal. 


JOURNAL— 





















FOR THE ARMY. 


103 


Journal. 


Continued. 


Remarks. 


At the point where the road forks, turn to the right. The left-hand 
road leads to a deep ravine, which cannot be crossed. 


After the road strikes the ravine, it runs one mile along its bank be¬ 
fore coming to the crossing-place. The camping-ground is at springs, 
half a mile beyond the ravine. Old Indian signs at the springs. 


Road less rocky ; last three miles rather sandy; no water. Passed at 
the point marked f an Indian grave. 


Road still rocky; good springs, where casks should be filled. No more 
water for twenty miles after leaving springs. Occasional hills to left of 
road; no wood or grass. 
















104 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Posts.-Battles. 

streams to be crossed are fordable, miry, have quicksands or steep banks, 
and whether they overflow their banks in wet seasons; also the quality 
of the water; and, in brief, every thing of practical importance. 

715. When a detachment leaves the main column, the point on the 
“Route” will be noted, and the reason given in the Remarks. The com¬ 
mander of the detachment will be furnished with a copy of the journal 
up to that point, and will continue it over his new line of march. 

POSTS. 

716. Whenever a new post is established, or a camp, meant to be oc¬ 
cupied for some time, the commanding officer will forward to the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s office, as well as to the head-quarters of the Department, 
or corps d’armee if in the field, an accurate description of its locality, of 
its distance and bearings from the nearest known point, and the manner 
of reaching it by mail, together with a sketch of the country in its imme¬ 
diate vicinity. 

717. Military posts will be named by the Secretary of War. 

BATTLES. 

718. Dispositions for battle depend on the number, kind, and quality 
of the troops opposed, on the ground, and on the objects of the war; 
but the following rules are to be observed generally: 

719. In attacking, the advanced guard endeavors to capture the enemy’s 
outposts, or cut them off from the main body. Having done so, or 
driven them in, it occupies, in advancing, all the points that can cover 
or facilitate the march of the army, or secure its retreat, such as bridges, 
defiles, woods, and heights; it then makes attacks, to occupy the enemy, 
without risking too much, and to deceive them as to the march and pro¬ 
jects of the army. 

720. When the enemy is hidden by a curtain of advanced troops, the 
commandant of the advanced guard sends scouts, under intelligent officers, 
to the right and left, to ascertain his position and movements. If he does 
not succeed in this way, he tries to unmask the enemy by demonstrations; » 
threatens to cut the advance from the main body; makes false attacks; 
partial and impetuous charges in echelon; and if all fail, he makes a 
real attack to accomplish the object. 

721. Detachments left by the advanced guard to hold points in the 
rear rejoin it when other troops come up. If the army takes a position, 
and the advanced guard is separated from it by defiles or heights, the 
communication is secured by troops drawn from the main body. & 

1 22. At proper distance from the enemy, the troops are formed for the 
attack in several lines; if only two can be formed, some battalions in 





FOR THE ARMY. 


105 


Battles. 

column are placed behind the wings of the second line. The lines may 
he formed of troops in column or in order of battle, according to the 
ground and plan of attack. 

723. The advanced guard may be put in the line or on the wings, or 
other position, to aid the pursuit or cover the retreat. 

724. The reserve is formed of the best troops of foot and horse, to 
complete a victory or make good a retreat. It is placed in the rear of 
the centre, or chief point of attack or defense. 

725. The cavalry should be distributed in echelon on the wings and at 
the centre, on favorable ground. 

726. It should be instructed not to take the gallop until within charg¬ 
ing distance; never to receive a charge at a halt, but to meet it, or, if not 
strong enough, to retire manoeuvring; and in order to be ready for the 
pursuit, and prepared against a reverse, or the attacks of the reserve, not 
to engage all its squadrons at once, but to reserve one-third, in column or 
in echelon,, abreast of or in the rear of one of the wings; this arrange¬ 
ment is better than a second line with intervals. 

727. In the attack, the artillery is employed to silence the batteries 
that protect the position. In the defense, it is better to direct its fire on 
the advancing troops. In either case, as many pieces are united as 
possible, the fire of artillery being formidable in proportion to its concen¬ 
tration. 

728. In battles and military operations it is better to assume the offen¬ 
sive, and put the enemy on the defensive; but to be safe in doing so 
requires a larger force than the enemy, or better troops, and favorable 
ground. When obliged to act on the defensive, the advantage of posi¬ 
tion and of making the attack may sometimes be secured by forming in 
rear of the ground on which we are to fight, and advancing at the mo¬ 
ment of action. In mountain warfare, the assailant has always the dis¬ 
advantage; and even in offensive warfare in the open field, it may 
frequently be very important, when the artillery is well posted, and any 
advantage of ground may be secured, to await the enemy and compel him 
to attack. 

729. The attack should be made with a superior force on the decisive 
point of the enemy’s position, by masking this by false attacks and demon¬ 
strations on other points, and by concealing the troops intended for it by 
the ground, or by other troops in their front. 

730. Besides the arrangements which depend on the supposed plan of 
the enemy, the wings must be protected by the ground, or supported by 
troops in echelon; if the attack of the enemy is repulsed, the offensive must 
at once be taken, to inspire the troops, to disconcert the enemy, and often 
to decide the action. In thus taking the offensive, a close column should 





106 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Battles. 

be pushed rapidly on the wing or flank of the enemy. The divisions of 
this column form in line of battle successively, and each division moves 
to the fiont as soon as formed, in order, by a rapid attack in echelon, to 
prevent the enemy from changing front or bringing up his reserves. In 
all arrangements, especially in those for attack, it is most important to 
conceal the design until the moment of execution, and then to execute it 
with the greatest rapidity. The night, therefore, is preferred for the 
movement of troops on the flank or rear of the enemy, otherwise it is 
necessary to mask their march by a grand movement in front, or by taking 
a wide circuit. 

731. In making an attack, the communications to the rear and for 
retreat must be secured, and the General must give beforehand all neces¬ 
sary orders to provide for that event. 

732. When a success is gained, the light troops should pursue the 
enemy promptly and rapidly. The other troops will restore order in their 
columns, then advance from position to position, always prepared for an 
attack or to support the troops engaged. 

733. Before the action, the Generals indicate the places where they 
will be; if they change position, they give notice of it, or leave a staff 
officer to show where they have gone. 

734. During the fight the officers and non-commissioned officers keep 
the men in the ranks, and enforce obedience if necessary. Soldiers 
must not be permitted to leave the ranks to strip or rob the dead,—nor 
even to assist the wounded unless by express permission, which is only 
to be given after the action is decided. The highest interest and most 
pressing duty is to win the victory, by winning which only can a proper 
care of the wounded be ensured. 

735. Before the action, the Quartermaster of the division makes all the 
necessary arrangements for the transportation of the wounded. He esta¬ 
blishes the ambulance depots in the rear, and gives his assistants the 
necessary instructions for the service of the ambulance wagons and other 
means of removing the wounded. 

736. The ambulance depot, to which the wounded are carried or directed 
for immediate treatment, is generally established at the most convenient 
building nearest the field of battle. A red flag marks its place, or the way 
to it, to the conductors of the ambulances and to the wounded who can 
walk. 

737. The active ambulances follow the troops engaged to succor the 
wounded and remove them to the dep6ts; for this purpose the conductors 
should always have the necessary assistants, that the soldiers may have 
no excuse to leave the ranks for that object. 

738. The medical director of the division, after consultation with tne 




FOR THE ARMY. 


107 


____Battles.—Prisoners of War. 

Quartermaster-General, distributes the medical officers and hospital 
attendants at his disposal, to the depots and active ambulances. He 
will send officers and attendants, when practicable, to the active 
ambulances, to relieve the wounded who require treatment before 
being removed from the ground. He will see that the depots and 
ambulances are provided with the necessary apparatus, medicines, and 
stores. He will take post and render his professional services at the 
principal depot. 

739. If the enemy endanger the depot, the Quartermaster takes the 
orders of the General to remove it or to strengthen its guard. 

740. The wounded in the depots and the sick are removed, as soon as 
possible, to the hospitals that have been established by the Quartermaster- 
General of the army on the flanks or rear of the army. 

<41. After an action, the officers of ordnance collect the munitions of 
war left on the field, and make a return of them to the General. The 
Quartermaster’s Department collects the rest of the public property cap¬ 
tured, and makes the returns to head-quarters. 

742. Written reports for the General commanding-in-chief are made by 
commandants of regiments, batteries, and separate squadrons, and by all 
commanders of a higher grade, each in what concerns his own command, 
and to his immediate commander. 

743. When an officer or soldier deserves mention for conduct in 
action, a special report shall be made in his case, and the General com¬ 
manding-in-chief decides whether to mention him in his report to the 
government and in his orders. But he shall not be mentioned in the 
report until he has been mentioned in the orders to the army. These 
special reports are examined with care by the intermediate commanders, 
to verify the facts, and secure commendation and rewards to the merito¬ 
rious only. 

744. The report of battles, which must frequently be made before these 
special reports of persons are scrutinized, is confined to general praise or 
blame, and an account of the operations. 

PRISONERS OF WAR. 

745. Prisoners of war will be disarmed and sent to the rear, and 
reported as soon as practicable to the head-quarters. The return of pri¬ 
soners from the Head-Quarters of the Army to the War Department will 
specify the number, rank, and corps. 

746. The private property of prisoners will be duly respected, and 
each shall be treated with the regard due to his rank. They are to obey 
the necessary orders given them. They receive for subsistence one ration 
each, without regard to rank; and the wounded are to be treated with 







108 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Couvoys and their Escorts. 

the same care as the wounded of the army. Other allowances to them 
will depend on conventions with the enemy. Prisoners’ horses will be 
taken for the army. 

747. Exchanges of prisoners and release of officers on parole depend 
on the orders of the General commanding-in-chief, under the instructions 
of government. 


CONVOYS AND THEIR ESCORTS. 

748. The strength and composition of the escort of a convoy depend 
on the country, the nature and value of the convoy, and the dangers it 
may incur. A larger escort is required for a convoy of powder, that the 
defense may not be near the train. 

749. Cavalry is employed in escorts chiefly to reconnoitre; the propor¬ 
tion is larger as the country is more open. 

750. Pioneers or working-parties are attached to convoys to mend 
roads, remove obstacles, and erect defenses. The convoys should always 
be provided with spare wheels, poles, axles, &c. 

751. The commandant of the escort should receive detailed instruc¬ 
tions in writing. 

752. As far as the defense permits, the commander of the escort shall 
refer to the officer in charge of the convoy for the hours of departure, 
the halts, the parking and order of the train, and the precautions against 
accidents. 

753. Officers who accompany the convoy, but do not belong to the 
escort, shall exercise no authority in it except by consent of the com¬ 
mander. If these officers are junior to the commander, he may assign 
them to duty if the defense requires it. 

754. Large convoys are formed into divisions, each with a conductor. 
The distance between the wagons is four paces. A small party of in¬ 
fantry is attached to each division. 

755. Generally, munitions of war are at the head of the convoy, sub¬ 
sistence next, and then other military stores; the sutler last. But always 
that part of the convoy which is most important to the army shall be 
where it is most secure from danger. 

756. The commandant should send out reconnoitring parties, and 
never put the convoy in motion until their reports have been received. 
He always forms an advance and rear guard, and keeps the main body 
under his immediate order at the most important point, with small guards 
or posts at other points. 

757. In an open country the main body marches by the side of the 
road, opposite the centre of the convoy; in other cases at the head or 
rear of the column, as the one or the other is more exposed. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


109 


_Convoys and their Escorts. 

758. The advance guard precedes the convoy far enough to remove all 
obstacles to its advance. It examines the woods, defiles, and villages, 
and by mounted men gives information to the commander, and receives 
his orders. It reconnoitres places for halts and parks. 

759. If the head of the column is threatened, the advanced guard 
seizes the defiles and places which the enemy might occupy, and holds 
them until the main body advances to the front and relieves it; the main 
body holds the positions until the head of the convoy arrives, and then 
leaves detachments which are relieved by the parties marching with the 
divisions; the posts are not abandoned until the whole convoy has passed 
and the position is no longer important. 

760. When the rear is threatened, like measures are taken; the rear 
guard defends the ground and retards the enemy by breaking the bridges 
and blocking the road. 

761. If the flanks are threatened, and the ground is broken, and many 
defiles are to be passed, the defense of the convoy becomes more difficult; 
the advance and rear guards must be reduced, the flanks strengthened, and 
positions which will cover the march of the convoy must be occupied by 
the main body of the troops before the head of the convoy reaches them, 
and until it has passed. 

762. If the convoy is large, and has to pass places that the force and 
position of the enemy make dangerous, the loss of the whole convoy must 
not be risked; it must pass by divisions, which reunite after the passage. 
In this case the greater part of the troops guard the first division; they 
seize the important points, and cover them with light troops, or, if neces¬ 
sary, with small posts, and hold them until all the divisions have passed. 

763. If there is artillery in the convoy, the commander of the escort 
uses it for the defense. 

764. To move faster and make the defense easier, the wagons move in 
double file whenever the road allows it. If a wagon breaks, it is at once 
removed from the road; when repaired, it takes the rear; when it cannot 
be repaired, its load and horses are distributed to some of the other 
wagons kept in the rear for that purpose. 

765. Convoys by water are escorted on the same principles. Each 
boat has a small infantry guard; one portion of the escort precedes or 
follows the convoy in boats. The cavalry march opposite the convoy; 
the advance and rear guard move by land, and all are connected by flank¬ 
ers with the convoy. Where a river runs through a narrow valley, the 
body of the infantry moves by land to prevent the enemy from occupying 
the heights and disturbing the convoy. 

766. Convoys halt every hour to let the horses take breath and the 
wagons close up. Long halts are made but seldom, and only in places 






110 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Convoys and their Escorts.-Baggage Trains. 

that have been reconnoitred and found favorable for defense. At night 
the park is arranged for defense, and in preference at a distance from 
inhabited places, if in an enemy’s country. 

767. The wagons are usually parked in ranks, axle against axle, the 
poles in the same direction, and with sufficient space between the ranks 
for the horses. If an attack is feared, they are parked in square, the 
hind-wheels outside, and the horses inside. 

768. On the appearance of the enemy during the march, the com¬ 
mander closes up the wagons and continues his march in order; he avoids 
fighting; but if the enemy seizes a position that commands his road, he 
attacks vigorously with the mass of his force, but is not to continue the 
pursuit far from the convoy, The convoy halts, and resumes the march 
when the position is carried. 

769. When the enemy is too strong to be attacked, the convoy is 
parked in square if there is room; if not, closed up in double file; at the 
front and rear the road is blocked by wagons across it. The drivers are 
dismounted at the heads of the horses. They are not permitted to make 
their escape. The light troops keep the enemy at a distance as long as 
possible, and are supported when necessary, but prudently, as the troops 
must be kept in hand to resist the main attack. 

770. If a wagon takes fire in the park, remove it if possible; if not, 
remove first the ammunition wagons, then those to leeward of the fire. 

771. When a whole convoy cannot be saved, the most valuable part 
may sometimes be by abandoning the rest. If all efforts fail, and there 
is no hope of succor, the convoy must be set on fire and the horses killed 
that cannot be saved; the escort may then cut its way through. 

772. If the convoy is of prisoners of war, every effort should be made 
to reach a village or strong building where they may be confined; if 
forced to fight in the field, the prisoners must be secured and made to lie 
down until the action is over. 

BAGGAGE TRAINS. 

773. The baggage train of general head-quarters and the trains of the seve¬ 
ral divisions are each under the charge of an officer of the Quartermaster’s 
Department. These officers command and conduct the trains under the 
orders they receive from their respective head-quarters. When the trains 
of different divisions march together, or the train of a division marches 
with the train of general head-quarters, the senior Quartermaster directs 
the whole. 

774. The Regimental Quartermaster has charge of the wagons, horses, 
equipments, and all means of transport employed in the service of the 
regiment. Under the orders of the Colonel, he assembles them for the 




FOR THE ARMY. 


Baggage Trains. 


Ill 


march, and maintains the order and police of the train in park and on 
the march. On marches, the regimental trains are under the orders of 
the Quartermaster of the division. When the march is by brigade, the 
senior llegimental Quartermaster in the brigade, or the Quartermaster of 
the brigade, has the direction of the whole. The necessary wagon-mas¬ 
ters, or non-commissioned officers to act as such, are employed with the 
several trains. 

775. None but the authorized wagons are allowed to march with the 
train. The wagons of the several head-quarters, the regimental wagons, 
and the wagons of sutlers authorized by orders from head-quarters to 
march with the train, are all to be conspicuously marked. 

776. When the train of head-quarters is to have a guard, the strength 
of the guard is regulated by the General. Generals of Brigade guard 
their trains by the men attached to the train of the first regiment of their 
brigades. The regimental trains are loaded, unloaded, and guarded, as far 
as practicable, by convalescents and men not effective in the ranks; in the 
cavalry, by dismounted men. When the guard of a train is the escort for 
its defense, the regulations in regard to convoys and escorts take effect. 

777. Habitually each division is followed by its train, the regimental 
trains uniting at the brigade rendezvous. When otherwise, the order for 
the movement of the divisions, brigades, and regiments contains the 
necessary directions in regard to the assembling and marching of the 
respective trains. The several trains march in an order analogous to the 
rank of the generals, and the order of battle of the troops to which they 
belong. Trains are not allowed in any case to be in the midst of the 
troops, or to impede the march of the troops. 

778. The wagon-masters, under the orders of the officers of the Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, exercise the necessary restraints over the teamsters 
and servants who leave their teams, or do not properly conduct them; or 
who ill treat their horses, or who attempt to pillage, or run away in case 
of attack. 

779. The General commanding the army and the Generals of Division 
will not permit any general or staff officer, or regiment under their orders, 
or any person whatsoever, attached to their command, to have more than 
the authorized amount or means of transportation. For this purpose they 
will themselves make, and cause to be made, frequent reviews and inspec¬ 
tions of the trains. They will see that no trooper is employed to lead 
a private horse, no soldier to drive a private vehicle, and that no trooper 
is put on foot to lend his horse to an officer. They will not permit the 
wagons of the artillery or of the train to be loaded with any thing foreign 
to their proper service, nor any public horse, for any occasion, to be 
harnessed to a private carriage. 




112 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


General Police.-Safeguards. 

780. The officers of the Quartermaster’s Department, the wagon- 
masters, and all conductors of trains, are charged with watching that the 
regulations respecting transportation allowances are strictly observed. 

GENERAL POLICE. 

781. When necessary, the General-in-chief or General of Division may 
appoint a provost marshal to take charge of prisoners, with a suitable guard, 
or other police force. 

782. Private servants, not soldiers, will not he allowed to wear the 
uniform of any corps of the army, but each will be required to carry with 
him a certificate from the officer who employs him, verified, for regimental 
officers, by the signature of the Colonel; for other officers under the rank 
of Colonel, by the chief of their corps or department. 

783. Laundresses permitted to follow the army will be furnished with 
certificates, signed as in the preceding paragraph, and no woman of bad 
character will be allowed to follow the army. Other persons with the 
army, not officers or soldiers, such as guides of the country, inter¬ 
preters, &c., will carry about them similar certificates from the head¬ 
quarters that employs them. 

784. Deserters from the enemy, after being examined, will be secured 
for some days, as they may be spies in disguise; as opportunities offer, 
they will be sent to the rear; after which, if they are found lurking about 
the army, or attempting to return to the enemy, they will be treated with 
severity. 

785. The arms and accoutrements of deserters will be turned over to 
the Ordnance Department, and their horses to the corps in want of them, 
after being branded with the letters “ U. S.” The compensation to be 
accorded to deserters, for such objects, will be according to appraisement, 
made under the direction of the Quartermaster’s Department. The en¬ 
listment of deserters, without express permission from general head¬ 
quarters, is prohibited. 

786. It is forbidden to purchase horses without ascertaining the right 
of the party to sell. Stolen horses shall be restored. Estrays, in the 
enemy’s country, when the owner is not discovered, are taken for the army. 

787. Plundering and marauding, at all times disgraceful to soldiers, 
when committed on the persons or property of those whom it is the duty 
of the army to protect, become crimes of such enormity as to admit of no 
remission of the awful punishment which the military law awards against 
offenses of this nature. 


SAFEGUARDS. 

788. Safeguards are protections granted to persons or property in 




FOR THE ARMY. 


113 


Safeguards.-Sieges. 

foreign parts by the commanding general, or by other commanders 
within the limits of their command. 

789. Safeguards are usually given to protect hospitals, public esta¬ 
blishments, establishments of religion, charity, or instruction, museums, 
depositories of the arts, mills, post-offices, and other institutions of public 
benefit; also to individuals whom it may be the interest of the army to 
respect. 

790. A safeguard may consist of one or more men of fidelity and firm¬ 
ness, generally non-effective non-commissioned officers, furnished with a 
paper setting out clearly the protection and exemptions it is intended to 
secure, signed by the commander giving it, and his staff officer; or it 
may consist of such paper, delivered to the party whose person, family, 

• house, and property it is designed to protect. These safeguards must be 
numbered and registered. 

791. The men left as safeguards by one corps may be replaced by 
another. They are withdrawn when the country is evacuated; but if 
not, they have orders to await the arrival of the enemy’s troops, and 
apply to the commander for a safe-conduct to the outposts. 

792. Form of a safeguard : 

By authority of-, 

A safeguard is hereby granted, to [A. B-, or the house and family 

0 f x. B-, or to the college, mills, or property; stating precisely 

the place, nature, and description of the person, property, or buildings]. 
All officers and soldiers belonging to the army of the United States are 
therefore commanded to respect this safeguard, and to afford, if necessary, 
protection to [The person, family, or property of , as the case 

may be]. 

Given at Head-Quarters, the — day of-. 

A. B-, Major-General commanding-in-chief. 

By command of the General. 

C. D--, Adjutant-General. 

55 tJi Article of the Rules and Articles of War. 

“ Whosoever belonging to the armies of the United States, employed 
in foreign parts, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death.” 

SIEGES. 

793. In the following regulations the besieging force is supposed to be 
two divisions of infantry and a brigade of cavalry. The same principles 
govern in other cases. 

794 The Brigadier-Generals of infantry serve, in turn, as Generals of 
the trenches; one or more of them are detailed daily, according to the 

8 














114 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Sieges. 

front and number of attacks; they superintend the operations, and 
dispose the guards of the trenches to repulse sorties and protect the 
works. Officers of the general staff are assigned to them to transmit 
their orders and attend to the details of service. 

795. The Colonels and Lieutenant-Colonels of infantry alternate for 
duty in the trenches; one or more are detailed daily; they superintend 
the service of the guards and workmen in the part of the work to which 
the General of the trenches assigns them, being posted with troops of 
their own regiments in preference. The commandant of the siege may 
place the Colonels on the roster with the Brigadier-Generals. 

796. The commandants of engineers and artillery accompany the first 
troops before the place to examine the works and the approaches. When 
the engineers have completed the reconnoissance of the works, and of 
each front as far as practicable, the commandant of engineers makes 
a plan of the works as exact and detailed as possible, and, under the 
instructions of the General commanding the siege, draws up the general 
plan of the siege, and discusses it with the commandant of artillery in 
regard to the best employment of that arm. These officers then submit 
their joint or separate opinions to the General, who decides on the plan 
of the siege, and gives the orders for the execution. The commandant 
of engineers directs the construction of all the works of siege, under the 
authority of the General, and lays before him every day a report of his 
operations, and a plan showing the progress of the attack. The com¬ 
mandant of artillery also makes daily reports to the General of all that 
relates to his branch of the service. 

797. The Quartermaster-General establishes the hospitals, and organizes 
the means for transporting the wounded to them. 

798. The commanding General appoints a field officer of the trenches, 
who is aided by one or two Captains or Lieutenants. 

799. The field officer of the trenches is charged with all the details 
relative to the assembling of the guards and the workmen. He dis¬ 
tributes the guards on the different points of the attack agreeably to the 
orders of the General of the trenches, and forms the detachments of 
workmen for the engineers and artillery; that he may be prepared for 
this distribution, he receives every day from the Adjutant-General a 
statement of the details for the next day. 

800 On the arrival of the General of the trenches, the field officer of 
the trenches gives him all the information necessary to enable him to 
station the troops, attends him in his visit to the trenches, and takes his 
orders on the changes to be made in the position of the troops. The 
execution is intrusted to the commandants of the troops. 

801. The field officer of the trenches sees that men and litters are 





FOR THE ARMY. 


115 


Sieges. 

always ready to bring off the wounded. One or more companies of the 
guards of the trenches are put under his immediate orders for the pre¬ 
servation of order and police in the trenches. 

802. The divisions, brigades, regiments, and battalions are encamped 
during the siege in the order of battle. The service of camp is conducted 
as heretofore prescribed. 

803. The infantry has two kinds of siege service,—the guard of the 
trenches and the work of the trenches. 

804. The guards of the trenches mount every day by battalions, in 
such order of detail that all the troops may take an equal share, and no 
part of the line be left too weak. If only one battalion is required, each 
division furnishes it alternately; if two are required, each division gives 
one; if three, one division furnishes two, the other one, alternately. 
The two battalions of the same division are not taken from the same 
brigade. 

805. The detail for work of the trenches is by company, from all the 
regiments at one time, or in turn, and continues generally twelve hours. 
The detail from any regiment should never be less than a company. If 
only half a company would be needed from all the regiments at a time, 
every other regiment furnishes a full company alternately. 

806. The battalions for guard are detailed at least twelve hours in ad¬ 
vance; they furnish no other details during this tour. If the whole 
regiment is called out, it leaves a sufficient police guard in camp. 

807. Twenty-four hours, or twelve at least, before mounting guard in 
the trenches, the battalions detailed for guard do not furnish workmen; 
and the companies of those battalions whose tour it would have been to 
work in the trenches, do not go there for twenty-four hours after guard, 
if possible, or at the least twelve. 

808. The workmen who are required for other work than that of the 
trenches are taken from the roster for fatigue from the battalions and 
companies not employed in the trenches. 

809. The battalions first for detail for guard of the trenches, and the 
companies first for detail for work in the trenches, furnish no other de¬ 
tails and are held on picket, ready to march at the call of the field officer 
of the trenches. 

810. Materials for the siege, such as fascines, gabions, hurdles, pickets, 
&c., are furnished by the different corps, in the proportion ordered by 
the General. 

811. Guards and workmen going to the trenches march without beat 
of drum or music. 

812. At all times, and especially on the day the trenches are opened, 






REVISED REGULATIONS 


116 

Sieges. 

every thing is avoided likely to attract the attention of the enemy. With 
this view, the General may vary the hour of relieving guards. 

813. The chiefs of engineers and artillery make requisitions for work¬ 
men in advance, that the details may be made in time to prevent any 
delay in the work. They should exceed the number strictly required, 
that there may be a reserve for unforeseen wants. If this reserve is 
found insufficient, the General directs the field officer of the trenches to 
call on the picket. 

814. Before the guards and workmen march, the field officer of the 
trenches arranges them so that each detachment can reach its ground 
without confusion. The troops are posted in the trenches according to 
the position of their regiments in the order of battle, and, as far as pos¬ 
sible, the companies of workmen in like order. The reserves of workmen 
are placed at the dep6t of the trenches, or the nearest suitable place to 
the works. 

815. The workmen leave their knapsacks and swords in camp, and 
march with their firearms and cartridge-boxes, which they place near 
them while at work. They always carry their overcoats, to cover them 
in resting or when wounded. 

816. The guards always enter the trenches with arms trailed , and the 
workmen also, unless they carry materials or tools, when the arms are in 
the sling. 

817. The guards and detachments of workmen send a Corporal to the 
openings of the trenches to guide the relief. They march out of the 
trenches by the flank, with trailed arms. 

818. Sand-bags, forming loop-holes, are placed at intervals on the 
parapet to cover the sentinels; they are more numerous than the senti¬ 
nels, so that the enemy may not know where the sentinels are placed. 

819. When detachments are placed at night in advance of the trenches, 
to cover the workmen, the men sit or lie down, with their firearms in 
their hands, to hide themselves better from the enemy; the sentinels put 
their ears to the ground frequently, that they may hear troops coming 
out of the place. To prevent mistakes, the workmen are told what troops 
cover them. 

8-0. In o honors are paid in the trenches. Wffien the General com¬ 
manding the siege visits them, the guards place themselves in rear of the 
banquette, and rest on their arms. The colors are never carried to the 
trenches unless the whole regiment marches to repulse a sortie or make 
an assault. Even in this case they are not displayed until the General 
commanding the siege gives a formal order. 

821. The materials of the siege of all kinds, together with the tools, 
are collected in part at the depots of the trenches, and in part at the 







FOR THE ARMY. 


117 


Sieges. 

openings of the trenches, or in such other place as has been appointed 
for the convenience of the service by the field officer of the trenches, on 
the advice of the chiefs of artillery and engineers. They are in charge 
of officers of engineers and of artillery, with guards or non-commissioned 
officers of both corps. But if these corps cannot furnish them, the 
chiefs apply for assistance from the infantry. 

8*^- -^e workmen, in going to the trenches, carry such tools and ma¬ 
terials as are required by the artillery and engineers. In this case, the 
field officer of the trenches has notice and superintends it. 

823. The soldiers sent to the trenches go with their cartridge-boxes 
filled. Cartridges, when needed, are sent to the trenches on the re¬ 
quisition of commanders of battalions, approved by the General of the 
trenches. 

824. In the case of a sortie, the guards move rapidly to the places that 
have been designated by the General of the trenches, and which afford 
the best defense for the head of the works, the batteries, the communica¬ 
tions, or the flanks, or best enable them to take the sortie itself in flank 
or reverse. Having lined the banquette to fire on the enemy, the troops 
form on the reverse of the trench to receive him. The workmen take 
arms, retain their positions, or retire with their tools, as ordered. The 
officers commanding the detachments of workmen see that their move¬ 
ments are made promptly and in good order, so as to avoid all confusion 
in the communications. 

825. The troops that advance beyond the trenches to repulse the sortie 
must not follow in pursuit. The General takes care that they return to 
the trenches before the retreat of the sortie allows the artillery of the 
place to open on them. When the workmen return, the officers and non¬ 
commissioned officers of the detachments call the roll without interrupt¬ 
ing the work, which is immediately resumed. 

826. When it is necessary to dismount cavalry and send them to the 
trenches, they should be employed as near their camp as possible, and 
posted between the detachments of infantry. 

827. Men belonging to the cavalry may, in assaults, be employed in 
carrying fascines and other materials to fill ditches and make passages. 

828. The general officers of cavalry are more particularly employed in 
the service of posts and detachments placed in observation to protect the 
siege. They and the field officers of this arm are employed in the com¬ 
mand of escorts to convoys, of whatever arms the escorts may be com¬ 
posed. When these duties are not sufficient to employ them, they take 
their share of the duty of the trenches. 

829. The officers of engineers and artillery of the trenches make to 
the General of the trenches a return of all losses in their troops, and such 








118 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Sieges.-Defense of Fortified Places. 

othe? reports on the work as he requires, in addition to the reports direct 
to their respective chiefs on the details of the service. 

830. At the end of each tour, the field officer of the trenches draws 
up a report for the twenty-four hours to the General of the trenches. 
The General of the trenches reports to the General commanding the 
siege. 

831. The commanders of the several corps in the trenches report, 
when relieved, to their respective head-quarters the losses during the 
tour, and the conduct of the officers and men. 

832. However practicable the breach may appear, or however ruined 
the works in rear of it, the heads of columns must always be supplied 
with ladders to get over unexpected obstacles. 

833. The General commanding the siege designates picked companies 
to protect property and persons, and prevent pillage and violence, from 
the moment the place is carried. The officers exert themselves to re¬ 
strain the men. 

834. The General designates the places requiring particular protection, 
such as churches, asylums, hospitals, colleges, schools, and magazines. 
The order for their protection should remind the soldiers, at the time, of 
the penalty of disobeying it. 

835. Whether the place be taken by assault or by capitulation, the 
provisions and military stores, and the public funds, are reserved for the 
use of the army. 

836. The commander of engineers will keep a journal of the siege, 
showing the operations of each day in detail, the force employed on the 
work, the kind and quantity of materials used in them, &c. He will also 
mark on a plan of the ground the daily progress of the works, and make 
the necessary drawings explanatory of their construction. 

837. The commander of the artillery will keep a daily journal of the 
operations under his direction, showing—the number and kind of pieces 
in battery, the force employed in serving them, the kind and quantity 
of ammunition expended, the number of rounds fired from each piece of 
ordnance, the effect of the fire, and all other particulars relative to his 
branch of the service. 

838. These journals and drawings will be sent, after the siege, with 
the report of the General, to the War Department. 

DEFENSE OF FORTIFIED PLACES. 

839. In war, every commander of a fortified place shall always hold 
himself prepared with his plan of defense, as if at any time liable to at¬ 
tack. He arranges this plan according to the probable mode of attack; 
determines the posts of the troops in the several parts of the works, the 





FOR THE ARMY. 


110 


__Defense of Fortified Places. 

reliefs, the reserves, and the details of service in all the corps. He draws 
up instructions for a case of attack, and exercises the garrison according 
to his plan of defense. In sea-coast works, he provides the instructions 
for the different batteries on the approach of ships. 

840. In framing his plan, he studies the works and the exterior within 
the radius of attack and investment, the strength of the garrison, the 
vrtillery, the munitions of wai’, subsistence and supplies of all kinds, and 
takes immediate measures to procure whatever is deficient of troops or 

upplies, either by requisition on the government or from the means put 
at his disposal. 

841. On the approach of an enemy, he removes all houses and other 
objects, within or without the place, that cover the approaches, or inter¬ 
rupt the fire of the guns or the movements of the troops. He assures 
himself personally that all posterns, outlets, embrasures, &c., are in proper 
state of security. 

842. He shall be furnished by the Department of War with a plan of 
the works, showing all the details of the fortifications and of the exterior 
>vithin the radius of attack • with a map of the environs within the radius 
)f investment; with a map of the vicinity, including the neighboring 
vorks, roads, water-channels, coasts, &c.; with a memoir explaining the 
iituation and defense of the place, and the relations and bearings of the 
several works on each other, and on the approaches by land and water— 
all which he carefully preserves, and communicates only to the council 
of defense. 

843. He consults his next in rank, and the senior officer of the en¬ 
gineers and of the artillery, either separately or as a council of defense. 
In the latter case he designates an officer to act as secretary to the coun¬ 
cil, and to record their proceedings and their joint or separate opinions, 
which are to be kept secret during the siege. The members may record 
their opinions under their own signature. In all cases, the commander 
decides on his own responsibility. 

844. The commander of the place, and the chiefs of engineers and of 
artillery, shall keep journals of the defense, in which shall be entered, 
in order of date, without blank or interlineation, the orders given or re¬ 
ceived, the manner in which they are executed, their results, and every 
event and circumstance of importance in the progress of the defense. 
These journals and the proceedings of the council of defense shall bo 
sent after the siege to the Department of War. 

845. There shall be kept in the office of the commandant of the place, 
to be sent after the siege to the Department of War, a map of the en¬ 
virons a plan of the fortifications, and a special plan of the front of 
attack, on which the chief engineer will trace, in succession, the positions 






120 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Defense of Fortified Places.-Troops on board of Transports. 

occupied, and the works executed by the enemy from the investment; 
and also the works of counter approach or defense, and the successive 
positions of the artillery and other troops of the garrison during the pro¬ 
gress of the siege. 

846. The commander shall defend in succession the advanced works, 
the covered way and outworks, the body of the work, and the interior 
intrenchments. He will not be content with clearing away the foot of 
the breaches, and defending them by abattis, mines, and all the means 
used in sieges; but he shall begin in good time, behind the bastions or 
front of attack, the necessary intrenchments to resist assaults on the 
main work. 

847. He shall use his means of defense in such manner as always to 
have a reserve of fresh troops, chosen from his best soldiers, to resist 
assaults, retake the outworks, and especially to resist the assaults on the 
body of the place; and a reserve of provisions for the last period of the 
siege, and of ammunition for the last attacks. 

848. He must, in every case, compel the besieging force to approach 
by the slow and successive works of siege, and must sustain at least one 
assault on a practicable breach in the body of the place. 

849. When the commander thinks that the end of the defense has 
come, he shall still consult the council of defense on the means that may 
remain to prolong the siege. But in all cases he alone will decide on the 
time, manner, and terms of the surrender. In the capitulation, he shall 
not seek or accept better terms for himself than for the garrison, but shall 
share their fate, and exert his best endeavors for the care of the troops, 
and especially of the sick and wounded. 

850. No commander in the field shall withdraw troops or supplies from 
any fortified place, or exercise any authority over its commandant, unless 
it has been put subject to his orders by competent authority. 

ARTICLE XXXVII. 

TROOPS ON BOARD OF TRANSPORTS. 

851. Military commanders charged with the embarkation of troops, 
and officers of the Quartermaster’s Department intrusted with the selec¬ 
tion of the transports, will take care that the vessels are entirely seaworthy 
and proper for such service, and that suitable arrangements are made in 
them for the health and comfort of the troops. 

852. If, in the opinion of the officer commanding the troops to be 
embarked, the vessel is not proper or suitably arranged, the officer charged 
with the embarkation shall cause her to be inspected by competent and 
experienced persons. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


121 


Troops on board of Transports. 

853. Immediately after embarking, the men will be assigned to quarters, 
equal parties on each side of the ship, and no man will he allowed to loiter 
or sleep on the opposite side. As far as practicable, the men of each 
company will be assigned to the same part of the vessel, and the squads, 
in the same manner, to contiguous berths. 

854. Arms will be so placed, if there be no racks, as to be secure from 
injury, and enable the men to handle them promptly—bayonets unfixed 
and in scabbard. 

855. Ammunition in cartridge-boxes to be so placed as to be entirely 
secure from fire; reserve ammunition to be reported to the master of the 
transport, with request that he designate a safe place of deposit. Fre¬ 
quent inspections will be made of the service ammunition, to insure its 
safety and good condition. 

856. No officer is to sleep out of his ship, or to quit his ship, without 
the sanction of the officer commanding on board. 

857. The guard will be proportioned to the number of sentinels required. 
At sea the guard will mount with side-arms only. The officer of the 
guard will be officer of the day. 

858. Sentinels will be kept over the fires, with buckets of water at 
hand, promptly to extinguish fires. Smoking is prohibited between declcs 
or in the cabins , at all times; nor shall any lights be allowed between 
decks, except such ship lanterns as the master of the transport may direct, 
or those carried by the officer of the day in the execution of his duty. 

859. Regulations will be adopted to enable companies or messes to 
cook in turn; no others than those whose turn it is, will be allowed to 
loiter around or approach the galleys or other cooking places. 

860. The commanding officer will make arrangements, in concert with 
the master of the vessel, for calling the troops to quarters, so that in case 
of alarm, by storm, or fire, or the approach of the enemy, every man may 
repair promptly to his station. But he will take care not to crowd the 
deck. The troops not wanted at the guns or to assist the sailors, and 
those who cannot be advantageously employed with small arms, will be 
formed as a reserve between decks. 

861. All the troops will turn out at -, A.M., without arms or 

uniform, and (in warm weather) without shoes or stockings; when every 
individual will be clean, his hands, face, and feet washed, and his hair 
combed. The same personal inspection will be repeated thirty minutes 
before sunset. The cooks alone may be exempted from one of these 
inspections per day, if necessary. 

862. Recruits or awkward men will be exercised in the morning and 
evening in the use of arms, an hour each time, when the weather will 








122 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Troops on board of Transports. 

863. Officers will enforce cleanliness as indispensable to health. When 
the weather will permit, bedding will be brought on deck every morning 
for airing. Tubs may be fixed on the forecastle for bathing, or the men 
may be placed in the chains and have buckets of water thrown over them. 

864. Between decks will not be washed oftener than once a week, and 
only when the weather is fine. The boards of the lower berths will be 
removed once or twice a week to change the straw. Under the direction 
of the Surgeon and the officer of the day, frequent fumigations will be 
performed between decks. The materials required are—common salt, 
four ounces; powdered oxide of manganese, one ounce; sulphuric acid, 
one ounce, diluted with two ounces of water. The diluted acid is poured 
over the other ingredients in a basin placed in a hot sand-bath. Solu¬ 
tions of chloride of lime and chloride of zinc are excellent disinfecting 
agents. 

865. During voyages in hot weather, the master of the vessel will be 
desired to provide wind-sails, which will be kept constantly hung up, 
and frequently examined, to see that they draw well and are not ob¬ 
structed. 

866. During cooking hours, the officers of companies visit the cam- 
boose, and see that the messes are well prepared. The coppers and other 
cooking utensils are to be regularly and well washed, both before and 
after use. 

867. The bedding will be replaced in the berths at sunset, or at an 
earlier hour when there is a prospect of bad weather; and at tattoo 
every man not on duty will be in his berth. To insure the execution of 
this regulation, the officer of the day, with a lantern, will make a tour 
between decks. 

868. Lights will be extinguished at tattoo , except such as are placed 
under sentinels. The officer of the day will see to it, and report to the 
commanding officer. The officers’ lights will be extinguished at 10 
o’clock, unless special permission be given to continue them for a longer 
time, as in case of sickness or other emergency. 

869. For the sake of exercise, the troops will be occasionally called to 
quarters by the beat to arms. Those appointed to the guns will be fre¬ 
quently exercised in the use of them. The arms and accoutrements will 
be frequently inspected. The metallic parts of the former will be often 
wiped and greased again. 

870. The men will not be allowed to sleep on deck in hot weather or 
in the sun; they will be encouraged and required to take exercise on 
deck, in squads by succession, when necessary. 

871. At morning and evening parades, the Surgeon will examine the 
men, to observe whether there be any appearance of disease. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


123 


Troops on board of Transports. 

872. The sick will, as far as practicable, be separated from tbe healthy 
men. On tbe first appearance of malignant contagion, a signal will be 
made for the hospital vessel (if there be one in company), and the dis¬ 
eased men removed to her. 

873. A good supply of hospital stores and medicines will he taken on 
each vessel, and used only for the sick and convalescent. 

874. The Surgeon will guard the men against costiveness on approach¬ 
ing a hot climate. In passing through the West Indies, to the southern 
coast for instance, and for some weeks after landing in those latitudes, 
great care is required in the use of fruit, as strangers would not be com¬ 
petent to judge of it, and most kinds, after long voyages, are prejudi¬ 
cial. 

875. In harbor, where there is no danger from sharks, the meu may 
bathe; but not more than ten at a time, and attended by a boat. 

876. In fitting'up a vessel for the transportation of horses, care is to 
be taken that the requisite arrangements are made for conveniently feed¬ 
ing and cleaning them, and to secure them from injury in rough weather 
by ropes attached to breast-straps and breeching, or by other suitable 
means ; and especially that proper ventilation is provided by openings in 
the upper deck, wind-sails, &c. The ventilation of steamers may be 
assisted by using the engine for that purpose. 

877. Horses should not be put on board after severe exercise or when 
heated. In hoisting them on board, the slings should be made fast to a 
hook at the end of the fall, or the knot tied by an expert seaman, so that 
it may be well secured and easily loosened. The horse should be run up 
quickly, to prevent him from plunging, and should be steadied by guide 
ropes. A halter is placed on him before he is lifted from the ground. 

878. On board, care is to be taken that the horses are not over-fed; 
bran should form part of their ration. The face, eyes, and nostrils of 
each horse are to be washed at the usual stable hours, and, occasionally, 
the mangers should be washed and the nostrils of the horses sponged 
with vinegar and water. 

879. In loading vessels with stores for a military expedition, the cargo 
of each should be composed of an assortment of such stores as may be 
available for service in case of the non-arrival of others, and they should 
be placed on board in such a manner that they may be easily reached, in 
the order in which they are required for service. Each store-ship should 
be marked, at the bow and stern, on both sides, in large characters, with 
a distinctive letter and number. A list is to be made of the stores on 
boai-d of each vessel, and of the place where they are to be found in it; 
a copy of this list to be sent to the chief officer of the proper depart¬ 
ment in the expedition, or at the place of destination. 





124 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Courts-Martial. 


ARTICLE XXXVIII. 

COURTS-MARTIAL. 

880. In appointing a general court-martial, as many members will be 
detailed, from five to thirteen inclusively, as can be assembled without 
manifest injury to the service. 

881. The decision of the officer appointing the court, as to the num¬ 
ber that can be assembled without manifest injury to the service, is con¬ 
clusive. 

882. A President of the court will not be appointed. The officer 
highest in rank present will be President. 

883. Form of Order appointing a general court-martial; the last para¬ 
graph omitted when the court can be kept up with thirteen members. 

Head-Quarters,-, &c. 

A General Court-martial is hereby appointed to meet at-, on 

the — day of -, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial 

of-and such other prisoners as may be brought before it. 

Detail for the Court: 

1 .- 8 .- 

2. -9.- 

3. -10.- 

4. - 11.- 

5. - 12.- 

6. - 13.- 

7. --, Judge Advocate. 

No other officers than those named can be assembled without manifest 
injury to the service. 

By order of-, commanding-. 

-, Assistant Adjutant^General. 

884. In the detail the members will be named, and they will take 
place in the court, in the order of their rank. A decision of the proper 
authority in regard to the rank of the members cannot be reversed by 
the court. 

885. The place of holding a court is appointed by the authority con¬ 
vening it. 

886. Application for delay or postponement of trial must, when prac¬ 
ticable, be made to the authority convening the court. When made to 
the court, it must be before plea, and will then, if in the opinion of the 
court well founded, be referred to the authority convening the court, to 




























FOR THE ARMY. 


12b 


Courts-Martial. 

decide whether the court should he adjourned or dissolved, and the 
charges reserved for another court. 

887. Upon application by the accused for postponement on the ground 
of the absence of a witness, it ought distinctly to appear on his oath, 1st. 
that the witness is material, and how; 2d. that the accused has used due 
diligence to procure his attendance; and, 3d. that he has reasonable 
ground to believe, and does believe, that he will be able to procure such 
attendance within a reasonable time stated. 

888. The President of a court-martial, besides his duties and privileges 
as member, is the organ of the court, to keep order and conduct its busi¬ 
ness. He speaks and acts for the court in each case where the rule has 
been prescribed by law, regulation, or its own resolution. In all their 
deliberations the law secures the equality of the members. 

889. The 76th Article of War does not confer on a court-martial the 
power to punish its own members. For disorderly conduct, a member is 
liable as in other offenses against military discipline; improper words are 
to be taken down, and any disorderly conduct of a member reported to 
the authority convening the court. 

890. The Judge Advocate shall summon the necessary witnesses for 
the trial; but he shall not summon any witness at the expense of the 
United States, nor any officer of the army, without the order of the court, 
unless satisfied that his testimony is material and necessary to the ends 
of justice. 

891. Every court-martial shall keep a complete and accurate record 
of its proceedings, to be authenticated by the signatures of the President 
and Judge Advocate; who shall also certify, in like manner, the sentence 
pronounced by the court in each case. The record must show that the 
court was organized as the law requires; that the court and Judge Advo¬ 
cate were duly sworn in the presence of the prisoner; that he was pre¬ 
viously asked whether he had any objection to any member, and his 
answer thereto. A copy of the order appointing the court will be 
entered on the record in each case. 

892. Whenever the same court-martial tries more prisoners than one, 
and they are arraigned on separate and distinct charges, the court is to 
be sworn at the commencement of each trial, and the proceedings in 
each case will be made up separately. 

. 893. The record shall be clearly and legibly written; as far as prac¬ 
ticable, without erasures or interliueations. The pages to be numbered, 
with a margin of one inch on the left side of each page, and at the top 
of the odd°and bottom of the even pages; through this last margin the 
sheets to be stitched together; the documents accompanying the pro- 




126 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Courts-Martial. 

ceedings to be noted and marked in such manner as to afford an easy 
reference. 

894. No recommendation will be embraced in the body of the sen¬ 
tence. Those members only who concur in the recommendation will 
sign it. 

895. The legal punishments for soldiers by sentence of a court-martial 
according to the offense, and the jurisdiction of the court, are—death; 
confinement; confinement on bread and water diet; solitary confinement; 
hard labor; ball and chain; forfeiture of pay and allowances; discharges 
from service; and reprimands, and, when non-commissioned officers, re¬ 
duction to the ranks. Ordnance Sergeants and Hospital Stewards, how¬ 
ever, though liable to discharge, may not be reduced. Nor are they to 
be tried by regimental or garrison courts-martial, unless by special per¬ 
mission of the department commander. Solitary confinement, or con¬ 
finement on bread and water, shall not exceed fourteen days at a time, 
with intervals between the periods of such confinement not less than 
such periods; and not exceeding eighty-four days in any one year. 

896. The Judge Advocate shall transmit the proceedings, without 
delay, to the officer having authority to confirm the sentence, who shall 
state, at the end of the proceedings in each case, his decision and orders 
thereon. 

897. The original proceedings of all general courts-martial, after the 
decision on them of the reviewing authority, and all proceedings that 
require the decision of the President under the 65th and 89th Articles 
of War, and copies of all orders confirming or disapproving, or remitting, 
the sentences of courts-martial, and all official communications for the 
Judge Advocate of the army, will be addressed to “ The Adjutant-Gene¬ 
ral of the Army , War Department” marked on the cover, i( Judge 
Advocate.” 

898. The proceedings of garrison and regimental courts-martial will be 
transmitted without delay by the garrison or regimental commander to 
the department head-quarters for the supervision of the department com¬ 
mander. 

899. The power to pardon or mitigate the punishment ordered by a 
court-martial is vested in the authority confirming the proceedings, and 
in the President of the United States. A superior military commander 
to the officer confirming the proceedings may suspend the execution of 
the sentence when, in his judgment, it is void upon the face of the pro¬ 
ceedings, or when he sees a fit case for executive clemency. In such 
cases, the record, with his order prohibiting the execution, shall be trans¬ 
mitted for the final orders of the President. 

900. When a court-martial or court of inquiry adjourns without day, 





FOR THE ARMY. 


127 


____ Working-Parties. 

the members will return to their respective posts and duties unless other¬ 
wise ordered. 

901. When a court adjourns for three days, the Judge Advocate shall 
report the fact to the commander of the post or troops, and the members 
belonging to the command will be liable to duty during the time. 


ARTICLE XXXIX. 

WORKING-PARTIES. 

902. When it is necessary to employ the army at work on fortifica¬ 
tions, in surveys, in cutting roads, and other constant labor of not less 
than ten days, the non-commissioned officers and soldiers so employed are 
enrolled as extra-duty men, and are allowed twenty-five cents a day when 
employed as laborers and teamsters, and forty cents a day when employed 
as mechanics, clerks, storekeepers, &c., at all stations east of the Rocky 
Mountains, and thirty-five and fifty cents per day, respectively, at all 
stations west of those mountains. But no man shall be rated and paid 
as a clerk or mechanic, who is not skilled in his particular employment; 
nor any man as a storekeeper, &c., whose trust is not of sufficient import¬ 
ance. Mere strikers, inferior workmen, &c. shall be rated as laborers. 
Commanding officers will particularly see to this; nor shall any soldier 
be rated at the higher pay, except by their order. 

903. Enlisted men of the Ordnance and Engineer Departments, and 
artificers of artillery, are not entitled to this allowance when employed in 
their appropriate work. 

904. Soldiers will not be employed as extra-duty men for any labor in 
camp or garrison which can properly be performed by fatigue parties. 

905. No extra-duty men, except those required for the ordinary service 
of the Quartermaster, Commissary, and Medical Departments, and sad¬ 
dlers in mounted companies, will be employed without previous authority 
from department head-quarters, except in case of necessity, which shall 
be promptly reported to the department commander. 

906. Extra-duty men should attend the weekly and monthly inspec¬ 
tions of their companies, and, if possible, one drill in every week. 

907. Extra-duty pay of the saddler in a mounted company will be 
charged on the company muster-roll, to be paid by the Paymaster and 
refunded by the Ordnance Department. Extra-duty pay of cooks and 
nurses in the hospital service will be paid by the quartermaster, in the 
absence of a medical disbursing officer, and refunded by the Medical 
Department. 

908. The officer commanding a working-party will conform to the 






128 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Recruiting Service.-Duties of Superintendents. 

directions and plans of the engineer or other officer directing the work, 
without regard to rank. 

909. A day’s work shall not exceed ten hours in summer, nor eight in 
winter. Soldiers are paid in proportion for any greater number of hours 
they are employed each day. Summer is considered to commence on the 
1st of April, and winter on the 1st of October. 

910. Although the necessities of the service may require soldiers to be 
ordered on working-parties as a duty, commanding officers are to bear in 
mind that fitness for military service by instruction and discipline is the 
object for which the army is kept on foot, and that they are not to 
employ the troops when not in the field, and especially the mounted 
troops, in labors that interfere with their military duties and exercises, 
except in case of immediate necessity, which shall be forthwith reported 
for the orders of the War Department. 

ARTICLE XL. 

RECRUITING SERVICE. 

911. The recruiting service will be conducted by the Adjutant-General, 
under the direction of the Secretary of War. 

912. Field officers will be detailed to superintend the recruiting dis¬ 
tricts, and lieutenants to take charge of the recruiting parties. The 
Adjutant-General will detail the field officers, and announce in orders the 
number of Captains and Lieutenants to be selected for this duty from each 
regiment by the Colonel. 

918. A recruiting party will consist generally of one lieutenant, one 
non-commissioned officer, two privates, and a drummer and lifer. The 
parties will be sent from the principal depots, and none but suitable men 
selected. 

914. Officers on the general recruiting service are not to be ordered on 
any other duty, except from the Adjutant-General’s office. 

DUTIES OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 

915. As soon as a recruiting station is designated, the superintendent 
sends estimates for funds to the Adjutant-General, and requisitions on 
the proper departments (through the Adjutant-General) for clothing, 
camp equipage, arms, and accoutrements. 

916. Subsequent supplies for the station in his district are procured 
by the superintendent on consolidated estimates; these are made quar¬ 
terly for funds, and every six or twelve months for clothing, equipage, 
arms, and accoutrements. Estimates for funds will be in the following 
form: 




FOR THE ARMY. 


129 


Recruiting Service.-Superintendents. 


Estimate of Recruiting Funds required for the 

during the quarter ending ,18 


Names. 

Rank. | 

Regiment. 

| Station. 

Amount ex¬ 
pended last 
quarter. 

Amount on 
hand. 

Amount 

required. 

Remarks. 

S 

Cts. 

$ 

Cts. 

$ 

Cts. 












Total amount required. 


■, Superintendent. 


917. Funds and supplies of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, 
arms and accoutrements, when ordered, will be sent direct to each station. 

918. For subsistence to recruiting stations, see regulations of the Sub¬ 
sistence Department. When army rations are issued for recruits, savings 
on the rations shall be applied for their benefit, as in companies. 

919. The superintendents will transmit to the Adjutant-General conso¬ 
lidated monthly returns of the recruiting parties under their super¬ 
intendence, according to directions on the printed blanks, accompanied by 
one copy of the enlistment of each recruit enlisted within the month. 

920. When recruits should be sent to regiments, a superintendent will 
report to the Adjutant-General for instructions in reference thereto. 

921. When recruits are sent from a dep6t or rendezvous to a regiment 
or post, a muster and descriptive roll, and an account of clothing of the 
detachment, will be given to the officer assigned to the command of it. 
And a duplicate of the muster and descriptive roll will be forwarded to 
the Adjutant-General by the superintendent, who will note on it the 
names of all the officers on duty with the detachment, and the day of its 
departure from the depot or rendezvous. 

922. The superintendent will report all commissioned or non-commis¬ 
sioned officers who may be incapable or negligent in the discharge of 
their functions. Where a recruiting party fails to get recruits from any 
cause other than the fault of the officer, the superintendent will recom¬ 
mend another station for the party. 

923. When a rendezvous is closed, the superintendent will give the 
necessary instruction^ for the safe-keeping or disposal of the public pro¬ 
perty, so as not to involve any expense for storage. 

924. Tours of inspection by superintendents will be made only on 

instructions from the Adjutant-General’s Office. Officers on the recruit- 

9 































130 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Duties of Recruiting Officers. 

ing service will not be sent from place to place without orders from the 
same source. 

DUTIES OE RECRUITING OFFICERS. 

925. Success in obtaining recruits depends much on the activity and 
personal attention of recruiting officers, and they will not entrust to en¬ 
listed men the duties for which themselves only are responsible. They 
will in no case absent themselves from their stations without authority 
from the superintendent. 

926. They will not allow any man to be deceived or inveigled into the 
service by false representations, but will in person explain the nature of 
the service, the length of the term, the pay, clothing, rations, and other 
allowances to which a soldier is entitled by law, to every man before he 
signs the enlistment. 

927. If minors present themselves, they are to be treated with great 
candor; the names and residences of their parents or guardians, if they 
have any, must be ascertained, and these will be informed of the minor’s 
wish to enlist, that they may make their objections or give their consent. 

928. With the sanction of superintendents, recruiting officers may 
insert, in not exceeding two newspapers, brief notices directing attention 
to the rendezvous for further information. 

929. Any free white male person above the age of eighteen and under 
thirty-five years, being at least five feet three inches high, effective, able- 
bodied, sober, free from disease, of good character and habits, and with a 
competent knowledge of the English language, may be enlisted. This 
regulation, so far as respects the height and aye of the recruit, shall not 
extend to musicians or to soldiers who may “re-enlist,” or have served 
honestly and faithfully a previous enlistment in the army. 

930. No man having a wife or child shall be enlisted in time of peace 
without special authority obtained from the Adjutant-General’s Office, 
through the superintendent. This rule is not to apply to soldiers who 
u re-enlist.” 

931. No person under the age of twenty-one years is to be enlisted or 
re-enlisted without the written consent of his parent, guardian, or master. 
The recruiting officers must be very particular in ascertaining the true 
age of the recruit. 

932. After the nature of the service and terms of enlistment have been 
fairly explained to the recruit, the officer, before the enlistments are filled 
up, will read to him, and offer for his signature, the annexed declaration, 
to be appended to each copy of his enlistment: 

I,-, desiring to enlist in the Army of the United States for the 

period of five years, do declare that I am-years and - 

months of age; that I have neither wife nor child; that I have never 







FOR THE ARMY. 


131 


___ D uties of Recruiting Officers. 

been discharged from the United States service on account of disability, 
or by sentence of a court-martial, or by order before the expiration of a 
teim of enlistment; and I know of no impediment to my serving honestly 

and faithfully as a soldier for five years. _ 

Witness: 


933. If the recruit be a minor, his parent, guardian, or master must 
sign a consent to his enlisting, which will be added to the preceding de¬ 
claration, in the following form: 

I) > do certify that I am the ( father, only surviving parent, legal 

master, or guardian, as the case may be) of-; that the said-is 

-years of age; and I do hereby freely give my consent to his en¬ 
listing as a soldier in the Army of the United States for the period of five 

years. - 

Witness: 


934. The forms of declaration, and of consent in case of a minor, 
having been signed and witnessed, the recruit will then be duly examined 
by the recruiting officer, and surgeon if one be present, and, if accepted, 
the 20th and 87th Articles of War will be read to him; after which he 
will be allowed time to consider the subject until his mind appears to be 
fully made up before the oath is administered to him. 

935. As soon as practicable, and at least within six days after his en¬ 
listment, the following oath will be administered to the recruit: 

“ I, A— B—, do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) that I 
will bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will 
serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers 
whatsoever, and observe and obey'the orders of the President of the 
United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according 
to the rules and articles for the government of the armies of the United 
States.” (See 10th Art. of War.) 

936. Under the 11th section of the act of 3d August, 1861, chap. 38, 
the oath of enlistment and re-enlistment may be administered by any com¬ 
missioned officer of the army. 

937. It is the duty of the recruiting officer to be present at the exami¬ 
nation of the recruit by the medical officer. (See par. 1261.) 

938. Recruiting officers will not employ private physicians without 
authority from the Adjutant-General’s Office, for the special purpose of 
examining the recruits prior to their enlisting. 

939. If it be necessary, as in case of sickness, to employ a physician, 
the recruiting officer may engage his services by contract on reasonable 
terms, “ by the visit/’ or by the month. If by the month, the examina- 


















132 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Duties of Recruiting Officers. 

tion of the recruits must be stated in the contract as part of his duty. 
In vouchers for medical attendance and medicines, the name of each 
patient, date of, and charge for, each visit, and for medicine furnished, 
must be given, and the certificate of the physician added, that the rates 
charged are the usual rates of the place. The physician will be paid from 
the recruiting funds. 

940. Enlistments must, in all cases, be taken in triplicate. The re¬ 
cruiting officer will send one copy to the Adjutant-General with his quar¬ 
terly accounts, a second to the superintendent with his monthly return, 
and a third to the depot at the time the recruits are sent there. In cases 
of soldiers re-enlisted in a regiment, or of regimental recruits, the third 
copy of the enlistment will be sent at its date to regimental head-quarters 
for file. 

941. When ordnance sergeants re-enlist, the recruiting officer will 
immediately send the second copy of the enlistment direct to the Ad¬ 
jutant-General, and the third copy to the station of the ordnance sergeant 
for file. 

942. Enlistments must, in no case, be ante-dated so as to entitle a sol¬ 
dier who applies after the period for “ re-enlisting” has expired, to any 
additional pay therefor. 

943. The recruiting officer will see that the men under his command 
are neat in their personal appearance, and will require the permanent 
party to wear their military dress in a becoming manner, especially when 
permitted to go abroad. 

944. Only such articles of clothing as are indispensable for immediate 
use will be issued to recruits at the rendezvous. Their equipment will 
not be made complete till after they have passed the inspection subsequent 
to their arrival at the depot. 

945. The instruction of the recruits will commence at the rendezvous 
from the moment of enlistment. The general superintendent will see 
that all recruiting officers give particular attention to this subject. 

946. Recruits will be sent from rendezvous to depots every ten days, 
or oftener if practicable, provided the number disposable exceeds three. 
The detachments of recruits will be sent from rendezvous to depots under 
charge of a non-commissioned officer. 

947. Before recruits are sent from recruiting depots to regiments or 
companies, the amounts due by them to the laundress and sutler, having 
been verified and audited, will be entered on a roll made for the purpose, 
and will be paid by the paymaster on his next visit at the post, the 
receipts of the laundress and sutler to the amounts paid being the voucher: 
Provided the recruits have a clear amount of pay due them, over and 
above their dues to the government, equal to the claims of the laundress 




FOR THE ARMY. 


133 


Rendezvous.-Blanks. 

and sutler. The same amounts will be entered on the muster and de¬ 
scriptive roll of the recruits as “amount paid laundress, or sutler,” 
(naming them,') to be deducted from the pay of the soldiers at their first 
subsequent payment. 

948. Every officer commanding a recruiting party will procure the 
necessary transportation, forage, fuel, straw, and stationery, taking the 
requisite vouchers. 

949. The transportation of recruits to depots, and from one recruiting 
station to another, will be paid from the recruiting funds; transportation 
of officers and enlisted men on the recruiting service will be paid in the 
same manner, except when first proceeding to join that service, or return¬ 
ing to their regiments after having been relieved. 

950. No expenses of transportation of officers will be admitted that do 
not arise from orders emanating from the Adjutant-General’s office, ex¬ 
cept they be required to visit branch or auxiliary rendezvous under their 
charge, when they will be allowed the stage, steamboat, or railroad fare, 
porterage included. 

951. Whenever an officer is relieved or withdrawn from the recruiting 
service, he will pay over the balance of any unexpended recruiting funds 
in his possession to the officer appointed to succeed him, or to the pay¬ 
master, if no officer be so designated; and if there be no paymaster or 
other proper officer convenient to receive such balance, the amount will 
be deposited to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States, with 
the most convenient Assistant Treasurer, or other depositary of public 
moneys. In either case the officer will forward to the Adjutant-General the 
evidence of the disposition he may make of the funds, and report the fact 
to the superintendent, or to his Colonel, if on regimental recruiting service. 

RENDEZVOUS, QUARTERING AND SUBSISTING RECRUITS. 

952. Written contracts will be made by recruiting officers for the rent 
qP ^ rendezvous upon the most reasonable terms possible. The rent will 
be paid from the recruiting funds. The terms of the contract will be 
immediately reported to the Adjutant-General. 

953. For the manner of subsisting recruits, see regulations of the 
Subsistence Department. 


BLANKS. 

954 Officers on recruiting service will make timely requisitions for 
printed blanks, direct, as follows. 

To the Adjutant-General. —For enlistments; re-enlistments; forms for 
medical inspection of recruits; muster-rolls; muster and descriptive rolls; 







184 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Furniture and Stationery.-Accounts, Returns, &c. 

monthly returns; tri-montlily reports; recruiting accounts current; 
accounts of clothing issued; posters or handbills. 

To the Quartermaster-General. —For estimates of clothing, camp and 
garrison equipage ) clothing receipt rolls ) quarterly returns of clothing, 
camp and garrison equipage. 

955. Of the blanks above named, none hut the printed forms furnished 
will be used. Other blanks, when required, must be ruled. 

956. Blanks for the regimental recruiting service are furnished to the 
company commanders. 

FURNITURE AND STATIONERY. 

957. The articles of -furniture and police utensils which may be abso¬ 
lutely necessary at a recruiting station may be procured by the officer in 
charge of the rendezvous, on the special authority of the superintendent. 

958. Necessary stationery will be purchased monthly or quarterly, not 
to exceed, per quarter at each station, six quires of paper, twenty-four 
quills, or twenty-four steel pens and two holders, half an ounce of wafers, 
one paper of ink-powder, one bottle of red ink, four ounces of sealing- 
wax, one quire of cartridge paper, or one hundred envelopes, one-fourth 
quire of blotting-paper, and one piece of tape. If necessary, an 
additional supply of one-fourth of these rates will be allowed to the re¬ 
cruiting officer having charge of one or more auxiliary rendezvous distant 
from his permanent station. At the principal dep6ts the allowance must 
be fixed by the wants of the public service. 

959. To each office table is allowed one inkstand, one wafer stamp, one 
wafer box, one paper-folder, one ruler, and as many lead-pencils as may 
be required, not exceeding four per annum. 

960. Such blank books as may be necessary are allowed to the general 
superintendent and at permanent recruiting depots; also, one descriptive 
book for the register of recruits at each permanent station. Blank books 
will be purchased by recruiting officers, under instructions from the 
superintendent. 

961. When a recruiting officer is relieved, the blanks, books, and un¬ 
expended stationery, with all the other public property at the station, will 
be transferred to his successor, who will receipt for the same. 

ACCOUNTS, RETURNS, ETC. 

962. The following are the accounts, returns, &c. to be rendered by 
officers on recruiting service : 

To the Adjutant-General. 

1. Recruiting accounts current , quarterly, with abstract, (Form C,) 
vouchers, (Form D,) and one set of enlistments. An account will 




FOR THE ARMY. 


135 


_Accounts, Returns, &c. 

be rendered by every officer who may receive funds, whether he 
makes expenditures or not during the quarter. 

2. A quar terly return of stationery, books, fuel, straw, and such other 
property as may have been purchased with the recruiting funds. 

3. A monthly summary statement of money received, expended, and 
remaining on hand, (Form E,) to be transmitted on the last day 
of each month. 

4. A muster-roll of all enlisted men at the rendezvous, including the 
names of all who may have joined, died, deserted, been transferred 
or discharged, during the period embraced in the muster-roll. 

T) {-monthly reports of the state of the recruiting service, accord¬ 
ing to the prescribed form. 

To the Superintendent. 

6. A monthly return of recruits and of the recruiting party, accom¬ 
panied with one copy of the enlistment of every recruit enlisted 
within the month. 

7. Duplicate muster-rolls for pay of the permanent recruiting party, 
which may be sent direct to the nearest paymaster, when 
authorized by the superintendent. A triplicate of this roll will 
be retained at the station. 

8. Muster and descriptive rolls and an account of clothing of every 
detachment of recruits ordered to the principal depot. If the re¬ 
cruits be ordered to proceed from the rendezvous direct , to join 
any regiment or post, these rolls and accounts of clothing will be 
delivered to the officer in command of the detachment, a duplicate 
of each muster and descriptive roll only being then made and 
sent to the superintendent. 

9. Copy of the quarterly abstract of contingent expenses; to be 
forwarded within three days after the expiration of each quarter. 

10. Quarterly estimates for funds. 

11. Estimates for clothing, and camp and garrison equipage, and for 
arms and accoutrements, for six or twelve months, or for such 
times as may be directed by the superintendent. 

12. Copy of the return No. 13. 

To the Quartermaster-General. 

13. A quarterly return of clothing and camp and garrison equipage, 
and of all quartermaster’s property in his possession, not including 
such as is purchased with the recruiting funds. 








136 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Accounts, Returns, &c. 

To the Ordnance Department. 

14. A quarterly return of arms, accoutrements, ammunition, and of 
all ordnance stores. 

RULES FOR MAKING ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS. 

963. The following rules must be observed in making out and for¬ 
warding accounts and papers: 

1. Letters addressed to the Adjutant-General u on recruiting service ,” 
will be so endorsed on the envelopes, under the words “ official 
business.” 

2. Each voucher must be separately entered on the abstract of 
contingent expenses, (Form E,) and only the gross amount of the 
abstract must be entered on the account current. 

3. No expenditure must be charged without a proper voucher to 
support it. (See Form D.) 

4. The receipt to the voucher must be signed, when practicable, by 
a principal. When this is not practicable, the recruiting officer 
will add to his own certificate a statement that the agent is duly 
authorized to sign the receipt. 

5. When an individual makes “his mark” instead of signing his 
name to the receipt, it must be witnessed by a third person. 

G. Expenditures must be confined to items stated in the Regulations. 
In an unforeseen emergency, requiring a deviation from this rule, 
a full explanation must be appended to the voucher for the ex¬ 
penditure ; and, if this be not satisfactory, the account will be 
charged in the Treasury against the recruiting officer. 

1. In all vouchers, the different items, with dates, and cost of each, 
must be given. To vouchers for transportation of officers, a copy 
of the order under which the journey was performed, must be 
appended. 

8. In vouchers for medical attendance and medicines, the name of 
each patient, date of, and charge for, each visit, and for medicine 
furnished, must be given, and the certificate of the physician 
added, that the rates charged are the usual rates of the place. 

9. To each voucher for notices inserted in newspapers a copy of 
the notice will be appended. 

10. Quarterly accounts current must exhibit the numbers of Treasury 
drafts and dates of their receipt; and when funds are transferred, 
the names of officers from whom they are received, or to whom 
they are turned over, with the dates of transfer. 

11. Fractions of cents are not to be taken up on accounts current. 

12. Enlistments must be filled up in a fair and legible hand. The 





FOR THE ARMY. 


137 


Depots for Collecting Recruits. 

real name of the recruit must be ascertained, correctly spelled, and 
written in the same way wherever it occurs; the Christian name 
must not be abbreviated. Numbers must be written, and not ex¬ 
pressed by figures. Each enlistment must be endorsed as follows:— 
No. —. 

A- B- 

enlisted at 


January —, 186-, 

By Lt. C-I)-, 

— Regiment of-. 

The number in each month to correspond with the names alpha¬ 
betically arranged. 

13. Whenever a soldier re-enters the service, the officer who enlisted 
him will endorse on the enlistment, next below his own name and 
regiment, “ second (or third) enlistment,” as the case may be, to¬ 
gether with the name of the regiment and the letter of the, com¬ 
pany in which the soldier last served, and date of discharge from 
former enlistment. This information the recruiting officer must 
obtain, if possible, from the soldier’s discharge, which he should 
in all cases be required to exhibit. (See 22d Art. of War.) 

14. Re-enlistments must be forwarded with recruiting accounts, al¬ 
though the bounty due on them may not be paid. When the bounty 
is subsequently paid, the soldier’s receipt is to be taken on a 
voucher showing date and place of re-enlistment, company and 
regiment, and by whom re-enlisted. 

15. The filling up of, and endorsement on, the enlistment, will be in 
the handwriting of the recruiting officer, or done under his imme¬ 
diate inspection. 

16. To facilitate the final settlement of accounts of discharged soldiers, 
the name of the State, as well as the town, where each recruit is en¬ 
listed, will be recorded on all muster, pay, and descriptive rolls. 

dep6ts for collecting and instructing recruits. 

964. The depots for recruits are established by orders from the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s Office. 

965. To each depot there will be assigned a suitable number of officers 
to command and instruct the recruits; and, when necessary, such number 
of enlisted men as may be designated at the Adjutant-General’s Office, will 
be selected for the permanent party, to do garrison duty and for drill-masters. 

966. The number of recruits at depots to be assigned to each arm and 
regiment is directed from the Adjutant-General’s Office. 













138 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Depots for Collecting Recruits. 

967. The recruits are to be dressed in uniform according to their 
respective arms, and will be regularly mustered and inspected. They 
are to be well drilled in the Infantry Tactics, through the school of the 
soldier to that of the battalion, and in the exercise of field and garrison 
pieces. Duty is to be done according to the strict rules of service. 

968. The general superintendent will cause such of the recruits as are 
found to possess a natural talent for music, to be instructed (besides the 
drill of the soldier) on the fife, bugle, and drum, and other military in¬ 
struments ; and boys of twelve years of age, and upward, may, under his 
direction, be enlisted for this purpose. But as recruits under eighteen 
years of age and under size must be discharged, if they are not capable 
of learning music, care should be taken to enlist those only who have a 
natural talent for music, and, if practicable, they should be taken on trial 
for some time before being enlisted. 

969. Regiments will be furnished with field music on the requisitions 
of their commanders, made, from time to time, direct on the general super¬ 
intendent; and, when requested by regimental commanders, the super¬ 
intendents will endeavor to have suitable men selected from the recruits, 
or enlisted, for the regimental bands. 

970. At every depot pains will be taken to form from the permanent 
party a body of competent cooks, some of whom will be sent with every 
large draft of recruits ordered to regiments. 

971. To give encouragement to the recruits, and hold out inducements 
to good conduct, the commanding officer of the depot may promote such 
of them as exhibit the requisite qualifications to be lance corporals and 
lance sergeants, not exceeding the proper proportion to the number of 
recruits at the depot. These appointments will be announced in orders 
in the usual way, and will be continued in force until they join their 
regiments, unless sooner revoked. No allowance of pay or emoluments 
is to be assigned to these appointments: they are only to be considered 
as recommendations to the captains of companies and colonels of regi¬ 
ments for the places in which the recruits may have acted; but such 
non-commissioned officers are to be treated with all the respect and to 
have all the authority which may belong to the stations of sergeant and 
corporal. 

972. Permanent parties at depots, and recruiting parties and recruits, 
will be mustered, inspected, and paid in the same manner as other 
soldiers. Recruits will be mustered for pay only at depots, and, when 
paid there, one-half of their monthly pay will be retained until they join 
their regiments. 

973. When recruits are received at a garrisoned post, the commanding 
officer will place them under the charge of a commissioned officer. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


139 


_ Inspection of Re cruits at Depots and Posts.-Rejected Recruits. 

974. Recruits are not to be put to any labor or work which would in¬ 
terfere with their instruction, nor are they to be employed otherwise 
than as soldiers, in the regular duties of garrison and camp. 

975. The Rules and Articles of War are to he read to the recruits 
every month, after the inspection; and so much thereof as relates to the 
duties of non-commissioned officers and soldiers will be read to them every 
week. 


INSPECTION OF RECRUITS AT DEPOTS AND POSTS. 

976. The superintendent or commanding officer will cause a minute and 
critical inspection to be made of every recruit received at a dep6t, two 
days after his arrival; and should any recruit be found unfit for service, 
or to have been enlisted contrary to law or regulations, he shall assemble 
a Board of Inspectors , to examine into the case. A board may also be 
assembled in a special case, when a concealed defect may become manifest 
in a recruit, at any time during his detention at the depot. 

977. Every draft of recruits ordered from a depot to any regiment or 
post, shall, immediately preceding its departure, be critically inspected by 
the superintendent or commanding officer, and surgeon; and, when neces¬ 
sary, a Board of Inspectors will be convened. 

978. Recruits received at a military post or station shall be carefully 
inspected by the commanding officer and surgeon, on the third day after 
their arrival; and if, on such inspection, any recruit, in their opinion, be 
unsound or otherwise defective, in such degree as to disqualify him for 
the duties of a soldier, then a Board of Inspectors will be assembled to 
examine into and report on the case. (See paragraphs 979, 980, 981.) 

979. Boards for the inspection of recruits will be composed of the com¬ 
manding officer, the senior medical officer of the army present, and, if 
possible, the three senior regimental officers present on duty with the 
troops. 

REJECTED RECRUITS. 

980. In all cases of rejection, the reasons therefor will be stated at large 
in a special report , to be made by the board; which, together with the 
surgeon’s certificate of disability for service, will be forwarded by the 
superintendent or commandant of the post direct to the Adjutant-General. 
In all such cases the commanding officer will cause the articles of clothing, 
which may have been issued to the recruit, with the price of each article, 
to be endorsed on the certificates of disability. If the recommendation 
of the board for the discharge of the recruit be approved, the authority 
therefor will be endorsed on the certificate, which will be sent back to be 
filled up and signed by the commanding officer, who will return the same 
to the Adjutant-General’s Office. 






140 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Recruits sent to Regiments. 

981. The board will state in the report whether the disability, or other 
cause of rejection, existed before his enlistment; and whether with proper 
care and examination it might not have been discovered. 

RECRUITS SENT TO REGIMENTS. 

982. An officer intrusted with the command of recruits ordered to 
regiments, will, on arriving at the place of destination, forward the follow¬ 
ing papers: 

1. To the Adjutant- General and the Superintendent, each, a descrip¬ 
tive roll and an account of clothing of such men as may have 
deserted, died, or been left on the route from any cause whatever, 
with date and place; also, a special report of the date of his arrival 
at the post, the strength and condition of the party when turned 
over to the commanding officer, and all circumstances worthy of 
remark which may have occurred on the march. 

2. To the Commanding Officer of the regiment, or post, the muster 
and descriptive roll furnished him at the time of setting out, 
properly signed and completed by recording the names of the re¬ 
cruits present, and by noting in the column for remarks, opposite 
the appropriate spaces, the time and place of death, desertion, ap¬ 
prehension, or other casualty that may have occurred on the route. 

983. Should an officer be relieved in charge of a party of recruits en 
route, before it reaches its destination, the date and place, and name of 
the officer by whom he is relieved, must be recorded on the roll of the 
party. Without the evidence of such record, no charge for extra pay on 
account of clothing accountability of the party, where equal to a company, 
will be allowed. 

984. The “ original muster and descriptive roll” of every draft, with 
remarks showing the final disposition of each recruit, and the regiment 
and letter of the company to which he may be assigned, will be signed 
and forwarded to the Adjutant-General by the commanding officer who 
makes the assignment. If the recruits embraced in one roll happen to 
be assigned to different posts, the original roll is to continue with the 
last party to its destination, each commander completing it so far as con¬ 
cerns the recruits left at his post. When this is not practicable, extracts 
from the original roll are to be made by the authority which distributes 
the recruits, to accompany the several parties, and to be forwarded to the 
Adjutant-General as in case of the original roll. 

REGIMENTAL RECRUITING SERVICE. 

985. The regimental recruiting will be conducted in the manner pro¬ 
scribed for the general service. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


141 


Regimental Recruiting Service. 

986. Every commander of a regiment is the superintendent of the 
recruiting service for his regiment, and will endeavor to keep it up to its 
establishment; for which purpose he will obtain the necessary funds, 
clothing, &c., by requisition on the Adjutant-General. 

987. At every station occupied by his regiment, or any part of it, the 
colonel will designate a suitable officer to attend to the recruiting duties; 
which selection will not relieve such officer from his company or other 
ordinary duties. The officer thus designated will be kept constantly fur¬ 
nished with funds, and, when necessary, with clothing and camp equip- 
age. 

988. The regimental recruiting officer will, with the approbation of the 
commanding officer of the station, enlist all suitable men. He will be 
governed, in rendering his accounts and returns, by the rules prescribed 
for the general service; and, when leaving a post, will turn over the funds 
in his hands to the senior company officer of his regiment present, unless 

’ some other be appointed to receive them. 





Dr. THE UNITED STATES 


142 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


<i 


& 


Ph 

O 

Ph 


Recruiting Service.-Forms. 






nS 

a 

c3 

a 

a 


ns 

a 

a 

.3 


TJ 

a 


bO 


C 


© 

u 

« 



Received from the United States-dollars and-cents, in full of the above account. 
























FORM B. 

Abstract of rations issued to recruits stationed at -, under 




o* © 

« s 

e -c 

i § 
s ^ 






FOR THE ARMY. 


143 


Recruiting Service.-Forms. 


I certify that I have carefully compared the above abstract with the original returns now in my possession, and they amount to 
— complete rations. 
































144 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Recruiting Service.-Forms. 


FORM C. 

Abstract of disbursements on account of contingencies of the recruiting 

service, by - - ; in the quarter ending -, 18 —, 

at -. 


No. of 
voucher. 


Date of pay¬ 
ment. 


To whom paid. 


On what account. 


Amount. 


Dolls. Cts 


Recruiting Officer. 






















FOR THE ARMY. 


145 


Recruiting Service.-Forms. 


FORM D. 

The United States, 


To 


Dr. 


I ate. 


For 


Dolls. 

Cts. 






I certify that the above account is correct. 


Recruiting Officer. 

Received-- this - day of -, 18—, of-, recruiting 

0 ffi cerj _dollars and-cents, in full of the above account. 


$ 

_. (DUPLICATE.) 


10 























MONTHLY SUMMARY STATEMENT. 


146 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Recruiting Service.-Forms. 


O 


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M 

35 

P 

W 

HI 

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Note.—N o vouchers accompany this statement. 








































FOR THE ARMY. 


14, 


Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 


ARTICLE XLI. 

PUBLIC PROPERTY, MONEY, AND ACCOUNTS. 

989. All officers of the Pay, Commissary, and Quartermaster’s Depart¬ 
ments, and military store-keepers, shall, previous to their entering on the 
duties of their respective offices, give good and sufficient bonds to the 
United States fully to account for all moneys and public property which 
they may receive, in such sums as the Secretary of War shall direct; and 
the officers aforesaid shall renew their bonds every four years, and oftener 
if the Secretary of War shall so require, and whenever they receive a 
new commission or appointment. 

990. The sureties to the bond shall be bound jointly and severally for 
the whole amount of the bond, and shall satisfy the Secretary of War 
that they are worth jointly double the amount of the bond, by the 
affidavit of each surety, stating that he is worth, over and above his debts 
and liabilities, the amount of the bond or such other sum as he may 
specify; and each surety shall state his place of residence. 

991. The chiefs of disbursing departments who submit requisitions for 
money to be remitted to disbursing officers, shall take care that no more 
money than actually needed is in the hands of any officer. 

992. The Treasury Department having provided, by arrangement 
with the assistant treasurers at various points, secure depositories for 
funds in the hands of disbursing officers, all disbursing officers are 
required to avail themselves, as far as possible, of this arrangement, by 
depositing with the assistant treasurers such funds as are not wanted for 
immediate use, and drawing the same in convenient sums as wanted. 

993. No public funds shall be exchanged except for gold and silver. 
When the funds furnished are gold and silver, all payments shall be in 
gold and silver. When the funds furnished are drafts, they shall be 
presented at the place of payment, and paid according to law; and pay¬ 
ments shall be made in the funds so received for the drafts, unless said 
funds or said drafts can be exchanged for gold and silver at par. If any 
disbursing officer shall violate any of these provisions, he shall be sus¬ 
pended by the Secretary of War, and reported to the President, and 
promptly removed from office or restored to his trust and duties as to the 
President may seem just and proper. (Act August 6, 1846.) 

994. No disbursing officer shall accept, or receive, or transmit to the 
Treasury to be allowed in his favor, any receipt or voucher from a 
creditor of the United States without having paid to such creditor, in 
such funds as he received for disbursement, or such other funds as he is 







148 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 

authorized by the preceding article to take in exchange, the full amount 
specified in such receipt or voucher; and ever^ such act shall be deemed 
to be a conversion to his own use of the amount specified in such receipt 
or voucher. And no officer in the military service charged with th& 
safe-keeping, transfer, or disbursement of public money, shall convert to 
his own use, or invest in any kind of merchandise or property, or loan 
with or without interest, or deposit in any bank, or exchange for other 
funds, except as allowed in the preceding article, any public money 
intrusted to him; and every sueh act shall be deemed to be a felony and 
an embezzlement of so much money as may be so taken, converted, 
invested, used, loaned, deposited, or exchanged. (Act August 6, 1846.) 

995. Any officer who shall directly or indirectly sell or dispose of, for 
a premium, any Treasury note, draft, warrant, or other public security in 
his hands for disbursement, or sell or dispose of the proceeds or avails 
thereof without making returns of such premium and accounting therefor 
by charging it in his accounts to the credit of the United States, will 
forthwith be dismissed by the President. (Act August 6, 1846.) 

996. If any disbursing officer shall bet at cards or any game of hazard, 
his commanding officer shall suspend his functions, and require him to 
turn over all the public funds in his keeping, and shall immediately 
report the case to the proper bureau of the War Department. 

997. All officers are forbid to give or take any receipt in blank for 
public money or property; but in all cases the voucher shall be made 
out in full, and the true date, place, and exact amount of money, in 
words, shall be written out in the receipt before it is signed. 

998. When a signature is not written by the hand of the party, it 
must be witnessed. 

999. No advance of public money shall be made, except advances to 
disbursing officers, and advances by order of the War Department to 
officers on distant stations, where they cannot receive their pay and 
emoluments regularly; but in all cases of contracts for the performance 
of any service, or the delivery of articles of any description, payment 
shall not exceed the value of the service rendered, or of the articles 
delivered, previously to such payment. 

1000. No officer disbursing or directing the disbursement of money for 
the military service shall be concerned, directly or indirectly, in the 
purchase or sale, for commercial purposes, of any article intended for, 
making a part of, or appertaining to the department of the public service 
in which he is engaged, nor shall take, receive, or apply to his own use 
any gain or emolument, under the guise of presents or otherwise, for nego¬ 
tiating or transacting any public business, other than what is or may be 
allowed by law. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


149 


Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 

1001. No wagon-master or forage-master shall be interested or concerned. 
directly or indirectly, in any wagon or other means of transport employed 
by the United States, nor in the purchase or sale of any property pro¬ 
cured for or belonging to the United States, except as the agent of the 
United States. 

1002. No officer or agent in the military service shall purchase from 
any other person in the military service, or make any contract with any 
such person to furnish supplies or services, or make any purchase or con¬ 
tract in which such person shall be admitted to any share or part, or to 
any benefit to arise therefrom. 

1003. No person in the military service whose salary, pay, or emolu¬ 
ments is or are fixed by law or regulations, shall receive any additional 
pay, extra allowance, or compensation in any form whatever, for the dis¬ 
bursement of public money, or any other service or duty whatsoever, 
unless the same shall be authorized by law, and explicitly set out in the 
appropriation. 

1004. All accounts of expenditures shall set out a sufficient explanation 
of the object, necessity, and propriety of the expenditure. 

1005. The facts on which au account depends must be stated and 
vouched by the certificate of an officer, or other sufficient evidence. 

1006. If any account paid on the certificate of an officer to the facts is 
afterward disallowed for error of fact in the certificate, it shall pass to the 
credit of the disbursing officer, and be charged to the officer who gave 
the certificate. 

1007. An officer shall have credit for an expenditure of money or 
property made in obedience to the order of his commanding officer. If 
the expenditure is disallowed, it shall be charged to the officer who 
ordered it. 

1008. Disbursing officers, when they have the money, shall pay cash, 
and not open an account. Heads of bureaus shall take care, by timely 
remittances, to obviate the necessity of any purchases on credit. 

1009. When a disbursing officer is relieved, he shall certify the out¬ 
standing debts to his successor, and transmit an account of the same to 
the head of the bureau, and turn over his public money and property 
appertaining to the service from which he is relieved to his successor, 
unless otherwise ordered. 

1010. The chief of each military bureau of the War Department shall, 
under the direction of the Secretary of War, regulate, as far as prac¬ 
ticable, the employment of hired persons required for the administrative 
service of his department. 

1011. When practicable, persons hired in the military service shall be 




150 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 

paid at the end of the calendar month, and when discharged. Separate 
pay-rolls shall be made for each month. 

1012. When a hired person is discharged and not paid, a certified 
statement of his account shall be given him. 

1013. Property, paid for or not, must be taken up on the return, and 
accounted for when received. 

1014. No officer has authority to insure public property or money. 

1015. Disbursing officers are not authorized to settle with heirs, exe¬ 
cutors, or administrators, except by instructions from the proper bureau 
of the War Department upon accounts duly audited and certified by the 
proper accounting officers of the Treasury. 

1016. Public horses, mules, oxen, tools, and implements shall be 
branded conspicuously U. S. before being used in service, and all other 
public property that it may be useful to mark; and all public property 
having the brand of the U. S. when sold or condemned, shall be branded 
with the letter C. 

1017. No public property shall be used, nor labor hired for the public 
be employed, for any private use whatsoever not authorized by the regu¬ 
lations of the service. 

1018. When public property becomes damaged, except by fair wear 
and tear, or otherwise unsuitable for use, or a deficiency is foyind in it, 
the officer accountable for the same shall report the case to the command¬ 
ing officer, who shall, if necessary, appoint a Board of Survey. 

1019. Boards of Survey shall have no power to condemn public pro¬ 
perty. They are called only for the purpose of establishing data by which 
questions of administrative responsibility may be determined, and the 
adjustment of accounts facilitated; as, for example, to assess the amount 
and kind of damage or deficiency which public property may have 
sustained from any extraordinary cause, not ordinary wear, either in 
transit or in store, or in actual use, whether from accident, unusual wast- 
age, or otherwise, and to set forth the circumstances and fix the responsi¬ 
bility of such damage, whether on the carrier, or the person accountable 
for the property or having it immediately in charge; to make inventories 
of property ordered to be abandoned, when the articles have not been 
enumerated in the orders; to assess the prices at which damaged, clothing 
may be issued to troops, and the proportion in which supplies shall be 
issued in consequence of damage that renders them at the usual rate 
unequal to the allowance which the Regulations contemplate; to verify 
the discrepancy between the invoices and the actual quantity or descrip¬ 
tion of property transferred from one officer to another, and ascertain, as far 
as possible, where and how the discrepancy has occurred, whether in the 
hands of the carrier or the officer making the transfer; and to make 




FOR THE ARMY. 


151 


♦ 


Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 

inventories and report on tlie condition of public property in the possession 
of officers at the time of their death. The action of the board for 
these authorized objects will be complete with the approval of the command¬ 
ing officer, provided that neither he nor any of the board are interested 
parties; but will be subject to revision by higher authority. In no case, 
however, will the report of the board supersede the depositions which 
the law requires with reference to deficiencies and damage. 

1020. Boards of Survey will not be convened by any other than the 
commanding officer present, and will be composed of as many officers, 
not exceeding three, as may be present for duty, exclusive always of the 
commanding officer and the officer responsible in the matter to be reported 
on; but in case the two latter only are present, then the one not responsible 
will perform the duties, and the responsible officer will perform them only 
if there be no other recourse. The proceedings of the board will be 
signed by each member, and a copy forwarded by the approving officer to 
the head-quarters of the department or army in the field, as the case may 
be, duplicates being furnished to the officer accountable for the property. 

1021. All surveys and reports having in view the condemnation of 
public property, for whatever cause, will be made by the commanding 
officers of posts or other separate commands, or by Inspectors-General, or 
inspectors specially designated by the commander of a department or an 
army in the field, or by higher authority. Such surveys and reports 
having a different object from those of Boards of Survey, will be required 
independently of any preliminary action of a board on the same matter. 

1022. When public property is received by any officer, he will make a 
careful examination to ascertain its quality and condition, but without 
breaking packages until issues are to be made, unless there should be 
cause to suppose the contents defective; and in any of the cases supposed 
in the preceding paragraph, he will apply for a Board of Survey for the 
purposes therein set forth. If he deem the property unfit for use and 
that the public interest requires it to be condemned , he will, in addition, 
report that fact to the commanding officer, who will make, or cause to be 
made, a critical inspection of it—according as he may be commander of 
a post only, or have a higher command. If the inspector deem the pro¬ 
perty fit, it shall be received and used. If not, he will forward a formal 
inspection report to the commander empowered to give orders in the case. 
The same rule will be observed, according to the nature of the case, with 
reference to property already on hand. The person accountable for the 
property, or having it in charge, will submit an inventory, which will 
accompany or be embodied in the inspection report, stating how long the 
property has been in his possession, how long in use, and from whom it was 
received. The inspector’s report will state the exact condition of each 






152 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 

article, and what disposition it is expedient to make of it: as, to he de¬ 
stroyed, to be dropped as being of no value, to be broken up, to be 
repacked or repaired, or to be sold. The inspector will certify on his 
report that he has examined each article, and that its condition is as 
stated. If the commanding officer, who ordinarily would be the inspector, 
is himself accountable for the property, the next officer in rank present 
for duty will act as the inspector. The authority to inspect and condemn 
will not, without special instructions, be exercised by commanding officers 
of arsenals with reference to ordnance and ordnance stores, but only in 
regard to other unserviceable supplies. 

1023. An officer commanding a department, or an army in the field, 
may give orders, on the report of the authorized inspectors, to sell, destroy, 
or make such other disposition of any condemned property as the case 
may require—ordnance and ordnance stores alone excepted, for which 
the orders of the War Department must always be taken. But if the 
property be of very considerable value, and there should be reason to 
suppose that it could be advantageously applied or disposed of elsewhere 
than within his command, he will refer the matter to the Chief of the 
Staff Department to which it belongs, for the orders of the War Depart¬ 
ment. No other persons than those above designated, or the General-in¬ 
chief, will order the final disposition of condemned property; saving only 
in the case of horses which should be killed at once to prevent contagion, 
and of provisions or other stores which are rapidly deteriorating, when 
the immediate commander may have to act perforce. Inventories of 
condemned property will be made in triplicate, one to be retained by the 
person accountable, one to accompany his accounts, and one to be for¬ 
warded through the department or other superior head-quarters to the 
Chief of the Staff Department to which the property belongs. Separate 
inventories must be made of the articles to be repaired, of those to be 
broken up, those to be sold, to be dropped, &c. 

1024. Every inspector, member of a Board of Survey, and commander 
acting on their proceedings, shall be answerable that his action has been 
proper and judicious, according to the Regulations and the circumstances 
of the case. 

1025. As far as practicable, every officer in charge of public property, 
whether it be in use or in store, will endeavor by timely repairs to keep 
it in serviceable condition, for which purpose the necessary means will 
be allowed on satisfactory requisitions; and property in store so repaired 
will be issued for further use. Unserviceable arms will be sent to an 
arsenal for repair. Provisions and other perishable stores will be repacked 
whenever it may be necessary for their preservation and their value will 
justify the expense, which will be a legitimate charge against the depart- 




FOR THE ARMY. 


153 


__Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 

ment to which they belong. Public animals will not be condemned for 
temporary disease or want of condition, but may, by order of the com¬ 
manding officer after inspection, be turned in for rest and treatment, if 
unfit for the service for which they are immediately required. 

1026. Public property shall not be transferred gratuitously from one 
staff department to another; nor shall the funds of one be used to liquid¬ 
ate the debts of another. 

1027. If any article of public property be lost or damaged by neglect 
or fault of any officer or soldier, he shall pay the value of such article, or 
amount of damage, or cost of repairs, at such rates as a Board of Survey, 
with the approval of the commanding officer, may assess, according to 
the place and circumstances of the loss or damage. And he shall, more¬ 
over, be proceeded against as the Articles of War provide, if he demand 
a trial by court-martial, or the circumstances should require it. 

1028. Charges against a soldier shall be set against his pay on the 
muster-roll—but only on clear proof, and never without an inquiry, if he 
demand it. Charges against an officer to be set against his pay shall be 
promptly reported to the Secretary of War.* 

1029. If any article of public property be embezzled, or by neglect 
lost or damaged, by any person hired in the public service, the value or 
damage, as ascertained, if necessary, by a Board of Survey, shall be 
charged to him, and set against any pay or money due him. 

1030. Public property lost or destroyed in the military service must 

be accounted for by affidavit, or the certificate of a commissioned officer, 
or other satisfactory evidence. . 

1031. Affidavits or depositions may be taken before any officer in the 
list, as follows, when recourse cannot be had to any before named on said 
list, which fact shall be certified by the officer offering the evidence : 1st. 
a civil magistrate competent to administer oaths; 2d. a judge advocate; 
3d. the recorder of a garrison or regimental court-martial; 4th. the adju¬ 
tant of a regiment; 5th. a commissioned officer. 

1032. Military stores and other army supplies regularly condemned, 
and ordered for sale, shall be sold for cash at auction, on due public 
notice, and in such market as the public interest may require. The 
officer making the sale will bid in and suspend the sale when, in his 
opinion, better prices may be got. Expenses of the sale will be paid from 
its proceeds. The auctioneer’s certified account of the sales in detail, 
and the vouchers for the expenses of the sale, will be reported to the 


* If the pay of any officer or soldier is wrongfully withheld for arrears or liabilities to 
the United States, a civil remedy is provided by the act of January 25, 1828. 








154 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Public Property, Money, and. Accounts. 

chief of the department to which the property belonged. The net pro¬ 
ceeds will be applied as the Secretary of War may direct. 

1033. No officer making returns of property shall drop from his return 
any public property as worn out or unserviceable until it has been con¬ 
demned, after proper inspection, and ordered to be so dropped. 

1034. An officer issuing stores shall deliver or transmit to the receiving 
officer an exact list of them in duplicate invoices, and the receiving officer 
shall return him duplicate receipts. 

1035. When an officer to whom stores are forwarded has reason to 
suppose them miscarried, he shall promptly inform the issuing and for¬ 
warding officer, and the bureau of the department to which the property 
appertains. 

1036. When stores received do not Correspond in amount or quality 
with the invoice, they will be examined by a Board of Survey, and a copy 
of the report of the board be communicated to the proper bureau, to the 
issuing and forwarding officer, and to the officer authorized to pay the 
transportation account. Damages recovered from the carrier or other 
party liable, will be refunded to the proper department. 

1037. On the death of any officer in charge of public property or 
money, the commanding officer shall appoint a Board of Survey to take 
an inventory of the same, which he shall forward to the proper bureau 
of the War Department, and he shall designate an officer to take charge 
of the said property or money till orders in the case are received from 
the proper authority. 

1038. Wh$n an officer in charge of public property is removed from 
the care of it, the commanding officer shall designate an officer to re¬ 
ceive it, or take charge of it himself, till a successor be regularly ap¬ 
pointed. Where no officer can remain to receive it, the commanding 
officer will take suitable means to secure it, and report the facts to the 
proper authority. 

1039. Every officer having public money to account for, and failing to 
render his account thereof quarter-yearly, with the vouchers necessary to 
its correct and prompt settlement, within three months after the expira¬ 
tion of the quarter if resident in the United States, and within six 
months if resident in a foreign country, will be promptly dismissed by 
the President, unless he shall explain the default to the satisfaction of 
the President. (Act January 31, 1823.) 

1040. Every officer intrusted with public money or property shall 
render all prescribed returns and accounts to the bureau of the depart¬ 
ment in which he is serving, where all such returns and accounts shall 
pass through a rigid administrative scrutiny before the money accounts 




FOR THE ARMY. 


155 


Contracts and Purchases. 

are transmitted to the proper offices of the Treasury Department for 
settlement. 

1041. The head of the bureau shall cause his decision on each account 
to he endorsed on it. He shall bring to the notice of the Secretary of 
War all accounts and matters of account that require or merit it. 
When an account is suspended or disallowed, the bureau shall notify it 
to the officer, that he may have early opportunity to submit explanations 
or take an appeal to the Secretary of War. 

1042. When an account is suspended or disallowed in the proper office 
of the Treasury Department, or explanation or evidence required from 
the officer, it shall be promptly notified to him by the head of the mili¬ 
tary bureau. And all vouchers, evidence, or explanation returned by 
him to the Treasury Department shall pass through the bureau. 

1043. Chiefs of the disbursing departments shall, under the direction 
of the Secretary of War, designate, as far as practicable, the places 
where the principal contracts and purchases shall be made and supplies 
procured for distribution. 

1044. All purchases and contracts for supplies or services for the army, 
except personal services, when the public exigencies do not require the 
immediate delivery of the article or performance of the service, shall be 
made by advertising a sufficient time previously for proposals respecting 
the same. 

1045. The officer advertising for proposals shall, when the intended 
contract or purchase is considerable, transmit forthwith a copy of the 
advertisement and report of the case to the proper bureau of the War 
Department. 

1046. Contracts will be made with the lowest responsible bidder, and 
purchases from the lowest bidder who produces the proper article. But 
when such lowest bids are unreasonable, they will he rejected, and bids 
again invited by public notice ; and all bids and advertisements shall be 
sent to the bureau. 

1047. When sealed bids are required, the time of opening them shall 
be specified, and bidders have privilege to be present at the opening. 

1048. When immediate delivery or performance is required by the 
public exigency, the article or service required may be procured by open 
purchase or contract at the places and in the mode in which such articles 
are usually bought and sold, or such services engaged, between in¬ 
dividuals. 

1049. Contracts shall be made in quadruplicate; one to be kept 
by the officer, one by the contractor, and two to be sent to the military 
bureau, one of which for the office of the Second Comptroller of the 
Treasury. 






156 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Contracts and Purchases.-Abstracts. 

1050. The contractor shall give bond, with good and sufficient security, 
for the true and faithful performance of his contract; and each surety 
shall state his place of residence. 

1051. An express condition shall be inserted in contracts that no 
member of Congress shall be admitted to any share or part therein, or 
any benefit to arise therefrom. 

1052. No contract shall be made except under a law authorizing it, or 
an appropriation adequate to its fulfilment, except contracts by the Secre¬ 
tary of War for the subsistence or clothing of the army, or the Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, which shall not exceed the necessities of the current 
year. 

1053. It is the duty of every commanding officer to enforce a rigid 
economy in the public expenses. 

1054. The commander of a geographical district or department shall 
require abstracts to be rendered to him, at least once in each quarter, by 
every officer under his orders who is charged with the care of public 
property or the disbursement of public money, showing all property 
received, issued, and expended by the officer rendering the account, and 
the property remaining on hand, and all moneys received, paid, or con¬ 
tracted to be paid by him, and the balances remaining in his hands; and 
where such officer is serving under any intermediate commander, as of 
the post, regiment, &c., the abstracts shall be revised by such commander; 
and both the accounting officer and the commanding officer shall accom¬ 
pany the abstracts with full explanations of every circumstance that may 
be necessary to a complete understanding, by the commander of the de¬ 
partment, of all the items on the abstracts. These abstracts, where the 
accounting officer is serving in more than one staff department, will be 
made separately for each. 

1055. The commander of the department shall promptly correct all 
irregularities and extravagances which he may discover. He shall also 
forward, as soon as practicable, the money abstracts to the bureau of the 
War Department to which the accounts appertain, with such remarks as 
may be necessary to explain his opinions and action thereon. 

1056. All estimates for supplies of property or money for the public 
service within a department shall be forwarded through the commander 
of the department, and carefully revised by him. And all such estimates 
shall go through the immediate commander, if such there be, of the 
officer rendering the estimate, as of the post or regiment, who shall be 
required by the department commander to revise the estimates for the 
service of his own command. 

1057. The administrative control exercised by department commanders 
shall, when troops are in the field, devolve on the commanders of 





FOR THE ARMY. 


157 


Signal Officer. 

divisions; or, when the command is less than a division, on the commander 
of the whole. 

1058. No land shall be purchased for the United States except under 
a law authorizing such purchase. 

1059. No public money shall be expended for the purchase of any 
land, nor for erecting armories, arsenals, forts, fortifications, or other per¬ 
manent public buildings, until the written opinion of the Attorney-Gene¬ 
ral shall be had in favor of the validity of the title to the land or site, 
nor, if the land be within any State of the United States, until a cession 
of the jurisdiction by the Legislature of the State. 

1060. No permanent buildings for the army, as barracks, quarters, 
hospitals, store-houses, offices, or stables, or piers, or wharves, shall be 
erected but by order of the Secretary of War, and according to the plan 
directed by him, and in consequence of appropriations made by law. And 
no alteration shall be made in any such public building without authority 
from the War Department. 

1061. Complete title papers, with full and exact maps, plans, and draw¬ 
ings of the public lands purchased, appropriated, or designed for perma¬ 
nent military fortifications, will be collected, recorded, and filed in the 
Bureau of the Corps of Engineers; of the public lands appropriated or 
designated for armories, arsenals, and ordnance depots, will be collected, 
recorded, and filed in the Ordnance Bureau; of all other land belonging 
to the United States, and under the charge of the War Department for 
barracks, posts, cantonments, or other military uses, will be collected, 
recorded, and filed in the office of the Quartermaster-General of the army. 

1062. A copy of the survey of the land at each post, fort, arsenal, and 
depot, furnished from the proper bureau, will be carefully preserved in 
the office of the commanding officer. 

SIGNAL OFFICER. 

1063. The signal officer shall have charge, under the direction cf the 
Secretary of War, of all signal duty, and of all books, papers, and appa¬ 
ratus connected therewith. 










* 





. 
























revised regulations for the army. 


159 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Barracks and Quarters. 


ARTICLE XLII. 

QUARTERMASTER’S DEPARTMENT. 

1064. This department provides the quarters and transportation of the 
army; storage and transportation for all army supplies; army clothing; 
camp and garrison equipage; cavalry and artillery horses; fuel; forage; 
straw; material for bedding, and stationery. 

1065. The incidental expenses of the army paid through the Quarter¬ 
master’s Department include per diem to extra-duty men; postage on 
public service; the expenses of courts-martial, of the pursuit and appre¬ 
hension of deserters, of the burials of officers and soldiers, of hired escorts, 
of expresses, interpreters, spies, and guides, of veterinary surgeons and 
medicines for horses, and of supplying posts with water; and generally 
the proper and authorized expenses for the movements and operations of 
an army not expressly assigned to any other department. 

BARRACKS AND QUARTERS. 

1066. Under this head are included the permanent buildings for the 
use of the army, as barracks, quarters, hospitals, store-houses, offices, 
stables. 

1067. When barracks and quarters are to be occupied, they will be 
allotted by the quartermaster at the station, under the control of the com¬ 
manding officer. 

1068. The number of rooms and amount of fuel for officers and men 
are as follows: 


A Major-General. 

A Brigadier-General or Colonel. 

A Lieutenant-Colonel or Major. 

A Captain or Chaplain. 

Lieutenant. 

Military store-keeper.... 

The General commanding the army. 

The commanding officer of a division or department, an as¬ 
sistant or deputy Quartermaster-General. 



* Or coal, at the rate of 1500 lbs. anthracite, or 30 bushels bituminous, to the cord, 
f Two cords of pine wood for fuel may, at the discretion of a department commander, 
be issued in lieu of one cord of oak, provided the cost be not greater. 




























160 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Barracks and Quarters. 


Cords of 
wood per 
month. 


E ,® 


o-g 
a o. 


The commanding officer of a regiment or post, Quarter¬ 
master, Assistant-Quartermaster, or Commissary of Sub¬ 
sistence . 

The senior Ordnance Officer stationed at the Head-Quarters 

of a Military Department. 

The Assistant Adjutant-General at the Head-Quarters of the 
Army, the Assistant Adjutant-General, the Medical Di¬ 
rector and Medical Purveyor of a Military Department, 


each. 


Officers of the Pay Department. 

An acting Assistant-Quartermaster, when approved by the 

Quartermaster-General. 

Wagon and forage master, Sergeant-Major, Ordnance Ser¬ 
geant, Quartermaster-Sergeant, or Medical Cadet. 

Each non-commissioned officer, musician, private, officer’s 

servant, and washerwoman. 

Each necessary fire for the sick in hospital, to be regulated 

by the surgeon and commanding officer, not exceeding . 

Each guard-fire, to be regulated by the commanding officer, 

not exceeding. 

A commissary or quartermaster’s store-house, when neces¬ 
sary, not exceeding .. 

A regiment or post mess. 

To every six non-commissioned officers, musicians, and pri¬ 
vates, servants and washerwomen, 225 square feet of room 
north of 38° N., and 256 square feet south of that latitude. 


1069. Merchantable hard wood is the standard; the cord is 128 cubic 
feet. 

1070. A particular set of quarters will he set apart at every chaplain- 
post for the chaplain. He will not be disturbed in these further than by 
a reduction of his allowance when that of the other officers is reduced. 
Nor will he be allowed to choose other quarters. 

1071. No officer shall occupy more than his proper quarters, except by 
order of the commanding officer when there is an excess of quarters at 
the station; which order the quartermaster shall forward to the Quarter¬ 
master-General, to be laid before the Secretary of War. But the amount 
of quarters shall he reduced pro rata by the commanding officer when 
the number of officers and troops make it necessary; and when the public 
buildings are not sufficient to quarter the troops, the commanding officer 
shall report to the commander of the department for authority to hire 
quarters, or other necessary orders in the case. The department com¬ 
mander shall report the case, and his orders therein, to the Quarter¬ 
master-General. 




























FOR THE ARMY. 


161 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Barracks and Quarters. 

1072. A mess-room, and fuel for it, are allowed only when a majority 
of the officers of a post or regiment unite in a mess; never to less than 
three officers, nor to any who live in hotels or boarding-houses. Fuel for 
a mess-room shall not be used elsewhere, or for any other purpose. 

1073. Fuel issued to officers or troops is public property for their use; 
what they do not actually consume shall be returned to the quartermaster 
and taken up on his quarterly return. With this exception, however: 
that the fuel issued to troops, and not actually used in quarters, may be 
used in baking their bread. 

1074. In November, December, January, and February, the fuel is 
increased one-fourth at stations from the 39th degree to the 43d degree 
north latitude, and one-third at stations north of the 43d degree. 

1075. Fuel shall be issued only in the month when due. 

1076. In allotting quarters, officers shall have choice according to rank, 
but the commanding officer may direct the officers to be stationed conve¬ 
nient to their troops. 

1077. An officer may select quarters occupied by a junior; but, having 
made his choice, he must abide by it, and shall not again at the post dis¬ 
place a junior, unless himself displaced by a senior. 

1078. The set of rooms to each quarters will be assigned by the quar¬ 
termaster, under the control of the commanding officer; attics not counted 
as rooms. 

1079. Officers cannot choose rooms in different sets of quarters. 

1080. When public quarters cannot be furnished to officers at stations 
without troops, or to enlisted men at general or department head-quarters, 
quarters will be commuted at a rate fixed by the Secretary of War, and 
fuel at the market price delivered. When fuel and quarters are com¬ 
muted to an officer by reason of his employment on a civil work, the com¬ 
mutation shall be charged to the appropriation for the work. No com¬ 
mutation of rooms or fuel is allowed for offices or messes. 

1081. The following rates of monthly commutation for quarters, when 
officers are serving without troops and at posts where there are no public 
quarters which they can occupy, have been established: 

1. At Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington City, 
Charleston, Key West, Mobile, and New Orleans, and at all posts 
and stations in Texas, and in the Territories of New Mexico, 
Oregon, and Washington, $9 per room. 

2. At Detroit, Chicago, and St. Louis, and at all places east of the 
Rocky Mountains, not heretofore enumerated, $8 per room. 

3. At San Francisco, $20 per room, and at all other places in Cali¬ 
fornia, $12 per room. 

02 


11 






162 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Barracks and Quarters. 

1082. An officer is not deprived of his quarters and fuel, or commutar 
tion, at his station, by temporary absence on duty. 

1083. Officers absent from their appropriate duties for a period exceed¬ 
ing six months, either with or without leave, shall not receive the allow¬ 
ances authorized by the existing laws for servants, forage, transportation 
of baggage, fuel, and quarters, either in kind or in commutation. (Act 
5 Aug. 1861, chap. 38, sect. 20.) 

1084. Officers and troops in the field are not entitled to commutation 
for quarters or fuel. 

1085. Topographical engineers, however, when actually engaged on a 
survey, are entitled to the commutation for fuel and quarters allowed at 
the station nearest to which the survey is conducted. 

1086. An officer arriving at a station shall make requisition on the 
quartermaster for his quarters and fuel, accompanied by a copy of the 
order putting him on duty at the station. If in command of troops, his 
requisition shall be for the whole, and designate the number of officers of 
each grade, of non-commissioned officers, soldiers, servants, and washer¬ 
women. 

1087. Bunks, benches, and tables provided for soldiers’ barracks and 
hospitals, are not to be removed from them, except by the quartermaster 
of the station, or order of the commanding officer, and shall not be re¬ 
moved from the station except by order of the Quartermaster-General. 

1088. The furniture for each office will be two common desks or tables, 
six common chairs, one pair common andirons, and shovel and tongs. 

1089. Furniture will be provided for officers’ quarters when special 
appropriations for that purpose are made. Sales to officers of materials 
for furniture may be made at cost, at posts where they cannot be other¬ 
wise obtained. 

1090. When buildings are to be occupied or allotted, an inspection of 
them shall be made by the commanding officer and quartermaster. 
Statements, in triplicate, of their condition, and of the fixtures and fur¬ 
niture in each room, shall be made by the quartermaster, and revised by 
the commanding officer. One of these shall be retained by the com¬ 
manding officer, one by the quartermaster, and the third forwarded to the 
Quartermaster-General. 

1091. Like inspection of all buildings in the use of troops will be 
made at the monthly inspections of the troops, and of all buildings which 
have been in the use of officers or troops, whenever vacated by them. 
Damages will be promptly repaired if the quartermaster has the means. 
Commanding officers will take notice, as a military offense, of any neglect 
by any officer or soldier to take proper care of the rooms or furniture in 
his use or occupancy; but such officer or soldier may be allowed to pay the 







FOR THE ARMY. 


163 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Army Transportation. 

cost of the repairs when the commanding officer deems that sufficient in 
the case. Commanding officers are required to report to the Quartermas¬ 
ter-General their proceedings in all cases of neglect under this regulation. 

1092. An annual inspection of the public buildings at the several sta¬ 
tions shall be made at the end of June by the commanding officer ana 
quartermaster, and then the quartermaster shall make the following re¬ 
ports: 1st. of the condition and capacity of the buildings, and of the 
additions, alterations, and repairs that have been made during the past- 
year ; 2d. of the additions, alterations, and repairs that are needed, with 
plans and estimates in detail. 

These reports the commanding officer shall examine and forward, with 
his views, to the Quartermaster-General. 

1093. Necessary repairs of public buildings, not provided for in the 
appropriations, can only be made by the labor of the troops. 

1094. When private buildings occupied as barracks or quarters, or 
lands occupied for encampments, are vacated, the commanding officer and 
quartermaster shall make an inspection of them, and a report to the 
Quartermaster-General of their condition, and of any injury to them by 
the use of the United States. 

1095. Military posts evacuated by the troops, and lands reserved for 
military use, will be put in charge of the Quartermaster’s Department, 
unless otherwise specially ordered. 

ARMY TRANSPORTATION. 

1096. When troops are moved, or officers travel with escorts or stores, 
the means of transport provided shall be for the whole command. Proper 
orders in the case, and an exact return of the command, including officers 
servants and company women, will be furnished to the quartermaster who 
is to provide the transportation. 

1097. The baggage to be transported is limited to camp and garrison 
equipage, and officers’ baggage. Officers’ baggage shall not exceed (mess- 
chest and all personal effects included) as follows : 



In the field. 

Changing stations. 


125 pounds. 

100 

1000 pounds. 


800 “ 


80 

700 “ 


80 

600 “ 


These amounts shall be reduced pro rata by the commanding officer 
when necessary, and may be increased by the Quartermaster-General on 
transports by water, when proper, in special cases. 
















3 64 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Army Transportation. 

1096. The regimental and company desk prescribed in army regula¬ 
tions will be transported; also for staff officers, the books, papers, and 
instruments necessary to their duties; and for medical officers, their 
medical chest. In doubtful cases under this regulation, and whenever 
baggage exceeds the regulated allowance, the conductor of the train, or 
officer in charge of the transportation, will report to the commanding 
officer, who will order an inspection, and all excess to be rejected. 

1099. Estimates of the medical director, approved by the commanding 
officer, for the necessary transportation to be provided for the hospital 
service, will be furnished to the quartermaster. 

1100. The sick will be transported on the application of the medical 
officers. 

1101. Certified invoices of all public stores to be transported will be 
furnished to the quartermaster by the officer having charge of them. In 
doubtful cases, the orders of the commanding officer will be required. 

1102. Where officers’ horses are to be transported, it must be authorized 
in the orders for the movement. 

1103. The baggage trains, ambulances, and all the means of transport 
continue in charge of the proper officers of the Quartermaster’s Depart¬ 
ment, under the control of the commanding officers. 

1104. In all cases of transportation, whether of troops or stores, an 
exact return of the amount and kind of transportation employed will be 
made by the quartermaster to the Quartermaster-General, accompanied 
by the orders for the movement, a return of the troops, and an invoice of 
the stores. 

1105. Wagons and their equipments for the transport service of the 
army will be procured, when practicable, from the Ordnance Department, 
and fabricated in the government establishments. 

1106. Spring wagons or carriages will not be used except on extra¬ 
ordinary occasions, and then only on the written order of a department 
commander or the commander of an army in the field, a copy of which 
order will be transmitted to the Quartermaster-General. The purchase 
of this description of conveyance is prohibited, unless specially authorized 
by the War Department. 

1107. When army supplies are turned over to a quartermaster for 
transportation, each package shall be directed and its contents marked on 
it; and duplicate invoices and receipts in bulk will be exchanged between 
the issuing and forwarding officer. 

1108. On transports, cabin passage will be provided for officers, and 
reasonable and proper accommodation for the troops, and, when possible, 
a separate apartment for the sick. 

1109. An officer who travels not less than ten miles without troops, 





FOR THE ARMY. 


165 


___ Quarter master’s Department.-Army Transportation. 

escort, or military stores, and under special orders in the case from a 
superior, or a summons to attend a military court, shall receive ten cents 
mileage, or, if he prefer it, the actual cost of his transportation and ol 
the transportation of his allowance of baggage for the whole journey, 
provided he has ti’aveled in the customary reasonable manner. Mileage 
will not be allowed where the travel is by government conveyances, which 
will be furnished in case of necessity. 

1110. If the journey be to cash treasury drafts, the necessary and 
actual cost of transportation only will be allowed; and the account must 
describe the draft and state its amount, and set out the items of expense, 
and be supported by a certificate that the journey was necessary to procure 
specie for the draft at par. 

1111. If an officer shall travel on urgent public duty without orders, 
he shall report the case to the superior who had authority to order the 
journey; and his approval, if then given, shall allow the actual cost of 
transportation. Mileage is computed by the shortest mail route, and the 
distance by the General Post-Office book. When the distance cannot be 
so ascertained, it shall be reckoned subject to the decision of the Quar¬ 
termaster-General. 

1112. Orders to an officer on leave of absence to rejoin the station or 
troops he left, will not carry transportation. 

1113. In changes of station, an officer entitled to mileage, or actual 
cost of transportation, shall be entitled to actual cost of transportation of 
his authorized servants; and in other cases than change of station, an 
officer entitled to transportation, who, from wounds or disability, requires 
and takes one servant, shall be entitled to the actual cost of his trans¬ 
portation. 

1114. The Inspectors-General, when on tours of inspection where they 
are obliged to take a servant, shall be entitled to the actual cost of his 
transportation. 

1115. Citizens receiving military appointments join their stations with¬ 
out expense to the public. 

1116. But assistant surgeons approved by an examining board and 
commissioned, receive transportation in the execution of their first order 
to duty, and graduates of the Military Academy receive transportation 
from the academy to their stations. 

1117. When officers are permitted to exchange stations, or are trans¬ 
ferred at their own request from one regiment or company to another, the 
Dublic will not be put to the expense of their transportation. They must 
bear it themselves. 

1118. A paymaster’s clerk will receive the actual expenses of his 
transportation while traveling under orders in the discharge of his duty, 







166 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forage.-Straw. 

upon his affidavit to the account of expenses, and the certificate of the 
paymaster that the journey was on duty. 

1119. Travel of officers on business of civil works will be charged to 
the appropriation for the work. 

1120. No officer shall have orders to attend personally at Washington 
to the settlement of his accounts, except by order of the Secretary of 
War on the report of the bureau, or of the Treasury, showing a necessity 
therefor. 

FORAGE. 

1121. The forage ration is fourteen pounds of hay and twelve pounds 
of oats, corn, or barley. For mules, fourteen pounds of hay and nine 
pounds of oats, corn, or barley. 

1122. The allowance of forage to mounted officers will apply for mules 
equally as for horses, when the exigencies of the service make it neces¬ 
sary to use the former instead of the latter. This will not authorize 
officers to make the substitution on drills and parades, or, under ordinary 
circumstances, on any duty under arms. 

1123. Forage shall be issued to officers only in the month when due, 
and at their proper stations, and for the horses actually kept by them in 
service, not exceeding in number as follows: In time of war, Major- 
General, seven horses; Brigadier-General, five; Colonels who have the 
cavalry allowance, five; other Colonels, four; Lieutenant-Colonels and 
Majors who have the cavalry allowance, four; other Lieutenant-Colonels 
and Majors, three; Captains who have the cavalry allowance, three; all 
other officers entitled to forage, two; and in time of peace, general and 
field officers, three horses; officers below the rank of field officers in the 
regiments of dragoons, cavalry, and mounted riflemen, two horses; all 
other officers entitled to forage, one horse. 

1124. No officer shall sell forage issued to him. Forage issued to 
public horses or cattle is public property; what they do not actually con¬ 
sume is to be properly accounted for. 

1125. Whenever the state of the supplies or circumstances of the ser¬ 
vice make it necessary to issue a part, only, of the ration, in kind, com¬ 
manding officers will prescribe what part shall be so issued. 

STRAW. 

1126. In barracks, twelve pounds of straw per month for bedding will 
be allowed to each man, servant, and company woman. 

1127. The allowance and change of straw for the sick is regulated by 
the surgeon. 

1128. One hundred pounds per month is allowed for bedding to each 
horse in public service. 







FOR THE ARMY. 


167 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Stationery. 

1129. At posts near prairie land owned by the United States, bay will 
be used instead of straw, and provided by tbe troops. 

Straw not actually used as bedding shall be accounted for as other 
public property. 

STATIONERY. 


1130. Issues of stationery are made quarterly, in amount as follows: 



j Quires of writing-paper. 

| Quires of envelope paper 

| Number of quills. 

| Ounces of wafers. 

| Ounces of sealing-wax. 

j Papers of ink-powder. 

| Pieces of office tape. 

Commander of an army, department, or division 
(wliat may be necessary for himself and staff for 
their public duty.) 

Commander of a brigade, for himself and staff. 

12 

1 

50 

1 

8 

2 

2 

Officer commanding a regiment or post of not less 
than five companies, for himself and staff. 

10 

1 

40 

1 

6 

2 

2 

Officer commanding a post of more than two and 
less than five companies. 

8 

i 

30 

i 

5 

1 

1 

Commanding officer of a post of two companies.... 

6 

\ 

25 

\ 

4 

1 

1 

Commanding officer of a post of one company or 
less, and commanding officer of a company. 

5 

i 

20 

i 

3 

1 

1 

A Lieutenant-Colonel or Major not in command of 
a regiment or post. 

3 

4 

12 

£ 

2 

1 

1 

Officers of the Inspector-General’s, Pay, and Quar¬ 
termaster’s Department (the prescribed blank 
books and printed forms, and the stationery re¬ 
quired for their public duty). 

All officers, including Chaplains, not enumerated 
above, when on duty and not supplied by their 

n 


6 

i 

1 

i 

£ 


Steel pens, with one holder to 12 pens, may be issued in place of quills, 
and envelopes in place of envelope paper, at the rate of 100 to the quire. 
1131. When an officer is relieved in command, he shall transfer the 


office stationery to his successor. 

1132. To each office table is allowed one inkstand, one stamp, one 
paper-folder, one sand-box, one wafer-box, and as many lead-pencils as 
may be required, not exceeding four per annum. 

1133. Necessary stationery for military courts and boards will be fur¬ 
nished on the requisition of the recorder, approved by the presiding officer. 

1134. The commander of an army, department, or division, may direct 
orders to be printed, when the requisite dispatch and the number to be 
distributed make it necessary. The necessity will be set out in the order 
for the printing, or certified on the account. 




























168 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Horses for Mounted Officers. 

1135. "Regimental, company, and post books, and printed blanks for 
tbe officers of Quartermaster and Pay Departments, will be procured by 
timely requisition on the Quartermaster-General. 

1136. Printed matter procured by the Quartermaster-General for use 
out of Washington may be procured elsewhere, at a cost not to exceed 
the rates prescribed by Congress for the public printing increased by the 
cost of transportation. 

EXPENSES OF COURTS-MARTIAL. 

1137. An officer who attends a general court-martial or court of in¬ 
quiry, convened by authority competent to order a general court-martial, 
will be paid, if the court is not held at the station where he is at the 
time serving, one dollar a day while attending the court and traveling to 
and from it if entitled to forage, and one dollar and twenty-five cents a 
day if not entitled to forage. 

1138. The Judge Advocate or Recorder will be paid, besides, a per 
diem of one dollar and twenty-five cents for every day he is necessarily 
employed in the duty of the court. When it is necessary to employ a 
clerk to aid the Judge Advocate, the court may order it; a soldier to be 
procured when practicable. 

1139. A citizen witness shall be paid his actual transportation or stage 
fare, and three dollars a day while attending the court and traveling to 
and from it, counting the travel at fifty miles a day. 

1140. The certificate of the Judge Advocate shall be evidence of the 
time of attendance on the court, and of the time he was necessarily em¬ 
ployed in the duty of the court. Of the time occupied in traveling, each 
officer will make his own certificate. 

EXTRA-DUTY MEN. 

1141. Duplicate rolls of the extra-duty men, to be paid by the Quar¬ 
termaster s Department, will be made monthly, and certified by the quar¬ 
termaster, or other officer having charge of the work, and countersigned 
by the commanding officer. One of these will be transmitted direct to 
the Quartermaster-General, and the other filed in support of the pay-roll. 

PUBLIC POSTAGE. 

1142. Postage and dispatches by telegraph, on public business, paid by 
an officer, will be refunded to him on his certificate to the account, and 
to the necessity of the communication by telegraph. The amount for 
postage, and for telegraph dispatches, will be stated separately. 

HORSES FOR MOUNTED OFFICERS. 

1143. In the field, on the frontier, or in active service, the commanding 




FOR THE ARMY. 


169 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Allowance of Clothing. 

officer may authorize a mounted officer to take from the public stables one 
or two horses at a price one-third greater than the average cost of the lot 
from which he selects, or at the actual cost of the horse when that can be 
ascertained ; providing he shall not take the horse of any trooper. A 
horse so taken shall not be exchanged or returned. Horses of mounted 
officers shall be shod by the public farrier or blacksmith. 

1144. The horses of a field battery will be shod by the artificers of the 
company, one of whom shall be a farrier. No other compensation than 
the pay and allowances of that grade will be made for these services. 

CLOTHING, CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPAGE. 

1145. Supplies of clothing and camp and garrison equipage will le 
sent by the Quartermaster-General from the general depot to the officers 
of his department stationed with the troops. 

1146. The contents of each package, and the sizes of clothing in it, 
will be marked on it. 

1147. The receiving quartermaster will give duplicate receipts for the 
clothing as invoiced to him, if the packages as received and marked agree 
with the invoice, and appear rightly marked, and in good order; if other¬ 
wise, an inspection will be made by a board of survey, whose report in 
case of damage or deficiency will be transmitted, one copy to the Quarter¬ 
master-General and one to the officer forwarding the supplies. In case 
of damage, the board will assess the damage to each article. 


1148. ALLOWANCE OF CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPAGE. 



1 Tents, in the 

field. 

Pi 

VI 

| Axes. 

© 

eS 

M 

o 

5 

A 

"5 

H 

| Camp-kettles. 

' OD 

a 

a 

9* 

© 

a 

A General. 

3 


1 


i 


• •• 

Field or staff officer above the rank of Captain. 

2 

... 

1 


i 



Other staff officers or Captains. 

1 


1 


i 


... 

Subalterns of a company, to every two. 

1 


1 


i 


... 

To every 15 foot and 13 mounted men. 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

5 


1149. Bed-sacks are provided for troops in garrison, and iron pots may 
be furnished to them instead of camp-kettles. Requisitions will be sent 
to the Quartermaster-General for the authorized flags, colors, standards, 
guidons, drums, fifes, bugles, and trumpets. 

ALLOWANCE OF CLOTHING. 

1150. A soldier is allowed the uniform clothing stated in the following 
table, or articles thereof of equal value. When a balance is due him at 
the end of a year, it is added to his allowance for the next: 





















170 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Allowance of Clothing. 


CLOTHING. 


Cap, complete. 

Hat with trimmings complete. 

Fatigue forage caps, of pattern in the Quartermaster- 
General’s Office, will be issued, in addition to hats 

Pompon. 

Eagle and ring. 

Cover. 

Coat. 

Trowsers. 

Flannel shirt. 

“ drawers. 

Bootees,* pair. 

Stockings, pair. 

Leather stock. 

Great-coat. 

Stable-frock (for mounted men). 

Fatigue overalls (for engineers and ordnance). 

Blanket. 


FOR FIVE TEARS. 

Total ill 

the five 

years. 

1st. 

2d. 

3d. 

4th. 

5th. 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

7 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 


1 



2 

1 


1 



2 

1 

i 

1 

1 

i 

5 

2 

l 

2 

1 

2 

8 

3 

2 

3 

2 

3 

13 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

15 

3 

2. 

2 

2 

2 

11 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

20 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

20 

1 


1 



2 

1 





1 

1 


i 



2 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

5 

1 


1 



2 


* Mounted men may receive one pair of “ boots ” arid two pairs of “ bootees ” instead of four pairs 
of bootees. 


1151. One sash is allowed to each company for the first sergeant, and 
one knapsack with straps, haversack, and canteen with straps, to each 
enlisted man. These and the metallic scales, letters, numbers, castles, 
shells, and flames, and the camp and garrison equipage, will not be re¬ 
turned as issued, but borne on the return while fit for service. They will 
be charged to the person in whose use they are, when lost or destroyed by 
his fault. 

1152. Commanders of companies draw the clothing of their men, and 
the camp and garrison equipage for the officers and men of their com¬ 
pany. The camp and garrison equipage of other officers is drawn on 
their own receipts. 

1153. When clothing is needed for issue to the men, the company 
commander will procure it from the quartermaster on requisition, approved 
by the commanding officer. 

1154. Ordinarily the company commander will procure and issue clothing 
to his men twice a year; at other times, when necessary in special cases. 

1155. Such articles of clothing as the soldier may need will be issued 
to him. When the issues equal in value his allowance for the year, further 
issues are extra issues, to be charged to him on the next muster-roll. 

1156. The talmas furnished the mounted troops will be accounted for 
as company property, and the men to whom they are issued will be held 
responsible for their preservation. 

1157. The money value of the clothing, and of each article of it, will 



































FOR THE ARMY. 


171 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Allowance of Clothing. 

be ascertained annually, and announced in orders from the War Depart¬ 
ment. 

1158. Officers receiving clothing, or camp and garrison equipage, will 
render quarterly returns of it to the Quartermaster-General. 

1159. Commanders of companies will take the receipts of their men 
for the clothing issued to them, on a receipt-roll, witnessed by an officer, 
or, in the absence of an officer, by a non-commissioned officer; the witness 
to be witness to the fact of the issue and the acknowledgment and signa¬ 
ture of the soldier. The several issues to a soldier to be entered sepa¬ 
rately on the roll, and all vacant spaces on the roll to be filled with a 
cipher. This roll is the voucher for the issue to the quarterly return ot 
the company commander. Extra issues will be so noted on the roll. 

1160. Each soldier’s clothing account is kept by the company com¬ 
mander in a company book. This account sets out only the money value 
of the clothing which he received at each issue, for which his receipt is 
entered in the book, and witnessed as in the preceding paragraph. 

1161. When a soldier is transferred or detached, the amount due to or 
by him on account of clothing will be stated on his descriptive list. 

1162. When a soldier is discharged, the amount due to or by him for 
clothing will be stated on the duplicate certificates given for the settle¬ 
ment of his accounts. 

1163. Deserters’ clothing will be turned into store. The invoice of it, 
and the quartermaster’s receipt for it, will state its condition, and the 
name of the deserter. 

1164. The inspection report on damaged clothing shall set out, with 
the amount of damage to each article, a list of such articles as are fit for 
issue, at a reduced price stated. 

1165. Commanding officers may order necessary issues of clothing to 
prisoners and convicts, taking deserters’ or other damaged clothing when 
there is such in store. 

1166. Officers of the army may purchase, at the regulation price, 
from the quartermaster of their post, such articles of uniform clothing 
as they actually need—certifying that the articles so drawn are intended 
solely for their own personal use. 

1167. But—with the exception of under-clothing and shoes, of which, 
when there are no other means of procuring them, a reasonable quantity 
may, on the officers’ certificate to that effect, be purchased for them from 
the quartermaster—no officer’s private servant, not a soldier, shall be 
permitted to draw or to wear the uniform clothing issued to the troops. 

1168. In all cases of deficiency, or damage of any article of clothing, 
or camp or garrison equipage, the officer accountable for the property is 
required by law “ to show by one or more depositions setting forth the 





172 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Returns. 

circumstances of the case that the deficiency was by unavoidable acci¬ 
dent or loss in actual service, without any fault on his part, and, in case 
of damage, that due care and attention were exerted on his part, and 
that the damage did not result from neglect.” 

RETURNS IN THE QUARTERMASTER’S DEPARTMENT. 

1169. All officers and agents having money and property of the De¬ 
partment to account for, are required to make the monthly and quarterly 
returns to the Quartermaster-General prescribed in the following articles: 

1170. Monthly returns, to be transmitted within five days after the 
month to which they relate, viz. : A summary statement (Form 1); re¬ 
port of persons and things (Form 2); roll of extra-duty men (Form 3); 
report of stores for transportation, &c. (Form 4); return of animals, 
wagons, harness, &c. (Form 5); report of forage (Form 6) ; report of 
fuel and quarters commuted (Form 7); report of pay due (Form 8); an 
estimate of funds for one month (Form 9) will be sent with the monthly 
returns. It will be for the current month, or such subsequent month as 
may give time to receive the remittance. Other special estimates will be 
transmitted when necessary. 

1171. Quarterly returns, to be transmitted within twenty days after 
the quarter to which they relate, viz. : An account current of money 
(Form 10), with abstracts and vouchers, as shown in Forms Nos. 11 to 
22; a return of property (Form 23), with abstracts and vouchers, as shown 
in Forms Nos. 24 to 45; a duplicate of the property return without 
abstracts or vouchers; and a quarterly statement of the allowances paid 
to officers (Form 46). 

1172. A distinct account current will be returned of money received 
and disbursed under the appropriation for “ contingencies of the army.” 
(See Forms Nos. 47, 48, and 22, for the forms of the account current, 
abstracts, and vouchers.) Necessary expenditures by the quartermaster 
for the Medical Department are entered on Abstract C. (See Forms 49 
and 50.) The account will, ordinarily, be transferred from “ army con¬ 
tingencies” to the appropriation for the Medical and Hospital Depart¬ 
ment, in the Treasury. 

1173. Forms 51 and 52 are the forms of the quarterly returns of cloth- 
ing, camp and garrison equipage, and the receipt-roll of issues to soldiers. 

1174. TV hen persons and articles hired in the Quartermaster’s Depart¬ 
ment are transferred, a descriptive list (Form 53) will be forwarded with 
them to the quartermaster to whom they are sent. 

1175. Officers serving in the Quartermaster’s Department will report 
to the Quartermaster-General useful information in regard to the routes 
and means of transportation and of supplies. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


173 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


eS 

O 


CO 

oo 




H 

P 

k—I 

(<=< 

p 

H 

<1 

H 

GO 

Ph 

<1 


P 

CO 

P 

P 

W 

H 

5z; 

o 


« 

^5 

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IS 


« 

ft 


.2-3 


^ a 


“ a <u 

GO S O ^ 


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ft _ H 

a .3 .3 [j 

p—*M 03 


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a> 

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CO ^ 

a> ^ 

CO P 

ce o> 

rP P"» 
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p a> 

P 

pu<*-* 
v- ° . 
O ^ A 

a 2 g 

o I a 
a s 

P P 


TT uj 

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P Q> 
o PL, 


P P 

*5 ° 

^ a 

® 03 


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3 — 
'O M 


W w — 

H H H 


P 2 


I certify that the above is a true statement of all the moneys which have come into my hands on account of the Quartermaster s 
Department., during the month of -, 186 , and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. The balance due the United 

States is deposited in-. _ . 

A. B., Quartermaster. 
































174 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 2. 

Report of Persons and Articles employed and hired at 


Running numbers. || 

No. of each class. || 

Names 
of persons 
and 

articles. 

Designation 

and 

occupation. 

Service 
during the 
month. 

Rate of hire 
or 

compensation. 

Date of 
contract, 
agreement, 
or 

entry into 
service. 

From. 

6 

H 

>> 

Cj 

a 

Amount. 

Day, 

month, 

or 

voyage. 

1 

1 

House, 3 rooms 

Quarters... 

1 

31 

31 

$40 00 

Month. 

July 1,18G0. 

2 

2 

House, 4 rooms 

Storehouse 

3 

31 

29 

31 00 

Mouth. 

Dec. 3,1859. 

3 

3 

House, 2 rooms 

Guard “ 

1 

31 

31 

10 00 

Month. 

Dec. 3,1859. 

1 

1 

Ship Fanny.... 

Transport. 

1 

31 

31 

22,000 00 

Voyage 

May 3,1860. 

2 

2 

Schr. Heroine. 

Transport. 

1 

31 

31 

700 00 

Month. 

June4,1860. 

1 

1 

Wagon & team 


1 

31 

31 

100 00 

Month. 

.Jan. 1,1860. 

1 

1 

Chas. James... 

Clerk. 

1 

31 

31 

75 00 

Month. 

Dec. 3,1860. 

2 

1 

Isaac Lowd.... 

Interpreter 

7 

10 

4 

2 00 

Day. 

Jan. 7,1861. 

3 

1 

Peter Keene ... 

Express.... 

7 

12 

6 

40 00 

Month. 

Jan. 7,1861. 

4 

1 

John Peters ... 

Blacksmith 

22 

31 

7 

2 00 

Day. 

Jan. 1,1861. 

5 

1 

Thos. Cross.... 

Laborer.... 

1 

31 

31 

20 00 

Month. 

May 3,1860. 



United States 










Steamer Fashion 








1 

1 

.Tas. Corwin ... 

Captain.... 

1 

31 

31 

150 00 

Month. 

Dec. 1,1860. 

2 

1 

Geo. Pratt. 

Engineer.. 

1 

31 

31 

100 00 

Month. 

Dec. 1,1860. 

3 

1 

John Paul. 

Mate. 

1 

31 

31 

50 00 

Month. 

Dec. 1,1860. 


Amount of rent and hire during the month 


I certify that the above is a true report of all the persons and articles employed 
the head of Remarks, and the statement of amounts due and remaining unpaid, 
Examined. 

C. D., 

Commanding. 






































FOR THE ARMY. 


175 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 2. 

during the month of - } 186 , hy — 




Remarks showing by whom the 

Time and amount due and 


Amount 

buildings were occupied, and 

remaining unpaid. 


of 

for what purpose, and how 




By whom 

rent or 

the vessels and men were em- 




owned. 

pay 

ployed during the month. 





in the 


From. 

To. 

Am’t. 


month. 

(Transfers and discharges will 






be noted under this head.) 







1860. 

1861. 


A. Byrne... 

$40 00 

Major 3d Infantry. 

Dec. 1. 

Jan. 31. 

$80 

Jas. Black. 

29 00 

Subsistence Store and Office... 

Dec. 3. 

Jan. 31. 

60 0 

Jas. Black. 

10 00 

Companies I & K, 3d Infantry 




G. Wilkins. 


Transporting stores to Benicia 

Voyage 

not 

com- 






pleted. 




1861. 

1861. 


T. Browne. 

700 00 

Transporting stores to Brazos. 

Jan. 1. 

Jan. 31. 

700 00 

Jas. Barry. 

100 00 

Hauling stores to San Antonio 

Jan. 1. 

Jan. 31. 

100 00 


75 00 

Quartermaster’s Office. 





8 00 

Employed by Com’ing General 





7 74 

Express to Indianola. 





14 00 

Shoeing public horses. 





20 00 

Helping blacksmith. 





150 00 

) ( 

July 1. 

July 31. 

150 00 


100 00 

>- Steamship sent to Brazos... 

July 1. 

July 31. 

100 00 


50 00 

J l 

July 1. 

July 31. 

50 00 


1303 74 

Total amount due and remaining unpaid. 

1240 00 


and hired by me during the month of-, 186 , and that the observations under 

are correct. 

E. F., 

Asst. Qr. Master. 




























































Roll of Non-commissioned Officers and Privates employed on extra duty, as mechanics and laborers, at , during the 

month of -, 186 , by -. 


176 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


How employed. 

REMARKS. 


Rate of pay or 
compensation. 

-3 

o 



Dolls. 



Per 

diem. 

GO 

5 


Term of 
service. 

•s^up '0£I 



•oi 


•mojj 


Nature of 
service. 


By whose order 
employed. 



| 

•ifucdmoQ 

| 

Rank or 
designation. 


Names. 


6 



p 

•zj 


rP 

O 

> p 
o o 

•o a 


Quartermaster (or officer commanding detachment). 








































'ort of Stores received for Transportation and Distribution at -, by -, in the month of -, 186 


FOR THE ARMY. 


177 


Quartermastt r’s Department.—Forms, 


& 

fci 


•UOTJ'BU 

-i^sap opsrarjjn 


•uoi^raui^sap 

apjipanua^ui 


•§* 

^ d 
o eS 


P 00 


mm 


O J 

ft, Ph 

•s 68 


<1 » « 

, a 1 

-gs^ 


o 


•'juas ainix 


fe.5 

I s S 

>>« 
W p 


a . 

rt ^ 
0> 

£ S 

a s 


•paAiooaj oraij; 


m ^ 

p<-w 
o p< 
O Ci 

m w 


. s « . 
c? m a 

-*J "oQ S "oQ 
aw ^ o 


©■ 


o 

< 

k 


12 


I certify that the above report is correct. 






























178 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.—Forms. 


us 

o 


% 


g CO 

e oo 


% 




S 
C 1 


s? I s 

s '£ 

g 

e 


fcl 


£ 


8 






•N 


Remarks. 

18 horses purchased; average 

cost $-. 

Wagons purchased at-. 

6 horses received from-. 

Horses transferred to-. 

Wagons transferred to-. 

1 horse sold; — horses died on 

the road to-. 

•xnuojnq pun sjfiqg 





•soSanq pun s^uog 





1 

•sjaraisajg 





•sdoojg 





•saouooqog 





•sdiqg 





•soippus uoSn^V. 





•jo SJ9S 

9j3uis ‘ssamieq puoq 





•jo SJ9S 9jS 

-uis ‘ssou^nq laoqAi 





•StJUQ 





•890uiqnqray 





•suoSn^ 





•uoxo 





•soinj\[ 





•S8SI0H 






On hand. 

Purchased during the month. 

Received from officers. 

Total to be accounted for. 

Transferred. 

Sold and worn out. 

Died and lost. 

Total issued and expended. 

Remaining on hand. 

•0?U(I 



o» 

« 

< 


0> 

J-t 

GO 


A 

d 

o 

r3 

o 

o 

a 

n 

a> 

rO 


d 

d 


0) 

Q 


I certify that the above return is correct. 








































No. 0. 

Monthly Report of Forage which has been issued to Horses, Mules, and Oxen in the public service at 

during the month of -, 186 . 


FOR THE ARMY. 


179 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 

Hay purchased at-, at — 

per 100 pounds. 

Corn purchased at-, and 

hauled at-per bush. 

Fodder delivered at thepost, 

at — per 100 lbs. 

Average cost of 

•spunod 

00IJad‘jappoj 

6 

© v : 


m 

1-1 : : 


•spunod 

001 Jad 

6 

o 

to • : 





(•sqi 28) 

•qsnq aod ‘smo 

6 

o 

to • l 


m 



(•sqi 99) 

•qsnq aod ‘ujoq 

6 

O : : 

o • 


m 

rH i ; 


Quantity issued. 

•joppoj 

Pounds. 

1,640 

1,640 


1,350 

2,240 

2,100 

33,000 

38,690 

•s^o 

Pounds. 


: 

•u.100 

6,480 

23,400 

18,360 

18,360 

158,400 

225,000 

To¬ 

tal. 

•si'Btnmy 

OO lO r— I T-H o 

r—( CD to to 

Tfl 

to 

01 

CO 

Private 

•saini\[ 

: : : : : 


•sosjoji 

CM rji ^ CD 

t-H 

CD 

CM 

Public. 

uoxo 

... . O 

: : : : 00 

O 

CO 

•sajnj^ 

... .0 

: : : : 0 

CO 

0 

0 

CO 

•sosjoji 

CD r-t tO O 

CD rjl ^ CD 

0 

Cl 

To whom issued. 

Field and staff officers. 

Company A, 1st Dragoons.. 

“ B, 2d 

“ K, 1st Artillery.. 

Qr. Master’s Department... 

Total . 

Date. 



I certify that the above report is correct A. B., Quartermaster. 














































Report of Officers of the Army stationed at -, whose Quarters and Fuel are commuted, for the month of 




180 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 




•sio 


•snoa 


•sjo 


•snoa 


•?aaa 


•spjoo 


■no 


f § 
« a 


•810 


I certify, that the above report is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. 




































Report of Persons Hired and Employed in the Quartermaster’s Department at - , who have deceased, deserted, or 

have been discharged the service with pay due, during the month of - , 186 , by -. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


181 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


^3 

rw 3 


Ph 


A 

a 

a> 

ft. 

a> 

to 

A 


tO CO 


ft. 


£-0 

*'3 

A p, 

° 2 

,3 3 

£ bD 
^..g 
3 ‘3 

<u 


ft*, 
® a 
Q 3 
o 

v S 

S3 ^ 

c3 3 

a * 

53 3 

3 <2 

c3 

p o 

a a 


3 

0> <T) 

a a 


a cs 

0) rG 

2 a 


a a, 
© 

GO jZJ 
<D 

p< £ 

£-4 a> 


O* 

ri 


bD"co 


* * 


i « S 

^ S 


^ rt w 
I—I O "o 


Q 


Note. —This report must contain all the information required, to enable the Department to pay the legal representatives of the 
deceased persons, to examine into the cases of deserters, and to examine and verify the correctness of payments made on certificates 
of discharge. 






























Est 

1 

2 

S 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 9. 

of Funds required for the service of the Quartermaster’s 
Department at -, by -, in the month of - , 186 . 


For Fuel. 

Forage. 

Straw. 

Stationery. 

Materials for building. (State what, and for what 

purpose.). 

Hire of mechanics. (State for what work.). 

Hire of laborers. (State for what service.). 

Hire of teamsters. (State on what service.)... 

Pay of extra-duty men. (State for what work.). 

Pay of wagon and forage masters. 

Hire of clerks, guides, escorts, expenses of courts- 
martial, of burials, of apprehending deserters, and 

other incidental expenses. 

Hire or commutation of officers’ quarters. 

Hire of quarters for troops, or ground for encamp¬ 
ment or use of military stations... 

Hire of store-houses, offices, &c. (For what use.). 

Mileage to officers. 

Army transportation,—viz.: 

Of troops and their baggage. 

Of Quartermasters’, subsistence, ordnance, and hos¬ 
pital stores. 

Purchase of horses and mules (Q. M. Dept.). 

Purchase of wagons and harness do. . 

Purchase of horses for mounted troops,—viz.: 

Horses for Company-Dragoons. 

Horses for Company-Artillery, &c., &c. 

Outstanding debts. 

Deduct actual or probable balance on hand. 


Dolls. 

Cts. 









































United States in account current with -, Quartermaster United States , on account of the Quartermaster's 

Department at - , in the quarter ending on the - day of - , 186 . 


FOR THE ARMY. 


183 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


PS 

O 


c3 

P 


o R 3 
o 3 O 

*3 a 

M ? 03 
3 bD 

« s's 

pH o ^ 
„ P ~ 

rj-J tfl 

° flj 


£ 


.O 

r> ^ 
Ph O 
o_. P 
O » 


-3 


.5 02 . 
o__ o 

<1)0^ 

P 

^ fl P 

C» 

CQ I—> P 


. a 8 

P .q O c3 
° *0 'h P 

'Sm'g £ 

>■ CO 

P C/J Jh +-> 
,n P 
P3 ^ ^ ^ 
CO co Ph 


p P 


fs 


.O P 

a ^ 2 
on tn p. 
c3 P cd O 

O o o P 

ca pq 


P 


' § i 
>-s 


: P ^3 


U m 

8 
r 8 
r p.ifl 
a> „ o 

Ph GO _ 

O 

m b ** 

(D 3 to 
CO p 

^ ^3 <2 

P co 

« S fl 

2 & (3 

5 m is 

Ph -w 

<" <(_ «M 


q a a P 

3 3 3 


3 IS 
c3 0> 

P 


a a a g * 

d d d 4j P o 
0 0 0 ^0^ 
H H H H 


I certify that the above is a true account of all the moneys that have come into my hands, on account of the Quartermaster’s 

Department, during the quarter ending on the-day of-, 186 , and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. 

A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note. —Moneys for clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and contingencies of the army, are not accounted for in this account 
current. Abstracts B b and B b b are used only where the number of transfers make them necessary. 





























No. 11. —(Abstract A.) 

Abstract of Purchases paid for at - in the quarter ending on the -, 186- 


184 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 










Ill II 



III II 



III II 



III II 



III II 


. 

III II 


£ 

III II 


§ 

III II 



III II 


a 

III II 


m 

III II 



III II 


Straw. 

•spunO(j 
















6 

to 

•Ash 

Lbs. 







S-t 

o 

Ph 

•s^o 

Bu. 








•mioQ 

Bu. 








Coal. 

Lbs. 







Fuel. 


Ins. 







Wood. 

Feet. 








Cords. 








d 

d 

Cts. 








s 

Dolls. 







Classes. 

From whom 

purchased. 


<X> 

c3 

d 

cr 

<D 

rd 

O 

u 

o 


u 

o 

p 

c3 

d 

cr 

<D 

rd 

.9 


p 

o> 

u 

a 

d 

cr 

<D 

rd 

.9 



•aaqonoA 

jo '°M 


u 

Ph 

nd 

o> 

m 


*5 

QJ 

xn 


£ 

rs 

d 



Date. 


rd 

o 

u 

d 

* 


rd 

o 

p 

d 

Ph 


c3 

"o 

El 


Note.— This abstract will be supported by vouchers (Form 12), and must exhibit all the articles paid for in the quarter, whether 
purchased within or prior to the quarter, except purchases of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and purchases for “army 


























































No. 12. —(Voucher for Purchases to Abstract A.) 


FOR THE ARMY. 


185 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


ft 


£ 


e 

<a 

•<s» 

to 


«3 £ 


£ 


Ph 


to 'S 
l 3 to 
o O S3 

O p4,Q 


ft ~ 
ft 
►"3 


Q2 


h O' 
P* 


> .ft 

| ^ 


c2 3 
T5 © 

O O 


© © 
® > 
































No. 13.— (Abstract B.) 

Abstract of Expenditures on account of the Quartermaster's Department, by -, at -■ in the quarter endinq on 

the - of -, 186 . 


186 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


I certify that the above abstract is correct. 

A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note.—T his abstract contains all payments in the account current, except purchases (Abstract A) and transfers of funds. 


























No. 14.— (Abstract B b.) 

Abstract of Advances made to officers for disbursement, on account of the Quartermaster's Department, by - ,in the quarter 

ending the - , 186 . 


FOR THE ARMY. 


187 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


fs 

« 























TJo. 15. —(Voucher to Abstract B.) 


188 


REVISED REGULATIONS 



certify, that the above receipt-roll is correct and just. A. B., Quartermaster. 





































No. 16. —(Voucher to Abstract B.) 


FOR THE ARMY. 


189 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



« a 

If 

n-T =3 


I 3 


S £ 


> o 

> rp p 


Received,-, 186 , of-, -dollars and-cents in full of tlie above account. 

(Signed duplicates.) 






























No. 17. —(Voucher to Abstract B.) 


190 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


si 

ft 


e 

*8 




O. ft 

CJ) 

a & 


OQ jH 

P 5 

Q> O 

h L. 

<u to 

.s 

o 


5 2 fl 
V a - 
S S n 
® S.s 

3 a) ci 
o »—< -w 
.3 3? 5; 


£ S 


3.35 

tn a> 

a M 


eS 3 

a 


3 O 


o. ft 
^ <D 
.3 .3 


^ 3 
3 » £ • 




3m 2 


_ "3 s* 
3 ® 3 


HH f> 

^ c3 ^ 
c3 ^ 


a ft- a 


c3 


a .. 

o «t-T 


bo S 
3 ,3 


a 

t. 

!>» <1 


xi a M 


t: 3 a 3 
£2 8 §• a 


c? 


>1 cj 

aj 

3 .2 

3 OT 

3 on 


<-* 3 O g 

- ® £ £ 

3 ft 

® ft o3 

O 

••» 05 05 

^ P ^ 

CO O rj 

P 12 ^ 
—ST3 c3 

T5 


ft to o 
ft -2 
3 ® 3 
O ’f* o 
p ft 

T5 
>% ^ 


Ph 

•p 

.9 

•P 

o 

p 


*-« ^ +-> 

ftp ce . 


X i- ^ 

3. 3 a) 


>3 0) 

fa p. * s 

fe J | •£> 

M^-g § 

«g § a 


P P 

o Vi 

S > 3 


05 *•" 
O ~ 
0) CO 

P5 3 


'S a j 

M o T3 
0) >■ _ 
3 '~3 
3 b0.2 
ea c ^ 

.2 ’3 .2 


° a 3 
o £ „ 


»5 # 

3 3 > 


- ^ w 

-3 

3 i _h 

03 HH - 

8^| 
ft P3 
ft v> ##s 

o ^ 

O ••‘fti 

« 

.*> ”3 p 

fl -ft* c3 
g w P3 


P M : 
rP 05 J 

^ ^ I 

-? X : 


O o o 
,5 ~j 3 
_ 3 o 


3 a 


Certificate in case of journey under orders. 
























No. 18. —(Voucher to Abstract B.) 


FOR THE ARJH 


191 


C3 

P 


e 

r TS 






Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


53 X2 




o O) 


c » 


2 <12 


P. £ 


3 c 

O a) 




T3 ~s 
•-" * 
1 s g) 

g -3 

'O cj o 

§2 3 

^ P 2 
© 3 g 
© © M 
p p © 
p © _^ 

g^- 

CO o 

,rH *P 
O P 
0 ^3 C3 
S3 ~ Ph 

° 5 . 

o ^ 

O C 

c3 © c3 


o o ; 


© © © 

ja fl s 

^3 a) © 

^3 ta 
5 ^ p 


© © j 


Received at -, the -of-, 186 , of-, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. Army, -dollars and -cents, 

in full of the above account. 

(Signed in duplica'e.) 















































No. 19.— (Voucher to Abstract B.) 


192 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


P 


£ 


e 

'■e 

<» 


• 2 a 
00 2 
<D V* 

■73 - 

3^ 

2 m 

p <p 

fc>0 P 

.2 55 

'£'5 


3 P 

13 & 

^ "oQ 

r. C3 

2 S 

.2 

3 Ph 

P 

o 

Ph 


O O o 

CO -*-> M 

fl H 
u M & 
a, p 

M ® -2 
a> o w 

7s "0'S 

3 ^ M 

If S 

a> -3 § 

rp . 

- .2 s 

ft 


3 ^3 


“ I 5 

5* e| 

S >,fci 

® s 5 

rQ T3 <3 
® 3 g 
.t; p 

P 8‘^ 

g-3 | 

S'* 

S 

ate | 

a> o 
Q.ao 
►>2 


30 W) 


S g 

3 3. 
0) M 
Ph 05 
to 3 
05 
05 ^ 


■3 2 


3 o 

* 2 

of «s 
3 

fe -3 

^ 05 

M 

h 

3 


5 a 

,>> O 


S 33 


of ° 

a § 

sg 

<2 ^ 

<D 

7J3 . 
a> ■*-» ^3 

P 0> 
c3 c3 <P 

Q.^ O 

1-2 
3 f£ 5T 


O 35 

a J 


S>>^~ 

05 . 

3 " 

3 63 


o . 


.3 ~ ~ 
>.3 bp.a 
-a o -5-3 

• h 05 h a) 
to t-s 3 35 
*■^3 3 r 3 ' 3 

3 a-3 3 
3 a to 
n 9 35 

■3 3 03 3 

3 3 %4 GO 


” 05 
3 £ g 
ci o 

CO p-t 

53 c3 co 

2 .fe^ 

C <*-. 
© S ° 
P 


CO 


<x> 


o 


_* C3 

c$ o 


>>.2 


c3 CO 
0) +j 

ft‘2 

3 13 
33 M 


.9.2 3h 


P 


3-5^ 

O 05 lo 

3 3 




Received at-, the-of-, 186 , of-, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army,-dollars and 

cents, in full of the above account. 

(Signed in duplicate.) 

Dollars r7VfS 
































No. 20. —(Voucher to Abstract B.) 


FOR THE ARMY. 


193 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


PS 

ft 


8 

e 

•o» 


> .g 

"S „ 


.O Sw 

3 O 
P. 


!S 5 

la 

OQ *M 
C3 rt 

o .§ 

fH ^ 


13 


m r* 

ce W) 


-I J! 


S C3 


| § 


boV 

.2 <D 
O OQ 
bJO o 
<D .2 

O 

<D * 
fl 




Received at-, the-of-, 186 , of-, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. Army,-dollars and -cents, 

in full of the above account. 

(Signed in duplicate.) E. F. 






























No. 21. —(Voucher to Abstract B.) 


194 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


ft 






fa ^ 


ti 

o •£ 

3 ® » 
u 

O o 

ftg 

_T c3 
-d w 

§ 9 


© c3 £ o 


o*J2' 


o .5 
d - 


o^t 

a $ « " 
- a >* 

| a s a 

; a ^ ^ 

5 O 0 0 

2 Sc^ch 


En pt( 


O 


>2 •* 


>» g 


O c3 

•73 ^ 
© o 
<3 w> 

£ 5 

® -a 




S- c3 
0) jq 
£ - 
<0^ 
<0 eS 
A „ 


a; q 
j .3 

60 

•2 § 

3 a 

r a «h 
„ o 

I a 


fe* a 

•°J 


>» >3 

7: -a 

c3 ,— 1 

d d 

bO«+H 

£ * 

o 

d ~ 
o d 
^ 2 

5 ^ 


■s'? 

a >o 

0J 

rrt '■d 

a .53 

e3 O 
U 

d 

o ct: 
o 

£ d 
M Q 

O O) 
o ^ 

GO 

« § 

d © 

0 5 

O <3 
o jq 
03 ^ 
O . 

> "3 
o 2 


d 'g 
S b0 


d 

O* 


5 g 

d 


cJ »5 




(Signed in duplicate.) 0. D. 

Note. —The certificate must show by whose order the officer was stationed, and the first account to be accompanied by a copy of the order. 













































No. 22.—(Voucher.) 


FOR THE ARMY. 


195 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



c 












O 

X 


O* 




o 

o 

o 

c3 

o> 

► 

o 

rO 

ci 

o 


o 


CD 

00 


T3 

GJ 

‘o 

o 

o 

PH 




(Signed duplicates.) E. F. 

Note.— This form will be used for miscellaneous disbursements, and will be entered in Abstract B or C, according to the nature of 
the expenditure. 


































































19 


REVISED regulations. 
Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 23. 


QUARTERLY RETURN OF QUARTERMASTER’S STORES 

received, issued , and remaining on hand at -, in the quarter ending 

on the - of -, 186 . 

A. B., Quartermaster. 


NOTE. 

The property on this return (which does not include clothing, camp 
and garrison equipage) will be classed as follows: 

1. Fuel. 

2. Forage. 

3. Straw. 

4. Stationery. 

5. Barrack, Hospital, and Office Furniture. 

6. Means of Transportation, including Harness, &c. 

7. Building Materials. 

8. Veterinary Tools and Horse Medicines. 

9. Blacksmiths’ Tools. 

10. Carpenters’ Tools. 

11. Wheelwrights’ Tools. 

12. Masons’ and Bricklayers’ Tools. 

13. Miscellaneous Tools for Fatigue and Garrison Purposes. 

14. Stores for Expenditure, such as Iron, Steel, Horse-Shoes, Rope, &c., 

&c., to be classed alphabetically. 

R2 














198 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 23. 


Quarterly Return of Quartermaster's Stores, received and issued at 

by -. 



Classes. 

1. Fuel. 


Date. 

Abstracts, &c. 


Wood. 

Coal. 

Cords. 

J Feet. 

j Inches. 

j Anthracite. 

Bituminous. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Lbs. 

Bu. 


Per last return. 

Abstract D. 

“ E. 

“ N. 

On hand. 

Received by purchase. 

“ from officers.... 

Fabricated, taken up, &c. 






Total to be accounted for. 







Per Abstract F.. 
“ G.. 

“ H.. 

“ I... 

“ K.. 

“ L.. 

“ M. 

Fuel. 

Forage. 

Straw. 

Stationery. 

Special issues. 

Expended, sold, &c. 

Transferred. 






Total issued and expended. 






Total remaining on hand. 






Condition 1. 

“ 2 . 

“ 3. 

In good order. 

Unfit for service, but re¬ 
pairable . 

Totally unfit for service... 






































































FOR THE ARMY. 


199 


Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. 


No. 23. 

---, in the quarter ending on the - of -186 

Continued. 


2. Forage. 

3. Straw. 

4. Stationery. 

Corn. 

Oats. 

Hay. 

Fodder. 

For Bedding. 

Foolscap Paper. 

Letter Paper. 

Folio Post Paper. 

Envelope Paper. 

Envelopes. 

Two-quire blank-books. 

Three-quire blk. books. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Pounds. 

Qrs. 

Qrs. 

Qrs. 

Qrs. 

No. 

No. 

No. 













































































































200 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 23. 

Quarterly Return of Quartermaster’s Stores, received and issued at 


4. Stationery. 


Abstracts, 

&c. 

Four-quire blank-books. 

Ink. 

Ink-powder. 

Wafers. 

Sealing-wax. . 

Steel pens. 

Quills. 

Lead-pencils. 

Office tape. 

Inkstands. 

Wafer-stamps. 


No. 

Bottles. 

Papers. 

Ozs. 

Ozs. 

No. 

Gross. 

No. 

Pieces. 

No. 

No. 

0. H. 

D. 

E. 

N. 
























F. 

G. 

H. 

I. 

K. 

L. 

M. 











— 






















— 

— 



















































FOR THE ARMY. 


203 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 23. 

3 in the quarter ending on the - of -, 186 , by 

Continued. 


4. Stationery. 


Erasers. 

Paper-folders. 

Sand-boxes. 

Wafer-boxes. 

• 












No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 











































































— 


































I certify that the foregoing return exhibits a true and correct statement of 
all the property which has come into my hands on account of the Quarter¬ 
master’s Department during the quarter ending on the-of-, 186 . 

A. B., Quartermaster. 

















































Wo. 24. —(Attract D.) 

Abstract of Articles purchased at -, in the quarter ending on the - of - , 186 


202 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



1 


1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


1 

1 


1 


1 

1 

1 


1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 





1 

1 





1 




1 

1 




1 

1 

Stationery. 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 

Straw. 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 

1 

to 

ci 

O 

Eh 




1 

1 




1 

1 








Fuel. 

Coal. 

•eijia 






Wood. 

•suj 












•SpJOQ 






Classes. 

Amount. 

*810 






■8110(1 






From whom purchased. 


Articles purchased and paid for. 


Articles purchased and not paid for 

Total purchased within the quarter 

uoqonoA jo -on 


Date. 




I certify that the above abstract is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note. —This abstract appertains exclusively to the Property Return , and is designed to show all the supplies purchased by the 
Quartermaster, whether paid for or not. No vouchers of the purchases paid for accompany this abstract. They are in the second 
division of Abstract A. Purchases not paid for are vouched as in Form No. 25. 


























































No. 25 .—(Voucher to Abstract D.) 


FOR TIIE ARMY. 


203 


P5 

P 


e 


£ 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



m 

& 


rs © 
u © 

O rH 


'O cS 
fe 

r’ © 
© ® 
” la 

t § 

o © 
o CM 


Pm Pm 



a> ^ 

-73 3 O' 
•3 « - 

a! aj pq 

o o • 

53^ 


S “ 

S3 a 
fl r-3 

a> 

<U *73 

II 


























No. 26.— (Abstract E.) 

Abstract of Articles received from officers at -, in the quarter ending on the - of -, 186 


204 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



1 







































Stationery. 
















Straw. 










Forage. 










Fuel. 

Coal. 

•spqsng 



Wood. 

•soqouj 



•poj 



•spjOQ 



er 

a 

a 

cr 

ct 

C 


From whom received. 


a 

> 

*a 

c. 

a 

4- 

1 



•uoqonoA jo -o^[ 


H 

Date. 




1 certify that the above abstract is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note. —All property received from other officers will be entered on this abstract, whether receipted for or not. For vouchers, see 
Form No. 27. 



















































No. 27. —(Voucher to Abstract E.) 

List of Quartermaster's Stores, &c., delivered by - to -■, at -, on the - day of -, 186 


FOR THE ARMY. 


205 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



S 


I certify that I have this day delivered to A. B., Quartermaster United States Army, the articles specified in the foregoing list. 

C. D., Quartermaster. 

Note.— When no invoice is received, the receiving officer will substitute for this form of voucher a list of the stores received, ce 
tified by himself. When the person responsible for the property entered without invoice is known, it will be entered in his name. 
























































No. 28.— (Abstract F.) 

Abstract of Fuel issued at -, in the quarter ending on the - of - ; 186 


206 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



I certify that the above abstract is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note. —For vouchers, see Forms No. 29 and No. 30. All fuel issued is entered ou this abstract. Fuel transferred to other officers, 
to be accounted for by them, is entered on Abstract M. 
























No. 29.— (Voucher to Abstract f.) 


FOR THE ARMY. 


207 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 






i 

8 


% 


as 


8 


Q 


I 




Remarks. 

4 

TOTAL ALLOWANCE. 

Coal. 

•spuno<j 



•spqsng 


* 

Wood. 

•soqouj 






•spjoo 



•spaoo ui ‘qoB9 

O? 90UBM.0JP3 i[q^UOJ^ 


*C 

C 

E- 


TH°lE 


•S}UR 

-aj9s pun sassoapuuB'x 


•SOJUAtad 

puB ‘suBioismu ‘suoo 
-gjo pouoissiraraoo-uo^j 


•suja^Bqng 


•SUIB^dBQ 


Station. 



•3C) 


® 8 
6 8 

re 


c3 

a 

a 


Received,-, 188 , of-, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. Army,-cords-feet-inches of wood and- 

-of coal, in full of the above requisition. 

(Signed duplicates.) R. S., Commanding Company. 













































No. 30.— (Voucher to Abstract F.) 

Requisition for Fuel for - , stationed at - , for the month of -, 186 


208 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 

/ 

Coal. 

•spunod; 



•sjoqsng; 



Wood. 

•soqouj 






•spuoo 













For myself. 

For private servant. 

Total. 


T3 

0 > 

fcD 


Received,-, 186 , of-, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army, -cords - feet-inches of wood 

an d_of coal, in full of the above requisition. 


































No. 31.— (Abstract G.) 

Abstract of Forage issued at -, in the quarter ending on the - of -, 186 


FOR THE ARMY. 


209 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


5 * 



OQ 




ci 

s 

<u 

P3 


Public. 

Private. 


Fodder. 

•spunoj 



c5 

ci 

HH 

•spuno<j 



O 

a 

c3 

Is 

o 

m 

•spunoj 



ci 

"c? 

o 

EH 

o 

(•sqi 68) 

‘spqsng; 




a 

•spunoj 




o 

o 

(•sqi 99) 
‘sjoqsng; 






•uexo jo roqum^j 


•soinnx jo uoquin^j; 


•sosjoq jo aoqran^i 


fc.S 


— oi 


- UI0JJ 


MoqonoA jo aaqurnsj 


I certify that the above abstract is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note.— For vouchers, see Forms Nos. 32, 33, 34. All forage issued -will be entered on this abstract. Forage transferred to other 
officers, to be accounted for by them, will be entered on Abstract M. 














































I 


210 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


O 




.3 % 


s 

o 


5 c 




to fO 

to CO 


s 

$ 

§ 




Fodder. 

•jo spuno<j 




Hay. 

•jo spunoj 




Oats. 

•jo spunoj 




Barley. 

•jo spunoj 




Corn. 

•j'o spunoj 





Daily allowance to 
each animal. 

•joppoj jo spunoj 


•Xuq jo spunoj 


•sjuo jo spunoj 


•iCopicq jo spunoj 


•uaoo jo spmro<j 


! •suoi'i'ca jo aoqumj^ 


•s£ep jo aoqmn^j 


•sjcmrau jo aoqnmu pejo^ 


•uoxo jo aoqum^j 


•saparti jo joqumjq 


•sosaoq jo aoqran^j 


•uoT^tsmhaj jo ojuq; 



r3 S 


o r 3 

?H O 

S.fc 

o 6) 
o 

.2 “ 
rt G 


Js n=S 


S3 „ 
XJ1 o 


!=> o 


O' 


o c.-, 

>, 0 

c3 co 

r3 *3 


>• P* 


































































Requisition for Forage for - Frigate Horses in the service of -, U. S. Army, at 

days, commencing the - of -, and ending the - of - , 


FOR THE ARMY 


211 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 


Total allowance. 

Fodder 

•spuno^ 



Hay. 

•spunoj 



Oats. 

•spunoj 



(•sqi 28) 
‘sjoqsng; 



Corn. 

•spunoj 



(’*1195) 
‘spqsng; 



Daily allowance for 
each. 

Hay. 

•spunoj 


Total. 


Oats. 

•spunoj 


Corn. 

•spunoj 


•sosioq jo joqum^ 


Period. 

6 

H 


From.' 


Date. 




I certify that the above requisition is correct and just, and that I have not drawn forage for any part of the time above charged. 

Received at-, the-of -, 186 , of —-, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. Army, -^ bushels corn, 

- ^2 bushels oats,-pounds hay, -pounds fodder, in full of the above requisition. 

(Signed duplicates.) 


























































No. 34.—(Voucher to Abstract G.) 


2L2 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


% 




3 • 

rig O 

e «. 


s 


s; 


£ 

'“3 


*53 

53 


s; 

% 


53 

Sq 


Remarks. 


Quantity of, consumed. 




uoppoj 

Pounds. 




Pounds. 



•ifeprca 

Pounds. 



•SP3() 

Pounds. 



•uuoq 

Pounds. 



Number of animals. 

•pujox 



•uoxo 



•sojnj^ 



'S9SUOJJ 



Period. 

•sXup JO -0£I 




•OX 


•raoij 


O 

H 


I certify that the above statement is correct; that the forage was issued to the Public Animals as stated, and that the issues were 
necessary. 

Approved: A. B., Quartermaster. 

R. S., Commanding. 






























Wo. 35.— (Abstract II.) 

Abstract of Straw issued at - , in the quarter ending on the 




FOR THE ARMY. 


213 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 




% 




'SJUBAJOg 


•sessaupumj'x 


•sopeApid 
put? ‘suBioisntu ‘sroo 
-tgo pouotssiunuoo-uo^ 


uoqonoA jo -o^ 


O* 

n 

•< 




Note. —For voucher, see Form No. 36. Issues on this abstract. Transfers on Abstract M. 
































No. 36.—(Voucher to Abstract II.) 


214 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


% 




$5 


ns 




§> 


g> 

s 


% 


s 


G$ 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


£ . 
O 


•S^URAiag 


•sossejpumj'j 


•sapjAird 
put? ‘sunioisnra ‘saao 

-tgO p9H0]SSICUUI00-U0J^ 


I 

<§ 

• ^ 
<D 

S c 
Js s 
° s 

'1 o 
it) 


s ( 


"5 t> 


’ C5 


.o 


b“ ori 

£ ® 



































No. 37. —(Abstract I.) 

Abstract of Stationery issued at -, in the quarter ending on the 




FOR THE ARMY. 


215 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


5 * 


Remarks. 


# 

i 


| 


| 

uaquma ‘s^ooq-^uTqg; j 

•seeded ‘jopAiod-^uj ^ 



•soouno ‘xuAr-SatiReg 



•seouno ‘saeju^V | 


•joqmnu ‘sqm^ | 


•sjeoqs ‘jaded aSpiJjJTSQ | 


•sajmb ‘jaded-SuijiJAt 

• 


For what 
period. 

6 

H 


Total. 

a 

o 

u 

Pm 


To whom issued. 


•jaipnoA jo -oh 


Date. 



HH 55 




and all issues by him. Transfers on Abstract M. 












































No. 38. —(Vouchee, to Abstract 1.) 


216 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 












t 



•aop 

-Aiod-qut jo sradcj 


•ode; jo sooaij 


•XR4S. 

-Suipjos jo soounQ 


•srajuM. jo soounQ 


•sprah jo aoquin^ 


•aodud 

oSpxa'ja'BO jo sjooqg 


Moded 

duosiooj jo sojtuQ 


•rod 

-Bd-.t9jja^ jo saaraQ 





Received at-, on the-of-, 186 , of-, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. Army, -quires of letter-paper, 

-quires of foolscap paper,-quills,-ounces of wafers,-ounces of sealing-wax,-pieces of tape,-sheets 

o*’ cartridge paper,-papers of ink-powder. 

(Signed duplicates.) 













































No. 39. —(Abstract K.—For all issues except Fuel, Forage, Straw, and Stationery.) 
Abstract of Articles issued on Special Requisitions at - , in the quarter ending on the of , 


FOR THE ARMY 


21 





$4 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


e 

5 



c3 


<V 

ci 


p 





Note.— For voucher, see Form No. 40. Transfers on Abstract M. 
























































SPECIAL REQUISITION. 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


218 


E- 

O 


O 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



<U ^ 




£ 0 > 
*55 tjo 


^ V4 

£ 3 

'o ^ 

CO ^ 

rO g 

3 


r 3 c3 


£ m 
P-* c3 

CO q; 


CO O 

•3 3 

cr d 


.S 1 — 1 

co 

o .2? 




S3 

c? 


Received at -, the - of-, 18—, of-, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army r here insert the arti¬ 

cles] in full of the above requisition. 

(Signed duplicates.) 

Note.—T he cost of articles issued on special requisitions, and orders of commanding- officers, will be entered on the requisition 
and on the list or invoice furnished the receiving officer. 















No. 41.— (Abstract L.) 

Abstract of Articles Expended, Lost, Destroyed, in the public service, sold,&c., at -, under the direction of 

in the quarter ending on the - of - , 186 . 


FOR THE ARMY 


219 


Quartermaster’s D epartment.-Forms. 


E* 

>> 

P 


J° '°N 


I certify that the above abstract is correct. h. B., Quartermaster. 


























































































No. 42. —(Voucher to Abstract L.) 

L ist of Quartermaster’s Stores expended in public service at - under the direction of -, in the month of - , 18G . 


220 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 





e 

c3 

ZS 

a* 


© 

6 

53 


I certify that the several articles of Quartermaster’s stores, above enumerated, have been necessarily expended in the public service, 
at this station, as indicated by the marginal remarks annexed to them respectively. 

(Signed duplicates.) 

Approved: R. S., Commanding. A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note. —This list should be made out monthly, to enable the Quartermaster to know the exact state of his supplies. 















No. 43. —(Voucher to Abstract L.) 

List of Articles Lost or Destroyed in the public service .at -, while in the possession and charge of -, in the 

month of -, 186 . 


221 


FOR THE ARMY. 
Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 




O 

CO 


O 




I certify that the several articles of Quartermaster’s stores, above enumerated, have been unavoidably lost or destroyed while in the 
public service, as indicated by the remarks annexed to them respectively. 

A. B., Quartermaster. 

Approved: C. D., Commanding 


















No. 44.— (Voucher, to Abstract L.) 

Account Sales of articles of public property sold at public auction at - , under the direction of - , on the 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 




I certify that the above account sales is accurate and just. A. B. Auctioneer. 

I certify that the above enumerated articles were sold at public auction as above stated, pursuant to—[state the orders or authority.] 

C. D., Quartermaster. 
























No. 45.— (Abstract M.) 

Abstract of Articles transferred to -, at -, in the quarter ending on the 


FOR THE ARMY 






Quartermaster’s Department.-——Forms. 






































































Classes. 

To whom 
transferred. 


Total. 

•raqonoA jo -ovj 


Date. 





c3 

CD 

> 

O 

rO 

c3 

o 

Dd 


ci 



CD 


223 


Note.— This abstract contains all transfers of stores to other officers, to he accounted for by them; the vouchers will he their 
receipts. When these are not received in time, the Quartermaster will substitute his own certified list of the stores sent, and the bill 
of lading. The receipts he will afterward transmit when he receives them. 

























































No. 45.— (Abstract N.) 

Abstract of Articles received from various sources at - , during the quarter ending the - dag of 


224 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


Stationery. 

1 


1 


| 


1 


1 











Straw. 

•spunoj 



Forage. 

•^H 

•spunOjj 



•sp>0 

(•sqi se) 

•spqsng 

• 


•ujoq 

(■sqi 99) 

•spqsng 



Fuel. 

Coal. 







Wood. 

•soqouj 



•poj 



•sproo 



Classes. 

From whence received. 

Found at the post. 

Manufactured. 

Parts of articles broken up. 

Heretofore issued, but not consumed. 
Captured from the enemy. 

Total. 

‘OOIOAUt JO 'ON 


Date. 



I certify that the above abstract is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. 

Note. —This abstract contains all Quartermaster’s property found at the post, not borne on the previous return ; all that may come 
to the Quartermaster’s possession -without his knowing who maybe accountable for it; articles manufactured in the quarter; material 
or parts of articles that have been condemned or broken up; fuel and forage issued but not consumed, &c., &c., &c. Separate lists of 
each class, with the necessary explanation, will be filed with the abstract 





























































226 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 46. 


Quarterly Statement of Allowances paid to Officers of the Army in Money, 

the quarter end - 



Rank and 
Corps. 

For Fuel. 

Quarters. 

Officers’ 

names. 

(Rank being 
that for 
which they 
were paid, 
or 

allowances 

furnished.) 


Ain’t. 

In money. 

In kind. 

Period. 

$ c. 

Period. 

$ c. 

Period. 

No. Rooms. 

w. s.... 

J.T. 

Maj. Genl. 

Brig. Genl.... 
Col. Ajt. Gl.. 
Col. Q.M. D.. 
Maj. Pay Dt. 
Col. Engrs... 
Mj. T. Engs.. 

1861. 

July, Aug., Sep.. 

96 00 
30 00 

1861. 

July, Aug., Sep.. 
July, Aug., Sep.. 
July, Aug., Sep.. 
July, Aug., Sep.. 

120 00 
80 00 

1861. 


K. J.... 

August. 

.30 00 

90 00 



T. M... 


30 00 

80 00 



T. L.... 

July, Aug., Sep.. 
July, Aug., Sep.. 

30 00 

80 00 


3 

L. B.... 

30 00 


80 00 



B. L.... 




B.B.M. 

Col. Drags.... 





July, Aug.. 
July, Aug.. 
July, Aug.. 

4 

J. C. 

Col. Art. 


20 00 



4 

F. E.... 

Maj. Infty.,.. 

July, Aug. 

12 00 



4 





























































Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 46. 

or furnished in kind, with the money value thereof, by - , at -, in 

ing -, 186 . 



For transportation 

of baggage. 

Per diem on court- 

martial. 

For forage issued 

in kind. 

Straw for servants. 

Stationery. 

Total amount. 

Abstract 

and 

voucher. 

Remarks. 

Rent. 

$ c 

$ c. 

$ c. 

$ c. 

$ c. 

$ c. 

$ c. 


120 00 

40 00 



20 00 

396 00 

B 1, 7, 9—1 9.. 



90 00 




15 00 

215 00 

B 2,11,14—14. 








120 00 

B 17. 








110 00 

B 21. 


30 00 

60 00 


30 00 



230 00 

B 4, 20—G 13. 








130 00 

B 19. 



100 00 





110 00 

B 26, 27.. 


30 00 

30 00 

40 00 

37 50 

2 00 


139 50 

B 27,'30—G 14. 


35 00 

70 00 



1 50 


126 50 

B 28, 32—11 2. 






50 


12 50 

F 4—II 6. 

Public quarters 










I certify that the above is correct 

A. B., Quartermaster. 


Note.—W hen officers occupy quarters owned by the public, the number of rooms only 
will be reported. 







































































228 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


§ 


% 


Bn 

o 


co 

QO 




^ •§ 
a r « 

a a 


2 

~ Si 


e 

Ru 

S' 

GJ 


6 


P 


►» 

M 


*•-< L 

® ri 

u fe 

<u l^- 
=w 

P o 

OT ^ 
c3 ri 
<D H 

H o 

g 

<U cj 

•5 ec 

a 

0 ® 
O & 


'w -*r 
0> C3 


,> m 

8 S ® . 

f-l >H .rt O 

■P 

CO to ' -4J 

cd d « d 

" »,q cS 

M 


>> 

W 


^ b0 


« 

C3 C> 

"cl ^ 


army, during the quarter ending on the-of-, 18—, and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. 
































FOR THE ARMY 


229 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



Note. —For vouchers, see Forms 49, 50. All payments for apprehending deserters must also be entered in this Abstract. 



































No. 49. — (Voucher to Abstract C.) 


230 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



Received of-, on the-of- , 186—, the articles above enumerated. 

(Signed duplicates.) A. B., Assistant Surgeon. 











No. 50. — (Voucher to Abstract C.) 

Bill of Medicine, &c., when purchased by an officer of the Quartermaster’s Department 


FOR THE ARMY. 


231 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



3 £ 


o ft, 

3 f, 


o n 
a -=J 




1 .2 -=5 


g'S 

o 3 


w A 

m a 




Ja is 


•_3 cp 


2 a 

H S 


o a 

ti 


m Abstract 0, and the articles not noticed in the property returns. 

























232 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 

No. 51. 


Quarterly Return of Clothing, Camp, and Garrison Equipage 

of -, 186 , 


WHEN RECEIVED. 

No. of invoice. 

OF WHOM RECEIVED. 


Cavalry hats. 

Caps and bands. 

Cap-letters, castle, shell and 

flame. 

Cap-covers. 

POMPONS. 

Color. 





On hand per last return 







Total to be accounted 









WHEN ISSUED. 

No. of roll. 

TO WHOM ISSUED. 
















Total issued. 







On hand to be accounted for. 




















































































_ for the army. 233 

Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 

No. 51. 

received and issued at -, in the quarter ending on the •- day 

by -—. 


CLOTHINO. 



Plumes for cavalry. 

COATS. 

METALLIC 

SEALS. 

Sashes. 

UNIFORM 

JACKETS. 

Eagle and rings. 

Sergeant-majors’. 

Quartermaster-sergeants’. 

| Ordnance sergeants’. 

Chief musicians’. 

First sergeants’. 

| Sergeants’. 

| Corporals’. 

| Musicians’. 

| Privates’. 

| Non-commissioned staff. 

Sergeants’. 

Corporals’ and privates’. 

Sergeant-majors’. 

Quartermaster-sergeants’. 

First sergeants’. 














































































































U 2 
































































234 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 

No. 51. 

Quarterly Return of Clothing , Camp and Garrison 


CLOTHING. 


UNIFORM 

JACKETS. 

TO 

U 

o> 

O 

u 

EH 

Yards of binding. 


Flannel shirts. 

Drawers, pairs of. 

Boots, cavalry, pairs of. 

Boots, infantry, pairs of. 

Stockings, pairs of. 

Leather stocks. 

Great-coats. 

Great-coat straps, number of. 

Talmas. 

Blankets. 

j Knapsacks and straps. 

| Haversacks. 

Sergeants’. 

Corporals’. 

Privates’. 











































































































_i 




















































FOR THE ARMS'. 


235 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Fora £. 


No. 51. 

Equipage, received and issued, &c.—Continued. 


EQUIPAGE. 


Canteens and straps. 


BED- 

SACKS. 

CQ 

O 

X 

< 

Axe-helves. 

Spades. 

Camp kettles. 

Mess pans. 

Camp hatchets. 

Hatchet handles. 

Garrison flag. 

Garrison flag halliards, 

Storm flag. 

| Recruiting flags. 

Recruiting flag halliards. 

| Camp colors. 

Guidons. 

Single. 

Double. 




































_ 











— 

— 

— 

— 




— 






. 






































































































236 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 51. 

Quarterly Return of Clothing, Camp and Gar 


EQUIPAGE. 


Trumpets. 

Bugles, with extra mouth-pieces. 

Fifes. 

DRUMS. 

Wall-tents. 

Wall-tent flies. 

Wall-tent poles and pins, sets. 

Common tents. 

Common-tent poles and pins, 

sets. 

Iron pots. 

Pickaxes. 

Complete. 

Heads, batter. 

Heads, snare. 

| Slings. 

Sticks, pairs. 

Drum-stick carriages. 

Cords. 

Snares, sets. 




































1 

i 

i 

















— 

i 









































1 





































































FOR THE ARMY. 


237 




_ Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 

No. 51. 

rison Equipage, received and issued, &c. —Continued. 



BOOKS AND BLANKS. 

Pickaxe-handles. 











Clothing account-book. 

. . 

Descriptive book. 

Order-book. 

Clothing returns. 

Receipt-rolls. 

Final statements. 


















































































































































































REVISED REGULATIONS 


2,‘58 

Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No. 52. 

We, the undersigned JSfon-commissioned Officers, Artificers, Musicians, and 

several articles of Clothing set 


Date of the 
issue. 

\ 

Name and designation 
of the soldier. 

Caps. 

Cap-covers. 

Pompons. 

| Eagles and rings. 

UNIFORM 

COATS. 

UNIFORM 

JACKETS. 


oi 

d 

z 

Sergeants’ 

Corporals’ 

Musicians’ 

Privates’ 

Sergeants’ 

Corporals’ 

Musicians’ 

| Privates’ 


• 












- 





Notes. —Erasures and alterations of entries are prohibited. 

Regular and extra issues will be distinguished on the receipt-roll. 
Each signature, whether written by the soldier or acknowledged by 
mark, must be witnessed. 

Vacant space will be filled by a cipher. 

Mounted men may receive one pair of “boots” and two pairs of “boot¬ 
ees,” instead of four pairs of bootees. 





























FOR THE ARMY. 


239 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 


No, 52.—Continued. 


Privates of -, do hereby acknowledge to have received of - the 

opposite our respective names. 



As the metallic shoulder-scales, letters, numbers, castles, and shells and 
flames will last for many years, they will be borne on the returns as 
company property, in the same manner as are sashes, knapsacks and 
straps, haversacks, canteens and straps, and other articles of camp 
and garrison equipage, and will be charged to the soldier only when 
lost or destroyed through neglect. 










































No. 53. 

Descriptive List of Persons and Articles employed and hired in the Quartermaster's Department, and transferred by 
-, at -, to -, Quartermaster at -, on the - day of - ; 186-. 


240 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Quartermaster’s Department.-Forms. 



I certify that the above is a true list of persons and articles transferred by me to-at-, on the-day of 

186-; and that the pei’iods of service, rates of hire or compensation, and amounts due, are correctly stated. 
















































FOR THE ARMY. 


241 


Subsistence Department.-Supplies. 


ARTICLE XLII1. 

SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 

SUPPLIES. 

1176. Subsistence stores for tbe army, unless in particular and urgent 
cases tbe Secretary of War shall otherwise direct, shall he procured by con¬ 
tract, to be made by the Commissary-General on public notice, to be deli¬ 
vered on inspection in the bulk, and at such places as shall be stipulated ■ 
the inspector to give duplicate inspection certificates (see Form 15), and 
to be a legal inspector where there is such officer. 

1177. Purchases, to supply such corps and posts as by reason of their 
position, the climate, or for other sufficient cause the Secretary of War may 
specially direct to be supplied in that way, will be made in open market, 
on public notice, from the lowest bidder who produces the proper article. 

1178. And whenever a deficiency of subsistence stores makes it ne¬ 
cessary to buy them, the commissary, where they are needed, will make 
a requisition for that purpose on the proper purchasing commissary, or 
buy them himself of good quality corresponding with the contract. 

1179. When subsistence is received under contract, the commissary 
will receipt for it on the inspection certificates (see Form 15). He will 
deliver one of these to the contractor, and forward the other to the Com¬ 
missary-General, with a report on the quality of the provisions and the 
condition of the packages. 

1180. Whenever subsistence stores are purchased, the advertisements 
and bids, and a copy of the bill of purchase, with a statement of the 
cause of purchase, will be forwarded by the purchasing officer to the 
Commissary-General. This rule does not apply to the ordinary purchase 
of hospital supplies. Pork, salt beef, and flour must be inspected before 
purchase by a legal inspector where there is such officer. Duplicate cer¬ 
tificates of inspection (see Form 15) will be taken as sub-vouchers to the 
vouchers for the payment. 

1181. Fresh beef, when it can be procured, shall be furnished as often 
as the commanding officer may order, at least twice a week: to be pro¬ 
cured by the commissary, when practicable, by contract. (For form of 
contract and bond, see Forms 20 and 21.) When it can be provided at 
not more than six and a quarter cents per pound, net weight, or at not 
more than an equivalent proportion of salt pork, it will be issued to the 
troops five times per week. When beef is taken on the hoof, it will be 
accounted for on the provision return by the number of cattle and their 
estimated weight. When the pasture is insufficient, hay, corn, and other 
forage will be procured for public cattle. 

v 16 




242 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Supplies. 

1182. When circumstances are favorable, and it can be done -with 
advantage to the government, the Subsistence Department will keep beef 
cattle to supply the issues. 

1183. Good and sufficient store-room for the subsistence stores will be 
procured by the commissary from the quartermaster. Care shall be taken 
to keep the store-rooms dry and ventilated. Packages shall be so stored 
as to allow circulation of air among and beneath them. The flour should 
occasionally be rolled out into the air. 

1184. Before submitting damaged commissary stores to boards of sur¬ 
vey, the commissary shall separate and repack sound .parts. 

1185. Wastage on issues, or from evaporation or leakage, will be ascer¬ 
tained quarterly, or when it can be, most conveniently; and the actual 
wastage thus found will be charged on the monthly return. Loss, from 
whatever cause, exceeding ordinary waste, must be accounted for by the 
certificate of an officer, or other satisfactory evidence. Ordinary waste 
on issues should not exceed, say 10 per cent, on pork, bacon, sugar, vine¬ 
gar, and soap; and 5 per cent, on hard bread, beans, rice, coffee, and salt. 

1186. No wastage is admitted on issues of fresh beef furnished the 
company, detachment, or regiment directly from the butcher. But in 
beef on the hoof, errors in estimated weight, and losses on cattle strayed, 
stolen, or which have died, will be accounted for by the certificate of an 
officer, or other satisfactory evidence. When cattle are transferred, they 
should be appraised, and loss in weight reported as wastage by the officer 
delivering them. Fair wastage in transportation of stores is accounted 
for by the receiving officer. 

1187. When practicable, cattle presented for acceptance must be 
weighed upon the scales. From the live weight of a steer, thus ascer¬ 
tained, his net weight shall be determined by deducting forty-five per 
centum when his gross weight exceeds thirteen hundred (1300) pounds, 
and fifty per centum when it is less than that and not under eight hun¬ 
dred (800) pounds. 

1188. When it is impracticable to weigh upon the scales, one or more 
average steers must be selected, killed, and dressed in the usual manner. 
The average net weight of these (necks and shanks excluded) will be 
accepted as the average net weight of the herd. 

1189. In all written instruments for the delivery of cattle on the hoof, 
the manner prescribed above for ascertaining net weight must, in express 
terms, be inserted; in verbal agreements, it must be understood and ac¬ 
cepted by the party delivering the cattle. 

1190. Vouchers for the payment of cattle will state the method ob¬ 
served in determining their net weight, except where payment is made 
on the certificate of an officer, when it must be stated in the certificate. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


248 


Subsistence Department.-Issues. 


THE RATION. 

1191. Tlie ration is three-fourths of a pound of pork or bacon, or one 
and a fourth pound of fresh or salt beef; eighteen ounces of bread ot 
flour, or twelve ounces of hard bread, or one and a fourth pound corn 
meal; and at the rate, to one hundred rations, of eight quarts of beans, 
or, in lieu thereof, ten pounds of rice, or, in lieu thereof, twice per week, 
one hundred and fifty ounces of desiccated potatoes, and one hundred 
ounces of mixed vegetables; ten pounds of coffee, or, in lieu thereof, one 
and one-half pound of tea; fifteen pounds of sugar; four quarts of 
vinegar; one pound of sperm candles, or one and one-fourth pound of 
adamantine candles, or one and one-half pound of tallow candles; four 
pounds of soap, and two quarts of salt. 

1192. The table on page 280 shows the quantity of each part of the 
ration in any number of rations from one to one hundred thousand. 

1193. On a campaign, or on marches, or on hoard of transports, the 
ration of hard bread is one pound.* 

ISSUES. 

1194. Returns for issues to companies will, when practicable, be consoli¬ 
dated for the post or regiment (see Form 14). At the end of the month 
the issuing commissary will make duplicate abstracts of the issues, which the 
commanding officer will compare with the original returns, and certify (see 
Form 2). This abstract is a voucher of the issue for the monthly return. 

1195. Issues to the hospital will be on returns by the medical officer, for 
such provisions only as are actually required for the sick and the attend¬ 
ants. The cost of such parts of the ration as are issued will be charged 
to the hospital at contract or cost prices, and the hospital will he credited 
by the whole number of complete rations due through the month at 
contract or cost prices (see note 7, page 248); the balance, constituting the 
Hospital Fund, or any portion of it, may be expended by the commissary, 
on the requisition of the medical officer, in the purchase of any article 
for the subsistence or comfort of the sick, not authorized to be otherwise 


* During the rebellion in the Southern States the ration is to be increased as follows : 
Twenty-two ounces of bread or flour, or one pound of hard bread, instead of the present 
issue; fresh beef shall be issued as often as the commanding officer of any detachment or 
regiment shall require it, when practicable, in place of salt meat; beans and rice shall be 
issued in the same ration in the proportions now provided by the regulation, and one pound 
of potatoes per man shall be issued at least three times a week, if practicable; and when 
these articles cannot be issued in these proportions, an equivalent in value shall be issued 
in some other proper food, and a ration of tea may bo substituted for a ration of coffee 
apon the requisition of the proper officer. 






REVISED REGULATIONS 


244 

Subsistence Department.-Issues. 

furnished (see Form 3). At large depots or general hospitals, this fund 
may be partly expended for the benefit of dependent posts or detachments, 
on requisitions approved by the medical director or senior surgeon of the 
district. On the 1st of January, each year, one-fourth of every hospital 
fund, if less than $150, and one-half, if more, will be dropped by the 
commissary from the fund (Form 3), and will be paid over to the trea¬ 
surer of the Soldiers’ Home by the Commissary-General. 

1196. The articles purchased for the hospital, as well as those issued 
from the subsistence store-house, will be included in the surgeon’s certifi¬ 
cate of issues to the hospital, and borne on the monthly return of pro¬ 
visions received and issued. Vouchers for purchases for the hospital must 
either be certified by the surgeon or accompanied by his requisition. 

1197. There may be allowed in hospitals, to be provided under such 
rules as the Surgeon-General of the army, with the approval of the Secretary 
of War, may prescribe, such quantities of fresh or preserved fruits, milk 
or butter, and of eggs, as may be necessary for the proper diet of the sick. 

1198. Abstracts of the issues to the hospital will be made by the com¬ 
missary, certified by the surgeon, and countersigned by the commanding 
officer (see Form 3). 

1199. In order that the authorized women of companies may draw their 
rations while temporarily separated from their companies, the officer com¬ 
manding the company must make a report to the commanding officer of 
the post where the women may he left, designating such as are to draw 
rations as attached to his company. Their rations are not commuted, and 
they can only draw them at a military post or station where there are supplies. 

1200. When provisions can be spared from the military supplies, com¬ 
manding officers have discretion to order issues to Indians visiting military 
posts on the frontiers, or in their respective nations, and to order sales of 
subsistence to Indian agents for issues to Indians. The returns for issues, 
where there is no Indian agent, will he signed by the commanding officer. 
The sales will he for cash, at cost, including all expenses; to be entered 
on the monthly return, and credited on the quarterly account current. 

1201. Issues to volunteers and militia , to sailors, to marines, to citizens 
employed by any of the departments, or to Indians, will be entered on 
separate abstracts to the monthly return. 

1202. An issue (extra) of ten pounds of sperm candles, or twelve 
pounds of adamantine candles, or fifteen pounds of tallow candles per 
month, may be made to the principal guard of each camp or garrison, on 
the order of the commanding officer, and salt, in small quantities, may be 
issued to public cattle. Occasional issues (extra) of molasses are made 
of two quarts to one hundred rations. (One gill of whisky is allowed 
daily, in case of excessive fatigue and exposure.) Troops at sea are 




FOR THE ARMY. 


245 


Subsistence Department.-Recruiting Service. 

recommended to draw rice in lieu of beans. Fresh vegetables (potatoes, 
onions, &c.), pickles, krout, and dried fruits, can only be purchased and 
paid for out of the hospital fund and issued to the sick. 

1203. When men leave their company, the rations they have drawn, 
and left with it, will be deducted from the next return for the company: 
a like rule, when men are discharged from the hospital, will govern the 
hospital return. 

RECRUITING SERVICE. 

1204. When subsistence cannot be issued by the Commissariat to re¬ 
cruiting parties, it will be procured by the officer in charge, on written con¬ 
tracts for complete rations, or wholesome board and lodging. (See Form 19.) 

1205. The contractor will send monthly or quarterly, as he may choose, 
his account for rations issued, to the Commissary-General for payment, 
vouched by the abstract of issues (Form 17) certified by the officer. 

1206. When convenience and economy require that the contract shall 
be for board and lodging, the officer in charge shall estimate the cost 
of the ration, for which the contractor shall be paid as before directed, 
and shall pay the amount due to lodging from the recruiting fund. 

1207. At temporary rendezvous, advertising may be dispensed with, 
and a contract made, conditioned to be terminated at the pleasure of the 
officer or the Commissary-General. 

1208. The recruiting officer will be required, when convenient, to re¬ 
ceive and disburse the funds for the subsistence of his party, and to 
render his accounts quarterly to the Commissary-General. 

1209. When a contract cannot be made, the recruiting officer may pay 
the necessary expenses of subsisting and boarding his party. 

1210. The expenses of subsistence at branch rendezvous, and all ex¬ 
penses of advertising for proposals, will be paid by the contractor at the 
principal station, and included in his accounts. 

1211. Issues of provisions will be made on the usual provision returns, 
and board will be furnished on a return showing the number of the party, 
the days, and dates. 

1212. A ration in kind may be allowed to one laundress at each prin¬ 
cipal rendezvous. 

SUBSISTENCE TO OFFICERS. 

1213. An officer may draw subsistence stores, paying cash for them at 
contract or cost prices, without including cost of transportation, on his 
certificate that they are for his own use and the use of his family. Com¬ 
manding officers of companies may, in the same way, when authorized by 
the post commander,, purchase subsistence stores for their company mess. 
These certified lists the commanding officer shall compare with the 
monthly abstracts of sales, which he shall countersign (see Form 5). 

V 2 




246 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Commutation of Rations. 

The commissary will enter the sales on his monthly return, and credit 
the money in his quarterly account current. 

1214. When savings on company rations cannot otherwise be disposed 
of, the commissary is authorized to deduct their amount from the next 
issue and pay their value, including cost of transportation, into the com¬ 
pany fund. 

BACK RATIONS. 

1215. When the supplies warrant it, back rations may be drawn, if the 
full rations could not have been issued at the time. The return for back 
rations shall set out the facts, and the precise time when rations were not 
issued. 

COMMUTATION OF RATIONS. 

1216. When a soldier is detached on duty, and it is impracticable to 
carry his subsistence with him, it will be commuted at seventy-five cents 
a day, to be paid by the commissary when due, or in advance, on the 
order of the commanding officer. The officer detaching the soldier will 
certify, on the voucher, that it is impracticable for him to carry his 
rations; and the voucher will show on its face the nature and extent of 
the duty the soldier was ordered to perform. (See Form 18.) 

1217. The expenses of a soldier placed temporarily in a private hos¬ 
pital, on the advice of the senior surgeon of the post or detachment, 
sanctioned by the commanding officer, will be paid by the Subsistence 
Department, not to exceed seventy-five cents a day. 

1218. The ration of a soldier stationed in a city, with no opportunity of 
messing, will be commuted at seventy-five cents. The rations of the non¬ 
commissioned regimental staff, when they have no opportunity of messing, 
and of soldiers on furlough, or stationed where rations cannot be issued 
in kind, may be commuted at the cost or value of the ration at the post. 

1219. The ration of an Ordnance Sergeant may be commuted at thirty 
cents, except when serving with troops, or on furlough, when it may be 
commuted at cost at his post (exclusive of transportation). 

1220. When a soldier on duty has necessarily paid for his own sub¬ 
sistence, he may be refunded the cost of the ration. When more than 
the cost of the ration is claimed, the account must be submitted to the 
Commissary-General. 

EXTRA-DUTY MEN. 

1221. The commanding officer will detail a suitable non-commissioned 
officer or soldier for extra duty, under the orders of the commissary, and 
to be exempt from ordinary company and garrison duty. All extra-duty 
men employed in the Commissariat will be paid the regulated allowance 
(see General Regulations) by the commissary. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


247 


Subsistence Department.-Accounts. 

1222. Barrels, boxes, hides, &c., -will be sold, and the proceeds credited 
in the quarterly account current. 


ACCOUNTS. 

1223. The following are the accounts and returns required in the Sub’ 
sistence Department: 

Monthly. 

Return of provisions and forage received and issued in the 


month. Form 1 

Abstracts of issues to troops, &c. (see par. 1201). “ 2 

Abstract of issues to hospital. “ 3 

Abstract of extra issues. “ 4 

Abstract of sales to officers. u 5 

Distinct abstracts of other sales. 

Summary statement of money received and expended during 

the month. “ 6 


Quarterly. 

Account current. “ 7 

Abstract of all purchases of provisions and forage during the 

quarter. “ 8 

Abstract of all expenditures in the quarter, except for pur¬ 
chase of provisions and forage. u 9 

Consolidated abstract of sales to officers during the quarter... “ 10 

Distinct abstracts of other sales. 

Estimate of funds required for next quarter. “ 11 

Quarterly return of all property in the department, except pro¬ 
visions and forage for cattle. u 12 

1224. The abstracts of issues will show the corps or detachment. 
When abstracts require more than one sheet, the sheets will be numbered 
in series, and not pasted together; the total at the foot of each carried to 
the head of the next, &c. All quarterly account currents, monthly sum¬ 
mary statements, abstracts, property returns, &c., with the vouchers relating 
thereto, must be folded (in three parts for letter-paper) and fully endorsed. 

1225. All lists of subsistence shall run in this order : meat, breadstuff, 
rice and beans, coffee, tea, sugar, vinegar, candles, soap, salt, desiccated 
potatoes, mixed vegetables, whisky, molasses, forage, purchases for hospital. 

1226. No charge for printing blanks, as forms, will be allowed. 

1227. A book will be kept by the commissary at each post, in which 
will be entered the monthly returns of provisions received and issued 
(Form 1). It will show from whom the purchases have been made, and 
whether paid for. It is called the Commissary’s book, and will not be 
removed from the post. 















248 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Notes. 

1228. When any officer in the Subsistence Department is relieved, he 
shall certify the outstanding debts to his successor, and transmit an ac¬ 
count of the same to the head of his bureau, and turn over his public 
property and funds, unless otherwise ordered; his property accounts he 
will close; his money accounts will be kept open till the end of the 
quarter, unless he cease to do duty in the department. 

1229. Commissaries of subsistence in charge of principal depots will 
render quarterly statements of the cost and quality of the ration, in all 
its parts, at their stations. 


NOTES. 

1. Stores longest on hand will be issued first. 

2. Armorers, carriage-makers, and blacksmiths, of the Ordnance Department, 
are entitled to one and a half ration per day ; all other enlisted men, one ration. 
Laundresses, one ration. No hired person shall draw more than one ration. 

3. One ration a day may be issued to any person employed with the army, 
when the terms of his engagement allow it, or on paying the full cost of the 
ration, when he cannot otherwise procure food. Commutation can only be paid 
to those persons entitled to rations by law. 

4. Lamps and oil to light a fort or garrison are not allowed from the Subsist¬ 
ence Department. 

5. In purchasing pork for the Southern posts, a preference will be given to that 
which is put up in small pieces, say from four to six pounds each, and not very fat. 

6. As soldiers are expected to preserve, distribute, and cook their own subsist¬ 
ence, the hire of citizens for any of these duties is not allowed, except in extreme 
cases. The expenses of bakeries are paid from the post fund, to which the profits 
accrue by regulations (see par. 198 page 35), such as purchase of hops, yeast, 
furniture; as sieves, cloths, &c., and the hire of bakers. Ovens may be built or 
paid for by the Subsistence Department, but not bake-houses. 

7. Mode of ascertaining the hospital ration: 100 complete rations consist of, 


say— 

68 rations of 

pork is 51 lbs. at 6 cents.. 

Cost. 

32 

<< 

fresh beef is 40 lbs. at 4 cents.. 


100 

u 

flour is 112 lbs. at 2 cents. 


100 

(( 

beans is 8 quarts at 4 cents... 32) 

I 

or 

100 

it 

rice is 10 lbs. at 6 cents. 60 J 


100 

(C 

coffee is 10 lbs. at 15 cents."] 

1 

or 

too 

a 

tea is 1£ lb. at $1.J 


too 

u 

sugar is 15 lbs. at 10 cents. 


100 

u 

vinegar is 4 quarts at 5 cents. 


100 

u 

tallow candles is 1£ lb. at 12 cents 


100 

<( 

soap is 4 lbs. at 6 cents.. 


100 

(( 

salt is 2 quarts at 3 cents. 



Cost of 

100 rations. 



or, one ration costs eleven cents and a half mill. 























. 



■ 

1 

I 






















Page 250 


Page 251 


Return of Provisions received, issued, and remaining on hand at 


FORM 1. 

during the month of -, by 


-, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, United States Army. 


(1861.) 


Oct, 16 
20 
31 


FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 


Balance on hand, as per last.return.. 
2d Lieut. J B, 4th Infantry, A.A.C.S.. 
II C, Agent Subsistence Department 

Major TWL..C. S., U. S. A. 

W J It, contractor for fresh beef. 

Purchased this month, as per abstract 
Gained in issuing. 


Total to be accounted for.. 


Oct. 31 


To troops (regulars)., as per abstract 

“ volunteers. “ “ 

“ citizens. “ “ 

“ sick in hospital. “ “ 

“ extra issues. “ “ 

“ sales to officers. “ “ 

Capt, G T II, A. C. S. mil. service. 

II P C, Agent Subsistence Dept. 

Capt.W W, A, Qr.M. for transportation 
Wastage, as per certificate. 


Total issued. 


Balance on hand.. 


I certify that the above return is correct and just. 


A. C. S. 

























































































































































Page 254 


FORM 3. 


Page 255 


Abstract of Provisions issued during the month of 


186 , to men in hospital at 


undei he charge of - , Assistant Surgeon U. S. Army, by A. C. S., U. S- A. 


Oct. 18 
18 
20 
20 
22 
26 


Oct. 25 


Oct. 23 
25 
25 
31 


Total rations due hospital.... 1,532 


108 

468 

184 

732 


Total quantity issued. 


Quantity in bulk. 


RATIONS ACTUALLY REQUIRED FOR CONSUMPTION IN THE HOSPITAL. 


40 


108 

100 


83 


30 


108 

468 

130 

697 


700 


108 

468 

184 

732 


1,616 


14 


40 


108 

300 


108 

468 

184 

732 


1,532 


15 


40 

108 

468 

184 

732 


1,532 


108 

200 


400 

Too 


848 


A MONTHLY STATEMENT OF THE HOSPITAL FUND. 


Dr. To balance due hospital last month. 

1,532 rations, being whole amouut due this month, at 9* cents per 
ration. 


Cr. By the following provisions at contract prices: 

283$ pounds of pork, at 6 cents per pound. 

690 pounds of fresh beef, at 4 cents per pound. 

1.612 2-16 pounds of t!our, at 2 cents per pound... 
10 pounds of hard bread, at 3£ cents per pound .... 

70 pounds of rice, at 6 cents per pound.. 

56 pounds of coffee, at 9 cents per pound. 

193 14-16 pounds of sugar, at 8 cents per pound... 

17| quarts of vinegar, at 5 cents per quart. 

15 5-16 pounds of candles, at 12 cents per pound.. 

61 y pounds of soap, at 6 cents per pound. 

16J quarts of salt, at 3 cents per quart. 


PURCHASED. 


2 pairs of chickens, at 87* cents per pair. $1 

4 quarts of milk, at 7 cents per quart. 

3 dozen oranges, at 25 cents per dozen. 


Total expended. 

Balance due this month. 


24^ 


33 93£ 


I certify that I have carefully compared the above “abstract” with the original returns now in my possession, and find that they amount to three hundred and seventy-eight rations of pork, five hundred 
tv.ad fifty-two rations of fresh beef, fourteen hundred and thirty-three rations of flour, ten rations of hard bread, seven hundred rations of rice, nine hundred and thirty-four rations of coffee, sixteen hundred 
end sixteen rations of sugar, four hundred and forty-eight rations of vinegar, fifteen hundred and thirty-two rations of candles, fifteen hundred and thirty-two rations of soap, eight hundred and forty-eight 
rations of salt, and that the purchases, amounting to two dollars and seventy-eight cents, were required by me for, and issued to, the sick, and that the rations drawn in kind were actually required for con- 
tmption in the hospital. 

Compared with returns of men in hospital and found correct. (Duplicates.) 

-, Commanding. --, Asst. Surgeon } U. S. Army. 
























































































































































































































FORM 2. 

Abstract of Provisions issued from the - , 18 , to the -, 18 , to the troops of the United States stationed 

post 0 f - ; by -, Commissary of Subsistence. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


257 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 





1 

1 




1 

1 

•jjes jo saope^j 



•s*b | 

•qsnq | 

•duos jo suoijbxj 



•zo I 

•sqi | 

jo uuods) 
‘sajpuno jo suoijBp[ 



•zo I 

•sqi | 

•juSouia jo suoxjnxj 



■e;b | 

•8ve3 1 

•jeSns jo suotje '51 



•zo I 

•sqi | 

•99JJ00 JO SUOIjep[ 



•zo I 

•eqi | 

•ooij jo suoixug 



•zo I 

•sqi | 

•suuaq jo suotjbxj 



•s;b 


•qsnq 


•pnajq p.ieq jo suojpBXl 



•zo 


•sqi 


unop jo suotjujl 



•sqi 


•siqq 


•uoonq jo suoijB'g; 



•zo 


•sqi 


•jaaq qsajj jo suotju^j 



•zo 


•sqi 


•jpiod jo suopjuxj 



■sqi 


•siqq 


•3aipu;j 


Total No. of rations. 


Quantity in bulk. 

•SuiouaurraoQ 


•joj UAiBjp sXnp jo -o^i 




•uatnoAi jo -oxi 


•uam jo * 0 $ 


•ujnpjjo *o^i 


•axna 



CO 

n 

T3.2 


50 g 


a a 

o.2 


a .2 


o I s 
r 1 o 


s a 


Ph 

.■a 

II 


c3 0 m 


a p? 


C3 «i—i . O 

o t* ^ • rj 
® f- eS g 


| a 

.3 53 


CO GO 
5h O O 

















































































FORM 4. 

Abstract of extra issues to the troops at -, during the month of 


253 


REVISED REGULATIONS 



amount to , and that the issues were made by my order. 






















FORM 5. 

Abstract of Provisions sold to officers at -, during the month of 




FOR THE ARMY. 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 



<w Ch 


T3 ^3 
0 0 
0 0 


g © 3 . 

VI O W 

O o o ° 

03 ^ CO CO ^ 

« U ^ ^ © 

r j 

cn 0 s co ; 


bjO ^ ^ 
m d A3 

a wto 


tfl 50 CD 

a ts t) 
o a a 
— a a 

cs o o 
bfl P< a 



Eh 


259 



s> 

*§ 


families, and find the abstract correct. 































FORM 6. 

Monthly Summary Statement of Funds received and disbursed at 


260 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


13 

O 


S3 

ft 


t? : 

& : 

<U PI 
£ § 


a eh a ^ 


^2 

pq 


$2 

cS 

•g® 

> T3 

•s 2 
S ’3 
Ku¬ 
rd <u 
m pa 
^ rl 


>> 1 

pq 


pq 


3 « 


Assistant Commissary of Subsistence. 






























FORM 7. 

United States, on account of Army Subsistence, in the quarter ending the - day of -- , 18 , in account 


FOR THE ARMY. 


261 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


B3 








>>- 

P 





a* 

A o 





3 g 










® as 


<N 

CO 


”2 ** 




S & 


0» c3 . 

& - 
a b 

« a 

a * 
a o> 
o j g 

63 o © 
© (D •‘S 

-2,2 S* 

.2 ^ 

®'to m 

•5 ^ 

-*2 “ a 

w 0) C3 

.a ,a 


o a 


Assistant Commissary of Subsistence. 

































FORM 8. 

Abstract of purchases made on account of Subsistence of the Army, by - , at - , in the quarter 

ending -, 186 . 


262 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


Amount. 

Cents. 



Dollars. 



•SU9J[0Il[Q 

•jo SJIUJ 



•U.IOQ 

•spqsng 




•spunog 



•?l®8 

•spqsng 



•doog 

•spunog 



•SOJPUUQ 

•spunog 



•JTjSoUIj^ 

■SU0gU£) 



uuSng 

•spunog 



•nox 

•zo—'sqq 



•89000 

•spunog 



•801)1 

•spunog 



•suuag 

•spqsng 



•mop* 

•sprang 



•5IJ0J 

•sprang 



•J88a 0S8JJ 

•spunog 



a 

o 

O 

OQ 


fl 

0 


03 


a 

a 

o 

o 

u 


c3 

Ph 

PH 


o 




Eh 

•uaqum^j 



•8)U(I 




I certify that the purchases were made agreeably to the above abstract, and that the sums were actually paid as charged; and, also, 
that I was wholly uninterested in the purchases, and that the articles were purchased at the lowest market price. 

A. B., Lieut. Regt., and A. C. S. 






































FORM 9. 

Abstract of Disbursements, on account of Contingencies, by Lieut. -, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, 

in the - quarter, ending the - day of - , 18 . 


FOR THE ARMY. 


263 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


P 


0) ^ 
^ 2 
g § 

A > 


Acting Commissary of Subsistence. 


















FORM 10. 

Consolidated Abstract of Provisions sold to officers at - in the quarter ending 


2G4 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 


O 

CO 


<N 

Pounds of fresh beef, at. 

Pounds of bacon, at... 

Pounds of pork, at. 

Pounds of salt beef, at. 

Pounds of flour, at. 

Pounds of coffee, at. 

Pounds of sugar, at. 

Pounds of hard bread, at . 

Pounds of rice, at. 

Pounds of candles, at. 

U 

Total 

Amount. 

CQ 

O 

00 

20 

10 



Dolls. 

CO lO 'Jt 







•snogcS ‘juSoui^v 




•jo sjjunb ‘jpeg 




•jo spnnod ‘duog 




•jo spunod ‘so^punQ 




•jo spunod ‘ooi'a; 




•jo spunod ‘pnoaq pueji 




•jo spunod ‘.reSng 




•jo spunod ‘eogoQ 




•jo spnnod ‘uno^ 




•jo spunod ‘joaq jpeg 




•jo spunod ‘q-ioj 




•jo spunod ‘nooug; 




•jo spunod ‘joaq qsaig 


| 


Month. 

1861. 

January . 

February . 

March. 

TVfol 

j g 

*S 

pH 


I certify that the above is correct. 


























































Estimate of Funds required for purchasing fresh beef and for contingencies for the troops stationed at - for the 

quarter ending -, 18 


FOR THE ARMY. 


265 


Subsistence Department.—Forms. 


•paurab 

-9j junouru x^ox 


•p^idsojj 


•Xjauorjujg 


•junoum x B l°X 


•punod aad ootjx 


•pauinbau 

spunod jo .igqainu xi3jox 


'5[99M. 

J9d spunod jo joqmn^ 


'3J99M. 

j9d suoixnu jo jgqmnjq 


•sq99Ai. jo agqtnn^i 


•qjSuojjg 



17 


i 


■, Commissary. 










































FORM 12. 

Return of Commissary Property received, issued, and remaining on hand at -, during the quarter ending the 

- day of -•, 186 , ly -, U S. A. 


266 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.—Forms. 


Tools. 


| 

| 


| 

| 



j 


| 

j 


| 


| 




| 


j 




[ 




Scales, Weights, etc. 





































Office Furniture. 





































Stationery. 








| 

















| 










•jotjonoA jo -oj^ 

| | 


•epB(j 

| 

| 

| 


From whom received. 

On hand per last return. 

Total to be accounted for.... 

Total issued and expended... 

Remaining on hand. 


certify that the above return is correct, and that the articles specified were actually and necessarily expended in the public 





















































FORM 13. 

Provision Return for Captain -, Company - , Regiment of - ,for - days, commencing 

' day of -, 186 , and ending -- day of - , 186 . 


FOR THE ARMY. 


267 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


Ph 


paxt J\[ 


•saojnjod p t ois8(i 


ling 


•dnog 


•Monnx 


•amiunmupy 


•uuadg 




•anSng 


•tsax 


•aajjoo 


•aoiu 


•snnag; 


•juoij 


•pnaaq pa«n 


•uoong | 


•jaaq qsaaj 


■jaaq jpjg 


•qao f i 


•suojina jo aaqranj^ 


•s^np jo aaqum^i 


T G ')°X 


IS 


s' 

<s 


•uauioja. jo aaqum^ 


•uani jo aaqum^ 


Pw 


to 

'O fci 

a cs 

* S 

m v 

~3& 

® n 

a ® 


§ a 
a a, 

DO rO 

a g 
^ 2 
5 a 

® <n 


a § 

< § 
I a 


*■§ 


x 
































































FORM 14. 

Consolidated Provision Return for - Regiment of -, fur - days, commencing - day of - , 186 

and ending - day of -, 186 . 


268 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


o> 

P3 





1 

•soiqu}0§OA poxi j^[ 

1 

•soojujod p^isoq; 

1 

ling 

1 

•duog 

1 

Candles. 

•AVOIIUX 



•OUIJUUUIUPV 



•utuodg 



ueSauiA 

I 

uuSng 

1 

•tjox 

1 

•aojjoo 

1 

•OOI'JI 

1 

•suuog 

1 

•■mop* 

1 

•pnoaq p.iuji 

1 

•uooeg; 

1 

•jooq qsojj 

1 

•jooq qpsg 

1 

•Jl-io <1 

1 


•suotjbj jo joqmn^j 


•s.£ep jo 


qujoi 


•noraoM. jo jaqtnn^ 


•uom jo aoqmnj^ 


d 

o 

ci 

35 



The A. C. S. will issue on the above return. 

Commanding Officer. Commanding Regiment. 

Note. —If rations are drawn for a commissioned officer on this return, his name, rank, and regiment or corps must V>® r- itioned 
under Remarks. 





























































Form of Commissary's receipt to Contractors. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


269 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


a 

bo 


© 




c 1 

a 


■73 

a 


E-i 

GO 


.© 

A 

d 




tin M2 


'"3 '73 




% 


Pm 


bD 

.S 

33 

a 


bfi 


£ cL, 


M4 a ^2 M« 


P* 

33 


cm 


M2 M2 


O 
Mi 

« C 

'S eS 
O M2 

>73 T3 
o o 

, O O 
1 bO bO 
=w =<-. 
O O 
m m 
P T3 
o a 
22 33 
a O 
bC P-i 


'TS 

a 


=4-1 ^ 


s ^ 

a cg 

o a 
PM M2 


M2 

T3 


•C ^ 


na 

a 

a 


£s 

CO 


mm a 


Received, Fort —- ; —- , 186 , the provisions above enumerated. 





















THE UNITED STATES 


270 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 



Received from the United States [or Lieut. B., recruiting officer], at-, 186 , -dollars and-cents, in full of the 

above account. 

-, Special Contractor. 

(Duplicate.) 
































FORM 17. 

Abstract of rations issued to recruits stationed at -, under command of 

special contract. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


271 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 



X 2 


I certify that I have carefully compared tlie above abstract with the original returns now in my possession, and they amount 
-complete rations. 

-, Recruiting Officer. 






























THE UNITED STATES 


272 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


PS 

Pi 


•"3 


3 33 


Z © 

p co 


a a 
.2 3 
> •-a 


► a 


o* 




e 

S.g 


2 C3 
pp p 
&, 
s 


0 *3 

I—I rO 


P3 


James H. McMullen. 

(Duplicates.) 

Note. —A similar form to the above ■will be used without a certificate for all purchases. For services rendered, a similar form will 
be used with a certificate, signed as A. C. S., stating that the services were rendered as charged for, and were necessary for the public 
service. 






















Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


FORM 19. 

Articles op agreement made and entered into this day 

of , anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 

, between , an officer of the United States 

army, of the one part, and , of the county 

of , and State of , of the other 

part. 

This agreement witnesseth, That the said , for and on 

behalf of the United States of America, and the said 
heirs, executors, and administrators, have covenanted and agreed, and 
by these presents do mutually covenant and agree, to and with each 
other, as follows, viz.: 

First. That the said heirs, executors, and adminis¬ 
trators, shall supply, or cause to be supplied and issued, at , 

all the rations, to consist of the articles hereinafter specified, that shall 
be required for the use of the United States recruits stationed at the 
place aforesaid, commencing on the day of , one 

thousand eight hundred and sixty- , and ending on the 
of , eighteen hundred and , or such earlier day 

as the Commissary-General may direct, at the price of cents 

mills for each complete ration. 

Second. That the ration to be furnished by virtue of this contract 
shall consist of the following articles, viz.: One and a quarter pound of 
fresh beef, or three-quarters of a pound of salted pork, eighteen ounces 
of bread or flour, and at the rate of eight quarts of beans or ten pounds 
of rice, ten pounds of coffee, fifteen pounds of sugar, four quarts of 
vinegar, and one and a half pounds of tallow, or one pound of sperm 
candles, four pounds of soap, and two quarts of salt, to every hundred 
rations, or the contractor shall furnish the men with good and wholesome 
board and lodgings, at the option of the recruiting officer; and the recruit¬ 
ing party shall have the privilege of hanging out a flag from the place of 
rendezvous. 




274 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 

Third. That fresh beef shall be issued at least thrice in each week, if 
required by the commanding officer. 

Fourth. It is clearly understood that the provisions stipulated to be 
furnished and delivered under this contract shall be of the first quality. 

Fifth. Should any difficulty arise respecting the quality of the pro¬ 
visions stipulated to be delivered under this contract, then the command¬ 
ing officer is to appoint a disinterested person to meet one of the same 
description to be appointed by the contractor. These two thus appointed 
will have power to decide on the quality of the provisions; but should 
they disagree, then a third person is to be chosen by the two already 
appointed, the whole to act under oath, and the opinion of the majority 
to be final in the case. 

Srxth. No member of Congress shall be admitted to any share herein, 
or any benefit to arise therefrom. 

In witness whereof, the undersigned have hereunto placed their hands 
and seals the day and date above written. 

Witness: 

-. [l. s.] 

--• l> s -] 


FORM 20. 

Articles of agreement made this day of , eighteen 

hundred and sixty- , between ,• Assistant Commissary of 

Subsistence in the service of the United States of America, of the one 
part, and , of , in the State of , of the other 

part. 

This agreement witnesseth, That the said , for and on behalf of 

the United States of America, and the said , for himself, his 

heirs, executors, and administrators, have mutually agreed, and by these 
presents do mutually covenant and agree, to and with each other, in 
manner following, viz.: 

First. That the said shall deliver at fresh beef 

of a good and wholesome quality, in quarters, with an equal proportion 








FOR THE ARMY. 


275 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 

of each (necks and shanks to be excluded), in such quantities as may be 
from time to time required for the troops, not exceeding five times in 
each week, on such days as shall be designated by the Assistant Com¬ 
missary of Subsistence. 

This contract to be in force for months, or such less time as the 

Commissary-General may direct, commencing on the day 

of , eighteen hundred and sixty- 

Second. The said shall receive cents and mills per 

pound for every pound of fresh beef delivered and accepted under this 
contract. 

Third. Payment shall be made monthly for the amount of fresh beef 
furnished under this contract; but in the event of the Assistant Com¬ 
missary of Subsistence being without funds, then payment to be made a® 
soon after as funds may be received for that purpose. 

Fourth. That whenever and as often as the beef specified to be issued 
by this contract shall, in the opinion of the commanding officer, be unfit 
for issue, or of a quality inferior to that required by the contract, a sur¬ 
vey shall be held thereon by two officers, to be designated by the com¬ 
manding officer; and in case of disagreement, a third person shall be 
chosen by those two officers; the three thus appointed and chosen shall 
have power to reject such parts or the whole of the fresh beef as to them 
appear unfit for issue, or of a quality inferior to that contracted for. 

Fifth. That in case of failure or deficiency in the quality or quantity of 
the fresh beef stipulated to be delivered, then the Assistant Commissary 
of Subsistence shall have power to supply the deficiency by purchase, 
and the said will be charged with the difference of cost. 

Sixth. No member of Congress shall be admitted to any share herein, 
or any benefit to arise therefrom. 

In witness whereof, the undersigned have hereunto placed their hands 
and seals the day and date above written 


Witness : 


[L.S.] 

[L.S.] 







276 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


FORM 21. 

Know all men by these presents, That we, and 

are held and firmly bound to the United States of America in the sum 
of dollars, lawful money of the United States; for which 

payment well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, and each of us, 
our and each of our heirs, executors, and administrators, for and in the 
whole, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents. 

Sealed with our seals—dated the day of , in the year 

of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty- 

The nature of this obligation is such , that if the above-bounden 
heirs, executors, and administrators, or any of them, shall and do in all 
things well and truly observe, perform, fulfil, accomplish, and keep, all 
and singular the covenants, conditions, and agreements whatsoever which 
on the part of the said heirs, executors, or administrators, are or 

ought to be observed, performed, fulfilled, accomplished, and kept, com¬ 
prised or mentioned in certain articles of agreement or contract bearing 
date , one thousand eight hundred and sixty- , between 

and the said , concerning the supply and delivery 

of fresh beef to the troops at , or rations to recruits at , 

according to the true intent and meaning of the said articles of agree¬ 
ment or contract, then the above obligations to be void; otherwise, tc 
remain in full force and virtue. 


Witnesses : 


-. [L.S.] 

, [L.S.] 

1> S 0 








FOR THE ARMY. 


277 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 


A box, 24 by 16 inches square, and 22 inches deep, will contain one 
barrel, or 10,752 cubic inches. 

A box, 16 by 16.8 inches square, and 8 inches deep, will contain one 
bushel, or 2,150.4 cubic inches. 

A box, 8 by 8.4 inches square, and 8 inches deep, will contain one 
peck, or 537.6 cubic inches. 

A box, 7 by 4 inches square, and 4.8 inches deep, will contain a half¬ 
gallon, or 131.4 cubic inches. 

A box, 4 by 4 inches square, and 4.2 inches deep, will contain one 
quart, or 67.2 inches. 

A convenient package for bacon is made 16 inches high, 16 inches 
wide, and 26 inches long (the three dimensions being inside measure). 
Make of 14-inch material, plain on the inside, tongue, groove, and strap 
with iron. 

Paint vinegar-kegs to prevent evaporation and to fill worm-holes; cap 
the bungs with tin. Block-tin liquid measures and scoops are, in the 
end, the most economical. 

One bushel of corn weighs. 56 pounds. 


wheat 
rye “ 
buckwheat 
barley 
oats 
beans 
potatoes 
onions 


weighs. 


60 

56 
52 
48 
24 
60 
60 

57 


dried peaches “ 33 

dried apples “ 22 

salt “ 50 

















TABLE SHOWING THE WEIGHT AND BULK OF BATIONS 


278 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Subsistence Department.-Forms. 


6 s © d o 


o n o g o 


c* 

0 


O 


i t* Q (h Q 

M M 


W 

M 

>> 

M 


-g jg 


Bulk in 
barrels. 

11.8224 

.01182 

16.2656 

.01626 

19.2827 

.01928 

ca (N C5CO 1C N(N 

H 05 H CO ^ (M GO CO (M N O 

»OOCOCO^HCOrfi CCC5 00 0 

hOir'OOt^^COiOCOOHH 

CO^iCC5<NOOOOOOOO 

T - 1 

Gross weight 
in pounds. 

8047.1801 

3.0471 

2419.2468 

2.4192 

2726.4757 

2.7264 

1218.75 

903.1861 

1234.0561 

921.6867 

1228.9156 

177.3187 

114.5 

70.901 

135.625 

107.5 

17.5 

46.8965 

38.6328 

Net weight 
in pounds. 

2391.25 
2.3912 

2016.25 
2.0162 

2266.25 
2.2662 

o 

ic t'- 

odioddoodo’iNiodco 

lOuOCIlOOiOOOiOOJh^cO 

L"- £"« i-H L^- O rH r-» r-l t-H 

Tare in 
pounds. 

655.9301 

.6559 

402.9968 

.4029 

460.2257 

.4602 

468.75 

153.1861 

109.0561 

171.6867 

228.9156 

22.3187 

14.5 

10.901 

15.625 

15. 

2.5 

6.8965 

4.8828 


O rH O r~l 0> t“H 


: ^ 


• W ^ M ©n»—I * 

^ ° S'S" ^ »£ d a ; 

^ “ o ° eSotobCdflcsM 
Oc3p_77h O cj o cj 

MMMM MtiOaj^Otca! 

jo suoijtu punsnoqj ouq 






































































Page 279 


Page 280 

TABLE SHOWING THE QUANTITY AND BULK OF ANY NUMBER OF RATIONS, FROM 1 TO 100,000. 


s? 

c 

E“ 

« 

C 

PS 

1 

PORK. 

BEEF. 

FLOUR. 

Barrels. 

Pounds. 

| Ounces. 

T5 

3 

O 

| Ounces. 

Barrels. 

Pounds. 

l 



12 

1 

4 


1 

2 


1 

8 

2 

8 


2 

3 


2 

4 

3 

12 


3 

4 


3 


5 

. 


4 

5 


3 

12 

6 

4 


5 

6 


4 

8 

7 

8 


6 

7 


5 

4 

8 

12 


7 

8 


6 


10 

. 


9 

9 


6 

12 

11 

4 


10 

10 


7 

8 

12 

8 


11 

20 


15 


25 

. 


22 

30 


22 

8 

37 

8 


33 









40 


30 


50 

. 


45 

50 


37 

8 

62 

8 


56 

60 


45 


75 

. 


67 

70 


62 

8 

87 

8 


78 

80 


60 


100 

. 

. 

90 

90 


67 

8 

112 

8 


101 

100 


75 


125 

. 


112 

1,000 

3 

150 


1,250 


6 

145 

10,000 

37 

100 


12,500 


67 

78 

100,000 

375 



125,000 


573 

192 


BEANS. 

RICE AND 

COFFEE. 

TEA 






r 3 

»d 

X 

GO 

a 

g 

a 




o 

3 

o 

« 

a 

O 

PM 

O 

pH 



0.64 


1.6 




1 28 


3.2 




1 92 


4.8 




2.56 


6.4 




.2 20 


8.0 






9.6 




4 48 


11.2 






12.8 






14.4 





1 




l 

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FOR THE ARMY. 


281 


Medical Department. 


ARTICLE XLIY. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1230. The medical supplies for the army are prescribed in the standard 
supply tables. 

1231. The medical purveyors and the senior medical officer of each 
hospital, post, or command, will make the necessary requisitions for 
medical and hospital supplies, in duplicate (Form 1). If the supplies 
are to be obtained from the principal purveying dep6ts, the requisitions 
will be made upon the Surgeon-General on the 31st day of December 
annually; if from department or field depots, they will be made upon 
the medical director at such times and for such periods as he may direct. 

S Good vaccine matter will be kept on hand by timely requisition on the 
Surgeon-General. 

1232. The medical purveyors at the principal dep6ts will issue medical 
and hospital supplies only on the order of the Surgeon-General; those 
at department or field depots will issue on the order of a medical director. 
In particular and urgent cases, issues may be made on a special requisi¬ 
tion (Form 2), approved by a commanding officer; a like authority will 
be required in transfers of medical supplies. 

1233. When it is necessary to purchase medical supplies, and recourse 
cannot be had to a medical disbursing officer, they may be procured by 
the quartermaster on a special requisition (Form 2) and account (Form 3). 

1234. When any requisition for medical supplies is not according to 
the supply table, the reason therefor must be set out. 

1235. In every case of special requisition, a duplicate of the requisi¬ 
tion shall, at the same time, be transmitted to the Surgeon-General, for 
his information, giving the name and station of the officer upon whom it 
is made. 

1236. Medical purveyors will make to the Surgeon-General, at the end 
of each fiscal quarter, returns in duplicate (Form 4) of medical supplies 
received, issued, and remaining on hand, stating to whom, or from whom, 
and where and when issued or received; other medical officers in charge 
of medical supplies make similar returns of them annually, on the 31st 
December; and all officers, when relieved from the duty to which their 
returns relate. The returns will show the condition of the stores, and 
particularly of the instruments, bedding, and furniture. Medical pur¬ 
veyors will furnish abstracts of receipts and issues, with their returns 

(Form 5), giving the name of the person from whom received and to 
whom issued. 

1237. An officer transferring medical supplies will furnish a certified 




282 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 

invoice to the officer who is to receive them, and transmit a duplicate of 
it to the Surgeon-General. The receiving officer will furnish a receipt to 
the officer making the issue, with a report of the quality and condition 
of the articles, and transmit a duplicate of the receipt and report to the 
Surgeon-General. A medical officer who turns over medical supplies to 
a quartermaster for storage or transportation will forward to the Surgeon- 
General, with the invoice, the quartermaster’s receipt for the packages. 

1238. Medical officers will take up and account for all medical supplies 
of the army that come into their possession, and report, when they know 
it, to whose account they are to be credited. 

1239. In all official lists of medical supplies the articles will be entered 
in the order of the supply table. 

1240. Medical disbursing officers will, at the end of each fiscal quar¬ 
ter, render to the Surgeon-General, in duplicate, a quarterly account 
current of moneys received and expended, with the proper vouchers for 
the payments, and certificates that the services have been rendered, and 
the supplies purchased and received for the medical service, and transmit 
to him an estimate of the funds required for the next quarter. 

1241. The senior medical officer of a hospital will distribute the 
patients, according to convenience and the nature of their complaints, into 
wards or divisions, under the particular charge of the several assistant sur¬ 
geons, and will visit them himself each day, as frequently as the state of 
the sick may require, accompanied by the assistant, steward, and nurse. 

1242. His prescriptions of medicine and diet are written down at once 
in the proper register, with the name of the patient and the number of 
his bed; the assistants fill up the diet table for the day, and direct the 
administration of the prescribed medicines. He will detail an assistant 
surgeon to remain at the hospital day and night, when the state of the 
sick requires it. 

1243. In distributing the duties of his assistants, he will ordinarily 
require the aid of one in the care and preparation of the hospital reports, 
registers, and records, the rolls, and descriptive lists; and of another in 
the charge of the dispensary, instruments, medicines, hospital expendi¬ 
tures, and the preparation of the requisitions and annual returns. 

1244. He will enforce the proper hospital regulations to promote health 
and prevent contagion, by ventilated and not crowded rooms, scrupulous 
cleanliness, frequent changes of bedding, linen, &c. 

1245. He will require the steward to take due care of the hospital 
stores and supplies; to enter in a book, daily (Form 6), the issues to the 
ward-masters, cooks, and nurses; to prepare the provision returns, and 
receive and distribute the rations. 

1246. He will require the ward-master to take charge of the effects 




FOR THE ARMY. 


28S 


Medical Department. 

of the patients; to register them in a book (Form 7); to have them 
numbered and labeled with the patient’s name, rank, and company; to 
receive from the steward the furniture, bedding, cooking-utensils, &c., for 
use, and keep a record of them (Form 8), and how distributed to the 
wards and kitchens; and once a week to take an inventory of the articles 
in use, and report to him any loss or damage to them, and to return to 
the steward such as are not required for use. 

1247. The cooks and nurses are under the orders of the steward; he 
is responsible for the cleanliness of the wards and kitchens, patients and 
attendants, and all articles in use. He will ascertain who are present^at 
sunrise, and sunset, and tattoo, and report absentees. 

1248. At surgeon’s call the sick then in the companies will be con¬ 
ducted to the hospital by the first sergeants, who will each hand to the 
surgeon, in his company book, a list of all the sick of the company, on 
which the surgeon shall state who are to remain or go into hospital; 
who are to return to quarters as sick or convalescent; what duties the 
convalescents in quarters are capable of; what cases are feigned ; and any 
other information in regard to the sick of the company he may have to 
communicate to the company commander. 

1249. Soldiers in hospital, patients, or attendants, except stewards, 
shall be mustered on the rolls of their company, if it be present at the 
post. 

1250. When a soldier in hospital is detached from his company so as 
not to be mustered with it for pay, his company commander shall certify 
and send to the hospital his descriptive list, and account of pay and 
clothing, containing all necessary information relating to his accounts 
with the United States, on which the surgeon shall enter all payments, 
stoppages, and issues of clothing to him in hospital. When he leaves 
the hospital, the medical officer shall certify and remit his descriptive list, 
showing the state of his accounts. If he is discharged from the service 
in hospital, the surgeon shall make out his final statements for pay and 
clothing. If he dies in hospital, the surgeon shall take charge of his 
effects, and make the reports required in the general regulations concern¬ 
ing soldiers who die absent from their companies. 

1251. Patients in hospital are, if possible, to leave their arms and 
accoutrements with their companies, and in no case to take ammunition 
into the hospital. 

1252. When a patient is transferred from one hospital to another, the 
medical officer shall send with him an account of his case, and the treat¬ 
ment. 

1253. The regulations for the service of hospitals apply, as far as prac¬ 
ticable, to the medical service in the field. 

Y2 18 




284 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 

1254. The senior medical officer of each hospital, post, regiment, or 
detachment, will keep the following records, and deliver them to his suc¬ 
cessor: a register of patients (Form 9); a prescription hook (Form 10); 
a diet book (Form 10) ; a case book; a meteorological register (Form 11); 
copies of his requisitions, annual returns, and quarterly reports of sick 
and wounded; and an order and letter book, in which will be transcribed 
all orders and letters relating to his duties. 

1255. He will make up the muster and pay rolls of the medical cadets, 
hospital steward, female nurses, and matrons, and of all soldiers in hos¬ 
pital, sick or on duty, detached from their companies, on the forms fur¬ 
nished from the Adjutant-General’s office, and according to the directions 
expressed on them. 

1256. He will make the rolls of the cooks and nurses for extra-duty 
pay, which will be paid by the paymaster, in the absence of a medical 
disbursing officer, as in other cases of expenditures for the medical de¬ 
partment (Form 12). 

1257. The senior medical officer will select the cooks, nurses, and 
matrons (and, at posts where there is no hospital steward appointed by the 
Secretary of War, a soldier to act as steward), with the approval of the 
commanding officer. Cooks and nurses will be taken from the privates, 
and will be exempt from other duty, but shall attend the parades for 
muster and weekly inspections of their companies at the post, unless 
specially excused by the commanding officer. 

1258. Ordinarily, hospital attendants are allowed as follows: to a 
general hospital, one steward, one nurse as ward-master, one nurse to ten 
patients, one matron to twenty, and one cook to thirty; to a hospital 
where the command exceeds five companies, one steward and ward-master, 
one cook, two matrons, and four nurses; to a post or garrison of one com¬ 
pany, one steward and ward-master, one nurse, one cook, and one matron; 
and for every two companies more, one nurse; at arsenals where the num¬ 
ber of enlisted men is not less than fourteen, one matron is allowed. The 
allowance of hospital attendants for troops in the field will be, for one com¬ 
pany, one steward, one nurse, and one cook; for each additional company, 
one nurse; and for commands of over five companies, one additional cook. 

1259. Medical officers, where on duty, will attend the officers and en¬ 
listed men, and the servants and laundresses authorized by law; and at sta¬ 
tions where other medical attendance cannot be procured, and on marches, 
the hired men of the army, and the families of officers and soldiers. 
Medicines will be dispensed to the families of officers and soldiers, and to 
all persons entitled to medical attendance; hospital stores to enlisted men. 

1260. Medical officers, in giving certificates of disability (Form 13), 
are to take particular care in all cases that have not been under their 




FOR THE ARMY. 


285 


Medical Department. 

charge; and especially in epilepsy, convulsions, chronic rheumatism, de¬ 
rangement of the urinary organs, ophthalmia, ulcers, or any obscure disease 
liable to be feigned or purposely produced; and in no case shall such cer¬ 
tificate be given until after sufficient time and examination to detect any 
attempt at deception. 

1261. In passing a recruit the medical officer is to examine him stripped; 
to see that he has free use of all his limbs; that his chest is ample; 
that his hearing, vision, and speech are perfect; that he has no tumors, 
or ulcerated or extensively cicatrized legs; no rupture or chronic cuta¬ 
neous affection; that he has not received any contusion, or wound of the 
head, that may impair his faculties; that he is not a drunkard; is not 
subject to convulsions; and has no infectious disorder, nor any other that 
may unfit him for military service. 

1262. Medical officers attending recruiting rendezvous will keep a re¬ 
cord (Form 14) of all the recruits examined by them. Books for this 
purpose will be procured by application to the Surgeon-General, to whom 
they will be returned when filled. 

1263. As soon as a recruit joins any regiment or station, he shall be 
examined by the medical officer, and vaccinated when it is required. 

1264. The senior medical officer of each hospital, post, regiment, or 
detachment, will make monthly to the medical director, and quarterly to 
the Surgeon-General, a report of sick and wounded, and of deaths, and of 
certificates for discharge for disability (Form 15), and transmit to him 
monthly a copy of the meteorological register (Form 11), and a copy of 
the “statement of the hospital fund” (Form 19). 

1265. After surgeon's call, he will make a morning report of the sick 
to the commanding officer (Form 16). 

1266. Every medical officer will report to the Surgeon-General and to 
the medical director the date when he arrives at a station, or when he 
leaves it, and his orders in the case, and at the end of each month when¬ 
ever not at his station, whether on service or on leave of absence, and 
when on leave of absence his post-office address for the next month. 

1267. The medical director will make to the Surgeon-General a 
monthly return of the medical officers of the command (Form 17), and a 
consolidated monthly report of the sick and wounded (Form 15) from 
the several reports made to him. 

1268. When it is necessary to employ a private physician as medical 
officer, the commanding officer may do it by written contract, conditioned 
as in Form 18, at a stated compensation not to exceed 850 a month when 
the number of officers and men, with authorized servants and laundresses, 
is 100 or more; 840 when it is from 50 to 100, and $30 when it is 
under 50. 




286 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 

1269. But when he is required to abandon his own business, and give 
his whole time to the public service, the contract may be not to exceed 
$80 a month; and not to exceed $100, besides transportation in kind, to 
be furnished by the Quartermaster’s Department, where he is required to 
accompany troops on marches or transports. But a private physician will 
not be employed to accompany troops on marches or transports, except by 
orders from the War Department, or in particular and urgent cases by 
the order of the officer directing the movement, when a particular state¬ 
ment of the circumstances which make it necessary will be appended to 
the contract. 

1270. And when a private physician is required to furnish medicines, 
he will be allowed, besides the stipulated pay, from 25 to 50 per cent, on 
it, to be determined by the Surgeon-General. 

1271. In all cases, a duplicate of the contract will be transmitted forth¬ 
with by the commanding officer to the Surgeon-General, and the com¬ 
manding officer for the time being will at once discontinue it, whenever 
the necessity for it ceases, or the Surgeon-General may so direct. 

1272. The physician’s account of pay due must be sent to the Surgeon- 
General for payment, vouched by the certificate of the commanding 
officer that it is correct and agreeable to contract, and that the services 
have been duly rendered. But when it cannot conveniently be submitted 
to the Surgeon-General from the frontier or the field, it may be paid on 
the order of the commanding officer, not to exceed the regulated amount, 
by a medical disbursing officer, or a quartermaster. 

1273. When medical attendance is required by officers or enlisted men 
on service, or for the authorized servants of such officers, and the 
attendance of a medical officer cannot be had, the officer, or, if there be 
no officer, then the enlisted man, may employ a private physician, and 
a just account therefor will be paid by the medical bureau. 

1274. The account will set out the name of the patient, the date of 
and charge for each visit and for medicines. The physician will make 
a certificate to the account in case of an officer, or affidavit in the case of 
an enlisted man, that the account is correct, and the charges are the 
customary charges of the place. 

1275. The officer will make his certificate, or the enlisted man his 
affidavit, to the correctness of the account, that he was on service at the 
place, and stating the circumstances preventing him from receiving the 
services of a medical officer. 

1276. When the charge is against an officer, he will pay the account 
if practicable, and transmit it to the medical bureau for reimbursement; 
in all other cases the account will be transmitted to the medical bureau 
for settlement. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


287 


Medical Department. 

1277. If the charge is against a deceased officer or enlisted man, the 
physician -will make the affidavit, before required, to the account, and 
that he has been paid no part of it. 

1278. No charges for consultation fees will be paid by the medical 
bureau, nor will any account for medical attendance or medicines be paid, 
if the officer or enlisted man he not on service. 

1279. A board of not less than three medical officers will be appointed 
from time to time by the Secretary of War, to examine applicants for 
appointment of assistant surgeons, and assistant surgeons for promotion. 
And no one shall be so appointed or promoted until so examined and 
found qualified. 

1280. The board will scrutinize rigidly the moral habits, professional 
acquirements, and physical qualifications of the candidates, and report 
favorably, either for appointment or promotion, in no case admitting of 
a reasonable doubt. 

1281. The Secretary of War will designate the applicants to be examined 
for appointment of assistant surgeon. They must be between 21 and 28 
years of age. The board will report their respective merits in the several 
branches of the examination, and their relative merit from the whole; 
agreeably whereto, if vacancies happen within two years thereafter, they 
will receive appointments and take rank in the medical corps. 

1282. When an assistant surgeon has served five years, he is subject 
to be examined for promotion. If he decline the examination, or be 
found not qualified by moral habits or professional acquirements, he ceases 
to be a medical officer of the army. 

1283. An applicant for appointment failing at one examination, may be 
allowed a second, after two years; but never a third. 

1284. Medical Cadets will be selected, from among the applicants who 
have been examined and approved by a Medical Board, by the Surgeon- 
General, who will assign them to duty at such places and in such num¬ 
bers as the service may require. These candidates will be enlisted for 
the full term, by the Surgeon-General, or by a medical officer of the army 
authorized by him, who will at once cause to be administered to the Cadet 
the following oath: 

_ } appointed a-in the army of the United States, do 

solemnly swear, or affirm, that I will bear true allegiance to the United 
States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully 
against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever; and observe and obey 
the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the 
officers appointed over me, according to the rules and articles for the 
government of the armies of the United States. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me, at-, this-day of-, 186 . 

-, Justice of the Peace. 












238 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Medical Department. 

1285. Medical Cadets will have the rank and pay of the Cadets at the 
Military Academy, and be under the direction and control of medical 
officers alone. They will be entitled each to one room as quarters, and 
fuel therefor, as allowed a Sergeant-Major, and will take choice next after 
Brevet Second Lieutenants in the selection of quarters. Transportation 
will be allowed them as in cases of paymaster’s clerks. 

1286. On the fifteenth day of the last month of his term of service, 
each Medical Cadet will report the fact to the medical officer in charge, 
whose duty it is to report the same to the Surgeon-General, together with 
a report of the general character and competency of the Cadet. 

1287. The Secretary of War will appoint from the enlisted men of the 
army, or cause to be enlisted, as many competent hospital stewards as the 
service may require, not to exceed one for each post. 

1288. The senior medical officer of a hospital requiring a steward may 
recommend a competent non-commissioned officer or soldier to be appointed, 
which recommendation the commanding officer shall forward to the Ad¬ 
jutant-General of the army, with his remarks thereon, and with the re¬ 
marks of the company commander. And, as the object of these more per¬ 
manent appointments is to procure the services of a more competent 
body of hospital stewards, no soldier, nor citizen, must henceforth be 
recommended for appointment who is not known to be temperate, honest, 
and in every way reliable, as well as sufficiently intelligent, and skilled in 
pharmacy, for the proper discharge of the responsible duties likely to be 
devolved upon him. 

1289. When no competent enlisted man can be procured, the medical 
officer will report the fact to the Surgeon-General.* Applications and 
testimonials of competency, from persons seeking to be enlisted for hos¬ 
pital stewards, may be addressed to the Surgeon-General. 

1290. The commanding officer may re-enlist a hospital steward at the 
expiration of his term of service, on the recommendation of the medical 
officer. 

1291. Hospital stewards, whenever stationed in places whence no post 
return is made to the Adjutant-General’s office, or when on furlough, 
will, at the end of every month, report themselves by letter to the Adju¬ 
tant-General and Surgeon-General, as well as to the medical director of 
the military department in which they may be serving; to each of whom 


*The current wants of the service may, however, be supplied by a detail from the com¬ 
mand, on the recommendation of the medical officer, of a soldier to act as temporary 
steward, thus affording the means of a careful probation of all soldiers so detailed, who 
are ambitious of one day deserving a permanent appointment. Stewards thus detailed at 
posts, or with a body of troops of more than four companies, will receive the pay and 
allowances of a sergeant of ordnance; and at all other posts, or with smaller hodies of 
troops, the pay and allowances of a sergeant of infantry. (See Act July 5, 1838, sec. 12.) 





FOR THE ARMY. 


289 


Medical Department. 

they will also report each new assignment to duty, or change of station, 
ordered in their case, noting carefully the number, date, and source of 
the order directing the same. They will likewise report monthly, when 
on furlough, to the medical officer in charge of the hospital to which 
they are attached. 

1293. The accounts of pay, clothing, &c., of hospital stewards must 
be kept by the medical officers under whose immediate direction they are 
serving, who are, also, responsible for certified statements of such accounts, 
and correct descriptive lists of such stewards, to accompany them in case 
of transfer—as, also, that their final statements and certificates of dis¬ 
charge are accurately made out, when they are, at length, discharged from 
service. 


AMBULANCES. 

1294. The following amount and kind of transportation for the sick 
and wounded may be provided for troops on marches and in campaigns 
against Indians : 

1. For commands of less than five companies, to each company, one 
two-wheeled ambulance. 

2. For a battalion, of five companies, one four-wheeled and five two¬ 
wheeled ambulances. 

3. For a regiment, two four-wheeled and ten two-wheeled ambu¬ 
lances. 

1295. The following schedule of transports for the sick and wounded 
and for hospital supplies will be adopted for a state of war with a civil¬ 
ized enemy: 

1. For commands of less than three companies, one two-wheeled 
transport cart for hospital supplies, and to each company one 
two-wheeled ambulance. 

2. For commands of more than three and less than five companies, 
two two-wheeled transport carts, and to each company one two¬ 
wheeled ambulance. 

3. For a battalion of five companies, one four-wheeled ambulance, 
five two-wheeled ambulances, and two two-wheeled transport 
carts. For each additional company less than ten, one two¬ 
wheeled transport cart. 

4. For a regiment of ten companies, two four-wheeled ambulances, 
ten two-wheeled ambulances, and four two-wheeled transport 
carts; and for greater commands in proportion. 

1296. Ambulances will not be used for any other than the specific 
purpose for which they are designed, viz.: the transportation of the sick 
and wounded; and those hereafter provided for the army, will be made 




290 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Ambulances. 

according to a pattern to be furnished the Quartermaster’s Department 
by the Surgeon-General. 

1297. The transport carts must be made after the models of the two¬ 
wheeled ambulances (their interior arrangement for the sick excepted), 
and to have solid board flooring to the body. 

1298. Horse-litters may be prepared and furnished to posts whence 
they may be required for service on ground not admitting the employ¬ 
ment of two-wheeled carriages; said litters to be composed of a canvas 
bed similar to the present stretcher, and ot two poles each sixteen feet 
long, to be made in sections, with head and foot pieces constructed to act 
as stretchers to keep the poles apart. 

1299. The allowance of hospital attendants in the field will be, for 
one company, one steward, one nurse, and one cook; for each additional 
company, one nurse ; and for commands of over five companies, one 
additional cook. 


HOSPITAL TENTS. 

1300. Hospital tents must in future be made according to the pattern 
of the present tent and of the same material, but smaller, and having on 
one end a lapel so as to admit of two or more tents being joined and 
thrown into one with a continuous covering or roof. The dimensions to 
be these: In length, 14 feet; in width, 15 feet; in height (centre), 
11 feet, with a wall 43- feet, and a “fly” of appropriate size. The ridge¬ 
pole to be made in two sections after the present pattern; and to measure 
14 feet when joined. Such a tent will accommodate from 8 to 10 patients 
comfortably. 

1301. The following will be the allowance of tents for the sick, their 
attendants and hospital supplies : 


Commands. 

Hospital 

tents. 

Sibley 

tents. 

Common 

tents. 

For one company. 


1 

i ! 

For three companies. 

1 

1 

1 

For five companies. 

2 

1 

1 

For seven companies. 

2 

1 

1 | 

For ten companies., 

3 

1 

1 I 




1 


1302. Upon the march or in battle, medical officers will habitually be 
attended by an orderly, carrying a hospital knapsack. This knapsack to 
be made of light wood and of the ordinary size; to be divided into four 

























FOR THE ARMY. 


291 


Medical Department.-Hospital Allowance. 

compartments or drawers, and to be covered with canvas or other suitable 
material: the object being to carry in an accessible shape such instru¬ 
ments, dressings, and medicines, as may be needed in an emergency on 
the march or in the field. 


z 




STANDARD SUPPLY TABLE FOR GENERAL AND POST HOSPITALS. 


292 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 


S 

m y 
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3 

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03 o o 

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Assafoetid® 


Cj 

a * 


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£ S 

CQ rQ 




FOR THE ARMY. 
Medical Department. 


293 


(MOq?OTHtO^CDTt<OOOOOCDQOOOTfOOiOrHCDOOQO^COQOCOOOCOCDtOCDOO GOCO O 

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1 -HrHCIClT-Hr-. Cl t-h 




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TABLE FOR GENERAL AND POST HOSPITALS.— Continued. 


294 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 


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Massse pil: 


FOR THE ARMY 


295 


Medical Department. 


^toanooo«ooxo'#'>i<'Maeqoiaoo»oocofflooooooo^ia®fAto®oooooc'UO 

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CO Cl CM rtorH HHHClCOOO^Cl^Cl HjMrH r-H rH r-H rH r-H CO Hc^sJ ^ Cl H H <N H ^ Hn 


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rH .—. .— i « .— i r-— .— i < r— < i—i rH O i-— o n r—i _• o 


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TABLE FOR GENERAL AND POST HOSPITALS.— Continued. 


296 


KEVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 


O O 

a 

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o a 


a 


go© 

£ O T* 

^ CO 


g o o 

r£ O CO 


r o o 
£2^ 


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£} ^ rZD r£u n N ,0 A rO S3 Noo n r5 o rj rj n n n rj rj 

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3 S3 s ci'3 «) o " ” ’p/3h 

6 O’ W 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 










































Spiritus vini gallici.bott. 


FOR THE ARMY 


297 


Medical Department. 


aot)QO^X(Nfiu5«qooi3coiooo<» 

C3 CO CO CO CO 

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rH CM 

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rH 1 —l 

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rH Ol rH rH CO rH rH CO rH <M rH rH rH CO Cl CO rH 

rH rH 

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HdHH^HHOHClHHHCOClOOOH 


X2 X! X/ ^ tc ^ n ^ £ S-i Xz 

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£ "u '£ "s- 
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TABLE FOR GENERAL AND POST HOSPITALS.— Continued. 


298 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


< 

a 

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w 


Medical Department. 


Ph 

1,000 

men. 

d O ^ ^ rlrlHHHHHHOlrl^HHHHH 

r—t <M 

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500 

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FOR THE ARMY. 


299 


Medical Department. 


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TABLE FOR GENERAL AND POST HOSPITALS.— Continued. 


300 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 


a 

GO 2 

2 > a 


a 


<M C<> O UO r—\ 


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O Ol N « I 


lO<M<M!MT-ICOC<llffl00Tt<r-IO5C<)e<l 


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Paper, 


FOR THE ARMY. 


301 


Medical Department. 


0 A 

Cl) Q 

•—< O 


HHH(NH^OO rticci^CN (NHCOW^OHOCOfN^ 


H(MOOOCOW<OHT}10HrtnHH(NO CO ^ GO C^H^CO<MOHCO<MHCO 


r 4 sO -Hi^CO HO* ^ ^H^^HOH(NOHCO 


02 QQ CO 
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cr cr cr* 


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to 
to a 

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£ 


a 

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a £ a a a a "£ -£ a a o^g 

p t * • • • m m • * . * 


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£ rS 3 h .08 


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PhO?p 3 p 3 p 3 o} 020202 


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° a 














































302 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 

1303. Each medical officer will also be supplied with the following 
surgical instruments for his personal use, which he will retain in his 
immediate possession so long as he remains iu the army, and for the 
complete and serviceable condition of which, at all times, he will be held 
responsible: 


AMPUTATING. 

1 Capital Saw. 

1 Metacarpal Saw. 

1 Capital Amputating Knife. 

1 Medium u “ 

1 Small “ u 

1 Large Catling. 

1 Small “ 

1 Scalpel. 

1 Tenaculum. 

1 Artery Needle. 

1 “ Forceps. 

1 Bone “ 

1 Spiral Tourniquet. 

12 Surgeon’s Needles. 

1 Mahogany Case, brass bound. 

1 Gutta-Percha Pouch. 

TREPHINING. 

2 Trephines. 

1 Scalpel, with Raspitor. 

1 Heys’ Saw. 

1 Elevator. 

1 Brush. 

1 Mahogany Case, brass bound. 
EXSECTING. 

1 Bone Forceps, Liston’s. 

2 Bone Forceps, sharp, assorted. 
1 Bone Forceps, for sequestra. 

1 Chain Saw. 

1 Chisel. 

1 Gouge. 

1 Lenticular Knife. 

2 Spatulas, protecting. 

1 Trephine, small crown. 

1 Ecraseur. 

1 Mahogany Case, brass bound. 
1 Gutta-Percha Pouch. 


GENERAL OPERATING. 

1 Metacarpal Saw. 

1 Trocar. 

1 Ball Forceps. 

1 Gullet “ 

1 Artery u 

1 Dressing 11 

2 Scissors, straight, and curved. 

1 Artery Needle, with 4 points. 

12 Surgeon’s Needles. 

1 Tourniquet 

1 Small Amputating Knife. 

1 “ Catling. 

3 Bistouries. 

1 Hernia Knife. 

3 Scalpels. 

1 Cataract Knife. 

1 “ Needle. 

1 Tenaculum. 

1 Double Hook. 

6 Steel Bougies, silvered, double 
curve, Nos. 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 
and 6, 7 and 8, 9 and 10, 11 and 
12 . 

6 Wax Bougies, Nos. 2,4, 6, 8,10. 
3 Silver Catheters, Nos. 3, 6, 9. 

6 Gum-elastic Catheters, Nos. 1,3, 
5, 7, 9, 11. 

2 Mahogany Cases, brass bound 
1 Gutta-Percha Pouch. 

POCKET. 

1 Large Scalpel. 

1 Small “ 

1 Artery Forceps. 

1 Bull-dog “ 

1 Curved “ 

1 Dressing u 
1 Needle. 

1 Sharp-pointed Bistoury. 








FOR THE ARMY. 


303 


Medical Department. 


1 Probe-pointed Bistoury. 

1 Long Probe-pointed Bistoury. 
1 Straight Scissors. 

1 Knee “ 

1 Flat-curved Scissors. 

1 Gum Lancet. 

1 Tenaculum. 

1 Tenotomy Knife. 

1 Abscess Lancet. 

1 Exploring Needle. 


1 Exploring Trocar. 

1 Seton Needle. 

1 Spatula. 

2 Probes. 

1 Director. 

1 Double Canula. 

1 Comp’d Silver Catheter. 
6 Surgeon’s Needles. 

1 Artery Needle. 

1 Morocco Case. 


1 Leather Trunk. 


1304. The transfer of the surgical instruments issued to each medical 
officer for his personal use, is positively forbidden. These instruments 
will be accounted for to the Surgeon-General on the 31st day of December 
annually in a special return, in which the true condition of each must be 
stated; and if any be lost or damaged, a report of the facts and circum¬ 
stances attending such loss or damage, must be given. 

1305. To each General and Post Hospital, one ounce of brominium , 
with printed directions for preparing and administering Bibron’s antidote 
to the poison of serpents. Also one bottle of liquor ferri per sidphatis, 
and one bottle of liquor ammonise, in equal proportions, with printed 
directions for preparing speedily and for administering the hydrated 
sesqui-oxide of iron , as an antidote to poisoning by arsenic. 

1306. If the following articles of hospital furniture cannot be ob¬ 
tained with the hospital fund, they shall be procured from a quarter 
master or medical disbursing officer, by special requisition : 


ARTICLES. 


Basins, wash. 

Bowls. 

Brushes. 


Mugs. 

Pans, frying. 


sauce. 


* Buckets. 
Candlesticks. 
Clothes-Lines. 

Cups. 

Dippers and Ladles. 
Graters. 

Gridirons. 

Kettles, tea. 

Knives and Forks. 
Lamps and Lanterns. 
Locks and Keys. 


Pitchers. 

Plates and Dishes. 

Pots, chamber and chair. 


coffee and tea. 


Sadirons. 

Shovels, fire. 
Snuffers. 

Spoons. 

Tongs and Pokers. 

Tumblers. 

Woodsaws. 


2 A 









STANDARD SUPPLY TABLE FOR FIELD SERVICE. 


804 


REVISED REGULATION S 


Medical Department. 


I eo r-t rtlNHl?*,—| rH r-i HncM I H M H CO H Hfra 


HfriHirn-1 lO "H|ocX> hhhh«Nh'JihhhiMU3«iOh Hm-h CO a 


HHOIOHCOO)Oleqr(^(NlMOOOq(MN^.O^Ortr-l(MCO(N 


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FOR THE ARMY. 


305 


Medical Department. 


t 


HHlO^HHH(NCOOlH(MClN rH r-f*rH CO O 


T—I Tf rH r$NrH (MNNOOOWHH^O^rl^^^rl *h)N»-H HNr-H H^Tt* GO rH i-f*CD <M 


<N 00 C 3 Hn:M ^ Tji Ttl o ZD 

CM I-H 


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3 

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TABLE FOR FIELD SERVICE.—Continued. 


306 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 


< 

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a 

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a cS a 3 

3/bb #3 

CQ bp - 

«_b 5 

P ft o * 

o p, a 

a fl ej 

PQ O H 


‘ p. 3 

s s 


a p< 1 

CD -3 O. 1 , 

be a ^aa 
a 2 o> a ' 
® a *2 33 3 
C.S a .: 

o o Cjft 5 
o u « ft2 
Pi P-i «j m 02 c 









































FOR THE ARMY. 


307 






XWHHOOWO 


Medical Department. 



i-H ^ CO H CO 


rH tJH lC rH lO HntJ< *0 rH 


■<# O CO 

o o 


I-H ONOHOOOiN 


O u 

c® OO 00 <M 


O O m © O O O 


b-s E 


« U 


03 


u 

K"? | 
o> a? .JT ~ 

B m £ " 

03 G 2 

O O O 

HHH 
2 A 2 


« o « o o 


O C3 

*So.2 


S "3 

O O 

"S *3 

<1 <! 


^3 _ - 

^?pi 

S .£ So 

g s o 
=2 o ° 
co A co 

5£,a 


Ch o 


o 

— >1 ® 

C? ti Ph ■ 
■O O P if 
® bD ® 3 
Mj« o g 
® s -3 

Ph CC H « 


i £ S fn O 

i'S.S MS 

s- a t- a -a ■_ 

Sh cj c3 — S 0) 

<JOPhO^H 


SSo 


M ^ 


® d 


M 






































TABLE FOR FIELD SERVICE.—Continued. 


308 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department. 





























































FOR THE ARMY. 


309 


Medical Department. 


I O rH r—< H r-H r-fa’r—I r—I t— i O i 


CO O 


H C<1 !M n4<JiH](NC0 r^C<J , 


I O CM ■ 


O r—I CO H ^ N <M O HlNTjH i 


c o fl 


aiOOTOoroooNwo^a) 


C p o a ' 


•5 

p< fl 
P< *2 


£ £ 


0> CO 

<v <d 
^ M 


a ; & 
C prj 

o rz; 
P^Ph 


CO ^ 


O c3 co 


g W p H J- 


s- p 2? 9 P< 1 


bo 


N « ^ .2 o> ftl ft! e3 o 
» <5 o o .J3 C2 .73 a< a. .a •-* o P 
ftcp3«2GGOQa2;>QGQa2&-lHc-lEHH 


.9 cj c3 

h 2 r* 


,a 


56 


o .« 


o E.S 3 

9c oa E-t H 
n«hio 


0 O 


a 

ft9 o 


^ 0 ?3 is — O 

^ ri, -I 9 9 9c 

o' OHH«H 


rQ O 

O 


2 

0" 


<U rS2 

rS !>» 


» ,a^5 

® g s 4 1 1 
.S* g *C ® a 


c3 

a 

>> 


S ft .^ ! 

^ &.S 2 i 
rf-Sj 

2 * ft’a 
s o 3 ci 
BSOO 
00 O) !C 


O 0 
» CH 

• S gg 

^ a 

>•» ®3 

U -a 

CO • 

n3 ’a 

9 Jh 

C3 a 

nd a 
a a 
t5 

CO A 


a 

aa 

EH 


a 

fc/; 

(-. 

a 

co 








































FORM 1. 

Requisition for Medical and Hospital Supplies. 

Station: -. Period: -. 

From-to-. 


no 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 




•punq HQ 


•pajunAV 


•puni[ uq 






&3 


transmitted in duplicate, and by different mails. 


























SPECIAL REQUISITION FOR SUPPLIES OF MEDICINES, ETC. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


311 


Medical Department.-Forms. 




e 




•S 

•8 




s 


fif. . 

_ zZ © © 

•s O <S3 
a-g r r 

H H o o 


« 3 


3 £ 
“ >> 
S 3 

V-t <y 

>>^5 

Jh ^ 

c3 o 

W -t-J 
GQ 

<D © 

S3 

d 

w © 
0, £ 
*, P 

s bX) 
c3 

^ CQ 
© -»H 

•a a 

d o 
© -tj 

U 

© Si 

O 2 

-2 * 
c3 © 

© -» 

.9 * 
.9 *3 
"3 I* 

<u 'o 

a § 

© ~ 


pd r 
© 

«&•*> 


m a 


$5, 

C? 


I 




















FORM 3. 

Account for Medicines, &c., purchased by a Surgeon or an Officer of the Quartermaster's Department. 


312 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


i© „ 

■S M 


* 8 
s • 

^2 O c 


P. O 


<3 


© 3 o 

< P4 




>> ^ 
S3 «3 


i 


.p 


ing to the army. 















FORM 4. 

Return of Medical and Hospital Property. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


313 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


•pucix uq 


•otj ‘papnadxa 


•asn joj xgnn jo ‘xno nro^ 


•Xuapioon axq 

-’BpjOA.nun jfq paXojxsap jo xsoq; 


•panssj 


•Jiois aqx qxiAi papnadxg; 


T*?oj; 


•ujnjaj xsnx aonxs paAiaoaxi 


•njnxaj xsnx xn punq no 




2 £ 


the sick belonging to the army alone. 


















Abstract of Medical and Hospital Property received and issued at - in the quarter ending on the - day of 

18—, by - , Medical Purveyor, United States Army. 


314 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


ISSUED. 

TU°X 


{•omvjy) 

- 8 '°N ‘ no A 


( - 9 WVy[) 

•L '°N ’noA 


•9 'OxM '™A 


{•dUlVfl) 

•q -otf -no A 


(■QlUDJtf) 

’ f '°K '«OA 


('OlUVJtf ) 

•g - 0 N 'no a 


(•oiuvjy) 

• Z '°N ‘ no A 


( -durnyf) 

■l -OK -noA 


RECEIVED. 



(■diuvjy) 

■g -on -noA 


(•dwvjg) 

■f -Oil -noA 


( -diuvjy) 

•g -ok -noA 


(■dwvy[) 

■Z ‘OK -uoa 


{•zwvjf) 

•\ -Oil -noA 


Articles, and cha¬ 
racters or quan¬ 
tities. 

Acacise.lb. 

Acidi acetici.lb. 


I certify that the above abstract is correct. 

-, Medical Purveyor , U. S. A. 

N.B.—Invoices and receipts must accompany this abstract. 





































FORM 6. 

Account of Hospital Stores, Furniture, &c., issued. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


315 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 

1 







•03 

d 


•03 

d 


•oij 

d 



m 


•09303 

>A 


•^pnnjg; 

m 

a 


‘ aa IAY 

OQ 

a 


•■eoj 

N 

O 


•xeSng 

Lbs. 1 


•0013 

QQ 

r£2 


d 



a 

P 





20 























Account of Clothing, Arms, Equipments, <Scc., of Patients in Hospital. 


316 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


O ® .» O d 
^ >1 m 0 

aj 03 0) O O 

■*£ te a M rd 

O ^ o -*-> te 

a n a ^ 

^ “ 1*5 

■£.2-g a 
to .d «*h *2 S? 
OS £ £ B .5 

^ bo 

a 2 •“ ® ... ® 

o 5 'g g .2 g 

rC| O •* O 
Eh ^ o JJ 




1 

1 

’»2? | 

• 02 ? 


•02? 


•sqousdmrq 


•s^oqsnj^; 


•02? 


•SUT3J9AO 




•S^COQ 


•jfundniOQ 


Regiment 
or corps. 


Rank. 


Names. 

1 


■jaqum^ 


Date. 


































FORM 8. 

Account of Furniture, Cooking Utensils, Bedding, Ac., in Use. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


317 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 

The remarks will 

state how articles 

have been lost, and 

by whom destroyed, 

or the persons sus¬ 

pected, &c. 

•p,xnAi.8}s 0} poujnjo'jj 


•aopao Xq pOjfoxfsOQ 


•}Tio naOj^ 


•^sot 




















•02? 


•£>Y 


•sq-xoj 


•soAttrg; 


•suoodg 


•seizes 


•s^aqmqg 


•speqg 


•sqocs-pag; 


•squng; 


•uoqojpi ao pjBMjo-o^ 




































FORM 9. 


818 


REVISED REGULATIONS 




Medical Department.-Forms. 


Remarks. 


•p 9 !a 


•qSnopinj no 


•pj^idsoq jnjonoS o^ paog 


•ootajos raojj poSanqosiQ 


•popiosofl 


•ifynp o? pouanpd 


•po^impy 


Complaint. 


•Xnndmoo 


•sdaoo jo ■jnaniiSo'g; 


•quna 


Names. 



N.B.—Both Christian and sur-name will be registered. 


























FORM 10. 

Prescription Boole, Diet Booh, and Diet Table. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


319 


Medical Department.-Forms. 



S *=3 o ef t } ^ 

2 5 .t3 £ a? £ fe 

S rt p< 2 ^ 

O .2 W CQ ^ CQ 

-< o ° o cS 

3 -rt ^ on . £ 03 

Q> O ^ ^ “ - 

a « 2 a '-S Jj a 

a? a ^ .2 g 5 -s 

g .sp o 2 o ® 

fcp ® a .2 ~ p ■*• 

3 ^ 'S "E .2 *8 £< 

£ 5 £ rt 5 S <2 

2 f? 3 ’o ® 


'r^ ^ 2 fl ^ 
A 2 o S £ 


s£-J ® 

.2 a * ^ •“ 
■S | -2 § o 

P rri d r« 0 


c3 


© 
o > 


S 2 M O 
U & § w 


TO ^ 

a *3 


aT 


^ u * 1 
s o § § * 

3 a- 3 -J § 

o 


4 U © <w 

o £ ft ° 

2 . 2 >> 
•-h CQ Q. ._ 
+-* 

C3 S to § 

‘ © *£ <p £ 

1 P.H ^ 

£ a -3 

>4 -2 O rd 

g * «* ^ 
fi SrfJ 

.a o 2 a 

« H oT 3 

© o 

5 -s 'E ® 

— .2 «M 03 
.3 O d 

*3 O r-> O 

6 ° g ^ 

IB flJ rt ^ 

a <0 s o 
.5 ^ 2 o 

bn ia 
«T ® 

a 3 .2 2 

'■^ o 5 S 

5^o® 

O f-H 

© O -U 
FI ^ rl 


"© M 
^3 © 


O , 


2 B 2 


as the quantity for each ward. When any liquor is directed, or any other article not contained in these general instructions of the 
surgeon, the precise quantity directed for each patient will be noted in the Diet Book. The Diet Tables are to be filled up daily from 
the Diet Book, and hung up in each ward of a general hospital. 
























320 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 11. 

METEOROLOGICAL 


Station _, Lat. -, Long. -, 


186 . 

Barometer. 

Therm, attd. 

Thermometer. 

Hygrometer. 

Month. 

7 

2 

0 

7 

2 

9 

7 

2 

9 

Daily 

7 

2 

9 

Daily 


A.M. 

P.M. 

r.M. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

mean. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

mean. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 















8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 















Monthly 

mean. 





































































FOR THE ARMY. 


321 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 11. 

REGISTER. 

Alt. of Bar. above __ feet. 


Winds. 

Weather. 

Rain. 


7 A 

M. 

2 P.M. 

9 P.M. 

7 

2 

9 

Be- 

End- 

Quan- 

Remarks. 

D. 

F. 

D. 

F. 

D. 

F. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

gan. 

ed. 

tity. 

































































REVISED REGULATIONS 


322 

Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 11. —(Meteorological 


SUMMARY OF WINDS AND WEATHER. 


N. 

N.E. 

E. 

S.E. 

s. 

s.w. 

w. 

N.W. 

Number. 

Days. 

Number. 

Days. 

Number. 

Days. 

Number. 

m 

c3 

P 

Number. 

GO 

c3 

P 

Number. 

CO 

;>> 

ci 

P 

Number. 

CO 

c3 

P 

Number. 

GO 

ci 

P 


















No. of days \ 


No. of days ) 


No. of days 1 


No. of days \ 


FAIR. J 


CLOUDY. / 


of RAIN. J 


of SNOW. J 






















































FOR THE ARMY. 


323 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


Register.) — Continued. 


REMARKS. 


This register is to be mailed to the Surgeon-General monthly without a letter 
of transmittal. All fractions are to be expressed in decimals carried out two 
points. The thermometer and hygrometer, if not connected, will be suspended 
side by side. One-third of the sum of the three daily observations will be regis¬ 
tered as the daily mean. The direction (D.) and force (F.) of the winds will be 
expressed in accordance with existing regulations. The whole number of times 
any point of the compass is recorded during the month gives the “number of 
observations and that number divided by 3 gives the number of days from that 
point. The results thus obtained are to be recorded under “Summary of winds 
and weather.” Observations on the weather will be recorded as fair or cloudy; 
and the number of fair and cloudy days during the month will be ascertained 
by dividing the sum total of each record by 3. The number of days on which it 
rains or snows will be noted separately. 

Surgeon-General’s Office, March, 1860. 


Surgeon U. S. Army. 


(Endorsement.) 


Station: 


METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER 


FOR THE 


Month of _ , 18—. 

Transmitted by 


Surgeon U. S. Army. 


Rec’d S. G. Office, _, 18—. 











FORM 12. 

Roll of Soldiers employed on extra duty as Cooks and Nurses in the Hospital at - during the month of 

186 , by -, Surgeon. 


324 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


How employed. 

Remarks. 


Rate of pay or 
compensation. 

GO 

5 


Dolls. 


Per 

diem. 

m 

6 


Term of service. 

•SiCnp jo -o^i 


— 04 


- UIOJJ 


Nature of 
service. 


By whose 
order 
employed. 


•juamiSa'ji 


•ifunduioQ 


Rank or 
designation. 


Names. 


No. 





I certify that the above is a correct roll of the enlisted men employed on extra duty, under my direction, during the month of — 
186 , and that the remarks opposite their names are accurate and just. 

Examined: 

-, Comm inding. -, Surgeon. 

































FOR THE ARMY. 


325 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 13. 

Army of the United States. 

Coat of Arms. 

Certificate of Disability for Discharge. 

[To be used, in duplicate, in all cases of discharge on account of disability.) 

A. B., of Captain-’s company (—), of the -- regiment of 

United States-, was enlisted by-, of the-regiment. 

of-, at-, on the-day of-, to serve-years; he 

was bom in-, in the State of-, is-years of age,- 

feet- inches high,- complexion,- eyes,- hair, and by 

occupation when enlisted-. During the last two months said 

soldier has been unfit for duty-days. 


(The company commander will here add a statement of all the facts 
known to him concerning the disease or wound, or cause of disability of 
the soldier; the time, place, manner, and all the circumstances under 
which the injury occurred, or disease originated or appeared; the duty, 
or service, or situation of the soldier at the time the injury was received 
or disease contracted, or supposed to be contracted; and whatever facts 
may aid a judgment as to the cause, immediate or remote, of the dis¬ 
ability, and the circumstances attending it.) 

C. D., Commanding Company. 


When the facts are not known to the company commander, the certifi¬ 
cate of any officer, or affidavit of other person having such knowledge, 
will be appended. 


I certify that I have carefully examined the said-of Captain 

- ’ s company, and find him incapable of performing the duties of a 

soldier, because of [here describe particularly the disability, wound, or 
disease; the extent to which it deprives him of the use of any limb or 
faculty, or affects his health, strength, activity, constitution, or capacity 
to labor or earn his subsistence. The surgeon will add, from his know¬ 
ledge of the facts and circumstances, and from the evidence in the case, 
his professional opinion of the cause or origin of the disability.] 

E. F., Surgeon. 


(Duplicates.) 


Discharged this-day of-, 186 , at 


Commanding the Post. 


jj 0TE i._When a probable case for pension, special care must be taken to state the 

degree of disability. 

Note 2.—The place where the soldier desires to be addressed may be here added. 
Town— County— State— 



























Record of Recruits examined by 


326 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 



■, Surgeon. 























FOR THE ARMY 


327 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


£5 


e 

s 


10 ^ 


S 

P? 

O 
h 

e 

^3 

S 

3 






IS 


2C 


A 

0 

c3 

a> 

*Sq^t!9(J 



^ r2 

'S » 

0 

H 

•S9ST?Q 



r£3 

O 

c3 

« © 

•sq;n9([ 



S* 63 

»“ O 
, CQ 

43 *3 

0 

H 

•sgs’eg 




•sqinaa 


•sgsrQ 


•sinnaa 


•sesnQ 


•sq^neo; 


•S9SBQ 


® % 
a> J 

3.S 

50 


co m 

a 5 


o? 


a> 


2 a ’a ’a 

,*r« r s- . 


s 53 

’o 3 2 <u 
-d ^3 ^3 m 
.2 S ft. ft. o,^ 

a s >» t>> p*> r, 

1—1 Eh Eh H <5 

”c "S - a *c’s *s's 'p "S © 

*—- 1 

fcEMG^EuifciEL.Ci.&ili.-'tl 


a a « ® 
o, 


« * i „ w „ 

ft. o ci ri r-< r3 
m S’J.S.So 

f-t p © ^3 Cw »—« 

P3pjrei>i>^ 


pR 


H 

























































TAKEN SICK OR RECEIVED INTO HOSPITAL DURING THE 


828 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


CS 

K 

E* 

C 

< 

& 

a 


o 

C3 

Q . 

•sq?uea 


P ^c3 

© 

H 

•S8SUQ 


o 

C3 . 

o o 

•sipiiaa 


b d 

O 

.5 "5 

o 

H 

•S3SBQ 



■SqtBOQ 

. 

13 

EH 

•S3SBQ 


T3 

•sq)B3(i 


O 

o 

a> 

U1 

•S3SRQ 



•si^bsq; 


•S9SRQ 


f 3 « : p 


c o ^ 
A < o 

^ .2 .2 

"C '2 ■ 


m co 


P.-£ 


' a 5 

i o —i 

»a ft 


8 ^ 

'S a fl - n B 

r « o p S 3 J 3 

rt M W M 4J w 

.2 &>> a c3 

POP PHO 


3 

o ^ 

<: o 


; c o 

c» ro . 

•55 gs’gS2, 

i $5 S ^ o ^ 

; h S l ^"c5^ < a3 cpo^-j <» s- ^ 

cg H <1 <!«« 


213 13 

COO 

pa a a 


P5 « 


P3 ® 


c 3 .2 

So 


<D C O) ^ 

W C3 +J 
C5 Wig flj W 


O £ 


r3 ^ 































































FOR THE ARMY. 


329 


Medical Department.-Forms. 





















































TAKEN SICK OR RECEIVED INTO HOSPITAL DURING THE QUARTER, 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


© 

c3 

© . 

•sqt'BaG 


M 

^ c3 

3 « 

o 

H 

•S8SR3 


r=3 

© 

c3 

© a> 

•sinuao; 


r “ © 

,—. «2 

,2 *3 

o 

Eh 

•sa^BQ 


rd 

•sq^uaa 


EH 

•S3SRQ 




•Sinead 


o 



© 




•S9SRQ 



Pw 


•sq^uaQ 


•sasuQ 


09 

a a 

^ S3 

^3 O 

rd 

S3 ^ 

2 a 
O gi 


m 8 

,2 -C 


O 3 rO 7 
S P rP ft-f 


< 4j 43 a w 3 eg g g % 


a a 


8 > a m m 
2-13 g fl g 

CJ fl © O c3 
© a w P © 
M r fl -n ” 

p^a-p^ 

C3 r „ ro © U 
*- .2 .52 Qj © 

5^:3 

o g «-> 

•C ftfto, 
C^r 


— • ci 

O ^ 'O 


<JO W 
m « rt 
S3 S3 © 

gap 


m « s -s a to g cs 

^ S 2 2^-e ^°| 
v v v ° a -3 3 

o -P 




C3 © 

HS 

g O 


,3 3 


5« 


0Q >> 


o .H CJ T3 © 


M ® 


© O 

S 


O os 3 


































































FOR THE ARMY 


331 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


i 


j a p 

3 3 3 ' 


a 5^: 

0 = 0 


13.2 s 
, ^ DC 


3 

,o « ^ -*-> O 

S 3 3 P cj - 
o o o 

< O O O ? 


*P * 






Cj 








M 
















o 








a 








ci 




: : c3 



vj 





ca-2 

r- 




r« {j O 

d "o 13 

rt *-« 

S.J3 <7 
,3*^ 

£-. 

J§ .£ 


Cj 

g S 

rS *- 


b 

3 

o 


■- "? a c c a 

2-e^'3'3' 


□ 5 fiso^B ° 

.wp-H — H !j Sr 1 h o. © 

s a i-3 S m i>> > > <1 -^oPm ^ O M <5 


d.B o 
O © © ! 


CO w 

TS .2 


2C2 


CO 0) 

p 


21 









































































RECEIVED INTO HOSPITAL DURING THE 


332 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


Total by each 
class. 

•sqjROd 



•sasRQ 



Total by each 
disease. 

■sqiBoa 



•SOSBQ 



Third. 

•SI[}R0Q[ 



•sosrq 



Second. 

•sqjuoa 



•SOSRQ 



First. 

•sqiBOQ; 

I 

1 

■S0SRQ 

I 

Month. 

Specific Diseases. 

Brought forward. 

Anchylosis. 

Atrophia. 

Bubo simplex. 

Cachexia. 

Debilitas. 

Ebrietas. 

Epistaxis. 

Exostosis. 

Hoemorrhois. 

Hematocele. 

Morbi Cutis. 

Necrosis. 

Nostalgia. 

Odontalgia. 

Prolapsus ani. 

Scirrhus. 

Scorbutus. 

Scrofula. 

Suicidium. 

Toxicum. 

Tumores. 

Vermes. 

Morbi Varii. 

Total. 











































































FOR THE ARMY 


333 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


O 

G 


G 

o 




3 

Ph 

o 

f*t 


Ratio per 1000 of 
mean strength. 

Deaths. 




Cases. 




Deaths. 




Number 

treated. 




Mean strength. 

Total. 




Enlisted 

men. 




Officers. 




Months. 

Total... 

Ratio 
per qr. 

Remaining. 

•RD°I 


•^uaosa^AUOQ 


•^»!S 


•P 8 !(I 1 

•popiasod | 

•poSjnqosi(j | 

•qSnojanj uo | 

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3o4 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 15. —Continued. 

Discharges on Surgeon’s Certificate and Deaths. 


Name. 

Rank. 

Regiment. 

Company. 

Disease. 

Date of 
discharge 
from 
service. 

Date of 
death. 

Surname. 

Christian 

name. 










REMARKS. 


Notes. —Discharges on Surgeon’s certificate, and deaths occurring among those 
of the command not on sick report, will also be reported, but separated from the 
others by a double line drawn across the page. The remarks will in each case 
specify the manner in which the disease originated, when it is known. 

In every case of the death of an officer, whether on duty or not, a special report 
is to be made to the Surgeon-General. 




















FOR THE ARMY. 


335 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 15. —Continued. 
[Endorsement.) 


REPORT OF SICK AND WOUNDED 

FOE THE 

Quarter ending , 186 . 

Station: 


Sukgeon U. S. Akmy. 


COMMAND. 


Regiments. 


Companies. 








FORM 16. 

Morning Report of the Surgeon of a Regiment, Post, or Garrison. 


336 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.——Forms. 


Remarks. 


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FORM 17. 

Return of the Medical Officers of the Regular Army, Volunteer Corps, and Militia, including Physicians employed 
contract, serving in the Department of - , for the month of , 186 


FOR THE ARMY. 


337 


Medical Department.-Forms. 





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338 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 18. 


Contract with a Private Physician. 


This contract, entered into this-day of-, 18—, at-, 

State of-, between-, of the United States Army, and 

Dr.-, of-, in the State of-, witnesseth, that 

for the consideration hereafter mentioned, the said Dr.-promises 

and agrees to perform the duties of a medical officer, agreeably to the 

Army Regulations, at-( and to furnish the necessary medicines ). 

And the said-promises and agrees, on behalf of the United States, 

to pay, or cause to be paid, to the said Dr.-the sum of-dollars 

for each and every month he shall continue to perform the services above 
stated, which shall be his full compensation, and in lieu of all allowances 
and emoluments whatsoever ( except that for medicines furnished , which 
shall he at the rate of—per cent, on his monthly pay, to he determined 
hy the Surgeon-General). This contract to continue till determined by 
the said doctor, or the commanding officer for the time being, or the 
Surgeon-General. 

[Seal.] 

Signed, sealed, and delivered 
in presence of 


[Seal.] 


I certify that the number of persons entitled to medical attendance, 

agreeably to regulations, at -, is-, and that no competent 

physician can be obtained at a lower rate. 

-, Commanding Officer. 
























FOR THE ARMY. 


339 


Medical Department.—Forms. 


FORM 19. 


A Monthly Statement of the Hospital Fund at 

of -,186 . 


for the month 


Dr. To balance due hospital last month. 

1582 rations, being whole amount due this month, at 9* cents 
per ration. 


Cr. By the following provisions, at contract prices: 


T(T 


283 £ 
690 
1612 
10 
70 
56 

193 « 

17 * 

16* 

611 

16* 

12 


lbs. of pork, at 6 cents per pound. 

lbs. of fresh beef, at 4 cents per pound .... 

lbs. of flour, at 2 cents per pound. 

lbs. of hard bread, at 3* cents per pound.. 

lbs. of rice, at 6 cents per pound. 

lbs. of coffee, at 9 cents per pound. 

lbs. of sugar, at 8 cents per pound. 

quarts of vinegar, at 5 cents per quart. 

lbs. of candles, at 12 cents per pound. 

lbs. of soap, at 6 cents per pound. 

quarts of salt, at 3 cents per quart. 

gallons of molasses, at 28 cents per gallon 


PURCHASED. 

2 pairs of chickens, at 87* cents per pair 
4 quarts of milk, at 7 cents per quart.... 

3 dozen oranges, at 25 cents per dozen... 


Total expended. 

Balance due this month., 


$17 

01 

27 

60 

32 

241 


35 

4 

20 

5 

04 

15 

51 


85* 

1 

83* 

3 

674 


50* 

3 

36 

112 

00 

2 

78 


— 




$0 

145 


114 


30 


00 

54 


57* 


-, Surgeon l T . S. Army. 

[Date.] 

(No letter of transmittal required.) 


2D 








































340 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Medical Department.-Forms. 


FORM 20. 

Form of a Medical Certificate. 

-, of the-regiment of-, having applied for a 

certificate on which to ground an application for leave of absence, I do 
hereby certify that I have carefully examined this officer, and find that 

-. [Here the nature of the disease, wound, or disability, is to be 

fully stated, and the period during which the officer has suffered under its 
effects.] And that, in consequence thereof, he is, in my opinion, unfit 
for duty. I further declare my belief that he will not be able to resume 
his duties in a less period than-. [Here state candidly and expli¬ 

citly the opinion as to the period which will probably elapse before the 
officer will be able to resume his duties. When there is no reason to 
expect a recovery, or when the prospect of recovery is distant and uncer¬ 
tain, it must be so stated.] 

Dated at-, this-day of-. 

Signature of the ] 

Medical Officer, j ‘ 














FOR THE ARMY. 


341 


Pay Department. 


ARTICLE XLY. 

PAY DEPARTMENT. 

1307. The troops 'will be paid in such manner that the arrears shall at 
no time exceed two months, unless the circumstances of the case render 
it unavoidable, which the paymaster charged with the payment shall 
promptly report to the Paymaster-General. 

1308. The Paymaster-General shall take care, by timely remittances, 
that the paymasters have the necessary funds to pay the troops, and shall 
notify the remittances to the paymasters and commanding officers of the 
respective pay districts. 

1309. The payments, except to officers and discharged soldiers, shall 
be made on muster and pay rolls; those of companies and detachments, 
signed by the company or detachment commander; of the hospital, signod 
by the surgeon; and all muster and pay rolls, signed by the mustering 
and inspecting officer. 

1310. When a company is paraded for payment, the officer in com¬ 
mand of it shall attend at the pay-table. 

1311. When a receipt on a pay-roll or account is not signed by the 
hand of the party, the payment must be witnessed. The witness to be a 
commissioned officer when practicable. 

1312. Officers are paid on certified accounts, as in Form 3; discharged 
soldiers, on accounts according to Form 5, and certificates, Form 4. An 
officer retiring from service must make affidavit to his pay account, and 
to the certificate annexed to it, and state his place of residence, and the 
date when his resignation or removal takes effect. Pay accounts of post 
chaplains are to be certified by the commanding officer of the post. 

1313. When an officer is dismissed from the service, he shall not be 
entitled to pay beyond the day on which the order announcing his dis¬ 
missal is received at the post where he may be stationed, unless a par¬ 
ticular day beyond the time is mentioned in the order. 

1314. No officer shall receive pay for two staff appointments for the 
Bame time. 

1315. Officers are entitled to pay from the date of the acceptance of 
their appointments, and from the date of promotion. 

1316. No account of a restored officer for time he was out of service 
can be paid, without order of the War Department. 

1317. As far as practicable, officers are to draw their pay from the pay¬ 
master of the district where they may be on duty. 

1318. No officer shall pass away or transfer his pay account not actually 
due at the time; and when an officer transfers his pay account, he shall 







,S42 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Pay Department. 

report tlie fact to the Paymaster-General, and to the paymaster expected 
to pay it. 

1319. No person in the military service, while in arrears to the United 
States, shall draw pay. When the Secretary of War shall find by report 
of the Comptroller of the Treasury, or otherwise, that an officer of the 
army is in arrears to the United States, the Paymaster-General shall be 
directed to stop his pay to the amount of such arrears, by giving notice 
thereof to the paymasters of the army, and to the officer, who may pay 
over the amount to any paymaster. And no paymaster shall make to 
him any payment on account of pay until he exhibits evidence of having 
refunded the amount of the arrears, or that his pay accrued and stopped 
is equal to it, or until the stoppage is removed by the Paymaster-General. 

1320. Officers having brevet commissions are entitled to their brevet 
pay and emoluments when on duty and having a command according to 
their brevet rank, and at no other time. (Act April 16, 1818.) 

1321. Officers are on duty and have a command according to their 
brevet rank only when assigned to their brevet rank by the President 
with the appropriate actual command composed of different corps, or 
when serving on detachments composed of different corps, with such 
appropriate command. But in the regiment, troop, or company to which 
officers belong, they do duty and draw pay according to the commissions 
by which they are mustered in their own corps. 

1322. The following are the appropriate commands to each grade: 

1. For a captain, at least a company. 

2. For a major, at least 2 companies. 

3. For a lieutenant-colonel, at least 4 companies. 

4. For a colonel, at least 1 regiment, or 10 companies. 

5. For a brigadier-general, 2 regiments, or 20 companies. 

6. For a major-general, 4 regiments, or 40 companies. 

7. For a lieutenant-general, 8 regiments, or 80 companies. 

1323. Officers charging brevet pay will state on their pay accounts the 
regiments and companies composing their commands. 

1324. Double rations are allowed to the major-general commanding the 
army, and to every officer commanding in chief a separate army actually 
in the field; to the generals commanding the eastern and western geo¬ 
graphical divisions; to the Quartermaster-General and the Adjutant-Gene¬ 
ral; to the colonels or other officers commanding military geographical 
departments. 

1325. Commanding officers of companies will not forfeit the allow¬ 
ances to which they are entitled by reason of such command when 
temporarily absent on duty, provided the absence is less than one 
month. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


343 


Pay Department. 

1326. No officer or soldier shall receive pay or allowances for any time 
during which he was absent without leave, unless a satisfactory excuse 
for such absence be rendered to his commanding officer, evidence of 
which, in case of an officer, shall be annexed to his pay account. 

1327. Every deserter shall forfeit all pay and allowances due at the 
time of desertion. Stoppages and fines shall be paid from his future 
earnings, if he is apprehended and continued in service and if they are 
adjudged by a court-martial; otherwise, from his arrears of pay. 

1328. No deserter shall receive pay before trial, or till restored to duty 
without trial by the authority competent to order the trial. 

1329. In case of a soldier’s death, desertion, or discharge without pay, 
or the forfeiture of his pay by sentence of court-martial, the amount due 
the laundress and sutler will be noted on the muster-roll. 

1330. The extra pay allowed to soldiers acting as cooks and nurses in 
hospitals will be paid by the Pay Department. Such extra services will 
be noted on the hospital muster-rolls, and for the sums thus expended, 
the Pay Department will be reimbursed by the Medical Department. 

1331. When an improper payment has been made to any enlisted 
soldier, and disallowed in the settlement of the paymaster’s accounts, the 
paymaster n ay report the fact to the commander of the company in 
which the soldier is mustered, who will note on the muster-rolls the 
amount to be stopped from the pay of the soldier, that it may be re¬ 
funded to the paymaster in whose accounts the improper payment has 
been disallowed. 

1332. Authorized stoppages to reimburse the United States, as for loss 
or damage to arms, equipments, or other public property; for extra issues 
of clothing; for the expense of apprehending deserters, or to reimburse 
individuals (as the paymaster, laundress, &c.); forfeitures for desertion, 
and fines by sentence of court-martial, will be entered on the roll and 
paid in the order stated. 

1333. The paymaster will deduct from the pay of all enlisted men 
twelve and a half cents per month for the support of the “Sojdiers’ 
Home,” and also the amount of the authorized stoppages entered on the 
muster-roll, descriptive list, or certificate of discharge. 

1334. The additional pay of two dollars a month to a private soldier 
in virtue of a certificate of merit (Act March 3, 1847), commences at 
the date of the service for which the certificate is given, and continues 
while he remains a private soldier, if he has been continuously in service, 
or has a certificate of merit given for service in the war with Mexico. 
(Act August 4, 1854.) 

1335. Non-commissioned officers who were recommended by the com¬ 
manding officer of their regiment for promotion by brevet for distinguished 

2D 2 





344 


EEVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department. 

service in the war with Mexico, and not promoted, receive two dollars a 
month additional pay, while in service as non-commissioned officers. (Act 
August 4, 1854.) 

1336. The muster-rolls are to embrace all the data necessary to insure 

justice to the soldier, and to guide the paymaster in making his pay¬ 
ments. Thus, when a man is entitled to the benefits of the 2d section 
of the Act of August 4, 1854, the following remark should he placed 
opposite his name : pr. mo. for 1st re-enlistment.” If he be entitled 

to $1 additional for re-enlisting subsequent to its date, the remark will 
then be, “ 83 pr. mo. for 2d re-enlistment;” for a third re-enlistment, 
“ $4 pr. mo. for 3d re-enlistment,” &c. For soldiers coming under the 
provisions of the 3d and 4th sections of the act, note as follows : “ $2 pr. 
mo. for cert, merit;” “ $2 pr. mo. for 1st re-enlistment, $2 for cert, merit,” 
&c., according to the facts of the case. 

1337. The retained pay is due to a discharged soldier unless forfeited 
by sentence of a court-martial, or as provided in paragraph 1340. 

1338. The traveling pay is due to a discharged officer or soldier unless 
forfeited by sentence of a court-martial, or as provided in paragraph 
1340, or the discharge is by way of punishment for an offense. 

1339. In reckoning the traveling allowance to discharged officers or 
soldiers, the distance is to be estimated by the shortest mail route; if 
there is no mail route, by the shortest practicable route. Rations of 
soldiers, if not drawn in kind, are estimated at the contract price at the 
place of discharge. The price of the ration shall be stated on the certi¬ 
ficate. 

1340. Every enlisted man discharged as a minor, or for other cause 
involving fraud on his part in the enlistment, or discharged by the civil 
authority, shall forfeit all pay and allowances due at the time of the dis¬ 
charge, and shall not receive any final statements. 

1341. Paymasters or other officers to whom a discharged soldier may 
a PPty> shall transmit to the Paymaster-General, with their remarks, any 
evidence the soldier may furnish relating to his not having received or 
having lost his certificates of pay due. The Paymaster-General will 
transmit the evidence to the Second Comptroller for the settlement of 
the account. 

1342. No paymaster or other officer shall be interested in the purchase 
of any soldier’s certificate of pay due, or other claim against the United 
States. 

1343. The Paymaster-General will report to the Adjutant-General any 
case of neglect of company officers to furnish the proper certificates to 
soldiers entitled to discharge. 

1344. Whenever the garrison is withdrawn from any post at which a 





FOR THE ARMY. 


345 


Pay Department. 

chaplain is authorized to be employed, his pay and emoluments shall cease 
on the last day of the month next ensuing after the withdrawal of the 
troops. The Paymaster-General will be duly informed from the Adju¬ 
tant-General’s office whenever the appointment and pay of the post 
chaplain will cease under this regulation. 

1345. Funds turned over to other paymasters, or refunded to the Trea¬ 
sury, are to be entered in accounts current, but not in the abstracts of 
payments. 

1346. Whenever money is refunded to the Treasury, the name of the 
person refunding, and the purpose for which it is done, should be stated, 
in order that the officers of that Department may give the proper credits. 

1347. When an officer of the army receives a temporary appointment 
from the proper authority to a grade in the militia then in actual service 
of the United States higher in rank than that held by him in the army, 
he shall be entitled to the pay and emoluments of the grade in which he 
serves. But in no case can an officer receive the compensation of two 
military commissions or appointments at the same time. 

1348. Whenever the Paymaster-General shall discover that an officer 
has drawn pay twice for the same time, he shall report it to the Adjutant 
General. 

1349. The Paymaster-General shall transmit to the Second Auditor, 
in the month of May, a statement exhibiting the total amount during 
the year up to the 31st December preceding, of stoppages against officers 
and soldiers on account of ordnance and ordnance stores, that the amount 
may be refunded to the proper appropriations. These stoppages will be 
regulated by the tables of cost published by the chief of the Ordnance 
Department, and shall have precedence of all other claims on the pay of 
officers or soldiers. 

1350. The following returns are to be transmitted to the Paymaster- 
General after each payment: 

1st. Estimate for succeeding months (Form 1). 

2d. Abstracts of payments (Form 6), accompanied by the vouchers. 

3d. General account current (Form 7). 

4th. Monthly statement of funds, disbursements, &c. (Form 9). 

1351. The accounts and vouchers for the expenditures to the regular 
army must be kept separate and distinct from those to volunteers and 
militia. 

1352. Pay-roll of militia will be according to Form 8, the certificate 
at the foot to be signed by all the company officers present. 

1353. No militia or volunteers shall be paid till regularly mustered 
into service, as provided in the General Regulations.* 


* But see chap. 16, July 24, 1861, vol. xii. p. 274. 










346 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department. 

1354. In order to afford enlisted men of the army a secure deposit for 
the amounts from their pay, and to relieve the muster and pay rolls from 
accumulated credits of pay, the following provisions are made : 

1. All enlisted men present with their companies or detachments at 
the time of payment shall hereafter sign the receipt for their 
monthly pay. 

2. Soldiers may deposit with the paymaster any portion of their 
pay, not less than $5 at one time, provided that no amount so 
deposited shall be withdrawn until the expiration of the soldier’s 
enlistment. 

3. At the time of first deposit, a check-hook will be given to the 
soldier, and a certificate of every deposit made, signed by the 
paymaster and company commander, shall be entered therein at 
the time of making the same. 

4. The company commander shall keep an account of every deposit 
made by a soldier on the company book, and shall transmit to the 
Paymaster-General, after each payment, a list of the depositors 
and the amounts deposited by them respectively. 

5. In case of the transfer of a soldier, his descriptive roll shall 
exhibit the several amounts deposited by him. 

6. On the discharge of a soldier, the amount of his deposits shall be 
entered on his final statements, and paid on settlement of the 
same. 

7. On the death of a soldier, his deposits shall be accounted for in 
the inventory of his effects and on the accompanying final state¬ 
ments. 

8. The money deposited by any soldier shall not be liable to forfeit¬ 
ure by sentence of court-martial. 

9. Paymasters will receive the deposits of the soldiers in their 
respective districts, credit the same in their accounts current, and 
furnish a list of the depositors, with the several sums deposited 
by each, to accompany their accounts and vouchers of disburse¬ 
ments. The sums thus received by the paymasters may be again 
used by them in the payment of troops. 

10. The I aymaster-General shall keep in his office such record as 
may be necessary to show the deposits made by the enlisted men 
of each company. 

1355. Paymasters will afford Sutlers every facility in the collection of 
the amounts due them in accordance with regulations 217 and 218 

1356. Officers absent from their appropriate duties, either with or 
without leave, for six months, will thereby forfeit all the emoluments and 
allowances to which they would otherwise be entitled. 










* 





' 

22 









TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FOBAGE, &c. OF THE U. S. ARMY. 


348 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department. 


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FOR THE ARMY. 949 


Pay Department. 

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TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, &c.,—Continued. 


350 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department. 


•paAioxps s}unAjas jo -o^[ 

<M <M (N H : 

concioihh : ; ; : 


•aouad jo 

CO CO CO H H 

CO CO CO CO ! • • • • • 


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FOR THE ARMY 


3')1 


Pay Department. 


f i e-i n h 


CO CO CO •>! 




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^ co co 01 ; : 


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TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, &c.,-Continued. 


352 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department. 


•paAlOJlB 8JUBAJ3S JO '0^ 





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Onill UI p8A1.0{ 

-ps sosaoif jo ‘o^i 





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Pay. 

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$15 00 

13 00 

12 00 

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o o o o o 

O N CO (M 
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30 00 

22 00 

20 00 


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FOR THE ARMY. 353 

Pay Department. 





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C-, H 


Note. —Ch.aplains, $40 per month and 4 rations. Upon the recommendation of the Council of Administration, the Secretary of War may allow 
Chaplains $20 per month in addition. Chaplains in volunteers, by Act of July, 1801, are paid as Captains of Cavalry. 

For Army Pay Li°t, see Appendix, pages 524-526. 














































REVISED REGULATIONS 


354 

Pay Department. 


TABLES OF THE DAILY 


Days. 

$5 per month. 

$6 per month. 

rd 

o 

3 

a> 

Ph 

o 

$7 per month. 

$7J per month. 

$8 per month. 

$9 per month. 

$10 per month. 

$11 per month. 

$12 per month. 

$13 per month. 

I. 


16 


20 


22 


23 


24 


26 


30 


33 


36 


40 


43 

II. 


33 


40 


44 


46 


48 


53 


60 


66 


78 


80 


86 

III. 


50 


60 


66 


70 


73 


80 


90 

1 

00 

1 

10 

1 

20 

1 

30 

IV. 


66 


80 


88 


93 


97 

1 

06 

1 

20 

1 

33 

1 

46 

1 

60 

1 

73 

V. 


83 

1 

00 

1 

11 

1 

16 

1 

22 

1 

83 

1 

50 

1 

66 

1 

83 

2 

00 

2 

16 

VI. 

1 

00 

1 

20 

1 

33 

1 

40 

1 

46 

1 

60 

1 

80 

2 

00 

_ 2 

20 

2 

40 

2 

60 

VII. 

1 

16 

1 

40 

1 

55 

1 

63 

1 

71 

1 

86 

2 

10 

2 

33 

_ 2 

56 

2 

80 

8 

03 

VIII. 

1 

33 

1 

60 

1 

11 

1 

86 

1 

95 

2 

13 

2 

40 

•> 

66 

2 

93 

3 

20 

3 

46 

IX. 

1 

50 

1 

80 

1 

99 

2 

10 

2 

19 

2 

40 

2 

70 

3 

00 

3 

30 

3 

60 

3 

90 

X. 

1 

66 

2 

00 

2 

22 

2 

33 

2 

44 

2 

66 

3 

00 

3 

33 

3 

66 

4 

00 

4 

33 

XI. 

1 

83 

2 

20 

2 

44 

2 

56 

2 

68 

2 

93 

3 

30 

3 

66 

4 

03 

4 

40 

4 

76 

XII. 

2 

00 

2 

40 

2 

66 

2 

80 

2 

93 

3 

20 

3 

60 

4 

00 

4 

40 

4 

80 

5 

20 

XIII. 

2 

16 

2 

60 

2 

88 

3 

03 

3 

17 

3 

46 

3 

90 

4 

33 

4 

76 

5 

20 

5 

63 

XIV. 

2 

33 

2 

80 

3 

10 

3 

26 

3 

42 

3 

73 

4 

20 

4 

66 

5 

13 

5 

60 

6 

06 

XV. 

2 

50 

3 

00 

3 

33 

3 

50 

3 

66 

4 

00 

4 

50 

5 

00 

5 

50 

6 

00 

6 

50 

XVI. 

2 

66 

3 

20 

8 

55 

3 

73 

3 

90 

4 

26 

4 

80 

5 

33 

5 

86 

6 

40 

6 

93 

XVII. 

2 

83 

3 

40 

3 

77 

3 

96 

4 

15 

4 

53 

5 

10 

5 

66 

6 

23 

6 

80 

7 

36 

XVIII. 

3 

00 

3 

60 

3 

99 

4 

20 

4 

39 

4 

80 

5 

40 

6 

00 

6 

60 

7 

20 

7 

80 

XIX. 

3 

16 

3 

80 

4 

21 

4 

43 

4 

64 

5 

06 

5 

70 

6 

33 

6 

96 

7 

60 

8 

23 

XX. 

3 

33 

4 

00 

4 

44 

4 

66 

4 

88 

5 

33 

6 

00 

6 

66 

7 

33 

8 

00 

8 

66 

XXI. 

3 

50 

4 

20 

4 

66 

4 

90 

5 

13 

5 

60 

6 

30 

7 

00 

7 

70 

8 

40 

9 

10 

XXII. 

3 

66 

4 

40 

4 

88 

5 

13 

5 

37 

5 

86 

6 

60 

7 

33 

8 

06 

8 

80 

9 

53 

XXIII. 

3 

83 

4 

60 

5 

10 

5 

36 

5 

61 

6 

13 

6 

90 

7 

66 

8 

43 

9 

20 

9 

96 

XXIV. 

4 

00 

4 

80 

5 

22 

5 

60 

5 

86 

6 

40 

7 

20 

8 

00 

8 

80 

9 

60 

10 

40 

XXV. 

4 

16 

5 

00 

5 

55 

5 

83 

6 

10 

6 

66 

7 

50 

8 

33 

9 

16 

10 

00 

10 

83 

XXVI. 

4 

33 

5 

20 

5 

i 1 

6 

06 

6 

35 

6 

93 

7 

80 

8 

66 

9 

53 

10 

40 

11 

26 

XXVII. 

4 

50 

5 

40 

5 

99 

6 

30 

6 

59 

7 

20 

8 

10 

9 

00 

9 

90 

10 

80 

11 

70 

XXVIII. 

4 

66 

5 

60 

6 

21 

6 

53 

6 

84 

7 

46 

8 

40 

9 

33 

10 

26 

11 

20 

12 

13 

XXIX. 

4 

83 

5 

80 

6 

43 

6 

76 

7 

08 

7 

73 

8 

70 

9 

66 

10 

63 

11 

60 

12 

56 

XXX. 

5 

00 

6 

00 

6 

66 

7 

00 

7 

33 

8 

00 

9 

00 

10 

00 

11 

00 

12 

00 

13 

00 
































FOR TIIE ARMY. 


300 


Pay Department. 


PAY OF THE ARMY. 


$16 per month. 

$20 per month. 

$23 per month. 

$25 per month. 

$26f per month. 

$30 per month. 

5 

o 

a 

<D 

Ph 

CO 

CO 

$40 per month. 

$50 per month. 

o 

a 

<y 

P« 

O 

o 

m 

$75 per month. 

53 

*66 


76 


83 


88 

1 

00 

1 

11 

1 

33 

1 

66 

2 

00 

o 

50 

1 06 

1 33 

1 

53 

1 

66 

1 

11 

2 

00 

2 

22 

2 

66 

3 

33 

4 

00 

5 

00 

1 60 

2 00 

o 

30 

2 

50 

2 

66 

o 

00 

3 

33 

4 

00 

5 

00 

6 

00 

i 

50 

2 13 

2 06 

3 

06 

3 

33 

3 

55 

4 

00 

4 

44 

5 

33 

6 

60 

8 

00 

10 

00 

2 66 

3 33 

O 

O 

83 

4 

16 

4 

44 

5 

00 

5 

55 

6 

66 

8 

33 

10 

00 

12 

50 

3 20 

4 00 

4 

60 

5 

00 

5 

33 

6 

00 

6 

66 

8 

00 

10 

00 

12 

00 

15 

00 

3 73 

4 66 

5 

36 

5 

83 

6 

22 

7 

00 

7 

77 

9 

33 

11 

66 

14 

00 

17 

50 

4 26 

5 33 

(i 

13 

6 

66 

7 

To 

8 

00 

8 

88 

10 

66 

13 

33 

16 

00 

20 

00 

4 80 

6 00 

6 

90 

7 

50 

t 

99 

9 

00 

9 

99 

12 

00 

15 

00 

18 

00 

22 

50 

5 33 

6 66 

7 

66 

8 

33 

8 

88 

10 

00 

11 

11 

13 

33 

16 

66 

20 

00 

25 

00 

5 86 

7 3o 

8 

43 

9 

16 

9 

11 

11 

00 

12 

22 

14 

66 

18 

33 

22 

00 

27 

50 

6 40 

8 00 

9 

20 

10 

00 

10 

66 

12 

00 

13 

33 

16 

00 

20 

00 

24 

00 

30 

00 

6 93 

8 66 

9 

96 

10 

83 

11 

55 

13 

00 

14 

44 

17 

33 

21 

66 

26 

00 

32 

50 

7 46 

9 33 

10 

73 

11 

66 

12 

44 

14 

00 

15 

55 

18 

66 

23 

33 

28 

00 

35 

00 

8 00 

10 00 

11 

50 

12 

50 

13 

33 

15 

00 

16 

60 

20 

00 

25 

00 

30 

00 

37 

50 

8 53 

10 60 

12 

26 

13 

33 

14 

21 

16 

00 

17 

1 7 

21 

33 

26 

66 

32 

00 

40 

00 

9 06 

11 33 

13 

03 

14 

16 

15 

10 

17 

00 

18 

88 

22 

66 

28 

33 

34 

00 

42 

50 

9 60 

12 00 

13 

80 

15 

00 

15 

99 

18 

00 

19 

99 

24 

00 

30 

00 

36 

00 

45 

00 

10 13 

12 66 

14 

56 

15 

83 

16 

88 

19 

00 

21 

11 

25 

33 

31 

66 

38 

00 

47 

50 

10 60 

13 33 

15 

33 

16 

66 

17 

77 

20 

00 

22 

22 

26 

66 

33 

33 

40 

00 

50 

00 

11 20 

14 00 

16 

10 

17 

50 

18 

66 

21 

00 

23 

33 

28 

00 

35 

00 

42 

00 

52 

50 

11 73 

14 66 

10 

86 

18 

33 

19 

55 

22 

00 

24 

44 

29 

33 

36 

66 

44 

00 

55 

00 

12 26 

15 33 

17 

63 

19 

16 

20 

43 

23 

00 

25 

55 

30 

66 

38 

33 

46 

00 

57 

50 

12 80 

16 00 

18 

40 

20 

00 

21 

32 

24 

00 

26 

66 

32 

00 

40 

00 

48 

00 

60 

00 

13 33 

16 66 

19 

16 

20 

83 

22 

21 

25 

00 

27 

77 

33 

33 

41 

66 

50 

00 

62 

50 

13 86 

17 33 

19 

93 

21 

66 

23 

10 

26 

00 

28 

88 

34 

66 

43 

33 

52 

00 

65 

00 

14 40 

18 00 

20 

70 

22 

50 

23 

99 

27 

00 

29 

99 

36 

00 

45 

00 

54 

00 

67 

50 

14 93 

18 GO 

21 

46 

23 

33 

24 

88 

28 

00 

31 

11 

37 

33 

46 

66 

56 

00 

70 

00 

15 46 

19 33 

22 

23 

24 

16 

25 

77 

29 

00 

32 

22 

38 

G6 

48 

33 

58 

00 

72 

50 

16 00 

20 00 

23 

00 

25 

00 

26 

66 

30 

00 

33 

33 

40 

00 

50 

00 

60 

00 

75 

00 

























FORM 1 . —(Estimate for Funds.) 

Estimate of Funds required for the pay, subsistence, forage, and clothing of the troops of the United States, of which 

- is Paymaster, from the ls£ of -, 18 —, to the ls£ of -, 18—, two months, founded on the actual 

number of said troops. 


856 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department.-Forms. 



<*3 

fcj 


I certify that the above estimate is founded on the best data, as to the actual number of troops, to be obtained. 





































!eceipts to be rendered by Paymasters for remittances. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


357 


Pay Department.-Forms. 




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Note. —One receipt for the Paymaster-General, one for the Second Auditor, and one for the Treasurer. 

























FORM 3 .—(Officers’ Pay Account.) 


358 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


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FOR THE ARMY. 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


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360 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


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(N* d ^ u; Q 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


FORM 4. 

Certificate to be given a soldier at the time of his discharge. 

I certify that the within named-, a-of 

Captain-company (—) of the-regiment of 

-, born in-, in the State of-, aged- 

years,-feet-inches high,-complexion,-eyes, 

-hair, and by profession a-, was enlisted by- 

-, at-, on the - day of-, eighteen hundred 

and-, to serve for-years, and is now entitled to a 

discharge by reason of-. 

The said-was last paid by Paymaster-, 

to include the-day of-, eighteen hundred and-, 

and has pay due from that time to the present date. 

There is due to him-dollars retained pay. 

There is due to him-dollars on account of clothing 

not drawn in kind. 

He is indebted to the United States-dollars on account 

of extra clothing, &c. 

He is indebted to-, laundress at-,- 

dollars. 

The contract price of the ration at-is-cents. 

Given in duplicate at-, this-day of-, IS—. 


Commanding Company. 


Note.—W hen a soldier transfers his certificates, the transfer must he made 
on them, witnessed by a commissioned officer, when practicable, or by some 
other reputable person known to the Paymaster. 




















FOR THE ARMY. 


361 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


The United States , 
To 

-- Regiment of 


FORM 5. 


discharged from 


Company, 

Dr. 


For pay from-of-, 18—, to-of-, 18—, 

being - months, - days, at - dollars per 

month. 

For retained pay due. 


Dolls. 


Cents. 


For pay for traveling from-, the place of my dis¬ 
charge, to -, the place of my residence, - 

miles, at twenty miles per day, equal to-days, at 

-dollars per month. 


For subsistence for traveling as above, - days, at 

-cents per ration or day. 

For clothing not drawn. 

Amount. 


Deduct for Army Asylum.$ 

Deduct for clothing overdrawn. 

Balance due.. 


Received of - -, Paymaster United States Army, this - day of 

- f 18—,-dollars and-cents, in full of the above account. 


Pay. 

Subsistence. 
Clothing. 


(Signed in duplicate.) 


Dollars. 











































62 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


FORM 6. 

Abstract of Payments made by 


No. of vouchers. 

Date of payment. 

To whom paid. 

Rank or grade. 

Corps. 

Commencement 

and 

expiration. 

Pay. 

Subsistence. 

From — 

To — 

Dolls. 

Cts. 

Dolls. 

Cts. 











I 


I do hereby certify that the foregoing Abstract contains an accurate state- 































FOR THE ARMY. 


363 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


FORM 6. 

Paymaster, for the - months of - 



mcnt of the payments made by me, as therein expressed. 


Paymaster. 


2 F 


23 


Remarks. 








































FORM 7.— (Account Current.) 

The United States, in account current with --, Paymaster United States Army. 


3G4 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department.——Forms. 


junoray 

•s?0 


«n°a 


•2mq;oio 

•s»0 


•S[lO(I 


•oStuor 

•s >0 


•snoa 


•aouajsisqirg 

•s?0 


•siioq 



•SJO 


•sRoa 



By balance to be ac¬ 
counted for, as 
stated in last ac¬ 
count . 

By cash received of 

-, as per 

my receipt dated 
the - of -, 

186 . 

By amount received 

J- 

| 

•o^a 

O CD 

GO 00 

•junouiy 

•SJO 

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•aouojsisqng 

■S)0 


•SROR 



•sto 


•SROQ 



For amount expend¬ 
ed, as per abstract 
and vouchers here¬ 
with, in paying 
the troops since 

the - of -, 

186 , the date of 
the last account 
rendered . 

For amount turned 

over to.. 

Due the U. States, 
to be accounted 
for in next ac¬ 
count . 

•9)U(J 

CD 

GO 
















































FOR THE ARMY 


365 


Pay Department.-Forms. 








































366 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


FORM 8.— 


We, the subscribers, do hereby acknowledge to have received of - 

the full of our pay and allowances for the period 



We certify that we actually employed the servants, and owned and kept in 
charged, and did not, during any part of the time, employ a soldier as a servant, 
non-commissioned officers and privates of the company to which we belong, who 
them in service for the time paid for, although, in some cases, they may not have 
company. 











































FOR THE ARMY. 


307 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


(Pat Roll of Militia.) 


-- , Paymaster, the sums annexed to our names respectively, be ivy 

herein expressed, having signed duplicates thereof. 



service the horses, for which we have received payment, for the whole of the time 
The names and description of our servants are below. We also certify that the 
are made up for pay, &c., as having horses and arms, actually owned and had 
been valued. We also certify that we witnessed the payment of the whole 


-, Captain, servant named--. 


-, 1st Lieut., do. 

-, 2d Lieut., do. 

•, Ensign, do. 
























































Statement of moneys received and expended, and on hand, for the month ending 


368 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Pay Department.-Forms. 


•^nnoray 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 


1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•soaojs 

s.jeismnao^a'cnO 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•sjtmmdtnba 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•oouxiup.10 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•Suiq^op 

UAicapjoAO 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

'sjaipfos pasuao 
-ap jo spopa 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•Sut 

-qtop < saOTp’[Og 


1 II 1 II 

•2u; 

-q;op (S^msAJOg 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•oSbaoj 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•oouo^sisqng 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 

•^d 

1 II 1 II 

1 II 1 II 


Amount on hand from last month 

Received from the Treasurer. 

Received from Paymaster. 

Total received.$ 

Expended in paying the troops 
Turned over to Paymaster. 

Total expended.$ 

1 

j Balance to he accounted for.$ 


Accountable for-iron safe. - 1 Paymaster. 



























































FOR THE ARMY. 


369 


Corps of Engineers and Topographical Engineers. 


ARTICLE XLYI. 

CORPS OF ENGINEERS AND TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS. 

1357. All quarters for officers and soldiers at permanent fortifications 
will be estimated for and built by the Engineer Department, and then 
turned over to the Quartermaster’s Department for preservation and 
assignment according to regulations; workshops and store-houses, which 
do not form part of the defenses, will be built and retained by the de¬ 
partment for whose special use they are intended, but the location and 
character of the structure will be determined by the Engineer Bureau. 

1358. The duties of these corps usually relate to the construction of 
permanent and field fortifications; works for the attack and defense of 
places; for the passage of rivers; for the movements and operations of 
armies in the field; and such reconnoissances and surveys as may be re¬ 
quired for these objects, or for any other duty which may be assigned 
to them. By special direction of the President of the United States, 
officers of engineers may be employed on any other duty whatsoever. 
(See 63d Article of War.) 

1359. No permanent fortification, or other important work assigned to 
either corps, shall be undertaken, until the plans have been submitted to 
a board composed of such officers of the corps as the Secretary of War 
may designate. The report of the board, with complete drawings and 
specifications of the work, and detailed estimates of the cost, shall be 
made to the bureau of the corps in the War Department, and be submitted 
to the Secretary of War, without whose sanction no plan shall be adopted. 
A dissenting member of the board may present his own project, memoir, 
plans, and estimates. 

1360. The chief engineer, with the approbation of the Secretary of 
War, will regulate and determine the number, quality, form, and dimen¬ 
sions, &c., of the necessary vehicles, pontons, tools, implements, arms, and 
other supplies for the use and service of the engineer company of sap¬ 
pers, miners, and pontoniers, to be procured, as far as practicable, by 
fabrication in the government establishments of the Engineer and Ord¬ 
nance Departments. 

1361. In any work carried on under the direction of the chief of either 
corps, his authority must be obtained for the erection of any temporary 
buildings required in the progress of the work, or the purchase of any 
vessel or boat, or for furnishing medicines or medical attendance to hired 
men, and to determine the number and wages of clerks, foremen, and 
overseers. 

1362. An engineeer superintending a work or operation shall disburse 










370 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Corps of Engineers and Topographical Engineers. 

the money for the same, and when informed of the funds applicable to 
the work, he will furnish to the bureau or office through which he receives 
his instructions, a detailed report of the manner in which he proposes to 
apply the funds. 

1363. Public works in charge of either corps shall be inspected once a 
year, and when completed, by such officers of the corps as the Secretary 
of War shall designate. A report of each inspection shall be made to the 
Secretary of War through the bureau of the corps. 

1364. On the completion of any fortification or other work, the officer 
in charge will transmit to the appropriate bureau all the books, papers, and 
drawings relating to it. Of fortifications, the following drawings are re¬ 
quired : a plan of the finished work and the environs within the scope of 
investment, on a scale of 12 inches to a mile; a plan of the main work 
and outworks, on a scale of 1 inch to 50 feet, with sections, profiles, and 
elevations, on a scale of 1 inch to 25 feet; and a plan of the masonry, on 
a scale of 1 inch to 50 feet, with profiles and elevations, on a scale of 1 
inch to 25 feet; and such other drawings as maybe necessary to show 
important details of the work. 

1365. An officer charged with a survey will procure the books and 
instruments for the execution of the duty by requisition on the appro¬ 
priate bureau, and upon his return from field operations will report to it 
the condition of the instruments in his charge; on the completion of the 
survey, he will transmit to the bureau a full report thereof, with the field 
notes, and all necessary drawings. 

1366. The following reports and returns for a work or operation under 
the direction of the chief of either corps are to be sent to the appro¬ 
priate bureau of the corps by the officer in charge: 

1367. Monthly returns, within five days after the month to which they 
relate, viz.: report of operations (Form 1); return of officers and hired 
men (Form 2); money statement (Form 3); 

1368. An estimate of funds for one month, in time to receive the re¬ 
mittance for the service of the month; 

1369. Quarterly returns, within twenty days after the quarter to which 
they relate, viz.: a money account current (Form 4); with abstract of dis¬ 
bursements (Form 5), and vouchers (Forms 6, 7, 8); and a return of 
property (Form 9), with abstracts of receipts and issues (Forms 10,11, 
12, 13, and 14); 

1370. A quarterly return of instruments, books, &c. (Form 15) by 
every officer accountable for them; 

1371. A report, in time to reach the bureau by the 20th of October, 
of the operations on the work or survey during the year ending 30th of 
June, with the necessary drawings, and showing the condition of the 







FOR THE ARMY. 


371 


Corps of Engineers and Topographical Engineers. 

work, the extent and cost of the principal operations (as brick-work, 
stone-work, earth-work, surveys), accompanied by a summary statement 
of the expenditures during the year, with an estimate of the funds re¬ 
quired for the next year, and an estimate of the amount required to com¬ 
plete the work. 

1372. When disbursements are made by the same individual on account 
of different works, a separate set of accounts for each must be kept and 
rendered, as above required, as well as separate estimates, returns, and 
reports; the quarterly accounts being accompanied by a general state¬ 
ment (Form 3) of receipts and expenditures during the quarter on all 
the works. 

1373. The following books and files for each work will be kept by the 
officer in charge : a letter-book, for copies of his official letters; file ol 
letters received; file of orders received; a journal, containing a daily 
record of the occupations of the persons employed on the work; a book 
of materials, in which must be entered, under the appropriate head, every 
kind of material received, specifying date of delivery and payment, from 
whom received, the kind, quality, price, and cost—in this book the vari¬ 
ous articles will be entered under the same heads as in the quarterly 
return of property; a ledger, in which an account will be opened with 
every person of whom materials or supplies are purchased for the work, 
including every person not on the rolls; an account-book, containing en 
tries, according to Form 5, of all expenditures and copies of the quarterly 
accounts current, and estimates of funds; a roll-book, showing the name, 
occupation, rate of pay, of each hired person, and time made by him 
daily in each month; a book of miscellanies, containing accounts of ex¬ 
periments and miscellaneous information relating to the work. 

1374. Printed forms allowed will be furnished from the bureaus, un¬ 
less otherwise directed, on requisition in May for a year’s supply. 












372 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 1. 

Report of Operations at Fort Jay for the month of September, 1860. 

Masons have been employed in setting coping, N. and W. fronts; roofing case- 
mated traverse, S. W. exterior front; building breast-height and traverse 
walls, covert way, S. E. front; pointing interior counterscarps, S. E. 
and S. W. fronts. 

Laborers, embanking breakwater, S. W. front; embanking parapet of high 
covert way; excavating for and laying foundations of breast-height 
walls, covert way, S. E. front; sodding S. E. glacis coup<$; quarrying 
stone for masons at S. E. quarry; aiding masons and carpenters; re¬ 
ceiving materials. 

Teamsters, leveling S. E. glacis ; transporting stone for and embanking break¬ 
water, S. W. front; aiding masons and carpenters ; receiving materials. 

Carpenters, on quarters, E. front; making and repairing tools and machinery. 

Wheelwrights and Smiths, making and repairing tools and machinery. 

Plumbers, covering arches, W. front; leading breast-height, walls, covert way, 
S. E. front. 

State any important result during the month, as the condition of a front, bastion, 
battery, &c.; progress of a survey. 

Probable operations of the month of October. 

Masons, as in September: to commence laying the foundations of S. E. exterior 
front, and to lay the traverse circles in the exterior battery of N. front. 

Laborers, as in September: to finish breakwater, S. W. front, and commence 
the embankment of parapet of W. front. 

Teamsters, as in September. 

Carpenters, making and repairing tools and machinery. 

Wheelwrights and Smiths, do. do. do. 

Plumbers, covering arches : to finish the W. front, and commence the S. W. front. 


Fort Jay, New York, 

October 10, 1861. 


Maj. Engineers. 


Endorsement to be as follows: 

Fort Jay. 

Report of Operations for the month of September, 1860. 


I 







FOR THE ARMY. 


373 




Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 2. 

Return of Officers and Hired Men at Fort Jay, for the Month of 
September, 1860. 


OFFICERS. 


Present. 

Absent. 

Major A. B. relieved Lieutenant E. F., 
in charge September 15, by special 
order No. 14, of August 2. Post- 
office address for October, Fort Jay. 

Lieutenant E. F. at G. Island on service 
by order of Major A. B. Post-office 
address for October, Fort Jay. 

Lieutenant 0. P. left September 10, on 

leave of absence by order-. Post- 

office address for October, Indianola, 
Texas. 


HIRED MEN. 


No. 

Trade or occupation. 

Time or piece work. 

Wages. 

Amount. 

30 



$2 25 

1 75 

$1575 00 

350 00 

10 

Do. 


20 

10 

Do. at piece work .. 

700 sup. feet of granite.. 

at 15 c. 

2 00 

105 00 

Do 


1 50 





1 00 



Do 


90 


1 

fllprk 


00 00 


0 



80 00 


1 



40 00 









$. 







C. D., Major Engineer*. 


Endorsement: 
Officers and Hired Men. 
Fort Jay, 
September, I860. 
















































374 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 3. 

Statement of Money received and expended, under each appropriation, 
in the month of September, 1860. 



Fort Jay. 

Fort B. 

Contingencies of 
fortifications. 

Total. 

Due U. S. from last month 

$70 00 

$80 00 


$150 00 

Received in the month. 

450 00 

8000 00 

$300 00 

8750 00 

Total to be accounted for 

520 00 

8080 00 

300 00 

8900 00 




400 00 

400 00 

Expended in the month. 

400 00 

7000 00 


7400 00 

Total accounted for . 

400 00 

7000 00 

400 00 

7800 00 

Due 1st. Oct. to the U. S.... 

120 00 

1080 00 


1200 00 

Do. from the U. S. 



100 00 

100 00 




Due U. S. 

1100 00 


C. D., Major Engineers. 

















































Dr. The United States in account current with Major C. D., Corps of Engineers, at Fort Jag. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


375 


Engineers and. Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


es 

O 


do a 
o o > 


,0 C3® 


~ V o 


a 


a? ( 


ci 


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^ ^ >> , 
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cc 


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re? 

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tie O 
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sm A 


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S. b0 2 S 

H C Cj ^ 

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tn ^ 6cj 

GO- 

.« » ti h 

r* Q) M 

2 

D ^3 >—< o 
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2^0^° 
2 £-< ^ 3 fi 
cz o ° _2 

a> ^ ^ 

H « 


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g a 


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h: 3 


2a 


Fort Jay. Fort Jay, New York, 

Account current, of October 4, 1860. 

Major C. D-, U. S. Engineers, for the 3d quarter 1860. C. D., Major Engineers. 







































376 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 5. 


Abstract of Disbursements on account of Fort Jay during the quarter 
ending on the 3C )th of September, 1860. 


No. of 
voucher. 

Nature of purchase or 
expenditure. 

To whom paid or of whom 
purchased. 

AMOUNT. 

Dolls. 

Cts. 

1 



200 

00 

2 

Stone. 

Jones & King. . 

500 

00 

3 

Bricks. 

Stephenson & Co. 

300 

00 

4 

Sundries. 

Smith & Co. 

60 

00 

5 

Cement... 

Samuel Jones. 

100 

00 

6 

Services. 


826 

52 

7 

Granite, lime, and bricks 

Aaron Brown. 

3737 

50 



Dollars. 

5724 

02 


Foist Jay, New York, 

October 4, 1860. 


E. E. 

C. D., Major Engineers. 


Endorsement to be as follows : 

Fort Jay. 

Abstract of Disbursements 

ty 

Major C. D., U. S. Engineers, during the 3d quarter, 1860. 































FOR THE ARMY. 


377 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 6. 

The United States, for Fort Jay, 


To Aaron Brown, Dr. 


Date. 

Designation. 

i 

Application. 

Cost. 


Dolls. 

Cts. 

1860. 
July 4. 

For 600 cubic yards dressed Granite, 
at-per yard. 

For 30 tons broken Granite, at- 

Scarp wall. 

Backing of scarp 



August 1. 

per ton. 

For cutting 700 feet of Granite, at 
-per foot. 

For 20 M. hard Bricks, at-per M. 

For 100 barrels Lime, 3 bushels each, 
at-per barrel. 

Scarp . 

Casemate arches 
Foundation of 
scarp and piers 

Dollars. 

3737 

50 


I certify that the above account is correct and just; the articles to be (or 

have been) accounted for in my property return for-quarter of-. 

(Signed) C. D., Major Engineers. 


Received at Fort Jay, this 24th day of September, 1860, from Major C. D., 
Corps of Engineers, the sum of three thousand seven hundred and thirty-seven 
dollars and fifty cents, in full payment of the above account. 

- (Signed in duplicate.) 

$3737 50. Aaron Brown. 


Endorsement to he as follows : 

Fort Jay. 

Voucher No. 8. 

Aaron Brown. 
September 24th, 1860. 
Granite, Lime, Bricks, $3737 50. 



















378 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 7. 

We, the subscribers, hereby acknowledge to have received of - the sums set 

opposite our names respectively, being in full for our services at Fort A -, 

during the month of -, 18—, having signed duplicate receipts. 


Name. 

Occupation. 

Time 

employed. 

Rate of 
pay. 

AMOUNT. 

Signa¬ 

tures. 

Witness. 

Dolls. 

Cts. 

A R 

Clerk . . 

1 month... 
1 do . 

$80 00 
40 00 

2 50 

1 75 

1 00 

80 

40 

60 

35 

24 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

A. B.... 


r. T) 


C. I). ... 


F, F 

Master Mason 

24 days.... 
20 do. 

E. F. ... 


O H 

G. II.... 


IK ... 


24 do. 

I. x K.. 

A. B.... 




239 

00 


I certify that the foregoing pay-roll is correct and just. 

J. M., Captain Engineers 


Endorsement: 

Fort A-. 

No. —. 

Pay-roll for-. 18—. 

$239 00. 


FORM 8. 

We, the subscribers, acknowledge to have received of Captain - the sums 

set opposite our names respectively, being in full for the services of our slaves at Fort 
A -- during the month of -, l8—, having signed duplicate receipts. 


From 

whom 

Name and 
occupation. 

Time 

employed. 

Rate of 
wages. 

Amount 
for each 

AMOUNT 

RECEIVED. 

Signature. 

hired. 

slave. 

Dolls. 

Cts. 

A. B... 

Do. 

Do. 

A., mason. 

C. , blacksmith 

D. , laborer. 

1 month.... 

25 days. 

1 month.... 

$40 00 

2 00 
20 00 

$40 00 
50 00 
20 00 

$110 

00 

A. B. 

E. F... 
Do. 

G. , laborer. 

H. , do. 

12 days. 

1 month.... 

$25 a mo.. 
20 00 

12 00 
20 00 



32 

00 

E F 












142 

00 



I certify that the above pay-roll is correct and just. 

J. M., Captain Engineers. 

Endorsement: 

Fort A-. 

No. —. 

Slave-roll for —— 

$142 00. 


18 —. 










































































FORM 9. 

Return of Engineer Property at Fort Jay for the quarter ending 30 tli June, 18 


FOR THE ARMY. 


379 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.—Forms. 


MISCEL- 

LAN. 



J 




1 2 
j. 

•sao^njoj 





— 

■jnou 





■T J0 d 






i w 
o o 
s=* < 

•sqi ‘abjj 





•sqi ‘ujoq 





TOOLS. 











— 







•sjas ‘ssauanjj 

| 




•s?JR0 

| 




•ojj ‘sosjoh 





— 

•ojj ‘s;nog 





LUMBER. 






•j\[ ‘auid ‘spjRog 





•J\[ ‘2uip>m;og 





BUILDING MATERIALS. 

•sifSBD ‘juamag 



| 

•s^sno ‘sung 



| 

•K ‘ S T°P3 





Stone. 

•suo} 





Remaining on hand 30th June.| 

•spjn^ 

oiqno ‘oimnjjt) 

Second Quarter, 18 . 

On hand. 

Purchases paid for... 
Purchases not paid for 

Fabricated. 

Received from other 
posts. 

Total to be accounted for. 

Materials used. 

Forage issued. 

Provisions issued. 

Total issued and expended. 

Vouchers 

or 

Abstract. 

Abstract A 
Abstract B 
Abstract C 
Abstract D 

Abstract E 
Abstract F 
Abstract G 

1 

Date. 

o 

o 

CO 



2 G 2 24 




















































































FORM 10. 

Abstract of Purchases received and paid for at Fort A -, in the - quarter of 18 


380 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


Ironmongery. 

•spnnod ‘pajg 





o 

o 

O 

o 

•spnnod ‘uojt ang 





2000 

2000 

'°N ‘sqoog 





o 

d 

O 

Cl 

•o^[ ‘soSuijj 





O 

lO 

o 

o 

•spnnod 





1000 

1000 

•o^j ‘sAvaaog 





O 

O 

tO 

O 

o 

to 

•spaanq ‘aneqj 




O 

d 


o 

d 

•spnnod ‘Xtjjj 



4000 



4000 

'K ‘sqoug 

10,000 





10,000 

Stone. 

•190J 

pnogaodns ‘SnidoQ 


o 

o 

1^ 




o 

o 

l- 

•spacX 

oiqno ‘ognnajc) 

o 

o 

00 





o 

O 

00 

To whom paid. 

A. B. 

C. D. 

E. F. 

M. N. 

0. P. 


1 

"c 

E- 


•jotpnoA jo ojsj 

rH d CO lO 



I certify that the above abstract is correct. 









































FOR THE ARMY. 


381 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 11. 


Abstract of Purchases received, and not paid for, at Fort A 

quarter, 18—. 



Of whom pur¬ 
chased. 

Bricks, M. 

Bar iron, pounds. 

Oats, bushels. 

| Hay, pounds. 

1 






R 

50,000 








s 

4000 



T . 


100 

2000 

Y 



Y 










Amount. 

50,000 

4000 

100 

2000 






I certify that the above abstract is correct. 

J. M., Captain Engineers. 


FORM 12. 


Abstract of Materials expended at Fort A , quarter, 18 


For what purpose. 

Stone, cubic yards. 

L 

Bricks, M. 

Lime, barrels. 

White pine boards, 
feet. 

Yellow pine scant¬ 
ling, M. 




2000 








50,000 

50 





1500 

300 





Amount. 

2000 

50,000 

50 

1500 

300 


- 


I certify that the above abstract is correct; that the issues and expenditures 
were made, and were necessary. j Captain Engine*, 



































































882 REVISED REGULATIONS 

Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 13. 


Abstract of Forage issued at Fort Jag during the quarter ending on the 
30 tli September, 1860. 


Descrip¬ 
tion of 
Forage. 

Issued during the 
quarter. 

Number of rations. 


Distribution of the 

issues. 

Remarks. 

Horses. 

Days. 

Mules. 

Days. 

Oxen. 

Days. 

Rations. 





6 

92 





552 





2 

65 





130 


Hay, lbs. 

13,664 

976- 


4 

40 





80 

( Half rations 









1 at grass. 







3 

10 



30 










o 

92 

184-070 





. 

6 

92 




552 


Oats, bu. 

2331 

862- 


2 

65 





130 






2 


3 

60 



180 86 9 






4 

40 





160 


Corn, bu. 

210 

440- 



3 

32 



96 










2 

92 

184-440 












— 



I certify that the above abstract is correct; that the issues were made and 
were necessary. 

C. D., Major Engineert. 

Foni Jay, New York, 

October 1, 1860. 


Endorsement to be as fellows: 
Fort Jay. 

Forage Return for the 3d quarter of 1860. 












































FOR THE ARMY. 


383 

Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 14. 

Abstract of Provisions issued at Fort Jay during the quarter ending on 
the 30tfi September, 1860. 


Description of 
provisions. 


Pork.pounds. 

Beef—fresh. ...do... 

Beef—salt.do... 

Flour.do... 

Meal.do... 

Bread.do... 

Beans.quarts. 

Vinegar.do... 

&c. 


Issued in 
the quarter. 


1500 

2500 


4500 

320 

160 


Number of 
rations. 


2000 

2000 


4000 

4000 

4000 


Number of 
men to whom 
issued. 


a _ 


o o 

°° <M 
o CO 


Remarks. 


I certify that the above abstract is correct; that the issues were made, and 
were necessary. 

C. D., Major of Engineers. 

Fokt Jat, New York, 

October 1, 1860. 

Endorsement to be as follows: 

Fort Jat. 

Provision Return for the 3d quarter of 1860. 




























384 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


FORM 


Return of Instruments, Books, Maps, Charts, and Plans, belonging to the 

Engineers, for the quarter ending 



Books, Maps, Charts, 



Endorsement to be as follows : 

Return of Instruments, &c., 
in charge of 

Major C. D., U. S. Engineers, in 3d quarter, 1860. 






































































FOR THE ARMY. 


885 


Engineers and Topographical Engineers.-Forms. 


15. 

United States, received and accounted for by Major C. D., of the Corps of 
on the 80 th of September, 1860. 


Remarks. 


Exhibiting the pur¬ 
chase, repair, dis¬ 
position, &c., of 
the articles. 


and Plans 


I certify that the foregoing return is correct. 


New York, October 1, 1860. 


C. D , Major Engineers 



























































































. 



















FOR THE ARMY. 


387 


Ordnance Department. 


ARTICLE XLVII. 

ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

1375. The Ordnance Department has charge of the arsenals and armo¬ 
ries, and furnishes all ordnance and ordnance stores for the military service. 

1376. The general denomination, “ Ordnance and Ordnance Stores," 
comprehends all cannon and artillery carriages and equipments; all appa¬ 
ratus and machines for the service and manoeuvres of artillery; all small 
arms and accoutrements and horse equipments; all ammunition; all tools 
and materials for the ordnance service; horse medicines, materials for 
shoeing, and all horse equipments whatever for the light artillery. 

1377. Models or patterns proposed by the Ordnance Board and approved 
by the Secretary of War, of all ordnance and ordnance stores for the land 
service of the United States, with the standard gauges, weights, and 
measures, shall he deposited in the model office at the Washington arsenal; 
and no change or variation from them shall be allowed, except on the 
recommendation of the board, approved by the Secretary of War. The 
ordnance board is composed of such officers of that department as the 
Secretary of War may designate. 

1378. Directions in detail for the inspection and proof of all ordnance 
and ordnance stores shall be issued by the chief of ordnance, with the 
approbation of the Secretary of War. Ordnance and ordnance stores 
procured by contract or open purchase are required to pass the same 
inspection and proof as if fabricated at the arsenals. (See Ordnance 
Manual.) 

1379. The purchases and contracts for cannon, projectiles, powder, 
small arms, and accoutrements are made, or specially ordered by the 
chief of ordnance, under the direction of the Secretary of War. 

1380. In each case the inspector shall give to the contractor triplicate 
inspection certificates (Forms 30, 34, 38), and transmit to the ordnance 
bureau an inspection report (Forms 31, 32, 39). 

1381. The inspecting officers shall transmit to the ordnance bureau a 
consolidated report, in July (Form 33), of their inspections of ordnance 
and projectiles during the year ending 30th June, and quarterly and 
annual reports (Forms 35, 36, 37) of their inspections of small arms, 
barrels, &c. Inspectors shall retain copies of their inspection reports, to 
be turned over to their successors; at an armory, the quarterly and annual 
inspection reports (35, 36, 37) are signed by the superintendent and 
master armorer. 

1382. Reports of defects in the quality or condition of ordnance sup¬ 
plies will, in all cases, besides naming the articles, describe the particular 

211 







388 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department. 


pattern or model, when and where made, and whence, when, and from 
whom received, with such other information as will aid the Ordnance 
Department in taking the proper measures for correcting the defect. 

1383. The inspectors of small arms will procure necessary assistants 
from the national armories. No assistant shall inspect oftener than twice 
in succession the arms made at the same private establishment. The in¬ 
spector will have the accepted arms boxed and sealed in his presence. 

1384. In time of peace, ordnance and ordnance stores are to be issued 
from the arsenals and armories only by authority from the ordnance bureau 
of the War Department; in war, to supply troops in service, on the order 
of any general or field officer commanding an army, garrison, or detach¬ 
ment; provided, in issues to the militia, that they shall have been regularly 
mustered into the service, and the requisition (Form 23) be approved by 
the mustering and inspecting officer of the United States, or a general or 
field officer commanding in the regular service. In case of an issue not 
specially directed from the ordnance bureau, the order for the issue will 
be promptly transmitted to the bureau by the issuing officer. 

1385. The arms, accoutrements, and horse equipments required by 
an officer for his own use in the public service may be issued to him on 
payment of the regulated price (Form 19), to be passed to the credit of 
the proper appropriation at the ordnance bureau. 

1386. Requisitions (Form 22) for ordnance and ordnance stores for 
companies or posts may, in urgent cases, be sent direct to the Adjutant- 
General’s office, a duplicate being forwarded at the same time to Depart¬ 
ment head-quarters. Requisitions for the military academy are to be 
transmitted to the chief engineer. Requisitions for supplies for arsenals 
and armories are sent direct to the ordnance bureau. 

1387. Requisitions for horse equipments will be made according to the 
form prescribed for ordnance requisitions, the various articles being classi¬ 
fied in the requisitions and returns under heads, as follows: 

Under the head of Saddle will be included every thing embraced there¬ 
under in the published statement of equipments, until further orders, 
(see “ General Orders,” No. 23, of 1859,) excepting stirrups , saddle-bags , 
girths, and surcingles, wdiich w r ill be entered separately. 


CURB BRIDLES. 


The various kinds of curb bits, as— 



Leather fittings complete. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


389 


Ordnance Department. 


WATERING BRIDLES. 


Snaffle-bits, chains and toggles 


Picket-pins. 
Lariat-ropes. 
Cavalry blankets. 
Artillery blankets. 
Nose-bays. 
Hitching-snaps. 


included. 

Watering reins. 
Halters. 

Spurs, straps included. 
Curry-combs. 


Horse-hruslies. 

The minor parts of any article may be called for separately when neces¬ 
sary, and in that case will be borne on the return until expended to per¬ 
fect articles that are deficient. The injury or destruction of the minor 
parts of any article, particularly of leather, will not be a sufficient reason 
for condemning it, but, on the contrary, the necessary repairs will be 
made in the company by means of extra-duty men, or artificers, or at the 
depots. (See “ General Orders,” No. 22, of 1859, paragraph 7.) 

1388. When arms, accoutrements, and equipments need repairs that 
cannot be made by the troops, the commanding officer may send them to 
be repaired to the most convenient arsenal. 

1389. The commander of each company or detachment will be account¬ 
able for all ordnance and ordnance stores issued to his command. The 
commander of each post will be accountable for all ordnance and ordnance 
stores at the post, not issued to the company or detachment commanders, 
or not in charge of an officer of ordnance or a store-keeper. Ordnance 
sergeants will account for ordnance property only where there is no com¬ 
missioned officer of the army or store-keeper. 

1390. Commanding officers of the militia in service of the United 
States shall return and account for ordnance and ordnance stores in the 
use of troops as required in the regular service. And all arms and 
equipments issued to such militia shall be charged against the person to 
whom the issue is made on the muster-roll or pay account, to be accounted 
for to the mustering and inspecting officer, before receiving pay during 
service and on his discharge. 

1391. Enlisted men who lose, or dispose of, the Colt’s revolver pistols 
intrusted to their care, will hereafter be charged forty dollars in each 
case; that being the amount of pecuniary damage sustained by the United 
States, as estimated by the Ordnance Department. 

1392. When a mustering and inspecting officer relieves such person 
from charge for loss or damage to his arms or equipments, satisfactory 
evidence, by affidavit or otherwise, setting out the facts of the loss or 





REVISED REGULATIONS 


390 

Ordnance Department. 

damage, and showing that it was not by his fault, shall be annexed to the 
pay-roll or account. 

1393. When charges on account of ordnance stores are made against a 
soldier, the property return shall give his name and the pay-roll or account 
in which the charge is made. 

1394. Arm-chests are to be preserved and accounted for as other 
ordnance stores. 

1395. Every officer commanding a regiment, corps, garrison, or detach¬ 
ment shall make, at the end of February, April, June, August, October, 
and December, a report to the chief of ordnance, stating all damages to 
arms, equipments, and implements belonging to his command, noting 
those occasioned by negligence or abuse, and naming the officer or soldier 
by whose negligence or abuse the said damages were occasioned (Act of 
February 8, 1815), from which reports the necessary instructions shall be 
issued to the armories and the ordnance inspectors to correct defects in 
the manufacture. 

1396. Inspections shall be made of the armories and arsenals of con¬ 
struction annually, and of other arsenals every two years, by such officers 
of the department as the Secretary of War shall designate, and a report 
of each inspection made to the ordnance bureau. 

1397. The charge of an armory in the absence of the superintendent 
devolves on the master armorer, unless the chief of ordnance shall other¬ 
wise direct; of an arsenal, on the military store-keeper in the absence of 
an officer of ordnance. 

1398. The officer in charge of an arsenal or armory shall, under the 
direction of the chief of ordnance, make and publish the rules for its 
internal government; procure the necessary materials and tools; engage 
the workmen, assign their grade, and appoint the necessary foremen. 
The cause for discharging or displacing a foreman shall be reported to 
the ordnance bureau. 

1399. The military store-keeper shall disburse the funds on the certi¬ 
ficate of the officer in charge upon each pay-roll or other account, stating 
the sum total in words, and, under the direction of the officer in charge, 
have the care and custody and make the returns of the ordnance and 
ordnance stores, except those in the current service, for which, including 
draft animals, the officer in charge is accountable. 

1400. Where there is no store-keeper, the commanding officer is account¬ 
able for all the ordnance property, unless authorized by the ordnance 
bureau to devolve the accountability on another officer. 

1401. Orders for the issue of supplies from an arsenal or armory are 
directed to the officer in charge, who shall transmit them to the store¬ 
keeper, and see to their execution. For transportation, the stores will bo 




FOR THE ARMY. 


39] 


Ordnance Department. 

turned over to the Quartermaster’s Department, with duplicate invoices 
(Form 2) j a third shall be transmitted to the officer who is to receive 
the stores. 

1402. Materials to be consumed or expended are issued on the written 
orders of the officer in charge to the store-keeper, who shall make quar¬ 
terly abstracts of such issues (Form 9) as his voucher, to be certified by 
the officer in charge. 

1408. The officer in charge shall turn over to the store-keeper the 
invoices (Form 2) of stores received, to be receipted for by him (Form 7), 
and shall furnish to him invoices of articles fabricated, purchased, 
repaired, &c., from which the store-keeper shall make the quarterly 
abstracts to be certified by the officer in charge (Forms 3, 4, 5, 6). At 
an armory, all articles purchased, fabricated, or repaired are to be in¬ 
spected by the master armorer before being paid for, or turned into store. 

1404. The date when orders for supplies are received, or stores received 
at or issued from an arsenal or armory, shall be reported on the report of 
work done (Form 27). 

1405. Hired men in the ordnance service (except slaves) shall be en¬ 
gaged on daily wages, except men on piece-work, and paid only for such 
days or parts of days as they actually work. Working time, by daylight 
only, shall average ten hours throughout the year. When men are paid 
for extra time or night-work, the necessity shall be explained on the pay-roll. 

1406. Workmen in an armory shall be paid, as far as practicable, by 
piece-work. The price of piece-work shall be fixed, according to the skill 
and labor it requires, by the superintendent, under the direction of the 
chief of ordnance. 

1407. Any increase of wages shall be promptly reported to the ordnance 
bureau, with the necessary explanations. 

1408. The money value of any piece of work spoiled by the fault or 
incompetency of a workman shall be charged to him on the pay-roll. 

1409. A fair rent shall be charged monthly on the pay-roll to the hired 
men who occupy public quarters, except the master armorer and clerks at 
an armory. The rent-roll (Form 12) shall be returned quarterly to the 
ordnance bureau. 

1410. Armory officers and hired men in the ordnance service will 
receive ten cents mileage for travel on duty under orders. 

1411. No buildings or other permanent works or improvements will be 
undertaken without the sanction of the Secretary of War. The plans 
and estimates for them are to be sent to the ordnance bureau by the 
month of August. 

1412. No trees on the public grounds will be removed or destroyed 

without authority from the ordnance bureau. 

2112 





392 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department. 

1413. None but strong draft horses are to be purchased for the ord¬ 
nance service, nor without authority from the chief of ordnance. 

1414. The enlisted men of ordnance shall be enlisted in the grade of 
laborer. They may be mustered, at the discretion of the officer in com¬ 
mand, in any grade for which they are competent, except the grade of 
master workman. Promotions to that grade require the sanction of the 
chief of ordnance. Enlistments (Form 24) are to be in duplicate; one 
filed at the post, the other forwarded to the ordnance bureau. The num¬ 
ber of enlisted men at each arsenal will be directed by the chief of 
ordnance. 

1415. Expenses of the issue and • delivery of ordnance and ordnance 
stores to the States, at any point within the State designated by the 
governor, if on navigable water or otherwise easily accessible, are paid by 
the United States from the appropriation for arming and equipping the 
militia. The officers of the Ordnance Department provide for the trans¬ 
portation and the payment of the expenses. 

1416. The accounts with the several States and Territories are kept in 
terms of muskets; but other small arms, accoutrements, field artillery, and 
equipments of equal value and of the patterns adopted for the troops of 
the United States, may be issued at the request of the State or Territory, 
if the government supplies will permit. 

1417. lleceipts (Form 8) will be prepared in triplicate by the issuing 
officer, and transmitted for the signature of the governor, or officer or 
agent appointed by him to receive the stores; one of which, when 
returned, shall be forwarded by the issuing officer to the ordnance bureau. 

1418. The returns and reports prescribed in the following articles are 
required to be sent to the ordnance bureau. 

1419. Monthly returns, within five days after the quarter to which 
they relate, viz.: by the officer in charge of an arsenal: 1st, of the officers 
and men of ordnance (Form 25); 2d, of hired men (Form 26); 3d, of 
work done (Form 27); and by the officer in charge of an armory, a return 
of armory officers and men, and small arms and appendages manufactured 
(Form 28); and by the officer in charge of an arsenal or armory, a sum¬ 
mary statement by the disbursing officer of money received and expended 
(Form 20). 

1420. An estimate by the officer in charge of an arsenal or armory, at 
the beginning of the quarter, of the funds required during the quarter 
(Form 21). 

1421. Quarterly returns, within twenty days after the quarter, viz.: 
1st, by every disbursing officer, a money account current (Form 18), with 
abstract of disbursements (Form 17), and vouchers (Forms 13,14,15,16), 
and a duplicate of the abstract and of the account current, with endorsed 





FOR THE ARMY. 


393 


Ordnance Department. 

statement (Form 20); 2d, a property return (Form 1), with vouchers 
(Forms 2, 3, 4, 5, G, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 19), by every person accountable for 
ordnance and ordnance stores, except those in current service at arsenals 
and armories. The return for a post will be distinct from that for a com¬ 
pany or detachment. 

1422. An annual return, in July, by the officer in charge of an arsenal 
or armory, of all ordnance stores, tools, and draft animals in current 
service (Form 1). 

1423. An annual inventory, in August, by the officer in charge of an 
arsenal or armory (Form 29), with a report, in a condensed form, of the 
principal operations of the post during the year ending 30th June, includ¬ 
ing an account of experiments, of the construction and repairs of build¬ 
ings, machinery, &c. 

1424. Letters of transmittal are to accompany reports and returns to 
the ordnance bureau. 

1425. Every officer required to make a return of ordnance and ordnance 
stores shall take an inventory of them (Form 11) in the month of June, 
and certify on his return for the second quarter that the inventory has 
been taken and his return made in conformity with it. The same form 
of inventory is to be used at inspections. 

1426. In all official lists, ordnance and ordnance stores are to be ar¬ 
ranged according to the classification in Article 1432. 

1427. The following records of their reports and returns are required 
to be kept by ordnance officers and turned over to their successors: 

1. A company return book, consisting of the retained duplicates, 
bound together; 

2. A monthly return book, containing the other monthly returns and 
statements; 

3. An account book, containing copies of the quarterly accounts 
current and their endorsed statements, of abstracts of money dis¬ 
bursed, and of estimates for funds; 

4. A letter book of copies of all letters sent; 

5. Files of letters received; 

6. Files of orders received; 

7. An annual inventory book, by binding together the retained 
inventories; 

8. At armories and arsenals of construction, such other books may 
be kept as may be necessary to show the details of the operations. 

1428. All books and files are to be submitted to inspecting officers, 
when called for. 

1429. Printed blanks allowed will be furnished from the ordnance office, 
unless otherwise directed, on requisitions in May for a year’s supply. 







394 


REVISED REGULATIONS 



Ordnance Department.-Prices of Small Arms. 


1430. 

PRICES OP SMALL ARMS. 



PERCUSSION LOCK. 


PARTS. 


Barrel with sight, without breech 1 

screw.J 

Breech screw. 

Bayonet or band stud. 

Tang screw. 

Breech sight. 

Cone. 

Lock plate. 

Tumbler. 

Tumbler screw. 

Bridle. 

Sear. 

Sear spring. 

Main spring. 

Lock screw, each. 

Hammer. 

Side plate (with band, for pistol).... 

Side screws, each. 

Upper band. 

Middle band. 

Lower band. 

Upper band spring. 

Middle band spring. 

Lower band spring. 

Guard plate. 

Guard plate screw, each. 

Guard bow without swivels. 

Guard bow nut, each. 

Swivels and rivets, each. 

Swivel plate. 

Swivel plate screw, each. 

Trigger. 

Trigger screw. 

Butt plate. 

Butt plate screw, each. 

Ramrod. 

Ramrod spring. 

Ramrod wires. 

Ramrod stop. 

Stock. 

Bayonet. 

Bayonet clasp. 

Bayonet clasp screw. 

Box plate. 

Box catch. 

Box spring. 

Box spring screw. 

Box screw, each. 

Ramrod swivel and rivet. 

Ramrod swivel and rivet screw. 

Swivel bar. 

Swivel nut. 

Swivel screw. 

Swivel ring. 




S-« 

So 

. a 
© 

Si • P 

t/3 O 


-J 


O o 


*3 -2 

a 2 


S 

6 

2 

a 

'■si 

<5 3 

ci M 

O P 




SA 

B 

a 

B 

a 

Ph 

D. C. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

4 10 

4 40 

4 48 

3 50 

3 55 

3 55 

2 00 

10 

10 


10 

10 

10 

08 

01 



01 


01 


05 

05 


05 

05 

05 

04 


. 06 






09 

09 

09 

09 

09 

09 

09 

60 

50 


50 

50 

50 

40 

27 

27 


27 

27 

27 

25 

03 

03 


03 

03 

03 

03 

16 

16 


16 

16 

16 

14 

20 

20 

13 

20 

20 

20 

17 

10 

10 

13 

10 

10 

10 

08 

27 

27 

20 

27 

27 

27 

25 

03 

03 

04 

03 

03 

03 

03 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

45 

07 

10 


07 

12 

07 

40 

04 

04 

03 

04 

04 

04 

03 

38 

45 

23 

38 

38 

58 


23 







15 

18 

11 

21 

28 

21 


09 

09 

05 

09 

09 

09 


08 







08 

08 


08 


08 


42 

50 

47 

40 

50 

40 

35 

03 

03 

03 

03 

03 

03 

02 

30 

35 

20 

20 

25 

20 

20 

02 

02 

02 

02 

02 

02 

02 

10 

10 


10 


10 





10 


10 





03 


03 


12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

09 

02 

02 


02 

02 

02 

02 

30 

53 

29 

30 

50 

30 

28 

03 

03 

05 

03 

03 

03 

02 

50 

50 

50 

40 

50 

40 

25 

12 

12 

12 

12 


12 


01 

01 


01 


01 


01 

01 


01 


01 


1 45 

1 85 

2 25 

1 36 

1 36 

1 36 

90 

1 45 







16 







02 

72 







05 







10 







02 







03 



25 


25 





03 


02 



24 


24 





02 


02 





03 


03 





03 


03 

. 














































































































































































































FOR THE ARMY. 


395 


Ordnance Department.— 

—Prices of Small Arms. 


PRICES OF SMALL 

ARMS. — Continued. 






PERCUSSION 

LOCK. 



PARTS. 

Musket. 

Rifle. 

Hall’s car¬ 

bine. 

Artillery 

musketoon. 

Cavalry 

musketoon. 

Sappers’ 

musketoon. 

Pistol. 

Sword bayonet blade. 

Sword bayonet hilt, without clasp ... 

Sword bayonet clasp. 

Sword bayonet clasp screw. 

Guide. 

Bridge. 

Supporters, each. 

Supporter screws, each. 

Chocks, each.. 

Chock screws, each. 

Receiver. 

Butt piece. 

Butt piece screw. 

Strap. 

Strap screw. 

D. C. 

n. c. 

n. C. 

06 
65 
43 
02 
‘ 07 
03 

2 66 
08 
05 
25 
05 
03 

I). C. 

D. c. 

n. c. 

2 13 

1 60 
21 
02 

D. C. 




09 








03 








14 








13 








03 








19 








03 








12 








04 








16 








03 








20 






4 30 

4 65 

4 57 

3 70 

3 74 

3 75 

2 17 


2 25 

2 25 

1 46 

2 25 

2 25 

2 25 

1 89 

Guard complete. 

Bayonet complete. 

1 06 

1 63 

1 16 

98 
13 25 


84 

99 

84 

72 

Arm complete. 

13 00 

17 00 

10 37 

11 00 

10 62* 

7 00 


* Without sword bayonet. 


f Screw-driver and cone wrench. 

j Wiper. 

Appendages. ■{ Ball screw. 

[ Spring vice. 

[ Bullet mould (rifle calibre). 


46 cents') 

20 “ 

]2 “ }■ For all arms. 

35 “ 

50 “ j 


25 









































































































































































































































■5)6 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Prices of Small Arms. 


PRICES OF SMALL ARMS.— Continued. 


colt’s revolver. 


PARTS. 


PARTS. 


Barrel. 

D. C. 

7 00 

Key screw. 

D. C. 
02 


01 


1 00 

Cylinder. 

4 00 

Rammer. 

30 


06 


02 


.35 


01 

Lock frame. 

5 00 

Catch on barrel. 

04 


02 


06 

Hammer and tumbler. 

S8 

Stock strap. 

50 

Bolt. 

.33 


02 


10 



Bolt spring screw. 

02 

Guard plate screw. 

02 


.31 


30 


02 


50 



Main spring. 

50 

Screw driver and cone wrench. 

42 


31 


111 


02 


1 00 



Key spring and rivet. 

10 

Pistol and appendages. 

24 00 


SWORDS AND SABRES. 


PARTS. 

Cavalry sabre. 

Horse artillery sa¬ 
bre. 

u 

o 

Is 

o 

< 

Muskctoon sword 
bayonet. 

Non-commissioncd 
officer’s sword. 

Musician’s sword. 



D. C. 

D. C. 

D. c. 

D. c. 

D. C. 

D. C. 


( Gripe. 

20 

17 



24 

20 

Hilt. 

\ Head. 

70 

44 

87 

1 60 

50 

44 


( Guard. 

1 10 

58 



1 20 

44 

Blade. 


2 80 

1 98 

2 13 

2 13 

2 20 

1 92 


f Mouth piece. 

20 

10 






1 Body. 

1 20 

1 00 

50 

62 

66 

50 



60 

60 






Ferrule and stud. 

15 

13 

25 

40 

35 

25 


1 Tip. 



25 

25 

.35 

25 

Arm complete. 


7 00 

5 00 

4 00 

5 00 

5 50 

4 00 





















































































FOR THE ARMY. 


397 


Ordnance Department.-Prices of Accoutrements. 


1431. PRICES OF ACCOUTREMENTS. 

BLACK LEATHER BELTS. 


PARTS. 


Cartridge box. 

Cartridge box plate. 

Cartridge box belt. 

Cartridge box belt plate. 

Bayonet scabbard and frog. 

Waist belt, private’s. 

Waist belt plate. 

Cap pouch and pick. 

Gun sling. 

Sabre belt. 

Sabre belt plate. 

Sword belt.. 

Sword belt plate... 

Sword belt, non-commissioned officer’s and musician' 


Sword belt plate 

do. 

do. 

Waist belt 

do. 

do. 

Waist belt plate 

do. 

do. 


Carbine cartridge box. 

Pistol do . 

Holsters, with soft leather caps.. 

Carbine sling. 

Carbine swivel. 

Sabre knot. 

Bullet pouch.. 

Flask and pouch belt. 

Powder flask. 

Waist belt, sapper’s, with frog for sword bayonet, $1 


Infantry. 

Artillery. 

"e3 

Si 

o 

O 

SC 

2 

I), c. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

D. C. 

1 10 



95 

10 


10 

10 

09 




10 




56 




25 



37 

10 



10 

40 


40 

40 

10 



16 


1 03 

1 35 



00 

60 



1 00 




10 



02 



02 

10 



10 

37 



37 

00 



60 



87 




75 




2 63 




95 




8$ 




30 





53 




40 




1 20 











































































































398 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


1432. CLASSIFICATION OF ORDNANCE AND ORDNANCE STORES. 

PART FIRST. 

ARTILLERY, SMALL ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND OTHER ORDNANCE STORES. 


CLASS I. 
Cannon. 


18 pdr. 

brass cannot 

l, Mexican trophy, 

weight. 

lbs. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

French, 

do. 

do. 

9 pdr. 

do. 

Spanish, 

do. 

do. 

8 pdr. 

do. 

French, 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

do. 

English trophy, 

do. 

do. 

4 pdr. 

do. 

French, 

do. 

do. 

3 pdr. 

do. 

English trophy, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

field, U. S., pattern 1840, 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

do. 

do. do. 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

do. 

old pattern, 

do. 

do. 

8 inch brass howitzers, English trophy, 

do. 

do. 

6 inch 

do. 

French, 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

field, U. S., pattern 1840, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

do. do. 

do. 

do. 

16 inch brass stone mortars, French, 

do. 

do. 

13 inch brass mortar 

', do. 

do. 

do. 

42 pdr. 

iron cannon, 

U. S., pattern 1831, 

do. 

do. 

42 pdr. 

do. 

do. 1819, 

do. 

do. 

42 pdr. 

do. 

do. 1840, 

do. 

do. 

32 pdr. 

do. 

do. 1840, 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

do. 1819, 

do. 

do. 

24 'pdr. 

do. 

do. 1839, 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

old pattern, round breech, 

do. 

do. 

18 pdr. 

do. 

do. do. 

do. 

do. 

18 pdr. 

do. 

model 1819, 

do. 

do. 

18 pdr. 

do. 

do. 1839, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

garrison, model 1819, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

do. do. 1839, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

field, do. 1819, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

do. inspected 1834, 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

do. 

do. do. do. 

do. 

do 

100 pdr. 

columbiads, 


do. 

do. 

50 pdr. 

do. 


do. 

do 







' 

FOR THE ARMY. 


399 

Ordnance Department.--Classification of Stores. 

10 inch columbiads, 


weight. 

lbs. 

8 inch 

do. 


do. 

do, 

8 inch iron howitzers, sea-coast, model 1840, 

do. 

do 

8 inch 

do. 

do. do. 1839, 

do. 

do 

8 inch 

do. 

siege, do. 1839, 

do. 

do 

24 pdr. 

do. 

field, inspected 1834, 

do. 

do 

24 pdr. 

do. 

for flank defense, 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

field, old pattern, light, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

do. 

do. inspected 1834, 

do. 

do 

10 inch iron mortars, 

sea-coast, model 1839, 

do. 

do. 

10 inch 

do. 

do. do. 1819, 

do. 

do. 

8 inch 

do. 

siege, do. 1840, 

do. 

do. 



Unserviceable. 



9 pdr. 

brass cannon 

, field, 

do. 

do 

6 pdr. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do 

8 inch brass howitzers, American, old, 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

do. do. 

do. 

do. 

10 inch brass mortars, 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

iron cannon, 

cascable broken, 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

do. 

old, various patterns, 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

do. 

wrought iron, 

do. 

do. 

Note.- 

-The mean weight of each kind of ordnance, as 

well as the number of 

pieces, 


should be entered on the inventories. 


CLASS II. 

Artillery Carriages. 

12 pdr. field gun carriages, complete, stocktrail, pattern 1835, 


12 pdr. do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

1840. 

6 pdr. do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. howitzer field carriages, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. do. do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

24 pdr. siege gun carriages, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Mountain howitzer carriages, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Caissons for 12 pdr. guns, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Do. 6 pdr. do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Do. 24 pdr. howitzers, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Do. 12 pdr. do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Do. without interior divisions, 

do. 

do. 

do. 


Traveling forges. 

Battery wagons. 

Portable forges for mountain service. 
21 




m 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Chests with carriage-makers’ tools, for mountain service. 

Field battery wagons, with tools and stores, complete, C. 

Field traveling forges, with do. do. A. 

Mortar wagons, for siege service, complete. 

8 inch columbiad casemate gun carriages. 

8 inch do. do. chassis. 

32 pdr. casemate gun carriages. 

32 pdr. do. chassis. 

24 pdr. casemate gun carriages, wood. 

24 pdr. do. do. cast iron. 

24 pdr. do. chassis. 

24 pdr. howitzer casemate carriages, for flank defense, complete. 

8 inch sea-coast howitzer barbette carriages and chassis. 

32 pdr. barbette gun carriages. 


32 pdr. 

do. 

chassis. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

gun carriages. 

24 pdr. 

do. 

chassis. 

10 inch sea-coast mortar beds, iron. 

10 inch 

do. 

do. wood. 

10 inch 

siege 

do. iron. 

8 inch 

do. 

do. iron. 


Unserviceable. 

G pdr. field carriages, Gribeauval pattern, require repairs. 

6 pdr. do. stocktrail, 4 

Caissons, 

Battery wagons, f Ma -> or -’ s batter D 

Traveling forges, j 

Note.— The “field carriage, complete," includes the limber and ammunition chest, but 
no implements. The “ casemate or barbette carriage, complete," includes the upper or 
gun carriage, and the chassis, with all the wheels, but no implements. It is better, 
however, to enter the gun carriages and the chassis separately, as above. 


CLASS III. 

Artillery Implements and Equipments. 


Axes, felling. 
Bricoles. 
Buckets, sponge, 

iron, for field guns. 

Do. 

do. 

wood, for garrison guns. 

Do. 

tar, 

iron, for field guns. 

Do. 

water, 

for field forge. 

Do 

water in 

g, leather. 







FOR THE ARMY. 401 

Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 

Budge barrels. 

Cannon locks, left side, for guns with lock pieces. 

Do. do. do. without do. 

Cannon spikes. 

Chocks for casemate carriages. 

Drag ropes. 

Fuze augers. 

Do. extractors. 

Do. gimlets. 

Do. mallets. 

Do. plug reamers. 

Do. rasps. 

Do. saws. 

Do. setters, brass. 

Do. do. wood. 


Gunner’s 

callipers. 

Do. 

gimlets, for siege and garrison gun3. 

Do. 

do. for field guns. 

Do. 

haversacks. 

Do. 

levels. 

Do. 

pincers. 

Do. 

quadrants. 


Handspikes, trail, for field carriages. 


Do. 

manoeuvring, 

for garrison carriages. 

Do. 

shod, 

do. do. 

Do. 

truck, iron, 

casemate do. 

Do. 

roller, do. 

do. do. 

Harness, viz.: 

Sets for two wheel horses, pattern 1840. 

Do. 

leading do. 

do. 

Do. 

wheel do. 

with Grimsley’s saddles. 

Do. 

leading do. 

do. 


Draft for mountain howitzer carriage. 
Pack-saddles and bridles for do. 


Nose bags. 

Whips. 

Ladles and staves for 32 pdr. gun. 
Do. 24 pdr. gun. 

Do. 12 pdr. gun. 

Lanterns, common. 

Do. dark. 

Lanyards for friction primers. 




402 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 

Lead aprons and straps. 

Linstocks. 

Lock covers. 

Men’s harness. 

Pass boxes. 

Pendulum liausses for 12 pdr. field guns. 


Do. 

6 pdr. do. 

Do. 

32 pdr. field howitzers. 

Do. 

24 pdr. do. 

Do. 

12 pdr. do. 

Pick axes. 


Plummets. 



Pointing wires. 

Portfire cases. 

Portfire shears. 

Portfire stocks. 

Powder funnels, copper. 

Powder measures, do. 

Priming horns. 

Priming wires for siege and garrison guns. 

do. for field do. 

Prolonges. 

Rammers and staves, viz.: 

For 32 pdr. garrison guns. 

For 24 pdr. do. 

For 12 pdr. do. 

For 10 inch columbiads. 

For 8 inch sea-coast howitzers. 

Shell hooks. 

Shell plug screws. 

Splints. 

Shovels. ' 

Sponges, woolen, 8 inch. 


Do. 

do. 

32 pdr. 

Do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

Do. 

do. 

12 pdr. 

Do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 

Sponge 

covers, 

32 pdr. 

Do. 

do. 

24 pdr. 

Do. 

do. 

6 pdr. 


Sponges and rammers, viz.: 
For 8 inch siege howitzers. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


For 24 pdr. field howitzers. 

For 12 pdr. field guns. 

For 6 pdr. do. 

Sponges and staves, viz.: 

For 42 pdr. gun. 

For 32 pdr. gun. 

For 12 pdr. gun, siege and garrison. 

For 10 inch columbiad, bore. 

Do. do. chamber. 

For 8 inch sea-coast howitzer. 

Tangent scales for 12 pdr. field guns. 

Do. 6 pdr. do. 

Do. 24 pdr. field howitzer. 

Do. 12 pdr. do. 

Tarpaulins, large. 

Do. small. 

Thumb stalls. 

Tompions and collars for 12 pdr. field guns. 

Do. do. 6 pdr. do. 

Do. for 8 inch mortars. 

Tow hooks. 

Tube pouches. 

Yent covers. 

Vent punches. 

Worms and staves, viz.: 

For siege and garrison guns. 

For 12 pdr. field guns. 

For 6 pdr. do. 

Note.—A set of harness for two horses includes every thing required for them except 
whips and nose bags, which are reported separately. 


CLASS IY. 


Artillery Projectiles, and their Appendages, unprepared for Service. 


42 pdr. cannon halls. 


32 pdr. do. 

24 pdr. do. 

12 pdr. do. 

G pdr. do. 


24 pdr. shells. 

12 pdr. do. 

32 pdr. spherical case shot. 
24 pdr. do. do. 

12 pdr. spherical case shot. 


10 inch shells for columbiads. 
8 inch shells for mortars. 

32 pdr. shells. 

212 


6 pdr. do. do. 

42 pdr. grape shot, loose, No. 
24 pdr. do. do. do. 


do. 









404 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


12 pdr. grape shot, loose, No. 
Canister shot, loose, viz. : 

For 32 pdr. gun, pounds. 

For 24 pdr. do. do. 


For 12 pdr. do. pounds. 
For 6 pdr. do. do. 

For 24 pdr. howitzer, do. 
For 12 pdr. do. do. 


CLASS V. 


Artillery Projectiles, with their Appendages, prepared for Service. 


12 pdr. shot for 12 pdr. gun, 

fixed, 

rounds. 

12 pdr. spherical case shot for 12 pdr. gun, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. canisters for 12 pdr. gun, 

do. 

do. 

G pdr. shot, 

do. 

do. 

6 pdr. spherical case shot, 

do. 

do. 

G pdr. canisters, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. howitzer shells, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. do. spherical case shot, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. do. canisters, 

do. 

do. 

32 pdr. do. spherical case shot, with metal fuzes, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. spherical case for 12 pdr. field gun, 

do. 

do. 

12 pdr. shells do. do. 

do. 

do. 


8 inch shells, strapped, for columbiad. 

8 inch do. do. sea-coast howitzer. 

12 pdr. howitzer shells, strapped. 

12 pounder howitzer spherical case shot, strapped. 

12 pdr. canisters for 12 pdr. field guns. 

6 pdr. shot, strapped. 

6 pdr. canisters. 

12 pdr. grape shot, stands of. 

42 pdr. cannon wads, junk. 

32 pdr. do. hay. 

24 pdr. do. grommet. 

Note.— A “round of fixed ammunition” is here used to indicate the projectile with its 
cartridge prepared tor use, although, in some cases, they are not actually connected 
together. A “ shot strapped” or a “canister,” “stand of grape,” &c., indicates the projec¬ 
tile prepared for making fixed ammunition, or for service. 


CLASS VI. 

Small Arm > 

Muskets, complete, viz.: 

National armory, bright, percussion, new. 

Do. brown, flint, 4th class, short. 

Do. bright, altered to percussion 

National armory, brown, altered to percussion. 







FOR THE ARMY. 


405 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 

Contract, brown, altered to percussion. 

Do. bright, do. 

Musketoons, artillery, percussion. 

Do. cavalry, do. 

Do. sappers, do. 

Rifles, viz.: 

Harper’s Ferry, percussion, new. 

Do. do. repaired. 

Contract, full stocked, brown, flint. 

Hall’s patent, new, without bayonets. 

Do. do. with do. 

Pistols, viz.: 

Percussion, new model. 

Colt’s patent. 

Flail’s carbines, new, percussion. 

Wall pieces, rifle, 4 oz. calibre. 

Cavalry sabres, pattern 1840. 

Horse artillery sabres, privates’, pattern 1840. 
Non-connnissioned officers’ swords, do. 

Musicians’ swords, do. 

Artillery swords, new pattern. 

Cavalry sabres, English. 

Regulation artillery swords, English. 

Sergeants’ swords, Prussian. 

Foot officers’ swords, new pattern, 30 i inches. 

Do. do. 32 do. 

Field officers’ swords. 

Unserviceable. 

Muskets, without bayonets. 

Rifles, require repairs. 

Carbines, Hall’s patent, irreparable. 


CLASS VII. 

Accoutrements, Implements, and Equipments for Small Arms, and Horse 
Equipments for Cavalry. 


Infantry cartridge-boxes. 
Cartridge-box plates. 

Cartridge-box belts, black leather. 

Do. do. white do. 
Cartridge-box belt plates. 

Bayonet scabbards, 16 inches. 


Bayonet scabbards, 18 inches, black 
frogs. 

Gun slings. 

Waist belts, black leather. 

Do. belt plates, inf. privates’. 
Waist belt plates, inf. sergeants’. 





406 


REVISED REGULATIONS 




Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Wipers for percussion muskets. 
Ball screws, do. 

Screw drivers, do. 

Spring vices for muskets. 

Cones for new muskets. 

Do. altered do. 

Cap pouches. 

Cone picks. 

Bifle cartridge boxes. 

Rifle cartridge-box plates. 

Rifle flasks. 

Rifle ball pouches. 

Rifle pouch and flask belts, white. 

Do. do. black. 

Bayonet scabbards, Hall’s rifles. 
Bayonet scabbard belts, do. 
Wipers for percussion rifles. 

Screw drivers, do. 

Spare cones for rifles. 

Ball screws, do. 

Bullet moulds, do. round balls. 
Bullet moulds, do. con. do. 
Spring vices. 

Cartridge boxes for pistols. 


Cartridge-box plates for pistols. 
Spring vices, do. 

Screw drivers, do. 

Bullet moulds, do. 

Ball screws, do. 

Spare cones, do. 

Screw drivers for Colt’s pistols. 
Spring vices, do. 

Powder flasks, do. 

Bullet moulds, do. 

Artillery sword belts. 

Cavalry sabre belts, white, old pat. 
Cavalry sabre belt plates, do. 
Non-com’d officers’ sword belts 
double frogs, black leather. 
Non-com’d officers’ sword-belt plates 
Horse artillery sabre belts, black. 
Holsters. 

Housings. 

Musket flints. 

Rifle flints. 

Cavalry equipments, j ® a ^ es ‘ 


CLASS VIII. 

Powder, Ammunition for Small Arms, &c., and Materials. 


Cannon powder, 

lbs. 

Musket powder, 

do. 

Rifle powder, 

do. 

Mealed powder, 

do. 

Fulminate of mercury, 

do. 

Nitre, refined, 

do. 

Sulphur, crude, 

do. 

Sulphur, roll, 

do. 

Sulphur, flowers, 

do. 

Sulphur, pulverized, 

do. 

Pulverized charcoal, 

do. 

24 pdr. cartridges, 6 lbs. 


12 pdr. do. 2? do. 


6 pdr. do. 11 do. 



42 pdr. cartridge bags, paper, with 
flannel bottoms. 

32 pdr. cartridge bags, paper, with 
flannel bottoms. 

24 pdr. cartridge bags, flannel. 

12 pdr. do. field, do. 

6 pdr. do. do. do. 

Musket buck and ball cartridges for 
percussion arms. 

Musket buck and ball cartridges for 
flint lock arms. 

Rifle ball cartridges for perc’n arms. 

Pistol do. do. do. 

Musketoon ball cartridges, pcrc’n 







FOR THE ARMY. 


407 


Ordnance Department. 

Pistol ball cartridges, fliut. 

Musket blank cartridges. 

Rifle do. 

Cartridges for Colt’s pistols. 


Musket balls, pressed (for 

proving 

muskets), 

lbs. 

Musket balls, pressed, 

do. 

Rifle do. 

do. 

Buckshot, 

do. 

Laboratory paper, viz.: 


No. 1 (musket cartridge), 

do. 

No. 2 (wrapping), 

do. 

No. 3 (blank cartridge), 

do. 


Wrapping paper (No. 2) waxed, do. 
Wrapping paper, quires. 

Priming tubes, filled. 

Portfires. 

Quick match, lbs. 


-Classification of Stores. 

Slow match, lbs. 

Percussion caps for small arms. 

Do. caps for Colt’s pistols. 
Do. primers for Maynard’s 
lock. 

Do. primers for cannon, Hid¬ 
den’s. 

Friction tubes. 

Rockets, war, Congreve. 

Rockets, Hale’s, 31 inch. 

Rockets, do. 21 do. 

Rockets, 1 inch, signal. 

Fuzes, 10 inch, filled. 

Fuzes, 8 inch, filled. 

Fuzes, paper, for field ammunition 
Fuzes, wooden, do. 

Blue lights. 

Fire balls. 


CLASS IX. 

Parts, or Incomplete Sets of any of the Articles inserted in the Preceding 

Classes. 


Parts of barbette carriages, viz.: 
Bevil washers for 32 pdr. 

Do. 24 pdr. 

Elevating screws. 

Iron work for 24 pdr. carriages and 
chassis, complete, sets. 

Lunettes. 

Naves. 

Pintles. 

Pintle plates, 32 pdr. 

Pipes, 32 pdr. 

Rollers, 32 pdr. 

Do. 24 pdr. 

Traverse wheels. 

Parts of casemate carriages, viz.: 
Bed plates for elevating screws. 
Elevating screws. 

Handles for elevating screws. 

Iron work for 32 pdr. carriages, 
complete, sets. 

Pintles, east iron 


Traverse wheels, large. 

Do. do. small. 

Truck wheels. 

Trunnion plates, 32 pdr., pairs. 

Parts of field carriages, viz.: 
Airbacks for forges. 

Axletrees for 6 pdr. gun carriages. 

Do. for G pdr. limbers. 

Cap squares, 6 pdr. 

Cap square chains. 

Cold shut S links, No. 3. 

Do. No. 5. 

Elevating screws and nuts. 

Fellies. 

Iron work for 6 pdr. carriages, com¬ 
plete, sets. 

Keys for ammunition chests. 

Linch pins. 

Lock chains. 

Nails, Nos. 1 and 2, lbs. 

Nave bands. 









403 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Nave boxes, cast iron. 

Nuts, assorted. 

Pintle hooks, keys, and chains. 
Poles, spare, ironed. 

Pole props. 

Pole yokes. 

Rondelles, 6 pdr., large. 

Do. do. small. 

Splinter bars. 

Spokes. 

Stocks, 6 pdr. carriage, ironed. 
Do. caisson, do. 

Do. battery wagon, do. 

Tire bolts, nuts, and washers. 
Washers for axletrees, linch. 

Do. do. shoulder. 

Do. for bolts, assorted. 

Wheels, spare. 

Parts of artillery implements: 


42 

pdr. 

rammer heads. 

24 

pdr. 

do. 

12 

pdr. 

do. 

6 

pdr. 

do. 

42 

pdr. 

sponge heads. 

24 

pdr. 

do. 

12 

pdr. 

do. 

6 

pdr. 

do. 


8 inch columbiad sponge heads 
and staves, for bore. 

8 inch columbiad sponge heads 
and staves, for chamber. 

24 pdr. sponge heads and staves. 

6 pdr. sponge and rammer staves. 
6 pdr. worm staves. 

12 pdr. ladles. 

Worms for siege and garrison guns. 


Thimbles for prolonges. 

Parts of artillery harness, viz.: 
Drivers’ saddles, Grimsley’s pat’n. 
Valise do. do. 

Bridles, Grimsley’s pattern 
Bits, brass plated. 

Halters. 

Halter chains. 

Collars. 

Girths. 

Traces, leading, leather. 

Traces, wheel, do. 

Leg guards. 

Breast straps. „ 

Breech straps. 

Hames, pairs. 

Parts of small arms, viz.: 

Stocks for percussion muskets. 
Tumbler screws, do. 

Bridle screws, do. 

Sears, for percussion muskets. 

Sear screws, do. 

Main-springs, do. 

Main-spring screws, do. 

Sear-springs, do. 

Sear-spring screws, do. 

Bayonets for Hall’s rifles. 

Parts ofprepared ammunition,viz.: 
Sabots for 12 pdr. field gun. 

Sabots for 12 pdr. howitzer. 
Cylinders and caps for 6 pdr. field 
ammunition. 

Plates for 12 pdr. canisters. 

Plates for 24 pdr. grape. 

Rocket cases, 2? inch, Hale’s. 
Rocket cases, paper, 1 in., signal. 


Garrison gins, old pattern. 

Do. with ratchet windlass. 
Casemate gins, do. 


CLASS X. 
Miscellaneous. 


Field and siege gins, with ratchet 
windlass. 

Sling carts, large. 







FOR THE ARMY. 


409 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Sling carts, hand. 

Casemate trucks. 

Hand carts. 

Store trucks. 

Lifting jacks. 

Falls for casemate gins. 

Falls for garrison gins. 

Falls for field and siege gins. 
Treble blocks, iron. 

Double do. 

Single do. 

Gin handspikes. 

Handspikes for mechau’l. man’rs. 


Long rollers, do. 

Short rollers, do. 

Half rollers, do. 

Blocks, do. 

Half blocks, do. 

Quarter blocks, do. 

Gun chocks, do. 

Wheel chocks for mechanl man’rs. 
Holler do. do 

Skids, do. do 


Shifting planks for mechanical man¬ 
oeuvres. 

Trunnion chains. 

Mortar eprouvettes. 

Beds for do. 

Balls for do. 

Rocket conductors, Hale’s. 

Star gauges, with rings, for inspect¬ 
ing cannon. 

42 pdr. ring gauges for shot, large. 

Do. small, old. 

Do. do. new. 

13 in. ring gauges for shells, large. 

Do. small, old. 

Do. do. new. 

42 pdr. grape shot gauges, large. 

42 pdr. do. small. 

Can’r. shot gauges for 12 pdr. gun. 

Do. do. how’r. 

Shell callip’rs for thickness of sides. 

Do. do. bottom. 

42 pdr. cylinder gauges for shot. 

32 pdr. do. do. 


PART SECOND. 

TOOLS AND MATERIALS. 

Cloths, Ropes, Thread, &c. 


Canvas, 

yards. 

Cotton cloth, 

do. 

Duck, cotton, 

do. 

Linen, brown, 

do. 

Marline, 

pounds. 

Rope, hemp, 

do. 

Rope, Manilla, 

do. 

Sash cord, 

do. 


Bran, 

bush. 

Hay, 

lbs. 


Thread, shoe, 

pounds. 

Thread, patent, 

do. 

Tow, 

do. 

Twine, bundling, 

do. 

Worsted stuff, 

yards. 

Yarn, cotton, 

pounds. 

Yarn, packing, 

do. 

Yarn, woolen, 

do. 


Forage. 

I Oats, bush. 
I Straw, lbs. 













410 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Ironmongery. 


Bolts, door, 

No. 

Mica, sheet, 

pounds. 

Brass, sheet, 

pounds. 

Nails, iron, cut, 

do. 

Buckles, iron, 

No. 

Do. wrought, 

do. 

Do. brass, 

do. 

Do. finishing, 

do. 

Chains, iron, 

pounds. 

Do. horseshoe, 

do. 

Chalk, 

do. 

Do. bellows, 

do. 

Copper, sheet, 

do. 

Do. copper, 

do. 

Do. bar, 

do. 

Pulleys, brass, 

No. 

Do. cake, 

do. 

Hasps, 

do. 

Do. scrap, 

do. 

Bivets and burrs, iron, 

pounds. 

Emery, 

do. 

Do. copper, do. 

Files, assorted, 

No. 

Sand paper, 

quires. 

Glue, 

pounds. 

Screws, wood, assorted, 

No. 

Hinges, iron, butt, 

pairs. 

Spelter solder, 

pounds. 

Do. brass, do. 

do. 

Steel, cast, 

do. 

Horseshoes, 

pounds. 

Do. blister, 

do. 

Iron, bar, 

do. 

Do. shear, 

do. 

Do. sheet, 

do. 

Do. scrap, 

do. 

Do. plate, 

do. 

Tacks, iron, 

papers. 

Do. scrap, 

do. 

Do. copper, 

pounds 

Do. castings, 

do. 

Tin, block, 

do. 

Lead, pig, 

do. 

Do. sheets, 

do. 

Do. sheet, 

do. 

Tubing, wrought iron, 

feet. 

Do. scrap, 

do. 

Wire, iron, 

pounds. 

Locks, assorted, 

No. 

Do. brass, 

do. 

Do. magazine, 

do. 

Do. steel, 

do. 


Laboratory Stores. 


Acid, nitric, 

pounds. 

Gum shellac, 

pounds. 

Do. muriatic, 

do. 

Nitrate baryta, 

do. 

Alcohol, 

do. 

Nitrate strontia, 

do. 

Antimony, sulphuret, 

do. 

Quicksilver, 

do. 

Boras, 

do. 

Rosin, 

do. 

Beeswax, 

do. 

Sal ammoniac, 

do. 

Camphor, 

do. 

Soap, 

do. 

Chlorate potash, 

do. 

Sponge, 

do. 

Chloride lime, 

do. 

Tallow, 

do. 

Flour, 

do. 

Whisky, 

gallons. 

Gum arabic, 

do. 








FOR THE ARMY. 


41 i 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Lumber .— Gun Carriage Timber, and Building Materials. 


For 12 pdr. stocktrail carriage: 
Gun carriage stocks. 

Axle bodies. 

For six pdr. stocktrail carriage: 
Gun carriage stocks. 

Axle bodies. 

Cheeks. 

Axle bodies for limbers. 

Poles, do. 

Hounds, do. 

Forks, do. 

Splinter bars, do. 

Front footboards, do. 

Axle bodies for caissons. 

Stocks, do. 

Middle rails, do. 

Side rails, do. 

Cross bars, do. 

Front footboards, do. 

Hind footboards, do. 

Stocks for forges 

Axle bodies, do. 

Side rails, do. 

Middle rails, do. 

Cross bars, do. 

Studs, plates, and guides, do. 

Ends for coal boxes. 

Sides, do. 

Bottoms, do. 

Lids, do 

Axle bodies for battery wagons. 
Stocks, do. 

Lower side rails, do. 

Upper do. do. 

Ridge poles, do. 

Ends for ammunition chests. 

Sides, do. 

Frames for covers, do. 

Panels, do. 

Bottoms, do. 

Cover linings, do. 

2K 


26 


Principal partitions for ammunition 
chests. 

Naves for held carriages. 

Spokes, do. 

Fellies, do. 

Trail handspikes, do. 

Legs for siege and garrison gins. 

Pry poles, do. 

Windlasses, do. 

Upper braces, do. 

Middle do. do. 

Lower do. do. 

Handspikes for gins. 

For 32 pdr. casemate gun carriage: 
Cheeks. 

Front transoms. 

Rear do. 

Slides. 

Axletrees. 

For 32 pdr. casemate chassis: 
Tongues. 

Hurters and guides. 

Rails. 

Front transoms. 

Rear do. 

For 32 pdr. barbette top car¬ 
riage : 

Uprights. 

Braces. 

Front transoms. 

Middle do. 

For 32 pdr. barbette chassis: 
Tongues. 

Rails. 

Hurters. 

Front transoms. 

Middle do. 

Rear do. 

Props. 

Spokes for barbette carriages. 
Handspikes for do. 







412 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Plank, poplar, for interior of am¬ 
munition chests, feet. 

Plank, ash, for implements, do. 
Do. walnut, do. 

Do. cherry, do. 

Do. beech, do. 

Do. white pine, do. 

Do. yellow pine, do. 

Scantling, maple, for rammer 
heads, feet. 


Scantling, poplar, 

for sponge 

heads, 

feet 

Scantling, ash, 
Building materials: 

do. 

Brick, red, 

No. 

Do. fire, 

do. 

Fire clay, 

barrels. 

Lime, 

do. 

Sand, 

loads. 

Slates, 

No. 


Note.—T he number of pieces of timber for each part of a gun carriage, &c., should bo 
reported separately, as above. Miscellaneous plank, scantling, &c., should be stated in 
board measure. 


Leather and Materials for Harness Work. 


jatlier, 

buff, 

sides. 

Leather, sole, 

pounds. 

Do. 

bridle, 

do. 

Sheep skins, with wool, 

No. 

Do. 

kip, 

do. 

Do. tanned, 

do. 

Do. 

thong, 

do. 

Black wax, 

pounds. 

Do. 

collar, 

do. 

Bristles, 

do. 

Do. 

harness, 

pounds. 

Hair, 

do. 

Do. 

band, 

do. 

Raw hides, 

No. 

Do. 

skirting, 

do. 

Whip stocks, 

do. 


Paints , Oils, Glass , &c. 


Chrome green, 

pounds. 

Pumice stone, 

pounds. 

Coal tar, 

gallons. 

Prussian blue, 

do. 

Copperas, 

pounds. 

Paint, mixed, olive, 

do. 

Glass, window, 

feet. 

do. black, 

do. 

Lacker for cannon, 

gallons. 

Spirits of turpentine, 

gallons. 

Lampblack, 

pounds. 

Tar, 

do. 

Lead, white, 

do. 

Umber, 

pounds. 

Litharge, 

do. 

Varnish, copal, 

gallons. 

Oil, linseed, 

gallons. 

do. Japan, 

do. 

Oil, neatsfoot, 

do. 

Vermilion, 

pounds. 

Oil, sperm, 

do. 

Whiting, 

do. 

Ochre, yellow, 

pounds. 

Zinc paint, white, 

do 

Putty, 

pounds. 




Stationer 1 /. 


Books, office, blank. 


India-rubber, 

pieces. 

Ink, black, 

gallons. 

Paper, letter, 

quires. 

Ink, red, 

pints. 

Do. cap, 

do. 







FOR THE ARMY. 


413 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Paper, envelope, 

quires. 

Do. blotting, 

do. 

Do. drawing, 

sheets. 

Pencils, lead, 

No. 

Pens, steel, 

do. 

Pasteboard, 

pounds. 


Adzes, carpenters’. 

Do. coopers’. 

Alphabets, sets. 

Andirons, pairs. 

Anvils. 

Augers, assorted. 

Awls, saddlers’. 

Axes, broad. 

Do. felling. 

Do. band. 

Bellows, band. 

Benches, laboratory. 
Bevels, assorted. 

Bick irons. 

Bits, auger. 

Blocks for tackle. 

Braces. 

Brace bits. 

Brushes, dusting. 

Do. paint. 

Do. whitewash. 

Chasing tools. 

Cherries. 

Chisels, cold. 

Do. firmer. 

Do. framing. 

Do. splitting. 

Do. for turning wood. 
Clamps, wood. 

Do. iron. 

Claw tools. 

Compasses. 

Countersinks. 

Diamonds, glaziers’. 


Quills, No. 

Sealing-wax, pounds. 

Tape, pieces. 

Wafers, pounds. 

Ordnance Manual. 

Ordnance Regulations. 

Tools. 

Drawing knives. 

Dredging boxes. 

Drifts, assorted. 

Drills, do. 

Drill bows. 

Figure stamps, sets. 

Fire buckets. 

Fire engines. 

Flasks, moulders’, wood. 

Do. do. iron. 
Flatteners. 

Forks, hay. 

Do. straining. 

Formers, cast iron, assorted. 

Do. laboratory, do. 

Do. for musket cartridges. 
Do. for rifle cartridges. 
Fullers, assorted. 

Funnels, copper. 

Do. glass. 

Furnaces, tinners’. 

Gauges, assorted. 

Do. wire. 

Do. cutting. 

Do. for rockets. 

Do. for portfires. 

Gimlets, assorted. 

Glue pots. 

Gouges, carpenters’. 

Do. turners’. 

Do. Stockers’. 

Grindstones. 

Hacksaw frames. 

Hammers, bench. 









414 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Hammers, copper. 

Do. creasing. 

Do. hand. 

Do. planishing. 

Do. trimming. 

Hand barrows. 

Hardies. 

Hatchets, assorted. 

Heading tools. 

Hoes. 

Holdfasts, bench. 

Horses, draft. 

Do. saddlers’, wood. 
Instruments, drawing, cases of. 
Jugs. 

Kettles, lead. 

Do. copper. 

Do. varnish. 

Knives, pallet. 

Do. putty. 

Do. round, saddlers’. 

Do. shoe. 

Ladders. 

Do. step. 

Ladles, large. 

Do. lead. 

Lanterns. 

Lathes, hand. 

Do. engine. 

Level and plumb. 

Mallets. 

Mandrills, assorted. 
Marlinespikes. 

Measuring lines. 

Milling tools. 

Mortars and pestles, brass. 
Nippers, cutting. 

Oil stones. 

Paint mills. 

Pans, copper. 

Do. paste. 

Do. stone. 


Pick axes. 

Pincers, saddlers’. 

Pliers. 

Punches, saddlers’. 

Do. for cutting rifle patches 

Do. for stencils. 

Rakes. 

Reamers, assorted. 

Rules, carpenters’. 

Saws, compass. 

Do. cross-cut. 

Do. circular. 

Do. hand. 

Do. tenon. 

Do. web. 

Do. whip. 

Saw sets. 

Scales and beams, large. 

Do. do. small. 

Scales, counter. 

Do. graduated. 

Scissors. 

Scoops, copper. 

Screw plates and taps. 

Screw drivers. 

Scythes. 

Scythe snaths. 

Sets, nail. 

Shears, tinners’. 

Do. small. 

Shovels. 

Shoeing tools, sets of. 

Sickles. 

Sieves, composition. 

Do. parchment. 

Do. assorted. 

Sledges. 

Soldering irons. 

Spades. 

Spatulas. 

Spirit levels. 

Spoke shaves. 












FOR THE ARMY. 


415 


Ordnance Department.-Classification of Stores. 


Spy glasses. 

Squares, trying. 

Stakes, bench. 

Straight edges. 

Swedges. 

Sand screens. 

Taps, screw. 

Ticklers. 

Tongs, tinners’, grooving. 

Do. smiths’. 

Tools for cutting wood screws. 
Do. for turning iron. 

Do. for making paper fuzes. 
Do. for bending sheet iron. 
Do. for making metal fuzes. 
Trammels. 


Trestles. 

Tube moulds. 

Tube wires. 

Vices, bevel. 

Do. bench. 

Do. breeching. 
Do. hand. 

Water buckets. 
Watering pots. 
Wheels, buffing. 
Wheelbarrows. 
Wheel cutters. 
Wrenches, screw. 
Do. tap. 

Do. assorted. 


Miscellaneous Articles. 


Arm chests. 

Barrels. 

Baskets. 

Boxes, packing 
Brooms. 

Canisters, tin. 

Carboys. 

Corks. 

Coal, bituminous, bushels or tons. 
Coal, anthracite, pounds. 


Coal, charred, bushels. 
Demijohns. 
Lightning-rod points. 
Oil cans, large. 

Pumps. 

Plows. 

Safes, iron. 

Salt, bushels. 

Wood, oak, cords. 

Do. pine, do. 


2K2 







































































REVISED REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY. 


41V 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 1. 


RETURN 


Ordnance and Ordnance Stores received, issued, and remain¬ 
ing ON HAND, AT - ARSENAL, COMMANDED BY 

Major A. B., during the quarter 
-, 18- 


ending 

































PART FIRST. 


ARTILLERY, 

SMALL ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND OTHER 

ORDNANCE STORES. 


419 








420 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 1.— 


CLASS I.—ORD 


Date. 

18—. 

No. of voucher. 

Second Quarter, 18 —. 

B 

English 

trophies. 

RASS Gl 

Mexi¬ 

can. 

INS. 

U. S. 

6 pdr., weight 674 lbs. 

2 

1 

4 

p« 

CO 

18 pdr., trophies, weight 4384 lbs. 

| 6 pdr., old pattern, 800 lbs. 

12 pdr., pattern 1840, 1770 lbs. 

6 pdr., pattern 1S40, 885 lbs. 

April . 

1 


On hand from last quarter . 







U 

15 

1 

Received from C. D., Military Storekeeper.. 







May. 

10 

2 

Do. do. E. F., contractor at - 








22 

3 

Do. do. Capt. G. H., - regiment 










of artillery. 







June. 

30 

4 

Fabricated at the post during the quarter, 










per abstract. 







U 


5 

Purchased during the quarter, per ab- 







u 


6 

Repaired during the quarter . 










Total to be accounted for. . 







May . 

15 

7 

Condemned and dropped from the return 










by order of the President of the United 










States . 







June . 

30 

8 

Issued to sundry persons, per abstract . 








U 

9 

Expended at the post, per abstract . 







“ 

16 

10 

Issued for current service, per abstract . 








a 

6 

Repaired during the quarter . 










Total issued and expended . 










Remaining on hand to be accounted for 










next quarter . 

























































FOR THE ARMY. 


421 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


(Property Return.) 


BRASS 

HOWITZERS. 


BRASS 

MORTARS. 


U. States. 


French. 


IRON GUNS. 


IRON 

HOW’RS. 


UNSERVICEABLE. 


Brass 

guns. 


Iron 

guns. 


CLASS II.—ARTILLERY 


FIELD ARTILLERY. 


BAR¬ 

BETTE. 


ft 

CO 


•o 

ft 































































































422 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 1.— 


CARRIAGES. 


CLASS III.-ARTILLERY EQUIPMENTS AND IMPLEMENTS. 


CANNON 

LOCKS. 


fcJQ 


^ O 
V .2 

3 o. 


HANDSPIKES. 


WORMS AND 
STAVES. 



































































FOR THE ARMY. 


423 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 

(Pkopekty Return.)— Continued. 


CLASS IV.-CANNON BALLS. 


SPHERICAL 

CASE. 


CL. V.-FIXED AMMUNITION, 

&C. 


SHOT, SPHERICAL 
FIXED. CASE, FIXED. 


STRAPPED 

8HOT. 


CLASS VI.—SMALL 


MUSKETS. RIFLES. PISTOLS. 


2 L 









































































424 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 1.— 


ARMS. 

CLASS VII.—ACCOUTREMENTS. 

CLASS VIII.-POWDER, AC. 

SWORDS AND 
SABRES. 

FOR 

MUSKET8. 

FOR 

RIFLES. 

CAVALRY. 

POWDER, LBS. 

CARTRIDGES. 

LEAD 1 

BALLS,LBS. 

| Cavalry sabres, pattern 1840. 

| Horse artillery sabres, pattern 1840. 

Non-commissioned officers’ swords. 

| Infantry cartridge boxes. 

| Infantry cartridge box plates. 

Cartridge box belts. 

£ 

Ball screws. 

Bullet moulds. 

Holsters. 

Cavalry cartridge boxes. 

d 

o 

p 

p 

& 

o 

5 

Fulminate of mercury. 

Musket buck and ball. 

Pistol ball. 

Rifle blank. 

Musket, pressed. 

Buckshot. 



















































































































































FOR THE ARMY. 


425 




Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


(Property Extern.)— Continued. 


CLASS IX.—PARTS 

OF ARTILLERY CARRIAGES. 

CLASS X 

—MISCELLANEOUS. 

Elevating screws for barbette carriages. 

Flange rollers for do. 

Pintles for casemate chassis. 

Sets of iron-work for 24-pdr. barbette car¬ 
riages, complete. 

Traverse wheels for barbette chassis. 

SPARE PARTS FOR FIELD 
CARRIAGES. 

Sling carts, large. 

Garrison gins. 

Hand carts. 

Casemate trucks. 

Falls for garrison gins. 

Double blocks, iron. 

Fellies. 

Nave bands. 

Pole yokes. 

Spokes. 




































/ 



















































































































PART SECOND. 


TOOLS AND MATERIALS. 












428 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 

























































FOR THE ARMY 


429 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


(Property Return.) —Continued. 


LABORATORY STORES. 


a 


GUN CARRIAGE TIMBER. 


FOR FIELD CAR¬ 
RIAGES. 


12-pdr. 
gun car¬ 
riages. 


Caissons. 


FOR 24-PDR. BARBETTE CARRIAGES. 


Gun carriages. Chassis. 






























































































































4S0 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 1 . —(Property Return.)— Continued. 



I certify that the foregoing Return exhibits a correct statement of the public 

property in my charge during the-quarter, 18 —. 

A. B., Captain Commanding. 


U. S. Arsenal (Armory or Post), 
-, 18 —. 


Note. —For the quarter ending 30th June add a certificate that an accurate Inventory of property 
has been made, and the return corrected accordingly. Abstracts of the receipts and issues will be made 
when their number makes it more convenient. 




























































































invoice oj Ordnance and Ordnance Stores turned over by A. B., Captain or Military Storekeeper, to Lieutenant C. 1). 
Assistant Quartermaster, for transportation to -* Arsenal, in obedience to order for Sujiplies, JVo. —. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


a 
o c 
« td 


* to 
2 ® 


5= ^ 

V t*t 


a 


g a 1 t° 
a 8 !£ 

a P-I a r* 
a o 
o r o r 
u Ph r p3 
r s- P t-> 


c3 ci c3 

0 0 p 0 

1) <D O 
« M -w M 

5 o cS 
6 'h3 


a a 


X 


&3 


r ^ 


a 


p 

O’ 


- « 

cS 

a a 


£ 


431 


Endorsement to be as follows : 

No.-. 

Invoice of stores turned over to Quarter¬ 
master for transportation, 



















432 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


•spunod 
‘qojnxn qomO 

CO 




\o 

CO 

•soagqjOfj 




o 

o 

o 

iO 

<m 

•soSpir) 

-xbo qcq-^aqsnjv; 




10,000 

o 

o 

o' 

•saind ‘s.x9;sxoj{ 


o 

o 



o 

o 

•sqoq 

-ojqns 


o 

o 



o 

o 

•sqsng ogip[ 


o 

CN 



o 

<N 

qoqs pad 
-dB.qs aopunod -9 




O 

O 

o 

o 

<N 

•spaq-.iBptoxu 
1SB00-B9S qoui-of 



TjH 



•S9§BT.X.IB0 e^BXU 
-9SB0 uapunod-pg 



- 


- 

•s93bu.xbo e^rui 
-9SB0 aapunod-^g 



Cq 



•S9§BX.XJB0 

ppq J9punod*9 


00 


O 




O 

Pm 


e 




p. 

p 

< 


b£ 


a <u 
0> o 


„ JS w 

■§ a a-§ 

U U S-i 

0<<0 


ft, 

(5 


Note. —This abstract is designed to include such articles only as are completed, and are in a suitable condition to be issued for 
service. (To be made in triplicate. Two to be forwarded with the return.) 




















































FORM 4. 

Abstract of Articles purchased at - Arsenal during the - quarter of 18 


FOR THE ARMY. 


438 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


•sqj ‘juoo oxiou.iqjuy 

4480 




4480 

•oj^; ‘sexy 




o 

rH 


O 

■saainb ‘jadcd-ae^eq 

o 

<N 




o 

CM 

•s^nS ‘jio poosuyj 

O 

CM 

O O 

CO Tji 


O 

•op ‘pnet SRqAl 


O O O 
o o o 

rlAOO 


1150 

•sqj ‘jaq^nexssauanji 




o 

o 

T—t 


o 

o 

qj ‘spanoqemd aiiq^V 


o 

1- 

o 

o 

CO 


1520 

•sqx ‘oiqnan rang 

AO 




AO 

'°H ‘(Pi SSB ) SAiaaog 



720 

144 

8G4 

•op ‘noil ang 



1000 

750 


1750 

•op ‘^ B H 

1570 




1570 

•sqj ‘edoa dmajj 



300 

250 


550 

Appropriation. 

a 

c. 

'p 

a 

c/ 

C 

c. 

c 

*1 

c 

1 

fL 

c 

§ 

< 

or 

c 

c 

c. 

y= 

T 

«g 

c 

1 

ii 

£ 

< 

Ordnance and ordnance stores. 

Armintr fVio mill tin. 

: 

0 

1 

i 

i 

Total. 



O 

o 

u 

f-« 

o 

c 

tn 


,0 

ci 

a> 

> 

o 

d 

o 

^3 


c3 

^3 



o 





vs 

C3 


rO 

© 


§ 








Abstract of articles purchased 
at-Arsenal, 
























































Statement of Articles repaired at - durinq the - quarter of 18 


434 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


O 

2.2 


r-> 

<0) CZ 
CO v 

p .2 
p > 


1 a 

£ o 

<D 

Vh ^ CO 
CO p, CD 

% 

s_, a c3 

.g E « 

a t.2 


► ^ 

O g 

“ a 

<M VO O O 


M g 


ci o 
« 0) bO 
O-? S 


f 

'S 




Endorsement to be as follows: 



























FOR THE ARMY. 43;> 

Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 6. 


Statement of serviceable materials obtained from the breaking up of 
condemned Ordnance or Ordnance Stores, by order of the Secretary of 
War, of -, 18—. 

(See Form 10.) 


400 

200 

50 

30 

50 

20 


lbs. wrought iron. 

“ cast iron. 

“ brass. 

“ copper. 

“ old rope for junk. 
“ leather. 


(Ik duplicate.) 


(Signed) A. B., Captain Commanding. 


Endorsement to be as folloics: 


No. —. 

Materials obtained from 
condemned stores, 
-quarter,-, 18—. 


FORM 7. 


Received - 


this - day of ■ 


18—, of Captain - 


commanding 
Stores, dec. 


the following Ordnance and Ordnance 


4 

3 

3 

500 


32-pounder iron cannon. 

24 “ casemate carriages, complete. 
24 “ barbette carriages, complete, 
muskets, new, brown. 


C. D., Major Commanding. 


(In duplicate.) 


Endorsement to be as folloics: 

No. —. 

Receipts for issues to the Army, 

-quarter,-, 18—. 

jj ote _When the receipt of the officer to whom the stores are issued is not received by the issuing 

officer in time to accompany his property return, his certified invoice and the receipt of the qui rt< r- 
master for the packages will be substituted for this voucher. 

2 M 























Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 8. 


I hereby acknowledge to have received of the United States, by the hands of 
-, of the United States Army, the following arms and accoutrements, 


viz.: 


100 common rifles, equal in value to. 123 

100 sets accoutrements (black leather) for rifles, 

equal in value to. 21 

350 pistols.equal in value to. 215 

50 artillery swords.do. 16 

175 cavalry sabres.do. 80 

175 do. belts.do. 15 

1000 muskets.do. 1000 

500 sets accoutrements for muskets (black leather), 

equal in value to. 115 

4 6-pdr. iron cannon, -i 

4 6-pdr. field carriages, with V equal in value to 110 
equipments complete, J 


1-13 muskets. 


11-13 

do. 

5-13 

do. 

4-13 

do. 

10-13 

do. 

4-13 

do. 


do. 

10-13 

uo. 

3-13 

do. 


Total. 1698 9-13 do. 


The whole being equivalent to sixteen hundred and ninety-eight and nine-thir¬ 
teenth muskets, which are received on account of the quota of arms due to the 

-of-, under the Act of April, 1808, for arming the whole body of the 

militia, and for which I have signed triplicate receipts. 

Given at-, this-day of-, 18—. 

(Signed) A. B., Governor or Agent of the State of -. 

(To be given in triplicate.) 


Endorsement to he as follows : 
No.-. 

Receipts for issues to the Militia. 



























FORM 9. 

Abstract of Materials, etc., expended or consumed at - Arsenal during the - quarter of 18- 


FOR THE ARMY. 


437 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


•so.xinb ‘jad/od-janorj 


•spunod ‘pnoj 0}iqA\. 


•OH ‘sninsjino 


'°H ‘sqouq posso-qj 


093J 

‘spanoq ouid 8;tqAi. 


•soScijano opjoq.TBq 
••tpi-oS J0 J siqSudpi 


•op ‘oiqc.iB mn£) 


•spunod ‘joo^s ^sbq 


•spunod ‘uo.ii ang; 


•spunod ‘Abu 


•spunod 

‘ouiMq Suqpung; 


•spunod 

■posso.id ‘s[{Bq-^)3qsnj\[ 


•spunod 
‘opi.i ‘aopAioj 


•spunod 

‘uouubo ‘uopiioj 


Ph 

K 


o o o o o o 


^ T3 r3 'V •S r3 T3 <o cS <« 


o CO 


bO O 


C3 , 

"'S 

<D 

qrj d 


bjo’TJ 

C 


m ~ 

“ 3 
2 ^ 


c3 g co 


J2 w X (m 
^ <0 ® o 
^ *4 p —’ 

a 2 ^ ^ S 


<u s d 13 «h 

a M e k° 
•E c .h fe A 


^ m “ 

.«« <d d 

03 ° fep’Sb 

a> a es u 
“ o'C » 

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o tZ “ g 

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p} CO 


^ a 


£ 
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s 

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■ H CD <D 'T .-H .cz .LJ CJ 

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cq 


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. .55 

11 

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to s 
m I 


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a> 45 

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43 -& 1 

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5 

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s 

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a> 50 

(s 


'O 


08 g 

M 

O 3 

o ^3 
P ^ 
C3 0> 
ffl -2 


,t>> £ 


Endorsement to be as follows : 
No.-. 

Abstract of articles expended or 
consumed at-, 





































































FORM 10. 

List of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores condemned at - , by -, Inspector - ) at an inspection made on the 


438 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


% 


<M CO 03 O iO 


oq >> 

■Si 
m a 

i co ci 

2 **-« 
w-h a 
! b~i 


S 


-2 . 1-8 
g g.s-| 
a ^ a ^ 

G to W ff 


9 v. 




Note.— The stores embraced in the above are to be retained on the property return until the purposes of the condemnation, as ap¬ 
proved by the President, shall have been finally executed. 



























FORM 11. 

Inventory of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on hand at -, commanded by - , inspected 


FOR THE ARMY. 


439 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


oo 


3 

" o 

OQ 

-2^ 
o £ 
« c 
Ch H 


56 

O 

to 


*- .t; 
3= 3 


Z, 

2M2 


to . 

§ s 

3= 3 


S>> 8 


» R, 

k£ 1 


*73 P r vr 

§ 21 

BfeS 


>» 

33 


n *5 


a. 

la 

W _ 

: «* 


% 


ft- 
■ ** 
£ .** 


& O p 
^ ^3 c3 


•P -3-a 


£ 35 .. 

: 3 g ® 

: 03 o 33 


o - 


u 


hJ t3 


« “ ► 

6 tT S 
3 ^ oq 

■*■' © a 
^ 1= 


*73 *"05 *73 '"P 


2 
O 

2 


C5 :m 


: • 
© o o 

1^ l& »-H 

CO <N 


O O O 

o o o 

00 Cl CO 
CO CO rH 


o a a> 
'd ^ 
P P P 
p p p 
o o o 
PhPhP 

ci -4i co 


o a> o 

ft ft ft 
ft ft ft 
o o o 
P Ph ft 
00 CO Cl 


r e -rs ° 
3 3 r3 
3 3 a> 
o o 0) 
3.3” 
. . 3 

OO’" 


00 Cl to 


£» a 


3 

2 a 


3 33 


« ^ 
31 © 


® a « 

33 rt ^ 0 

33 ° 3 c 

s ^ "5 E 

.5 a >- - 2 

a 3 s>>^ 


® a 


ft CO 


O O rQ 

o ft "P 


« p 


p ft -O P % 
° <v 'u -w 
_5 -3 O O CO 

d°3»S 

® 2 ? 3 P 
^ 0 f.,2 jj 
qj a) *r| o 
S Mo O 5 
•£ g® 2 3 

ft ^ <U 


° 03 -P _. 
-£* r d -ft <-P 
p**.g 

2 p ^ pp 
£-05^ 

* 1.2 a 5 3 

I. a 

B.s cl | 

o -g ^3 3 g 

3 r-t '-’ rt 

ft .2 a 


Endorsement to be as follows: 

No.-. 

Inventory for inspection, or for the correction of second quarter's return of property. 



















































440 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 12. 

RENT-ROLL. 

Statement of Dwelling-Houses belonging to the United States at 

Armory (or Arsenal), and of the rents due thereon, on - 

186 . 


HOUSES. 

BY WHOM OCCUPIED. 

TIME OC¬ 
CUPIED. 

RENT PER 

QUARTER. 

AMOUNT. 

No. 

Of what kind. 

Months. 

1 

Brick, 

two story ... 

A.B., Com’ding officer’s clerk 


D. C. 

D. C. 

2 

Wood 


C. D., Master Armorer. 




3 

Do.... 


E. F., Store-keeper. 




4 

Do.... 

one story ... 

G. II. 

3 

3 25 

3 25 

5 

Brick. 


J. K. 

2 

4 00 

2 fi7 

6 

Do.... 


L. M. 

3 

3 50 

3 50 

7 

Do.... 

two story... 

N. 0 . 

11 

3 00 

1 50 




P. Q. 

3 

3 00 

3 00 




R. S. 

11 

3 00 

1 50 

8 

Do. 

one story ... 

T. U., Paymaster’s clerk. 




9 

Stone. 

.do. 

V. W. 

3 

2 75 

2 75 


Do.... 

.do. 

X. z. 

2 

2 75 

1 83 

10 

Do.... 


Unoccupied. 



I certify that the foregoing roll exhibits a correct account of the dwelling- 
houses at this armory, and of their occupation, and of the amount of rent now 
due for each. 


Armory, 

-, 186 . 


} 


A. B., Commanding Officer. 


Endorsement to be as follows : 


No. -. 

Rent-roll. 

-Armory, -quarter. 
















































FORM 13.—(To be printed.) 


FOR THE ARMY. 


441 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


rP GO 
. CO h-> 

§*iS 8 

■SI’S 

« g s 
•S ' 2 s 
si s 

02 pv, 


e 




2 *?£ 


Ph f-i o 

_ <D O 

■ts ~o 
p © *-< 

iaj£ tt 


K c3 
*-T ~ P 

c3 C3 

O o o 

? OP 
ci ^ o 

'S .2 
- § * 


5 2° 

P O o 

O'H 

0^0 
0 1^0 
r-H O 

*o 


d 5 5 

O 00 o 


s s 

p, ^ 

Sr ° 

02 £; 




w 5 

so „ 
•5 ^ 

,S 

fcO 


a w 

•t>"S 


'S .; 
§ «■ 
<3 

fO 


§ £ 


§ 


National Armories.$325 88 

Arming the militia. 80 00 














































We, the subscribers, hereby acknowledge to have received of-the sums set opposite our names, respectively, being in 

full for our services at-Arsenal during the month of-, 18—, having signed duplicate receipts. 


442 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


Signatures. 


AMOUNT. 

Cents. 

o o o 
© o o 

00 

Dollars. 

LOO^ 

OCOC4 

325 

PAY PER DAY. 

Cents. 

© © © 

<N 

Dollars. 

C4 H H 

•pojCojdaio 
siup jo •oji 

© T* © 

CJ C4 <N 

Occupation. 

| Master armorer. 

Blacksmith. 

Carpenter. 

&c. 

Names. 

< d d 




% 


W fl « rJ 

rd a cn a 

u t-> f- d. 

0<S < < 




I 15 “ 


CC O 

e V 

« o 

a =2 

a 

Si S 
3s p 




-3 a s a 

fci U U 


•5 £ 

O 

cu ^ 
« o 












































FOR THE ARMY 


443 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


% 




~Sj C3 I 
?- g oo 

Cl c 


5 

6 


g 4 


*5 


~ bL~ 
U r: _ 
a. ^ 


^ & - 
o w 
ej flj 


o &■ 


% 




e* & 


s s 


« ftp* 

-< d H 


o 


io o o 

OOCO 


o o o o ^ 

o to cc ^ 

m 


B S 
EH c 


3 P>iO 


O ei a 
■X 2 c ■ 


o 


£> ft pH Cl 

<5 d w 6 


uoqum^i 


28 


o o o 
o o o 
m 


Si 

t>3 


s.2 a 
2~~ 
b -q lj 

; c tf 

E bO ” 

c a .s 

•-B a §. 

d J. o 

£5 -< P3 


OOO 

o o o 

.t# 




^ a 

^ a 
2 


2 S 


E E ft 

Sh a> 

< < Pi 


O Js 

a.« 


o — 


ia 

c 

s 


-a > 


£ tp 


































































FORM 16— (To be printed.) 

We, the subscribers, hereby acknowledge to have received of-the sums set opposite our names, respectively, being in 


444 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 



o' 


*3 



P 


g C3 
G cS 

« t- 

<fi a 
























































FORM 17. —(To be printed .) 

Abstract of Disbursements at - Arsenal, by -, in the quarter ending 


FOR THE ARMY 


445 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 








V 3 
r-O 




o <u 

a a a 
2 a ci 


0<t 


Ordnance and ordnance stores. 426 00 

$1086 00 


























































FORM 18.—(To be printed.) 


446 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


oi 

o 




o 


OQ 


OS 

p 


o 

>> 


'zs ■ 

- o 
c ^ 


® .ts *5* 

P a ^ .22 S 

g S ^ o 

* “ g 3 £ 

r—I jt O .Jh 33 d 
3 .Si 3-1 33 o 0 5“ 

rrt « «W ® <U fc £ 

SB ° 3 * S o 

® 'g -*o M “A 

o ° fl .2 ri s b 

fl ^ 3 .. 3 ^ d 


U> o 


P.g 

< 


a> §3 

1-1 B= 


£ 


■§6 


«y 
: o 


o • 

s-1 

£ S 

a> cu 

03 Ja 

2 M 

B S’* 


O P 


P 

o P 
<J=3 P 


-u "p 2 

p « 
<2 ° £ 
O P P 
^ rt o 
3 O -»» 
<u o „, 

a a S 

3 S 3 
33 3 


P P ^ P 

r-j P M P _ . 

y p sh %* u c? 

o<l<l<10B 


r s 


e. 

eS 

00 


u oo 
<1^ 


(7b be signed and furnished in duplicate ly the disbursing officer.) 






































FOR THE ARMY. 


447 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 19. 

Received,-Arsenal,-, 186 , of Major- 

One field officer’s sword, 

One pair percussion pistols, 

for which I have paid the said Major-the cost price,- 

dollars. 

W. A. N., 

(To he made in duplicate.) Major - Artillery 


Endorsement to be as follows: 


No.-. 

Receipt for stores 
issued to Major W. A. N. 
for his own use. 














FORM 20. 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures, under each appropriation, for the month of - (or for the - quarter), 18- 


448 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


£S 
<2 t 
H 5' 


< a 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


a a 

o 


<U 

O 

° 

"*"* ’o 

O O 

3 o 
fi P3 


CO rd 

.5 fl 

o 

£ a 


as 

o r3 


P4 W 


% 


«e 

-o O 


a 

I 




Endorsement on monthly statement to he: 

Money received and expended, 

-Arsenal, Nov. —, 18—. 
























































FOR THE ARMY. 


449 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 21. 

Estimate of Funds required at - Arsenal during the fourth quarter 

of 18— 


ORDNANCE SERVICE. 



Police and preservation of Post. 

$430 00 


Placing arms in racks. 

500 00 


Tools and machinery. 

300 00 


Fuel for steam-engine. 

350 00 


Public horses. 

150 00 


Office duties. 

200 00 



1930 68 


Due U. S. from last quarter. 

130 68 


Amount required. 


$1800 00 

ORDNANCE, ORDNANCE STORES, AND SUPPLIES. 


Making sling carts. 

1027 48 


Making lifting jacks. 

300 00 


Purchase of lumber for packing boxes, &c. 

150 00 


Due from U. S. last quarter. 

222 52 




1700 00 

Total amount required. 


$3500 00 


REQUIRED IN SUMS AS FOLLOWS : 


Month. 

Ordnance ser¬ 
vice. 

Ordnance, ord¬ 
nance stores, and 
supplies. 

Amount. 


$500 00 

500 00 

800 00 

$700 00 

500 00 

500 00 

$1200 00 
1000 00 
1300 00 



Total. 

$1800 00 

$1700 00 

$3500 00 



[To be signed by the commanding officer.) 









































Requisition fur Ordnance and Ordnance Stores for - Arsenal or Post, - date. 


450 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


CQ 

£ 

B 

a> 




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Endorsement to be as follows: 

Requisition for Ordnance Stores for [post or place]. 
[Date]. 





























FORM 23. 

Requisition for Ordnance and Ordnance Stores for the use of - of militia ; in the service of the United States. 


FOR THE ARMY. 


451 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


00 

T. 

CS 

3 

a? 

& 

Company of infantry of 58 non-com¬ 
missioned officers and privates. 

Same form for Artillery, Riflemen, and 

Cavalry. 

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: o 
: o 
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2500 

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Endorsement to he as follows : 
Requisition for Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, 






































452 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 24. 

State of-: 

I-, born in-, aged-years, and by occupation a-, 

do hereby acknowledge to have voluntarily enlisted this-day of-, 18 , 

as a-of ordnance, in the army of the United States of America, for the 

period of five years, unless sooner discharged by proper authority; do also agree 
to accept such bounty, pay, rations, and clothing, as is or may be established by 

law. And I,-, do solemnly swear that I will bear true faith and 

allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly 
and faithfully against all their enemies and opposers whomsoever; and that I 
will observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the 
orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the Rules and Articles of 
War, and the regulations which govern enlisted men of the Ordnance Department. 

J. G., Recruit. 

Sworn and subscribed to, at-, 

this-day of-, 18 . 

S. M., Magistrate. 

I certify that I have carefully examined the above-named recruit, and that, 
in my opinion, he is free from all bodily defects and mental infirmity which 
would in any way disqualify him from performing the duties of a-of ord¬ 

nance. 

A. B., Examining Surgeon. 

I certify that I have minutely inspected the recruit,-, previously 

to his enlistment, who was entirely sober when enlisted ; and that, to the best of my 
judgment and belief, he is of lawful age, and a competent mechanic (carriage- 

maker, or otherwise, as the case may be). This recruit has-eyes, -hair, 

-complexion ; is-feet-inches high. 

(Duplicates.) 

C. D., Recruiting [or Enlisting') Officer. 


Endorsement to be as folloios: 

Jonas Gould, -Arsenal, 

February-, 18 . 

?*ote. In making up and endorsing enlistments, see General Regulations for 
the Army. 


















FORM 25.—(To be printed.) 

Return of a Company of Ordnance at the - Arsenal, for the month of 


FOR THE ARMY 


453 




Ordnance Department.- 

-Forms. 


1 

to 

ci 

1 




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1 




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Date. 



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Endorsement to he as follows: 
Company, 

-Arsenal, December-, 18 



































































































FORM 26.—(To be printed.) 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


454 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


% 


jO 




% 


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a 

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a 

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Endorsement to be as follows: 
Hired men, 

-Arsenal. December, 18— 


















































FOR THE ARMY. 455 

Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 27. 

Summary statement of work done at - Arsenal in the month oj 

-, 18 - 


Articles fabricated. 

4 6-pounder field carriages. 

200 12-pounder sponges. 

100 port-fires. 

10,000 musket ball cartridges. 

Tools. 

2 hand hammers. 

20 powder measures. 

Unfinished. 

2 6-pounder field carriages. 

1 6-pounder caisson. 

10 sets iron work for barbette car¬ 
riages, &c., &c. 

Stairs finished in new store-house. This 
building is now completed, except 
plastering and painting. 

Hired men. 

3 master workmen. 

30 mechanics. 

5 laborers. 


Other work done. 

500 pounds of powder proved. 

50 24-pounder cannon lackered. 
Inclosures repaired. 

Barracks painted and cleaned, &c., &c. 


Supplies fonvarded to -, in pur¬ 
suance of Order No. -, received, 


Received from- 

50 24-pounder cannon. 

500 pounds cannon powder. 

1000 sets of infantry accoutrements. 


Enlisted men. 
1 master workman. 

10 mechanics. 

6 laborers. 


(To be signed by the commanding officer.) 

Note.— This statement should exhibit such particulars as are necessary to 
give a correct view of what has been done at the post during the month, with¬ 
out descending into very minute details. Work may, when necessary, be reported 
in parts; but the articles reported as fabricated should accord with the quarterly 
abstract. In cases where new buildings or other extensive works are in pro¬ 
gress, after stating the particulars of the work done, the extent to which the 
work has advanced, and its condition at the end of the month, should be stated. 


Endorsement to he as follows: 
Work done, 

-Arsenal, 

December-, 18—. 














456 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 28.- 

Retvrrn of the Officers, Armorers, and others employed at the - 

the month 



ARMS AND APPENDAGES. 



Muskets. 

Rifles. 

Screw-drivers. 

Wipers. 

Ball-screws. 

Spring-vices. 

Cones. 

Bullet-moulds. 

K 

Uni 

ci 

a 

0 

£ 

| Musket-boxes. 

| Rifle-boxes. 


Manufactured. 

Delivered to store-keeper. 








— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Manufactured at rifle factory. 

Delivered to store-keeper. 


























































FOR THE ARMY. 


457 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


(To be printed.) 

Armory; and also the arms and appendages manufactured during 

of -, 186 . 


Assistant forgers. 

Annealers. 

Borers. 

Turners and drillers. 

Grinders. 

Barrel straighteners. 

Lock filers. 

Mounting filers. 

Polishers. 

Stockers. 

Barrel finishers. 

Lock finishers. 

Arm finishers. 

JOBBERS. 

15 

o 

Eh 

j_ 

1 | Smiths. 

OT 

S-i 

_o 

s 

' j | Carpenters. 

i ( | Laborers. 




























-Arm out, 

Office of Superintendent, -, 186 . 

A. 1)., Superintendent. 

Note. _This return will be limited to such operations as are carried on under 

the appropriation for armories. Persons employed, or work done, at armories, 
under other appropriations, will be separately reported. 


Endorsement to he as follows : 

Monthly Return. 

-Armory, October-, 186 . 






































































458 


REVISED REGULATION^ 


Ordnance Department.—Forms. 


FORM 29 — 


Inventory of Stores at - Arsenal, 30th June, 18G , and report 

inventory was 


Articles. 

Description, condition, 
and explanations. 

Number or quantity on hand per 
last inventory. 

Received since from other posts. 

Saved from articles broken up. 

Changed from unserviceable to ser¬ 

viceable. 

Fabricated. 

Purchased. 

Taken up not before accounted for. 

Total to be accounted for. 

Class No. 











Prices which are not established by the regulations, or by instructions from the 
Ordnance Office, or the Inspector of Arsenals and Armories, will be determined by 
reference to the first cost of the property, when it can be ascertained, allowing 
for such alterations as may have affected the original value. 

In estimating the cost of the labor of enlisted men, their time will be charged 
at the following rates : 


Master workmen.$1 50 per day 

Mechanics. 90 “ 

Artificers. 70 “ 

Laborers. 60 “ 


For the whole year, Sundays 
included. 































FOR THE ARMY. 


459 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


(To be printed.) 

of operations causing an increase or decrease at any time since the last 
rendered. 


Consumed and used in fabrication 
and for repairs. 

Issued to other posts. 

! 

Sold. 

Broken up and dropped. 

Lost by unavoidable accident. 

Number or quantity remaining on 
hand this 30th June. 

Value per 
piece, per lb., 
&c. 

Valuation of stores 
remaining. 

Total value 
of each 
description. 

Total value ot 
each class. 

Dollars. 

Cts. 

Dollars. 

Cts. 

Dollars. 

Cts. 













Amount carried forward. 








Note.— In printing the inventories for the national armories, the necessary 
alterations are made in the headings of the several columns to adapt them to the 
ciicumstances of the case. 

(Signed by the commanding officer.) 


23 


































460 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 30. 

I hereby certify that I have, this-day of-, 18—, inspected and proved 

twenty twenty-four pounder iron cannon (or other ordnance, or shot, or shells, 
as the case may be) manufactured by J. M., of C. D. C., under his contract 
(agreement, or open purchase, as the case may be) with the United States, 
dated-. 

And I do further certify that the said cannon (or other ordnance, or shot, or 
shells, as the case may be) have been inspected and proved by me in exact accord¬ 
ance with the regulations established in the Ordnance Department for the proof 
and inspection of ordnance before its reception for the service of the United 
States; that the said cannon have been numbered and weighed, and that their 
numbers and corresponding weights are as follows, viz.: 


No. 20. 5660 lbs. 

21 . 5652 “ 

22 . 5640 “ 

&c., &c., &c. 

Total weight. lbs. 


The total weight of the cannon being equivalent to-pounds. 

I further certify that the total weight of the shot (or shells, as the case may be) 

used in the proof of said guns amounts to-pounds. 

Given under my hand, at the-, this-day of-, 18_. 

(Signed) W. J. W., Major of Ordnance , 

Inspector of Ordnance at the foundries. 


RECAPITULATION. 

20 24-pounder cannon (or other ordnance, or shot, or shells, as the case may be). 


The United States, 


C. F.,-, 18—. 


To J. M., Dr. 

For 20 24-pounder cannon, weight-lbs., at $-per 100 lbs. $000 00 

For 24-pounder shot used in proving the same, weighing-lbs., at 

-per-lb. 000 00 



















FOR THE ARMY. 


461 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 30.—Continued. 

Received,-, 18—, on the ground of the C. F., the above 20 24-pounder 

cannon. 

(Signed) A. M., Captain of Ordnance, 

or Military Store-keeper. 

(To be given in triplicate.) 


Note. —Two of the triplicates are to be forwarded by the contractor to the 
Ordnance Office—one being intended for the Treasury, and one for the Ordnance 
Office; the third is retained by the contractor. 


Endorsement to be as follows: 

„ Certificate of Inspection 

of-pdr. cannon (or shot, or shells), 

at-Foundry,-, 18—. 


i. 






462 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 31.— 


Inspection and Proof of 


NUMBERS. 

DIAMETERS-OF 

! 

Foundry. 

Register. 

Cascable. 

Base ring. 

First re¬ 
enforce. 

Second re-enforce 

front. 

Chase. 

Muzzle. 

& 

O 

a 

w 

M 

o 

0> 

Fillet. 

Rear. 

Front. 

Rear. 

Front. 

Neck. 

Face. 

Prescribed dimensions. 
























Order of firing. 

PROOF CHARGES OF 

Powder. 

Balls. 

Shells. 

Number of 

Lis. 

Proof 

range 

No. 

Lbs. 

No. 

Lbs. 

Wads. 

Sabots. 

First. 

Second. 

Third. 










Preponderance taken at the plane of the muzzle lbs. 














































FOR THE ARMY. 


463 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


(To be printed.) 


at the - Foundry, 18—. 


Register number. 

DIAMETERS—OP 

Distance between rimbases. 

WIDTHS— 

OF 

Trunnions. 

Rimbases. 

Cylinder of 
Bore. 

Chamber. 

Vent. 

Base ring. 

Chase ring. 

Right. 

Left. 

Right. 

Left. 

Least. 

Greatest. 

Least. 

Greatest. 


























1 

1 


202 






























FORM 31. —(Inspection, &c.)— Continued. 


4G4 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


•spunod ‘iqSjaAi 

| 


GREATEST ENLARGE¬ 
MENT AFTER PROOF. 

uaqureqQ 



•japnqXQ 



LENGTH OF BORE FROM FACE 
OF MUZZLE—TO 

qnauiaS.nqna 
jaepea-iS jo uorjisog 



•aaoq eqj jo inowog 



•japui 

-pCo aaqai'cqo jo pug; 



uaqureqo jo q;noj^ 



uapujiXo jo png; 



•raoftoq raojj uouejui ‘jaa^ 



AXIS OF 
TRUNNIONS. 

•juatuuSjiy 



•ajoq jo sixb A\oiag; 



■joqranu jajsiSoy 



LENGTH OF 
TRUNNIONS. 




•}q§!H 



LENGTH FROM REAR OF BASE RING—TO 

MUZ¬ 

ZLE. 

•90BJ 



CHASE. 

•juojg 



UBa^j 



•jhojj eo-iojua-aj pg 



FIRST RE¬ 
ENFORCE. 

•inojg 



•jRa>j 



•jaaA jo ajjuaQ 



REAR OF 

TRUNNIONS. 

•yag 



•tq3ra 



•aiquasBO jo pug; 



•qoaajq jo jua^j 



■aoqrana jajaiSag 




.2 % 


.g» 


.o w 

X 5 


'ts 

J 


CO 3 














































FOR THE ARMY. 


465 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 32. 


-Foundry,-, 18—. 

Proof and Inspection of - inch shells, - pounder shot, &c. 




OQ 

OQ 

m 




o 

C3*3 




CQ 

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03 

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03 




GO 

£3 d 

£ O 

m • 

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GO 

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a .► 


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o ^ 

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.s £ 

a 

1 ^ 

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1 ^ 

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a 8 

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Remarks. 

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a 

03 03 
pQ Sh 

a 

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fcO M 

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o “ 

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S3 

55 

Number 

jected 

proof. 

S3 

P 

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o 

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S3 

S3 

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o 

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fs 

*3 

o 

EH 

^.2 

.2° 1 
*3 

£ 

-*j .s 

rd . 

.2° 1 
*3 

* 


10 

15 

25 

200 

Pounds. 

15,000 

Pounds. 

77 

Pounds. 

72 



Total number of shells rejected,-) as per certificate of inspection of this 

Total number of shells received - * date. 

I certify that the proof and inspection above referred to have been carefully 
made, and that this report is in all respects correct. 

(Signed) W. J. IV., Major of Ordnance, 

Inspector of Cannon and Foundries. 


Endorsement to he as follows: 

Inspection Report of-inch shells 

at-Foundry,-, 18—. 























FORM 33. 

Annual Consolidated Report of the Inspection of Ordnance and Projectiles at the Foundries for the year ended June 30, 18- 


466 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


- INCH SHELLS. 

•pauituRxa pajpunq qaua 
aoj poAO-idde aaqumu .10 orjRy; 

lO 00 

© oo 

r- oo 

CO 00 

•paAiaoaj aoquin^i 

175 

ICO 

•joojd air pun 

ja^RM. aqj ui popofaj jaqrun^j 

to <M 

•uoitaads 

-ui aq) tii papafa .1 aaquin^; 

O 00 

•pauituRxa .laqran^j 

o o 

O 00 

<N rH 

- POUNDER ROUND SHOT. 

•pauituRxa pa.ipunq qoRa 
joj paAOjddu jaqurau .10 orjR'g; 

Tfl CO 

O CO 

Ttf’ 05 

00 CO 

•paAiaaa.i .xaqran^j 

1688 

1340 

•jooad ui uaqcuq aaqiun^; 

12 

10 

•uoipads 

-ut aq; ui pajoafaa aaqtnnjq 

300 

150 

•pauiuiRxa aaqran^j 

2000 

1500 

- POUNDER GUNS (OR OTHER 

ordnance). 

•p 0 uiun?x 8 pajpunq qoi3a 
joj poAOjddt? jaqumu jo or}T5)j 

90.53 

96.11 

•paAiaaaa .xaqran^j 

CO T* 

^ r- 

rH rH 

•^sanq .laqmnjq 

<M CO 

•noiiaads 

-ut aqj ui pa;oafaa aaqran^j 

O (M 

•pauimRxa aaqiunj^ 

o o 

00 

Names of Foundries. 

. 

: : 

! = 

i : 

; : 

l • 

: z*4 

Cl pi 

Q £ 


2 k a 
S 2 J 


t 1 

<c 


S ^ 

M a> 

S a 
§ £f> 
<h in 


Endorsement to he as follows: 

Annual Consolidated Inspection Report of Ordnance and Projectiles 
at the foundries for the year ended June 30, 18—. 































FOR THE ARMY. 


467 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 34. 

I hereby certify that I have, this-day of-, 18—, inspected and ap¬ 

proved three hundred and twenty muskets, three hundred and twenty screw¬ 
drivers, three hundred and twenty wipers, thirty-two ball-screws, thirty-two 
spring vices, and three hundred and twenty spare flint caps, and sixteen pack¬ 
ing-boxes (or rifles, pistols, carbines, Hall’s rifles, and their appendages, cavalry 
sabres or swords, accoutrements, &c., as the case may be), manufactured by A. 
W., of Millbury, Massachusetts, under his contract (agreement, or open pur¬ 
chase, as the case may be) with the United States, dated-January, 18—. 

And I further certify that the said arms and appendages have been inspected 
according to the regulations established in the Ordnance Department, and that 
they conform to the standard models and the established gauges; that they are 
of good quality and workmanship ; that they are securely packed in good strong 
boxes; and that they are, in all respects, conformable to the contract. 

I also certify that, according to my best judgment, the true value of each pack¬ 
ing-box is - - dollars and-cents. 

Given under my hand at Millbury, -, this-day of-, 18 . 

(Signed) J. M., Mss’*, to Inspector of Arms. 

Approved: 

(Signed) H. K. C., Major of Ordnance, ^ 

Inspector of the contract service. 

RECAPITULATION. 

320 muskets and appendages (or other small arms, as the case may be), viz.: 

320 muskets. 320 ramrods. 

320 bayonets. 320 screw-drivers, &c. 


Millbury, Mass., November, 18—. 


The United States, 


To A. W., 

For 320 muskets, with bayonets and ramrods, at $12 each. 


Dr. 
$000 00 


320 screw-drivers, ~) 

320 wipers, j A dages at - cen t s f or each musket. 000 00 

32 ball-screws, | 

32 spring vices, J 
16 packing-boxes, at $2 50 each. 

Transportation of 16 boxes from Millbury, Massachusetts, to the Water- 

town Arsenal, at $1 20 per box. 000 00 













468 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 

Received, Watertown Arsenal,-November, 18—, sixteen boxes, containing 

three hundred and twenty muskets and appendages above mentioned. 

The transportation of arms from Millbury to Watertown Arsenal is estimated 
at one dollar and twenty cents per box. 

(Signed) H. K. C., Major of Ord. Com'g. 

(To be given in triplicate.) 

Notes. —This form of certificate will be used for every species of small arms 
and accoutrements manufactured for the military service of the United States. 

Two of the triplicates are forwarded by the contractor to the Ordnance Office, 
one being intended for the Treasury, and one for the Ordnance Office; the third 
is retained by the contractor. 


Endorsement to he as follows: 

Certificate of inspection of- 

muskets (rifles, pistols, &c.), 
-quarter,-, 18—. 






FORM 35.—(To be printed.) 

Quarterly Inspection Report of musket barrels (or carbine, rife, or pistol barrels, as the case may bef 
the United States by - , of - , proved and inspected by J. M., 18— 


FOR THE ARMY. 


469 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


% 


a 

e 


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°0 

CO 

00 

•peAteoej jeqranu pop j 

CO 

00 

CO 

•pepefeu puu pjnq aeqmnu pepj 


•panq jaqmnu pepj, 

rH 

BUEST. 

•eSjuqo pg 


•oSjnqo x s I 

T—1 

T—1 

•pepefej leqranu p«pj 

CO 

o 

POWDEE. 

Date of proof. 

Jan. 20, 18—. 

•— - o^ ‘eppAnoado eSupj-joojj 

o 

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C4 

EEJECTED FOE DEFECTS. 

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00 

tO 

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to 

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Endorsement to be as follows: 

Inspection Report of Musket (Rifle or Pistol) barrels, 
-quarter,-, 18—. 


































FORM 36.—(To be printed.) 

Quarterly Inspection Report of Muskets ( Carbines, Rifles, Pistols, Swords, Sabres, &c., as the case may be), 
for the United States by - , of - , inspected -, 18—. 


470 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


I 'e 




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REJECTED FOR DEFECTS IN 

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Endorsement to be as follows: 

Inspection Report of-Muskets 

(Carbines, common Rifles, or Pistols), 
-quarter, 18—. 





























FOR THE ARMY. 


471 


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Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


Mean. 

100 

95.88 

80.04 


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Endorsement to be as follows : 
Annual Consolidated Report of Muskets, &c. 


























472 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 38. 

I hereby certify that I have, this-day of-, 18—, inspected and proved 

ten barrels of cannon powder (or musket or rifle powder, as the case may be), 

numbered 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, and 15, manufactured by A. B., of-, 

under his contract (agreement, or open purchase, as the case may be) with the 
United States, dated-, 18—. 

And I further certify that the said cannon (or musket or rifle powder, as the 
case may be) has been inspected and proved by me in exact accordance with the 
regulations established in the Ordnance Department for the proof and inspection 
of gunpowder before its reception for the service of the United States, and that 
the weight of the powder in each of the above-mentioned barrels, saving only so 
much as was used by me in the proof and inspection, is one hundred pounds. 

Given under my hand, at the Powder Works of A. B., this-day of-, 

18—. 

(To be signed by the proving officer.) 

RECAPITULATION. 

10 barrels cannon (or musket or rifle powder, as the case may be). 


A. B. Powder Works. 

The United States, 

To A. B., Dr. 

For 10 barrels of cannon powder, weighing 1000 lbs., at 15 cents per lb.. $150 00 

For 10 barrels, $1 00 each. 10 00 

$160 00 


Received at the-Arsenal, -, 18—, of A. B., the above ten barrels 

of cannon powder. 

(Signed) C. D., Captain of Ordnance, 

or Military Store-keeper. 

(To be signed in triplicate.) 

Note. —Two of the triplicates are forwarded by the contractor to the Ordnance 
Office—one being intended for the Treasury and one for the Ordnance Office; the 
third is retained by the contractor. 


Endorsement to he as follows: 

Certificate of Inspection 

af-barrels of cannon (or musket) powder, 

at the Powder Works of A. B., -, 18—. 


















FOR THE ARMY. 


473 


Ordnance Department.-Forms. 


FORM 39. 

Report of the Proof and Inspection of Cannon (Musket or Rife') Powder, 

manufactured by - for the Ordnance Department at the 

Powder Works of - (or at the - Arsenal, as the 

case may be), this - day of -, 18—. 


g d 


PROOF-RANGES. 


S5 




m 




1 

318 

2 

293 

3 

200 

4 

178 

5 

268 

6 

192 

7 

261 

8 

260 

9 

243 

10 

200 

11 

235 

12 

203 

13 

212 

14 

201 

15 

232 


306 

312 

187 

290 

210 

205 

182 

175 

268 

268 

190 

191 

265 

263 

250 

255 

241 

242 

202 

201 

235 

235 

203 

203 

208 

210 

199 

200 

228 

230 


BARRELS REJECTED. 

BARRELS 

RECEIVED. 

Giving ranges less than 
225 yards. 

Their ranges not enter¬ 
ing into those form¬ 
ing the general mean 
range in next column. 

Giving the general mean 

range of 262 yards. 



Received. 



do. 

Rejected. 

Rejected. 


do. 

Rejected. 


do. 



do. 



do. 

Rejected. 


do. 

Rejected. 

Rejected. 

Rejected. 


do. 





Total number of barrels rejected, " \ ag p er certificate of inspection of this date. 
Total number of barrels received, 8 / 

I certify that the proof and inspection above referred to have been carefully 
made, and that this report is in all respects correct. 

[To he signed, in duplicate, by the proving officer.) 


Notes.— 1st. Quick match will be used in priming the eprouvette. 

2d. When government powder is inspected at the arsenals, the first 
four columns only are used. 


Endorsement to be as follows: 

Inspection Report of-barrels of Cannon 

(or Musket) Powder, &c., 
at the Powder Works of A. B., 

(or at the-Arsenal), 

-, 18—. 










































474 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Proceedings in Civil Courts.-Arms of the United States. 


ARTICLE XLVIII. 

PROCEEDINGS IN CIVIL COURTS. 

1433. When an officer is made a party to any action or proceeding in 
a civil court which may involve the interest of the United States; or 
when, by the performance of his public duty, he is involved in any action 
or proceeding in which he claims protection or indemnity from the United 
States, he shall promptly report the case to the Adjutant-General, to be 
laid before the Secretary of War. 

1434. In ordinary cases, when an officer is called upon to show by what 
authority he holds a soldier in service, he can himself set forth the facts, 
and need not employ counsel. In important cases, if counsel be neces¬ 
sary, and there is not time to obtain the previous authority of the War 
Department, he will forthwith report the facts to the Adjutant-General. 

ARTICLE XLIX. 

ARMS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

1435. Arms —Paleways of thirteen pieces, argent and gules; a chief, 
azure; the escutcheon on the breast of the American eagle displayed, 
proper, holding in his dexter talon an olive-branch, and in his sinister a 
bundle of thirteen arrows, all proper; and in his beak a scroll, inscribed 
with this motto: “ e pluribus unum.” 

For the crest: over the head of the eagle, which appears above the 
escutcheon, a glory breaking through a cloud, proper, and surrounding 
thirteen stars, forming a constellation, argent, and on an azure field. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


475 


Flags.-Colors. 


ARTICLE L. 

FLAGS, COLORS, STANDARDS, GUIDONS. 

GARRISON FLAG. 

1436. The garrison flag is the national flag. It is made of bunting, 
thirty-six feet fly, and twenty feet hoist, in thirteen horizontal stripes of 
equal breadth, alternately red and white, beginning with the red. In the 
upper quarter, next the staff, is the Union, composed of a number of 
white stars, equal to the number of States, on a blue field, one-third the 
length of the flag, extending to the lower edge of the fourth red stripe 
from the top. The storm flag is twenty feet by ten feet; the recruiting 
flag, nine feet nine inches by four feet four inches. 

COLORS OF ARTILLERY REGIMENTS. 

1437. Each regiment of Artillery shall have two silken colors. The 
first, or the national color, of stars and stripes, as described for the garri¬ 
son flag. The number and name of the regiment to be embroidered with 
gold on the centre stripe. The second, or regimental color, to be yellow, of 
the same dimensions as the first, bearing in the centre two cannon crossing, 
with the letters U. S. above, and the number of the regiment below; 
fringe, yellow. Each color to be six feet six inches fly, and six feet deep 
on the pike. The pike, including the spear and ferrule, to be nine feet 
ten inches in length. Cords and tassels, red and yellow silk intermixed. 

COLORS OF INFANTRY REGIMENTS. 

1438. Each regiment of Infantry shall have two silken colors. The 
first, or the national color, of stars and stripes, as described for the garri¬ 
son flag; the number and name of the regiment to be embroidered with 
silver on the centre stripe. The second, or regimental color, to be blue, 
with the arms of the United States embroidered in silk on the centre. 
The name of the regiment in a scroll, underneath the eagle. The size of 
each color to be six feet six inches fly, and six feet deep on the pike. 
The length of the pike, including the spear and ferrule, to be nine feet ten 
inches. The fringe yellow; cords and tassels, blue and white silk inter¬ 
mixed. 

CAMP COLORS. 

1439. The camp colors are of bunting, eighteen inches square; white 
for infantry, and red for artillery, with the number of the regiment on 
them. The pole eight feet long. 

2 P 2 


30 





476 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform, Dress, and Horse Equipments. 


STANDARDS AND GUIDONS OF MOUNTED REGIMENTS. 

1440. Each regiment will have a silken standard, and each company a 
silken guidon. The standard to bear the arms of the United States, em¬ 
broidered in silk, on a blue ground, with the number and name of the 
regiment, in a scroll underneath the eagle. The flag of the standard to 
be two feet five inches wide, and two feet three inches on the lance, and 
to be edged with yellow silk fringe. 

1441. The flag of the guidon is swallow-tailed, three feet five inches 
from the lance to the end of the swallow-tail; fifteen inches to the fork 
of the swallow-tail, and two feet three inches on the lance. To be half 
red and half white, dividing at the fork, the red above. On the red, the 
letters U. S. in white; and on the white, the letter of the company in 
red. The lance of the standards and guidons to be nine feet long, includ¬ 
ing spear and ferrule. 


ARTICLE LI. 

UNIFORM, DRESS, AND HORSE EQUIPMENTS. 

COAT. 

For Commissioned Officers. 

1442. All officers shall wear a frock-coat of dark blue cloth, the skirt 
to extend from two-thirds to three-fourths of the distance from the top 
of the hip to the bend of the knee; single-breasted for Captains and 
Lieutenants; double-breasted for all other grades. 

1443. For a Major-General —two rows of buttons on the breast, nine 
in each row, placed by threes; the distance between each row, five and 
one-half inches at top, and three and one-half inches at bottom; stand- 
up collar, to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over 
it, to hook in front at the bottom, and slope thence up and backward at 
an angle of thirty degrees on each side; cuffs two and one-lialf inches 
deep to go around the sleeves parallel with the lower edge, and to button 
with three small buttons at the under seam; pockets in the folds of the 
skirts, with one button at the hip, and one at the end of each pocket, 
making four buttons on the back and skirt of the coat, the hip button to 
range with the lowest buttons on the breast; collar and cuffs to be of 
dark blue velvet; lining of the coat black. 

1444. For a Brigadier-General —the same as for a Major-General, 
except that there will be only eight buttons in each row on the breast, 
placed in pairs. 

1445. For a Colonel —the same as for a Major-General, except that 
there will be only seven buttons in each row on the breast, placed at 




FOR THE ARMY. 


477 


_ Uniform for Enlisted Men. 

equal distances; collar and cuffs of the same color and material as the 
coat. 

1446. For a Lieutenant-Colonel —the same as for a Colonel. 

1447. For a Major —the same as for a Colonel. 

1448. For a Captain —the same as for a Colonel, except that there 
will be only one row of nine buttons on the breast, placed at equal dis¬ 
tances. 

1449. For a First Lieutenant —the same as for a Captain. 

1450. For a Second Lieutenant —the same as for a Captain. 

1451. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant —the same as for a Captain. 

1452. Fora Medical Cadet —thesameas fora Brevet Second Lieutenant. 

1453. A round jacket, according to pattern, of dark blue cloth, trimmed 
with scarlet, with the Russian shoulder-knot, the prescribed insignia of 
rank to be worked in silver in the centre of the knot, may be worn on 
undress duty by officers of Light Artillery. 

For Enlisted Men. 

1454. The uniform coat for all enlisted foot men, shall be a single- 
breasted frock of dark blue cloth, made without plaits, with a skirt ex¬ 
tending one-half the distance from the top of the hip to the bend of the 
knee; one row of nine buttons on the breast, placed at equal distances ; 
stand-up collar to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely 
over it, to hook in front at the bottom and then to slope up and back¬ 
ward at an angle of thirty degrees on each side; cuffs pointed according 
to pattern, and to button with two small buttons at the under seam; 
collar and cuffs edged with a cord or welt of cloth as follows, to wit: 
Scarlet for Artillery; sky-blue for Infantry; yellow for Engineers; 
crimson for Ordnance and Hospital stewards. On each shoulder a metal¬ 
lic scale according to pattern; narrow lining for skirt of the coat of the 
same color and material as the coat; pockets in the folds of the skirts 
with one button at each hip to range with the lowest buttons on the 
breast: no buttons at the ends of the pockets. 

1455. All Enlisted Men of the Cavalry and Light Artillery shall wear 
a uniform jacket of dark blue cloth, with one row of twelve small buttons 
on the breast placed at equal distances; stand-up collar to rise no higher 
than to permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in front at the 
bottom, and to slope the same as the coat-collar; on the collar, on each 
side, two blind button-holes of lace, three-eighths of an inch wide, one 
small button on the button-hole, lower button-hole extending back four 
inches, upper button-hole three and a half inches; top button and front 
ends of collar bound with lace three-eighths of an inch wide, and a strip 
of the same extending down the front and around the whole lower edge 





178 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform.-Buttons. 

of the jacket; the back seam laced with the same, and on the cuff a point 
of the same shape as that on the coat, but formed of the lace; jacket to 
extend to the waist, and to be lined with white flannel; two small buttons 
at the under seam of the cuff, as on the coat cuff; one hook and eye at 
the bottom of the collar; color of lace (worsted), yellow for Cavalry , and 
scarlet for Light Artillery. 

1456. For all Musicians —the same as for other enlisted men of their 
respective corps, with the addition of a facing of lace three-eighths of an 
inch wide on the front of the coat or jacket , made in the following 
manner: bars of three-eighths of an inch worsted lace placed on a line 
with each button six and one-half inches wide at the bottom, and thence 
gradually expanding upward to the last button, counting from the waist 
up, and contracting from thence to the bottom of the collar, where it will 
be six and one-half inches wide, with a strip of the same lace following 
the bars at their outer extremity—the whole presenting something of 
what is called the herring-bone form; the color of the lace facing to cor¬ 
respond with the color of the trimming of the corps. 

1457. For Fatigue Purposes —a sack coat of dark blue flannel extend¬ 
ing half-way down the thigh, and made loose, without sleeve or body 
lining, falling collar, inside pocket on the left side, four coat buttons down 
the front. 

1458. For Recruits —the sack coat will be made with sleeve and body 
lining, the latter of flannel. 

1459. On all occasions of duty, except fatigue, and when out of quar¬ 
ters, the coat or jacket shall be buttoned and hooked at the collar. 

BUTTONS. 

1460. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff- —gilt, 
convex, with spread eagle and stars, and plain border; large size, seven- 
eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch. 

1461. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers —gilt, nine-tenths of an 
inch in exterior diameter, slightly convex; a raised bright rim, one- 
thirtieth of an inch wide; device, an eagle holding in his beak a scroll, 
with the word “ Essayons,” a bastion with embrasures in the distance 
surrounded by water, with a rising sun—the figures to be of dead gold 
upon a bright field. Small buttons of the same form and device, and 
fifty-five hundredths of an inch in exterior diameter. 

1462. For Officers of the Corps of Topographical Engineers —gilt, 
seven-eighths of an inch exterior diameter, convex and solid; device, the 
shield of the United States, occupying one-half the diameter, and the 
letters JT.E. in old English characters the other half; small buttons, 
one-half inch diameter, device and form the same. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


479 


Uniform.-Trowsers.-Hat. 

1463. For Officers of the Ordnance Department —gilt, convex, plain 
border, cross cannon and bombshell, with a circular scroll over and across 
the cannon, containing the words u Ordnance Corps;” large size, seven- 
eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch. 

1464. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry , and Cavalry —gilt, convex; 
device, a spread eagle with the letter A, for Artillery—I, for Infantry— 
C, for Cavalry, on the shield; large size, seven-eighths of an inch in 
exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch. 

1465. Aides-de-camp may wear the button of the General Staff, or of 
their regiment or corps, at their option. 

1466. For Medical Cadets —same as for Officers of the General Staff. 

1467. For all Enlisted Men —yellow, the same as is used by the Artil¬ 
lery, &c., omitting the letter in the shield. 

TROWSERS. 

1468. For General Officers and Officers of the Ordnance Department 
—of dark blue cloth, plain, without stripe, welt, or cord down the outer 
seam. 

1469. For Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps, except the 
Ordnance—dark blue cloth, with a gold cord, one-eighth of an inch in 
diameter, along the outer seam. 

1470. For all Regimental Officers —dark blue cloth, with a welt let 
into the outer seam, one-eighth of an inch in diameter, of colors corre¬ 
sponding to the facings of the respective regiments, viz.: Cavalry, yellow; 
Artillery , scarlet; Infantry, sky-blue. 

1471. For Medical Cadets —same as for Officers of the General Staff, 
except a welt of buff cloth, instead of a gold cord. 

1472. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light Artillery—dark 
blue cloth; sergeants with a stripe one and one-half inch wide; corporals 
with a stripe one-half inch wide, of worsted lace, down and over the 
outer seam, of the color of the facings of the respective corps. 

1473. Ordnance Sergeants and Hospital Stewards —stripe of crimson 
lace one and one-half inch wide. 

1474. Privates —plain, without stripe or welt. 

1475. For Companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery —sky- 

blue cloth. 

All trowsers to he made loose, without plaits, and to spiead well over 
the hoot; to he re-enforced for all enlisted mounted men. 

HAT. 

1476. For Officers —of best black felt. The dimensions of medium 
size to be as follows: 






480 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


U niform.-Trimmings. 

Width of brim, 8} inches. 

Height of crown, 61 inches. 

Oval of tip, i inch. 

Taper of crown, f inch. 

Curve of head, f inch. 

The binding to be l inch deep, of best black ribbed silk. 

1477. For Enlisted Men —of black felt, same shape and size as for 
officers, with double row of stitching, instead of binding, around the 
edge. To agree in quality with the pattern deposited in the clothing 
arsenal. 

1478. Medical Cadets will wear a forage cap according to pattern. 

Trimmings. 

1479. For General Officers —gold cord, with acorn-shaped ends. The 
brim of the hat looped up on the right side, and fastened with an eagle 
attached to the side of the hat; three black ostrich-feathers on the left 
side; a gold-embroidered wreath in front, on black velvet ground, en¬ 
circling the letters m. &. in silver, old English characters. 

1480. For Officers of the Adjutant-General’s, Inspector-General’s, 
Quartermaster’s, Subsistence, Medical and Pay Departments, and the 

y Judge Advocate, above the rank of Captain —the same as for General 
Officers, except the cord, which will be of black silk and gold. 

1481. For the same Departments, below the rank of Field Officers 
—the same as for Field Officers, except that there will be but two 
feathers. 

1482. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers —the same as for the 
General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroid¬ 
ered wreath of laurel and palm, encircling a silver turreted castle on 
black velvet ground. 

1483. For Officers of the Topographical Engineers —the same as for 
the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-em¬ 
broidered wreath of oak leaves, encircling a gold-embroidered shield, on 
black velvet ground. 

1484. For Officers of the Ordnance Department —the same as for the 
General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroid¬ 
ered shell and flame, on black velvet ground. 

1485. For Officers of Cavalry —the same as for the General Staff, 
except the ornament in front, which will be two gold-embroidered sabres 
crossed, edges upward, on black velvet ground, with the number of the 
regiment in silver in the upper angle. 

1486. For Officers of Artillery —the same as for the General Staff, 
except the ornament in front, which will be gold-embroidered cro*>s-can- 




FOR THE ARMY. 


481 


Uniform.-Forage Caps.-Cravat. 

non, on black velvet ground, with tlie number of the regiment in silver 
at the intersection of the cross-cannon. 

1487. For Officers of Infantry —the same as for Artillery, except the 
ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered bugle, on black 
velvet ground, with the number of the regiment in silver within the 
bend. 

1483. For Enlisted Men , except companies of Light Artillery—the 
same as for officers of the respective corps, except that there will be but 
one feather, the cord will be of worsted, of the same color as that of the 
facing of the corps, three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter, running 
three times through a slide of the same material, and terminating with 
two tassels, not less than two inches long, on the side of the hat opposite 
the feather. The insignia of corps, in brass, in front of the hat, correspond¬ 
ing with those prescribed for officers, with the number of regiment, five- 
eighths of an inch long, in brass, and letter of company, one inch, in brass, 
arranged over insignia. 

1489. For Hospital Stewards the cord will be of buff and green mixed. 
The wreath in front of brass, with the letters U. S. in Roman, of white 
metal. Brim to be looped up to side of hat with a brass eagle, having a 
hook attached to the bottom to secure the brim—on the right side for 
mounted men and left side for foot men. The feather to be worn on the 
side opposite the loop. 

1490. All the trimmings of the hat are to be made so that they can be 
detached; but the eagle, badge of corps, and letter of company, are to be 
always worn. 

1491. For companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery, the old 
pattern uniform cap, with red horsehair plume, cord and tassel. 

1492. Officers of the General Staff, and Staff Corps, may wear, at their 
option, a light French chapeau, either stiff crown or flat, according to the 
pattern deposited in the Adjutant-General’s office. Officers below the 
rank of field officers to wear but two feathers. 

FORAGE CAPS. 

1493. For fatigue purposes, forage caps, of pattern in the Quarter¬ 
master-General’s office: dark blue cloth, with a welt of the same around 
the crown, and yellow metal letters in front to designate companies. 

1494. Commissioned officers may wear forage caps of the same pattern, 
with the distinctive ornament of the corps and regiment in front. 

CRAVAT OR STOCK. 

1495. For all Officers —black; when a cravat is worn, the tie not to 
be visible at the opening of the collar. 






482 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform.-Boots.-Sash.-Sword-Belt. 

1496. Foi all Enlisted Men —black leather, according to pattern. 

BOOTS. 

1497. For all Officers —ankle or Jefferson. 

1498. For Enlisted Men of Cavalry and Light Artillery —ankle and 
Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern. 

1499. For Enlisted Men of Artillery, Infantry, Engineers, and 
Ordnance —Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern. 

SPURS. 

1500. For all Mounted Officers —yellow metal, or gilt. 

1501. For all Enlisted Mounted Men —yellow metal, according to pat¬ 
tern. (See par. 1620.) 

GLOVES. 

1502. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff and Staff 
Corps —buff or white. 

1503. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry, Cavalry, Dragoons, and 
Riflemen —white. 

SASH. 

1504. For General Officers —buff, silk net, with silk bullion fringe 
ends; sash to go twice around the waist, and to tie behind the left hip, 
pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie. 

1505. For Officers of the Adjutant- General's, Inspector- General's, 
Quartermaster's, and Subsistence Departments, Corps of Engineers , 
Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, Artillery , Infantry, Cavalry, and 
the Judge Advocate of the Army —crimson silk net; for Officers of the 

i/ Medical Department —medium or emerald green silk net, with silk bul¬ 
lion fringe ends; to go around the waist and tie as for General Officers. 

1506. For all Sergeant Majors, Quartermaster Sergeants, Ordnance 
Sergeants, Hospital Stewards, First Sergeants, Principal or Chief Mu¬ 
sicians and Chief Buglers —red worsted sash, with worsted bullion fringe 
ends; to go twice around the waist, and to tie behind the left hip, 
pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie. 

1507. The sash will be worn (over the coat) on all occasions of duty 
of every description, except stable and fatigue. 

1508. The sash will be worn by “ Officers of the Day" across the 
body, scarf fashion, from the right shoulder to the left side, instead of 
around the waist, tying behind the left hip as prescribed. 

SWORD-BELT. 

1509. For all Officers —a waist-belt not less than one and one-half 
inch nor more than two inches wide; to be worn over the sash; the 







FOR THE ARMY. 


483 


Uniform.-Sword and Scabbard. 

sword to be suspended from it by slings of tbe same material as tbe 
belt, with a book attached to tbe belt upon which the sword may be 
bung. 

1510. For General Officers — Russia leather, with three stripes of 
gold embroidery ; the slings embroidered on both sides. 

1511. For all other Officers —black leather, plain. 

1512. For all Non-commissioned Officers —black leather, plain. , 

SWORD-BELT PLATE. 

1513. For all Officers and Enlisted Men —gilt, rectangular, two inches 
wide, with a raised bright rim; a silver wreath of laurel encircling the 
“Arms of the United States;” eagle, shield, scroll, edge of cloud and 
rays bright. The motto, “ E Pluribus Unum,” in silver letters, upon 
the scroll; stars also of silver; according to pattern. 

SWORD AND SCABBARD. 

1514. For General Officers —straight sword, gilt hilt, silver grip, brass 
or steel scabbard. 

1515. For Officers of tlic Adjutant-General’s, Inspector-General’s, 
Quartermaster’s, and Subsistence Departments, Corps of Engineers, 
Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, the Judge Advocate of the Army, 
Aides-de-Camp, Field Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Foot Riflemen, 
and for the Light Artillery —the sword of the pattern adopted by the 
War Department, April 9, 1850; or the one described in General 
Orders No 21, of August 28, 18G0, for officers therein designated. 

1516. For the Medical and Pay Departments —small sword and scab- ^ 
bard, according to pattern in the Surgeon-General’s office. 

1517. For Medical Cadets, the sword and belt and plate will be the 
same as for non-commissioned officers. 

1518. For Officers of Cavalry —sabre and scabbard now in use, 
according to pattern in the Ordnance Department. 

1519. For the Artillery, Infantry, and Foot Riflemen, except the field 
officers—the sword of the pattern adopted by the War Department, 
April 9, 1850. 

1520. The sword and sword-belt will be worn upon all occasions of 
duty, without exception. 

1521. When on foot, the sabre will be suspended from the hook 
attached to the belt. 

1522. When not on military duty, officers may wear swords of honor, 
ur the prescribed sword, with a scabbard, gilt, or of leather with gilt 

mountings. 

2Q 




484 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform.-Badges to distinguish Rank. 

SWORD-KNOT. 

1528. For General Officers —gold cord with acorn end. 

1524. For all other officers —gold lace strap with gold bullion tassel. 

BADGES TO DISTINGUISH RANK. 

Epaulettes. 

1525. For the Major-General Commanding the Army —gold, with solid 
crescent; device, three silver-embroidered stars, one, one and a half inches 
in diameter, one, one and one-fourth inches in diameter, and one, one and 
one-eighth inches in diameter, placed on the strap in a row, longitudinally, 
and equidistant, the largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest 
at the top; dead and bright gold bullion, one-half inch in diameter and 
three and one-half inches long. 

1526. For all other Major-Generals —the same as for the Major-Gene¬ 
ral Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars on the 
strap instead of three, omitting the smallest. 

1527. For a Brigadier-General —the same as for a Major-General, 
except that, instead of two, there shall be one star (omitting the smallest) 
placed upon the strap, and not within the crescent. 

1528. For a Colonel —the same as for a Brigadier-General, substituting 
a silver-embroidered spread eagle for the star upon the strap ; and within 
the crescent for the Medical Department —a laurel wreath embroidered in 
gold, and the letters <£., i n old English characters, in silver, within 
the wreath; Pay Department —same as the Medical Department, with the 
letters 13.0., in old English characters; Corps of Engineers —a turreted 
castle of silver; Corps of Topographical Engineers —a shield embroidered 
in gold, and below it the letters 22 ., old English characters, in sil¬ 
ver; Ordnance Department —shell and flame in silver embroidery; Regi¬ 
mental Officers —the number of the regiment embroidered in gold, within 
a circlet of embroidered silver, one and three-fourths inches in diameter, 
upon cloth of the following colors: for Artillery —scarlet; Infantry — 
light or sky blue; Cavalry —yellow. 

1529. For a , Lieutenant-Colonel —the same as for a Colonel, according 
to corps, but substituting for the eagle a silver-embroidered leaf. 

1530. For a Major —the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, 
omitting the eagle. 

1581. For a Captain —the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, 
except that the bullion will be only one-fourth of an inch in diameter, 
and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle two 
silver-embroidered bars. 

1532. For a First Lieutenant —the same as for a Colonel, according to 






FOR THE ARMY. 


48o 


_ U niform.-Badges to distinguish Rank. 

corps, except that the bullion will be only one-eighth of an inch in diame¬ 
ter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle one 
silver-embroidered bar. 

1533. For a Second Lieutenant —the same as for a First Lieutenant, 
omitting the bar. 

1534. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant —the same as fora Second Lieu¬ 
tenant. 

1535. All officers having military rank will wear an epaulette on each 
shoulder. 

1536. The epaulette may be dispensed with when not on duty, and on 
certain duties off parade, to wit: at drills, at inspections of barracks and 
hospitals, on Courts of Inquiry and Boards, at inspections of articles and 
necessaries, on working parties and fatigue duties, and upon the march, 
except when, in war, there is immediate expectation of meeting the enemy, 
and also when the overcoat is worn. 

Shoulder-Straps. 

1537. For the Major-General Commanding the Army —dark blue cloth, 
one and three-eighths inches wide by four inches long; bordered with an 
embroidery of gold one-fourth of an inch wide; three silver-embroidered 
stars of five rays, one star on the centre of the strap, and one on each side 
equidistant between the centre and the outer edge of the strap; the cen¬ 
tre star to be the largest. 

1538. For all other Major-Generals —the same as for the Major-Gene¬ 
ral Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars instead 
of three; the centre of each star to be one inch from the outer edge of 
the gold embroidery on the ends of the strap; both stars of the same 
size. 

1539. For a Brigadier-General —the same as for a Major-General, 
except that there will be one star instead of two; the centre of the star 
to be equidistant from the outer edge of the embroidery on the ends of 
the strap. 

1540. For a Colonel —the same size as for a Major-General, and bor¬ 
dered in like manner with an embroidery of gold; a silver-embroidered 
spread eagle on the centre of the strap, two inches between the tips of 
the wings, having in the right talon an olive-branch, and in the left a 
bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast, as represented in the 
arms of the United States; cloth of the strap as follows: for the General 
Staff and Staff Corps —dark blue; Artillery —scarlet; Infantry —light 
or sky blue; Cavalry —yellow. 

1541. For a Lieutenant-Colonel —the same as for a Colonel, according 
to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing a silver-embroidered leaf at 






486 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform.-Badges to distinguish Rank. 

each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end 
border of the strap. 

1542. For a Major —the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, 
omitting the eagle, and introducing a gold-embroidered leaf at each end, 
each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the 
strap. 

1548. For a Captain —the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, 
omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end two gold-embroidered 
bars of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the 
strap; the distance between them and from the border equal to the width 
of the border. 

1544. For a First Lieutenant —the same as for a Colonel, according to 
corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end one gold-embroid¬ 
ered bar of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of 
the strap, at a distance from the border equal to its width. 

1545. For a Second Lieutenant —the same as for a Colonel, according 
to corps, omitting the eagle. 

1546. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant —the same as for a Second Lieu¬ 
tenant. 

1547. For a Medical Cadet —a strip of gold lace three inches long, 
half an inch wide, placed in the middle of a strap of green cloth three 
and three-quarter inches long by one and one-quarter inches wide. 

1548. The shoulder-strap will be worn whenever the epaulette is not. 

Chevrons. 

1549. The rank of non-commissioned officers will be marked by chev¬ 
rons upon both sleeves of the uniform coat and overcoat, above the elbow, 
of silk or worsted binding one-half an inch wide, same color as the edging 
on the coat, points down, as follows: 

1550. For a Sergeant Major —three bars and an arc, in silk. 

1551. For a Quartermaster Sergeant —three bars and a tie, in silk. 

1552. For an Ordnance Sergeant —three bars and a star, in silk. 

1553. For a Hospital Steward —a half chevron of the following 
description,—viz.: of emerald green cloth, one and three-fourths inches 
wide, running obliquely downward from the outer to the inner seam of 
the sleeve, and at an angle of about thirty degrees with a horizontal, 
parallel to, and one-eighth of an inch distant from, both the upper and 
lower edge, an embroidery of yellow silk one-eighth of an inch wide, and 
in the centre a “ caduceus” two inches long, embroidered also with yellow 
silk, the head toward the outer seam of the sleeve. 

1554. For a First Sergeant —three bars and a lozenge, in worsted- 

1555. For a Sergeant —three bars, in worsted. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


487 


Uniform.-Overcoat. 

1556. For a Corporal —two bars, in worsted. 

1557. For a Pioneer —two crossed hatchets of cloth, same color and 
material as the edging of the collar, to be sewed on each arm above the 
elbow in the place indicated for a chevron (those of a corporal to be just 
above and resting on the chevron), the head of the hatchet upward, its 
edge outward, of the following dimensions, viz.: Handle —four and one- 
half inches long, one-fourth to one-third of an inch wide. Hatchet — 
two inches long, one inch wide at the edge. 

1558. To indicate service —all non-commissioned officers, musicians, 
and privates, who have served faithfully for the term of five years, will 
wear, as a mark of distinction, upon both sleeves of the uniform coat, 
below the elbow, a diagonal half chevron, one-half an inch wide, extend¬ 
ing from seam to seam, the front end nearest the cuff, and one-half an 
inch above the point of the cuff, to be of the same color as the edging on 
the coat. In like manner, an additional half chevron, above and parallel 
to the first, for every subsequent five years of faithful service; distance 
between each chevron one-fourth of an inch. Service in war will be in¬ 
dicated by a light or sky blue stripe on each side of the chevron for Artil¬ 
lery, and a red stripe for all other corps, the stripe to be one- eighth of an 
inch wide. 


OVERCOAT. 

For Commissioned Officers. 

1559. A u cloak coat” of dark blue cloth, closing by means of four 
frog buttons of black silk and loops of black silk cord d'<wn the breast, 
and at the throat by a long loop d dchelle, without tassel or plate, on the 
left side, and a black silk frog button on the right; oord for the loops 
fifteen-hundredths of an inch in diameter; back, a single piece, slit up 
from the bottom, from fifteen to seventeen inches, according to the height 
of the wearer, and closing at will, by buttons, and button-holes cut in a 
•'oncealed flap; collar of the same color and material as the coat, rounded 
at the edges, and to stand or fall; when standing, to be about five inches 
high; sleeves loose, of a single piece, and round at the bottom, without 
cuff or slit; lining, woolen; around the front and lower border, the edges 
of the pockets, the edges of the sleeves, collar, and slit in the back, a flat 
braid of black silk one-half an inch wide; and around each frog button on 
the breast, a knot two and one-quarter inches in diameter of black silk cord, 
seven-hundredths of an inch in diameter, arranged according to drawing; 
cape of the same color and material as the coat, removable at the pleasure 
of the wearer, and reaching to the cuff of the coat-sleeve when the arm 
is extended; coat to extend down the leg from six to eight inches below 
the knee, according to height. To indicate rank, there will be on both 

2Q2 







488 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform.-Shirts, Blankets, &c. 

sleeves, near the lower edge, a knot of flat black silk braid not exceeding 
one-eighth of an inch in width, arranged according to drawing, and com¬ 
posed as follows: 

1560. For a General —of five braids, double knot. 

1561. For a Colonel —of five braids, single knot. 

1562. For a Lieutenant-Colonel —of four braids, single knot. 

1563. For a Major —of three braids, single knot. 

1564. For a Captain —of two braids, single knot. 

1565. For a First Lieutenant —of one braid, single knot. 

1566. For a Second Lieutenant and Brevet Second Lieutenant —a plain 
sleeve, without knot or ornament. 

For Enlisted Men. 

1567. Of all Mounted Corps —of sky-blue cloth; stand-and-fall collar; 
double-breasted; cape to reach down to the cuff of the coat when the 
arm is extended, and to button all the way up; buttons (1467). 

1568. All other Enlisted Men —of sky-blue cloth; stand-up collar; 
single-breasted; cape to reach down to the elbows when the arm is ex¬ 
tended, and to button all the way up; buttons (1467). 

1569. For Cavalry —a gutta-percha talma, or cloak extending to the 
knee, with long sleeves. 

OTHER ARTICLES OF CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT. 

1570. Flannel shirt, drawers, stockings, and stable-frock —the same as 
now furnished. 

1571. Blanket —woolen, gray, with letters U. S. in black, four inches 
long, in the centre; to be seven feet long, and five and a half feet wide, 
and to weigh five pounds. 

1572. Canvas overalls for Engineer soldiers —of white cotton; one 
garment to cover the whole of the body below the waist, the breast, the 
shoulders, and the arms; sleeves loose, to allow a free play of the arms, 
with narrow wristband buttoning with one button; overalls to fasten at 
the neck behind with two buttons, and at the waist behind with buckle 
and tongue. 

1573. Belts of all Enlisted Men —black leather. 

1574. Cartridge-box —according to pattern in the Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment. 

1575. Drum-sling —white webbing; to be provided with a brass drum¬ 
stick carriage, according to pattern. 

1576. Knapsack —of painted canvas, according to pattern now issued 
by the Quartermaster’s Department; the great-coat, when carried, to be 
neatly folded, not rolled, and covered by the outer flap of the knapsack. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


489 




Horse Equipments. 

1577. Haversack —of painted canvas, with an inside sack unpainted, 
according to the pattern now issued by the Quartermaster’s Department. 

1578. Canteen —of tin, covered with woolen cloth, of the pattern now 
issued by the Quartermaster’s Department. 

TENTS. 

1579. For all Commissioned Officers —wall tent, with a fly, pattern now 
issued by the Quartermaster’s Department. 

1580. For Hospital purposes —pattern described in “General Orders” 
No. 1, of January 19, 1860. 

1581. For all Enlisted Men —Sibley’s patent, according to the pattern 
now issued by the Quartermaster’s Department, at the rate of one tent to 
17 mounted or 20 foot men. Sheet-iron stoves will be issued with the 
tents in cold climates, or when specially ordered. 

1582. For Officers’ Servants and Laundresses —small common tent, old 
pattern. 

HORSE FURNITURE. 

For General Officers and the General Staff. 

1583. Housing for General Officers —to be worn over the saddle; of 
dark blue cloth, trimmed with two rows of gold lace, the outer row one 
inch and five-eighths wide, the inner row two inches and one-fourth; to 
be made full, so as to cover the horse’s haunches and forehands, and to 
bear on each flank corner the following ornaments, distinctive of rank, to 
wit: for the Major-General Commanding the Army —a gold-embroidered 
spread eagle and three stars; for other Major-Generals —a gold-embroid¬ 
ered spread eagle and two stars; for a. Brigadier-General —a gold-em¬ 
broidered spread eagle and one star. 

1584. Saddle-cloth for General Staff Officers— dark blue cloth, of 
sufficient length to cover the saddle and holsters, and one foot ten inches 
in depth, with an edging of gold lace one inch wide. 

1585. Surcingle —blue web. 

1586. Bridle —black leather; bent branch bit, with gilt bosses; the 
front and roses yellow. 

1587. Collar —yellow. 

1588. Holsters — black leather, with gilt mountings. 

1589. Stirrups —gilt or yellow metal. 

For Officers of the Corps of Engineers and Topographical Engineers. 

1590. The same as for General Staff Officers. 

1591. In time of actual field service, General Officers and Officers of 
the General Staff and Staff Corps are permitted to use the horse equip¬ 
ments described for mounted service. 




490 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Horse Equipments. 


HORSE EQUIPMENTS FOR THE MOUNTED SERVICE. 

1592. A complete set of horse equipments for mounted troops consists 
of 1 bridle, 1 watering bridle., 1 halter, 1 saddle, 1 pair saddle bags, 1 
"addle blanket, 1 surcingle, 1 pair spurs, 1 currycomb, 1 horse brush, 1 
vicket pin, and 1 lariat; 1 link and 1 nose bag when specially required. 

HEAD GEAR. 

1593. All the leather is black bridle leather, and the buckles are mal¬ 
leable iron, flat, bar buckles, blued. 

1594. Bridle —It is composed of 1 headstall, 1 bit, 1 pair of reins. 

1595. Headstall—1 crown piece, the ends split, forming 1 cheek 
strap) and 1 throat lash billet on one side, and on the other, 1 cheek strap 
and 1 throat lash, with 1 buckle, .625 inch, 2 chapes and 2 buckles, .75 
inch, sewed to the ends of cheek piece to attach the bit; 1 brow band, 
the ends doubled and sewed form 2 loops on each end through which the 
cheek straps and throat lash and throat lash billet pass. 

1596. Bit (shear steel, blued)—2 branches, S shaped, pierced at top 
with an eye for the cheek strap billet, and with a small hole near the eye 
for the curb chain, terminated at the bottom by 2 buttons, into which are 
welded 2 rings, 1 inch, for the reins; 1 mouth piece, curved in the mid¬ 
dle, its ends pass through the branches and are riveted to them; 1 cross 
bar, riveted to the branches near the lower ends; 2 bosses (cast brass), 
bearing the number and letter of the regiment and the letter of the com¬ 
pany, riveted to the branches with 4 rivets; 1 curb-chain hook, steel wire, 
No. 10, fastened to the near branch; 1 curb chain, steel wire, No. 11, 
curb-chain links 0.7 inch wide, with 1 loose ring in the middle, fastened 
to the off branch by a S hook, coldshut; 1 curb strap (leather), fastened 
to the curb chain by 2 standing loops. 

1597. 1 curb ring for bit No. 1 replaces the curb chain and curb strap. 
They are of two sizes: No. 1 has an interior diameter of 4 inches; No. 
2, of 3.75 inches. The number is marked on the outside of the swell. 
No. 1 is the larger size. 

1598. There are four bits, differing from each other in the arch of the 
mouth piece, and in the distance from the mouth piece to the eye for the 
cheek strap. The branches are alike below the mouth piece. No. 1 is a 
Spanish bit, No. 2 is the next severest, and No. 4 is the mildest. Height 
of arch is 2| inches in No. 1, 2 inches in No. 2, 1£ inch in No. 3, and 
£ inch in No. 4. The distance between the branches is 4.5 inches in all 
the bits. 

1599. Heins —2 reins sewed together at one end, the other ends sewed 
to the rings of the bit. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


491 


Horse Equipments. 


WATERING BRIDLE. 

1600. The watering bridle is composed of 1 bit and 1 pair of reins. 

1601. Bit (wrought iron, blued)—2 mouth-piece sides united in the mid¬ 
dle by a loop hinge; their ends are pierced with 2 holes to receive 2 
rings 1.7 inches diameter for the reins. 2 chains and toggles , 3 links, 
each 1 inch X 0.55 inch, welded into the rein rings. 

1602. Heins —2 reins sewed together at one end, the other end sewed 
to rings of the bit. 

I 

HALTER. 

1603. 2 cheek pieces, sewed at one end to 2 square loops 1.6 inches 
diameter, and the other to 2 cheek rings 1.6 inches diameter; 2 standing 
loops for the toggles of the watering bridle sewed to the cheek piece 
near to the square loops; 1 crown piece sewed to the off cheek ring, 1 
buckle 1.12 inches, and chape sewed to the near cheek ring; 1 nose band, 
the ends sewed to the square loops; 1 chin strap, the ends sewed to the 
square loops and passing loose through the hitching-strap ring; 1 throat 
strap, folded on itself making two thicknesses, and forming at top a loop 
for the throat band to pass through, and embracing in the fold at the 
other end 1 bolt which holds 1 hitching-strap ring ; 1 throat band passes 
loose through the loop in the throat strap, and is sewed to the cheek 
rings; 1 hitching strap 6£ feet long, 1 buckle 1.25 inches, and 1 standing 
loop, 1 billet sewed to the buckle end by the same seam which holds the 
buckle. 


SADDLE. 

1604. All the leather is black bridle or harness leather, and the 
buckles are blued malleable iron. 

1605. The saddle is composed of 1 tree, 2 saddle skirts, 2 stirrups, 1 
girth and girth strap, 1 surcingle, 1 crupper. 


SADDLE TREE. 

1606. Wood (beech)—1 pommel made of 2 pieces framed together at 
top and glued; 1 cantle formed of 2 pieces like the pommel; 2 side bars 
(poplar), each made of 3 pieces glued together; they are glued to the 
pommel and cantle, and fastened by 2 rivets, 2 burrs, and 4 nails, the 
burrs let in on the under side; 1 strap mortise in the pommel, 3 strap 
mortises in the cantle. 

1607. There are three sizes of trees, varying in the length of the seat 

The number is marked on the pommel ornament. 

31 




492 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Horse Equipments. 

No. 1. 11 inches length of seat. 15 per cent. 

No. 2. 1U “ “ 50 “ 

No. 3. 12 “ “ 35 “ 

1608. Iron. —1 pommel arc 0.1 inch thick, with three small holes on 
top, fastened to the side bars by 4 rivets; 1 pommel plate 0.1 inch thick, 
semi-circular, fastened to the front of the pommel by 4 rivets; 1 cantle. 
arc 0.1 inch thick, with three small holes on top, fastened to the side bars 
by 4 rivets; 1 cantle plate 0.1 inch thick, fastened to the rear of the cantle 
by 4 rivets ; 2 stirrup loops hinged in 2 holdfasts which are fastened to 
the side bars by 6 rivets. 

1609. The tree is painted with one coat of white lead. It is covered 
with the best quality kip skin raw hide, put on wet, sewed with thongs 
of the same and held in place by stitches through the wood along the 
junction of the pommel and cantle with the side bars. The seams are 
made on the edges of the side bars, where they will not chafe the horse 
or rider. 

1610. 2 crupper rings, held by staples driven into the front ends of 
side bars; 2 foot staples for coat straps, fastened to tbe front of the 
pommel by 4 brass screws, | inch; 2 crupper rings (japanned black), 
fastened by staples driven into the rear ends of side bars; 2 foot staples, 
fastened to the rear of cantle by 4 brass screws, f inch; 1 guard plate, 1 
pommel ornament, shield-shaped (sheet brass), fastened to the pommel, 
each, by 3 brass screw pins; 6 guard plates, fastened to the cantle by 12 
screw pins; 2 foot staples, fastened on the back strap by 4 brass screws, 
f inch; 1 saddle-bag stud, fastened on the back strap to the cantle arc 
by 2 copper rivets. 

1611. Two SADDLE SKIRTS (thick harness leather), fastened to the 
side bars by 38 brass screws, f inch; 2 stag loops for the saddle-bag 
straps, sewed to the rear edge of the skirts. 

1612. Two stirrups (hickory or oak), made of one piece bent, the 
ends separated by 1 transom and fastened by 2 iron rivets, each, 4 burrs; 
2 leather hoods, fastened to the stirrups by 12 copper rivets and burrs — 
distance of hood from rear of stirrup, 6 inches; 2 stirrup straps, 2 brass 
buckles, 1.375 inches, 2 sliding loops, pass through the stirrup loops and 
through a hole cut in the skirts; 2 sioeat leathers, each has 2 standing 
loops. 

1613. Girth— 2 girth straps pass over the pommel and cantle arcs, to 
which they are fastened by 4 copper rivets and 4 burrs ; they are fastened 
to the side bars by 4 brass screws, f inch; the ends are sewed into 2 D 
rings, 1.85 inches; 2 girth billets, sewed to the straight side of the D rings; 
1 girth, 4.5 inches, blue woolen webbing; 1 chape, 1 buckle, 2 inches, 
1 standing loop, and 1 safe on the off end; and 1 chape, 1 buckle, 1.5 




FOR THE ARMY. 


493 


Horse Equipments. 

inches, 1 D ring , 1.85 inches, 1 standing loop, 1 safe on the near side; 

1 standing loop on the middle. 

1614. Six coat straps, 6 buckles, 0.625 inch, and stops. They pass 
through the mortises in the pommel and cantle and the foot staples. 

1615. One carbine socket, 1 strap, 1 buckle, 0.75 inch, sewed to the 
socket. The socket is buckled to the D ring on the off side of the 
saddle. 

1616. One surcingle, 3-25 inches, blue woolen webbing; 1 chape, 1 
buckle, 1.5 inches, 1 standing loop on one end, and 1 billet on the other; 
1 billet lining sewed over the end of webbing to the billet; 2 standing 
loops near the buckle end. 

1617. Crupper —1 dock, made of a single piece and stuffed with hair, 
the ends sewed to the body of the crupper; 1 body, split at one end, has 
sewed to it 1 chape, 1 ring, 1.25 inches, 2 back straps —each has one 
buckle, 0.75 inch, and 2 sliding loops —they pass through the rings of 
the side bars and the ring on the body of the crupper. 

1618. Saddle bags (bag leather).—They are composed of 2 pouches 
and 1 seat; the ends of the seat are sewed to the pouches. Each pouch 
has 1 back, sewed to the gusset and upper part of inner front with a welt; 
1 gusset, sewed to the back and to 1 outer and 1 inner front with a welt; 
1 flap, sewed to the top of the back and to the seat by 2 seams; 1 flap 
billet, sewed to the point of the flap; 1 chape and 1 buckle, 0.625 inch, 
sewed to the outer front; 1 billet, 1 buckle, 0.625 inch, sewed to the 
chape. The seat is sewed to the pouch by the same seams which join 
the flap to the back of the pouch. It has 2 holes for the foot staples and 
1 hole for the saddle-bag stud; 2 key straps, sewed to the seat near its 
ends; 4 lacing thongs for the pouches. 

1619. Saddle blanket. —To be of pure wool, close woven, of stout 
yarns of an indigo-blue color, with an orange border 3 inches wide, 3 
inches from the edge. The letters U. S., 6 inches high, of orange color, 
in the centre of the blanket. Dimensions: 75 inches long, 67 inches 
wide; weight, 3.1875 pounds; variation allowed in weight, 0.1875 pounds. 

1620. Spurs (brass).—2 spurs, 2 rowels, 2 rivets, 2 spur straps, 19 
inches long, 2 roller buckles, 0.625 inch, 2 standing loops. 

Length of heel for No. 1, 31 inches; for No. 2, 31 inches—inside meas. 
Width of heel “ 31 “ “ 3 “ “ 

Length of shank to centre of rowel, 1 inch. 

Diameter of rowel, 0.85 inch. 

1621. One horse brush —1 body (maple), Russia bristles; 1 cover , 
olued and fastened to the body by 8 brass screws; 1 hand strap, fair 
leather, fastened to the sides of the body by 6 screws; 2 leather washers 
under the heads of screws. Dimensions: Body, 9.25 inches long, 4 




404 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Uniform.-Miscellaneous. 

inches wide, 0.5 inch thick; cover, 0.1 inch thick; bristles project 0.9 
inch; hand strap, 2 inches wide. 

1622. One curry comb —iron, japanned black. The pattern of “ Car¬ 
penter’s, No. 333.” 1 body (sheet iron, 0.4), the top and bottom edges 

turned at right angles, forming two rows of teeth; 3 double rows of teeth, 
riveted to the body by six rivets', 1 cross bar , riveted across the top by 
2 rivets; 1 handle shank , riveted to the body by 3 rivets; 1 handle 
(wood), turned and painted, passes over the shank and is held by the 
riveted end of the shank; 1 ferrule, sheet iron. Dimensions: Length, 
4 inches; width, 4.75 inches; thickness, 0.75 inch; length of handle, 
4 inches; weight, 0.84 pound. 

1623. One picket pin (iron, painted black).—The parts are: the 
body, the neck, the head, the swell, the point; 1 lariat ring around the 
neck, 8-shaped, the larger opening for the lariat. Dimensions: Length, 
14 inches; diameter at swell, 4 inches from point, 0.75 inch; at neck, 
0.5 inch; at head, 1 inch; lariat ring, 0.2 inch wire, welded, interior 
diameter, 1 inch; weight of pin, 1.29 pounds. 

1624. One lariat. —Best hemp 11-inch rope, 30 feet long, of 4 
strands; an eye spliced in one end, the other end whipped with small 
twine; weight, 2.38 pounds. 

1625. One link —1 strap, embracing in the fold at one end 1 spring 
hook, and at the other 1 buckle, 0.75 inch, and 1 billet. 

1626. One nose bag —same as for Light Artillery. 

MILITARY STORE-KEEPERS. 

1627. A citizen’s frock-coat of blue cloth, with buttons of the depart¬ 
ment to which they are attached; round black hat; pantaloons and vest, 
plain, white or dark blue; cravat or stock, black. 

miscellaneous. 

1628. General Officers, and Colonels having the brevet rank of Gene¬ 
ral Officers, may, on occasions of ceremony, and when not serving with 
troops, wear the “dress” and “undress” prescribed by existing regulations. 

1629. Officers below the grade of Colonel having brevet rank, will 
wear the epaulettes and shoulder-straps distinctive of their army rank. 
In all other respects, their uniform and dress will be that of their re¬ 
spective regiments, corps, or departments, and according to their com¬ 
missions in the same. Officers above the grade of Lieutenant-Colonel by 
ordinary commission, having brevet rank, may wear the uniform of their 
respective regiments or corps, or that of General Officers, according to 
their brevet rank. 




FOR THE ARMY. 


495 


_Volunteers and Militia. 

1630. The uniform and dress of the Signal Officer will be that of a 
Major of the General Staff. 

1631. Officers are permitted to wear a plain dark blue body-coat, with 
the button designating their respective corps, regiments, or departments, 
without any other mark or ornament upon it. Such a coat, however, is 
not to he considered as a dress for any military purpose. 

1632. In like manner, officers are permitted to wear a buff, white, or 
blue vest, with the small button of their corps, regiment, or department. 

1633. Officers serving with mounted troops are allowed to wear, for 
stable duty, a plain dark blue cloth jacket, with one or two rows of buttons 
down the front, according to rank; stand-up collar, sloped in front as 
that of the uniform coat; shoulder-straps according to rank, but no other 
ornament. 

1634. The hair to be short; the heard to be worn at the pleasure of 
the individual; but, when worn, to be kept short and neatly trimmed. 

1635. A Band will wear the uniform of the regiment or corps to which 
it belongs. The commanding officer may, at the expense of the corps, 
sanctioned by the Council of Administration, make such additions in 
ornaments as he may judge proper. 

ARTICLE LII. 

VOLUNTEERS AND MILITIA IN THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

1636. Whenever volunteer or drafted militia are called into the service 
of the United States, by any officer authorized to make such call, the 
requisition must he made on the Governor of the State or Territory in 
which the militia are to be raised, and the number of officers, non-com¬ 
missioned officers, and privates will be stated in the requisition, accord¬ 
ing to the organization prescribed by the law of the United States. 

1637. Before militia are received in the service of the United States, 
they shall be mustered by an Inspector-General, or some other officer of 
the regular army, specially designated to muster them. 

1638. When volunteers are to be mustered into the service of the 
United States, they will, at the same time, be minutely examined by the 
surgeon and assistant surgeon of the regiment, to ascertain whether 
they have the physical qualifications necessary for the military service. 
And in case any individual shall be discharged within three months after 
entering the service, for a disability which existed at that time, he shall 
receive neither pay nor allowances except subsistence and transportation 
to his home. The certificate given by the surgeon will, in all cases 
state whether the disability existed prior to the date of muster, -or was 

contracted after it. 

2R , 






496 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Volunteers and Militia. 

1639. It shall be the duty of the officer designated to muster and 
inspect militia, to forward muster-rolls of each company, and of the field 
and staff of each regiment, direct to the Adjutant-General of the Army, 
Washington; and he will also immediately forward a consolidated return, 
by regiments and corps, of the force received into service, for the in¬ 
formation of the War Department. 

1640. Mustering in .—Reference will be made to the particular act or 
acts of Congress under which the militia are called into service. If there 
be no such act, then to the act May 8, 1792, amended by the acts April 
18, 1814, and April 20, 1816. Mustering officers will not muster into 
service a greater number of officers, or of higher rank, than the law pre¬ 
scribes. No officers of the general staff will be mustered or received into 
service, except such general officers, with their aides-de-camp, as may be 
required to complete the organization of brigades or divisions. 

1641. Mustering out .—The rolls for this purpose will be compared with 
those of the first muster. All persons on the first rolls, and absent at 
the final muster, must be accounted for—whether dead, captured, dis¬ 
charged, or otherwise absent; and if the mustering officer, in any par¬ 
ticular case, shall have cause to doubt the report made to be entered on 
the rolls, he shall demand the oath of one or more persons to prove the 
fact to his satisfaction; further, he shall take care that not more persons 
of the several ranks be mustered out of service than were mustered in, 
if there be an excess over the requisition or beyond the law, nor recognize 
additions or substitutes, without full satisfaction that the additions or sub¬ 
stitutions were regularly made, and at the time reported on the rolls. 

1642. Officers mustering in troops will be careful that men from one 
company or detachment are not borrowed for the occasion, to swell the 
ranks of others about to be mustered. No volunteer will be mustered 
into the service who is unable to speak the English language. 

1643. Officers charged with the duty of mustering militia will take 
care that the muster-rolls contain all the information that may iu any 
way affect their pay; the distance from the places of residence to the place 
of rendezvous or organization, and the date of arrival, must be stated in each 
case; the date and place of discharge, and the distance thence to the place 
of residence; all stoppages for articles furnished by the Government must 
be noted on the rolls; and in cases of absence at the time of discharge of 
the company, the cause of absence must be stated. When the necessary 
information cannot be obtained, the mustering officer will state the reason. 

1644. If, as has sometimes happened, militia, at the end of a term of 
service, shall, from the want of a mustering officer, disperse or return 
home without being regularly mustered out; and if, with a view to a pay¬ 
ment, a muster shall afterward be ordered by competent authority, tho 





FOR THE ARMY. 


497 


Volunteers and Militia. 

officer sent for the purpose shall carefully verify all the facts affecting 
pay, by the oath of one or more of the officers belonging to such militia, 
in order that full justice may he done. 

1645. In all cases of muster for payment, whether final or otherwise, 
the mustering officer will give his particular attention to the state and 
condition of the public property: such as quarters, camp-equipage, means 
of transportation, arms, accoutrements, ammunition, &c., which have been 
in the use or possession of the militia to be paid; and if any such public 
property shall appear to be damaged, or lost, beyond ordinary wear or un¬ 
avoidable accident, such loss or damage shall be noted on the muster-rolls, 
in order that the injury or loss sustained by the United States may be 
stopped from the pay that would otherwise be due to the individual or 
detachmeut mustered for payment. See regulations of the Ordnance De¬ 
partment. This provision shall be read to all detachments of militia on being 
mustered into service, and as much oftener as may be deemed necessary. 

1646. Payments will, in all cases, be made by the paymasters of the 
regular army. 

1647. Officers of the volunteer service tendering their resignations, 
will forward them through the intermediate commanders to the officer 
commanding the department or corps d’armte in which they may be 
serving, who is authorized to grant them honorable discharges. This 
commander will immediately report his action to the Adjutant-General 
of the Army, who will communicate the same to the Governor of the 
State to which the officer belongs. A clear statement of the cause will 
accompany every resignation. 

1648. Vacancies occurring among the commissioned officers in volun¬ 
teer regiments will be filled by the Governors of the respective States by 
which the regiments were furnished. Information of such appointments 
will, in all cases, be furnished to the Adjutant-General of the Army. 
















. 























APPENDIX. 


ARTICLES OP WAR. 

AN ACT FOR ESTABLISHING RULES AND ARTICLES FOR THE GOVERN¬ 
MENT OF THE ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES.* 

SECTION 1 . Be it enacted , by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States of America , in Congress assembled, That, from and 
after the passing of this act, the following shall be the rules and articles 
by which the armies of the United States shall be governed: 

Article 1. Every officer now in the army of the United States shall, 
in six months from the passing of this act, and every officer who shall 
hereafter be appointed shall, before he enters on the duties of his office, 
subscribe these rules and regulations. 

Art. 2. It is earnestly recommended to all officers and soldiers dili¬ 
gently to attend divine service; and all officers who shall behave in¬ 
decently or irreverently at any place of divine worship shall, if commis¬ 
sioned officers, be brought before a general court-martial, there to be 
publicly and severely reprimanded by the president; if non-commissioned 
officers or soldiers, every person so offending shall, for his first offense, 
forfeit one-sixth of a dollar, to be deducted out of his next pay; for the 
second offense, he shall not only forfeit a like sum, but be confined 
twenty-four hours; and for every like offense, shall suffer and pay in like 
manner; which money, so forfeited, shall be applied, by the captain or 
senior officer of the troop or company, to the use of the sick soldiers of 
the company or troop to which the offender belongs. 

Art. 3. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall use any pro¬ 
fane oath or execration, shall incur the penalties expressed in the fore¬ 
going article; and a commissioned officer shall forfeit and pay, for each 
and every such offense, one dollar, to be applied as in the preceding 
article. 

Art. 4. Every chaplain commissioned in the army or armies of the 
United States, who shall absent himself from the duties assigned him 
(excepting in cases of sickness or leave of absence), shall, on conviction 
thereof before a court-martial, be fined not exceeding one month’s pay, 


* These rules and articles, with the exceptions indicated by the notes annexed to 
articles 10, 20, 65, and 87, remain unaltered and in force at present. 

2R2 


499 







500 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

besides the loss of bis pay during bis absence; or be discharged, as the 
said court-martial shall judge proper. 

Art. 5. Any officer or soldier who shall use contemptuous or disre¬ 
spectful words against the President of the United States, against the 
Vice-President thereof, against the Congress of the United States, or 
against the Chief Magistrate or Legislature of any of the United States, 
in which he maybe quartered, if a commissioned officer, shall be cashiered, 
or otherwise punished, as a court-martial shall direct; if a non-commis¬ 
sioned officer or soldier, he shall suffer such punishment as shall be in¬ 
flicted on him by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 6. Any officer or soldier who shall behave himself with contempt 
or disrespect toward his commanding officer, shall be punished, accord¬ 
ing to the nature of his offense, by the judgment of a court-martial. 

Art. 7. Any officer or soldier who shall begin, excite, cause, or join 
in, any mutiny or sedition, in any troop or company in the service of the 
United States, or in any party, post, detachment, or guard, shall suffer 
death, or such other punishment as by a court-martial shall be inflicted. 

Art. 8. Any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, who, being 
present at any mutiny or sedition, does not use his utmost endeavor to 
suppress the same, or, coming to the knowledge of any intended mutiny, 
does not, without delay, give information thereof to his commanding 
officer, shall be punished by the sentence of a court-martial with death, 
or otherwise, according to the nature of his offense. 

Art. 9. Any officer or soldier who shall strike his superior officer, or 
draw or lift up any weapon, or offer any violence against him, being in 
the execution of his office, on any pretense whatsoever, or shall disobey 
any lawful command of his superior officer, shall suffer death, or such 
other punishment as shall, according to the nature of his offense, be in¬ 
flicted upon him by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 10. Every non-commissioned officer or soldier, who shall enlist 
himself in the service of the United States, shall, at the time of his so 
enlisting, or within six days afterward, have the Articles for the govern¬ 
ment of the armies of the United States read to him, and shall, by the 
officer who enlisted him, or by the commanding officer of the troop or 
company into which he was enlisted, be taken before the next justice of 
the peace, or chief magistrate of any city or town corporate, not being an 
officer of the army,* or where recourse cannot be had to the civil magis¬ 
trate, before the judge advocate, and in his presence shall take the 
following oath or affirmation: “I, A. B., do solemnly swear, or affirm (as 


* By Sect. 11 of Chap. 42, August 3, 1861, the oath of enlistment and re-enlistmen» 
may be administered by any commissioned officer of the army. 





FOR THE ARMY. 


501 


Articles of War. 

the case may be), that I will bear true allegiance to the United States of 
America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all 
their enemies or opposers whatsoever; and observe and obey the orders of 
the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed 
over me, according to the Rules and Articles for the government of the 
armies of the United States.” Which justice, magistrate, or judge advo¬ 
cate is to give to the officer a certificate, signifying that the man enlisted 
did take the said oath or affirmation. 

Art. 11. After a non-commissioned officer or soldier shall have 
been duly enlisted and sworn, he shall not be dismissed the service 
without a discharge in writing; and no discharge granted to him shall 
be sufficient which is not signed by a field officer of the regiment to 
which he belongs, or commanding officer, where no field officer of the 
regiment is present; and no discharge shall be given to a non-commis¬ 
sioned officer or soldier before his term of service has expired, but by 
order of the President, the Secretary of War, the commanding officer of 
a department, or the sentence of a general court-martial; nor shall a 
commissioned officer be discharged the service but by order of the Pre¬ 
sident of the United States, or by sentence of a general court-martial 

Art. 12. Every colonel, or other officer commanding a regiment, 
troop, or company, and actually quartered with it, may give furloughs to 
non-commissioned officers or soldiers, in such numbers, and for so long a 
time, as he shall judge to be most consistent with the good of the service; 
and a captain, or other inferior officer, commanding a troop or company, 
or in any garrison, fort, or barrack of the United States (his field officer 
being absent), may give furloughs to non-commissioned officers or soldiers, 
for a time not exceeding twenty days in six months, but not to more 
than two persons to be absent at the same time, excepting some extraor¬ 
dinary occasion should require it. 

Art. 13. At every muster, the commanding officer of each regiment, 
troop, or company, there present, shall give to the commissary of musters, 
or other officer who musters the said regiment, troop, or company, certifi¬ 
cates signed by himself, signifying how long such officers, as shall not 
appear at the said muster, have been absent, and the reason of their 
absence. In like manner, the commanding officer of every troop or 
company shall give certificates, signifying the reasons of the absence of 
the non-commissioned officers and private soldiers; which reasons and 
time of absence shall be inserted in the muster-rolls, opposite the names 
of the respective absent officers and soldiers. The certificates shall, 
together with the muster-rolls, be remitted by the commissary of musters, 
or other officer mustering, to the Department of War, as speedily as the 
distance of the place will admit. 





502 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

Art. 14. Every officer who shall be convicted before a general court- 
martial of having signed a false certificate relating to the absence of 
either officer or private soldier, or relative to his or their pay, shall be 
cashiered. 

Art. 15. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false muster of 
man or horse, and every officer or commissary of musters who shall 
willingly sign, direct, or allow the signing of muster-rolls wherein such 
false muster is contained, shall, upon proof made thereof, by two wit¬ 
nesses, before a general court-martial, be cashiered, and shall be thereby 
utterly disabled to have or hold any office or employment in the service 
of the United States. 

Art. 16. Any commissary of musters, or other officer, who shall he 
convicted of having taken money, or other thing, by way of gratification, 
on mustering any regiment, troop, or company, or on signing muster-rolls, 
shall be displaced from his office, and shall be thereby utterly disabled 
to have or hold any office or employment in the service of the United 
States. 

Art. 17. Any officer who shall presume to muster a person as a soldier 
who is not a soldier, shall be deemed guilty of having made a false muster, 
and shall suffer accordingly. 

Art. 18. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false return to the 
Department of War, or to any of his superior officers, authorized to call 
for such returns, of the state of the regiment, troop, or company, or 
garrison, under his command; or of the arms, ammunition, clothing, or 
other stores thereunto belonging, shall, on conviction thereof before a 
court-martial, be cashiered. 

Art. 19. The commanding officer of every regiment, troop, or inde¬ 
pendent company, or garrison, of the United States, shall, in the begin 
ning of every month, remit, through the proper channels, to the Depart¬ 
ment of War, an exact return of the regiment, troop, independent com¬ 
pany, or garrison, under his command, specifying the names of the officers 
then absent from their posts, with the reasons for and the time of their 
absence. And any officer who shall he convicted of having, through 
neglect or design, omitted sending such returns, shall be punished, 
according to the nature of his crime, by the judgment of a general 
court-martial. 

Art. 20. All officers and soldiers who have received pay, or have 
been duly enlisted in the service of the United States, and shall be con¬ 
victed of having deserted the same, shall suffer death, or such other 
punishment as, by sentence of a court-martial, shall be inflicted.* 

* No officer or soldier in the army of the United States shall be subject to the punish- ' 
ment of death, for desertion in time of peace .—Act 29 th May, 1830. 







FOR THE ARMY. 503 

Articles of War. 

Art. 21. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall, without, 
leave from his commanding officer, absent himself from his troop, com¬ 
pany, or detachment, shall, upon being convicted thereof, be punished 
according to the nature of his offense, at the discretion of a court-martial. 

Art. 22. No non-commissioned officer or soldier shall enlist himself 
in any other regiment, troop, or company, without a regular discharge 
from the regiment, troop, or company in which he last served, on the 
penalty of being reputed a deserter, and suffering accordingly. And in 
case any officer shall knowingly receive and entertain such non-com¬ 
missioned officer or soldier, or shall not, after his being discovered to be a 
deserter, immediately confine him, and give notice thereof to the corps in 
which he last served, the said officer shall, by a court-martial, be cashiered. 

Art. 23. Any officer or soldier who shall be convicted of having 
advised or persuaded any other officer or soldier to desert the service of 
the United States, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall 
be inflicted upon him by the sentence of a court-martial.* 

Art. 24. No officer or soldier shall use any reproachful or provoking 
speeches or gestures to another, upon pain, if an officer, of being put in 
arrest; if a soldier, confined, and of asking pardon of the party offended, 
in the presence of his commanding officer. 

Art. 25. No officer or soldier shall send a challenge to another officer 
or soldier, to fight a duel, or accept a challenge if sent, upon pain, if a 
commissioned officer, of being cashiered; if a non-commissioned officer or 
soldier, of suffering corporeal punishment, at the discretion of a court- 
martial. 

Art. 26. If any commissioned or non-commissioned officer command¬ 
ing a guard shall knowingly or willingly suffer any person whatsoever to 
go°forth to fight a duel, he shall be punished as a challenger; and all 
seconds, promoters, and carriers of challenges, in order to duels, shall be 
deemed principals, and he punished accordingly. And it shall be the 
duty of every officer commanding an army, regiment, company, post, or 
detachment, who is knowing to a challenge being given or accepted by 
any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, under his command, or 
has reason to believe the same to be the case, immediately to arrest and 
bring to trial such offenders. 

Art. 27. All officers, of what condition soever, have power to part and 
quell all quarrels, frays, and disorders, though the persons concerned 
should belong to another regiment, troop, or company; and either to 
order officers into arrest, or non-commissioned officers or soldiers into 
confinement, until their proper superior officers shall be acquainted there- 


* See note on page 502. 






504 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

with; and whosoever shall refuse to obey such officer (though of an 
inferior rank), or shall draw his sword upon him, shall be punished at 
the discretion of a general court-martial. 

Art. 28. Any officer or soldier who shall upbraid another for refusing 
a challenge, shall himself he punished as a challenger; and all officers 
and soldiers are hereby discharged from any disgrace or opinion of dis¬ 
advantage which might arise from their having refused to accept of 
challenges, as they will only have acted in obedience to the laws, and 
done their duty as good soldiers who subject themselves to discipline. 

Art. 29. No sutler shall be permitted to sell any kind of liquors or 
victuals, or to keep their houses or shops open for the entertainment of 
soldiers, after nine at night, or before the heating of the reveille, or upon 
Sundays, during divine service or sermon, on the penalty of being dis¬ 
missed from all future sutling. 

Art. 30. All officers commanding in the field, forts, barracks, or gar¬ 
risons of the United States, are hereby required to see that the persons 
permitted to suttle shall supply the soldiers with good and wholesome 
provisions, or other articles, at a reasonable price, as they shall be an¬ 
swerable for their neglect. 

Art. 31. No officer commanding in any of the garrisons, forts, or 
barracks of the United States, shall exact exorbitant prices for houses 
or stalls, let out to sutlers, or connive at the like exactions in others; 
nor by his own authority, and for his private advantage, lay any duty or 
imposition upon, or be interested in, the sale of any victuals, liquors, 
or other necessaries of life brought into the garrison, fort, or barracks, 
for the use of the soldiers, on the penalty of being discharged from the 
service. 

Art. 32. Every officer commanding in quarters, garrisons, or on the 
march, shall keep good order, and, to the utmost of his power, redress 
all abuses or disorders which may be committed by any officer or soldier 
under his command; if, upon complaint made to him of officers or sol¬ 
diers beating or otherwise ill-treating any person, or disturbing fairs or 
markets, or of committing any kind of riots, to the disquieting of the 
citizens of the United States, he, the said commander, who shall refuse 
or omit to see justice done to the offender or offenders, and reparation 
made to the party or parties injured, as far as part of the offender’s pay 
shall enable him or them, shall, upon proof thereof, be cashiered, or 
otherwise punished, as a general court-martial shall direct. 

Art. 33. When any commissioned officer or soldier shall be accused 
of a capital crime, or of having used violence, or committed any offense 
against the person or property of any citizen of any of the United States, 
such as is punishable by the known laws of the land, the commanding 




FOR THE ARMY. 


505 


Articles of War. 

officer and officers of every regiment, troop, or company, to which the 
person or persons so accused shall belong, are hereby required, upon 
application duly made by, or in behalf of, the party or parties injured, to 
use their utmost endeavors to deliver over such accused person or persons 
to the civil magistrate, and likewise to be aiding and assisting to the 
officers of justice in apprehending and securing the person or persons so 
accused, in order to bring him or them to trial. If any commanding 
officer or officers shall wilfully neglect, or shall refuse, upon the applica¬ 
tion aforesaid, to deliver over such accused person or persons to the civil 
magistrates, or to be aiding and assisting to the officers of justice in 
apprehending such person or persons, the officer or officers so offending 
shall be cashiered. 

Art. 34. If any officer shall think himself wronged by his Colonel, or 
the commanding officer of the regiment, and shall, upon due appli¬ 
cation being made to him, be refused redress, he may complain to 
the General commanding in the State or Territory where such regiment 
shall be stationed, in order to obtain justice; who is hereby required to 
examine into said complaint, and take proper measures for redressing the 
wrong complained of, and transmit, as soon as possible, to the Depart¬ 
ment of War, a true state of such complaint, with the proceedings had 
thereon. 

Art. 35. If any inferior officer or soldier shall think himself wronged 
by his Captain or other officer, he is to complain thereof to the command¬ 
ing officer of the regiment, who is hereby required to summon a regi¬ 
mental court-martial, for the doing justice to the complainant; from 
which regimental court-martial either party may, if he thinks himself 
still aggrieved, appeal to a general court-martial. But if, upon a second 
hearing, the appeal shall appear vexatious and groundless, the person so 
appealing shall be punished at the discretion of the said court-martial. 

Art. 36. Any commissioned officer, store-keeper, or commissary, who 
shall be convicted at a general court-martial of having sold, without a 
proper order for that purpose, embezzled, misapplied, or wilfully, or 
through neglect, suffered any of the provisions, forage, arms, clothing, 
ammunition, or other military stores belonging to the United States to 
be spoiled or damaged, shall, at his own expense, make good the loss or 
damage, and shall, moreover, forfeit all his pay, and be dismissed from 
the service. 

Art. 37. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall be con¬ 
victed at a regimental court-martial of having sold, or designedly, or 
through neglect, wasted the ammunition delivered out to him, to be 
employed in the service of the United States, shall be punished at the 
discretion of such court. 







500 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

Art. 38. Every non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall he con¬ 
victed before a court-martial of having sold, lost, or spoiled, through 
neglect, his horse, arms, clothes, or accoutrements, shall undergo such 
weekly stoppages (not exceeding the half of his pay) as such court- 
martial shall judge sufficient, for repairing the loss or damage; and shall 
suffer confinement, or such other corporeal punishment as his crime shall 
deserve. 

Art. 39. Every officer who shall be convicted before a court-martia 
of having embezzled or misapplied any money with which he may have 
been intrusted, for the payment of the men under his command, or for 
enlisting men into the service, or for other purposes, if a commissioned 
officer, shall be cashiered, and compelled to refund the money; if a non¬ 
commissioned officer, shall be reduced to the ranks, be put under stop¬ 
pages until the money be made good, and suffer such corporeal punish¬ 
ment as such court-martial shall direct. 

Art. 40. Every captain of a troop or company is charged with the 
arms, accoutrements, ammunition, clothing, or other warlike stores belong¬ 
ing to the troop or company under his command, which he is to be account¬ 
able for to his Colonel in case of their being lost, spoiled, or damaged, 
not by unavoidable accidents, or on actual service. 

Art. 41. All non-commissioned officers and soldiers who shall be 
found one mile from the camp without leave, in writing, from their com¬ 
manding officer, shall suffer such punishment as shall be inflicted upon 
them by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 42. No officer or soldier shall lie out of his quarters, garrison, 
or camp without leave from his superior officer, upon penalty of being 
punished according to the nature of his offense, by the sentence of a 
court-martial. 

Art. 43. Every non-commissioned officer and soldier shall retire to his 
quarters or tent at the beating of the retreat; in default of which he 
shall be punished according to the nature of his offense. 

Art. 44. No officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier shall fail in 
repairing, at the time fixed, to the place of parade, of exercise, or other 
rendezvous appointed by his commanding officer, if not prevented by 
sickness or some other evident necessity, or shall go from the said place 
of rendezvous without leave from his commanding officer, before he shall 
be regularly dismissed or relieved, on the penalty of being punished, 
according to the nature of his offense, by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 45. Any commissioned officer who shall be found drunk on his 
guard, party, or other duty, shall be cashiered. Any non-commissioned 
officer or soldier so offending shall suffer such corporeal punishment as 
shall be inflicted by the sentence of a court-martial. 






FOR THE ARMY. 507 

Articles of War. 

Art. -46. Any sentinel who shall be found sleeping upon his post, or 
shall leave it before he shall be regularly relieved, shall suffer death, or 
such other punishment as shall be inflicted by the sentence of a court- 
martial. 

Art. 47. No soldier belonging to any regiment, troop, or company 
shall hire another to do his duty for him, or be excused from duty but in 
cases of sickness, disability, or leave of absence; and every such soldier 
found guilty of hiring his duty, as also the party so hired to do another’s 
duty, shall be punished at the discretion of a regimental courbmartial. 

Art. 48. And every non-commissioned officer conniving at such hiring 
of duty aforesaid, shall be reduced; and every commissioned officer know¬ 
ing and allowing such ill practices in the service, shall be punished by 
the judgment of a general court-martial. 

Art. 49. Any officer belonging to the service of the United States, 
who, by discharging of firearms, drawing of swords, beating of drums, 
or by any other means whatsoever, shall occasion false alarms in camp, 
garrison, or quarters, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall 
be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial. 

Art. 50. Any officer or soldier who shall, without urgent necessity, 
or without the leave of his superior officer, quit his guard, platoon, or 
division, shall be punished, according to the nature of his offense, by the 
sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 51. No officer or soldier shall do violence to any person who 
brings provisions or other necessaries to the camp, garrison, or quarters 
of the forces of the United States, employed in any parts out of the said 
States, upon pain of death, or such other punishment as a court-martial 
shall direct. 

Art. 52. Any officer or soldier who shall misbehave himself before 
the enemy, run away, or shamefully abandon any fort, post, or guard 
which he or they may be commanded to defend, or speak words inducing 
others to do the like, or shall cast away his arms and ammunition, or who 
shall quit his post or colors to plunder and pillage, every such offender, 
being duly convicted thereof, shall suffer death, or such other punish¬ 
ment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial. 

Art. 53. Any person belonging to the armies of the United States 
who shall make^known the watchword to any person who is not entitled 
to receive it according to the rules and discipline of war, or shall pre¬ 
sume to give a parole or watchword different from what he received, shall 
suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence 
of a general court-martial. 

Art. 54. All officers and soldiers are to behave themselves orderly in 









508 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

spoil, either in walks of trees, parks, warrens, fish-ponds, houses, or gar¬ 
dens, corn-fields, inclosures of meadows, or shall maliciously destroy any 
property whatsoever belonging to the inhabitants of the United States, 
unless by order of the then commander-in-chief of the armies of the 
said States, shall (besides such penalties as they are liable to by law) be 
punished according to the nature and degree of the offense, by the judg¬ 
ment of a regimental or general court-martial. 

Art. 55. Whosoever, belonging to the armies of the United States in 
foreign parts, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death. 

Art. 56. Whosoever shall relieve the enemy with money, victuals, or 
ammunition, or shall knowingly harbor or protect an enemy, shall suffer 
death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a 
court-martial. 

Art. 57. Whosoever shall be convicted of holding correspondence 
with, or giving intelligence to, the enemy, either directly or indirectly, 
shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the 
sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 58. All public stores taken in the enemy’s camp, towns, forts, 
or magazines, whether of artillery, ammunition, clothing, forage or pro¬ 
visions, shall be secured for the service of the United States; for the 
neglect of which the commanding officer is to be answerable. 

Art. 59. If any commander of any garrison, fortress, or post shall be 
compelled, by the officers and soldiers under his command, to give up to 
the enemy, or to abandon it, the commissioned officers, non-commissioued 
officers, or soldiers who shall be convicted of having so offended, shall 
suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be inflicted upon them by 
the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 60. All sutlers and retainers to the camp, and all persons what¬ 
soever, serving with the armies of the United States in the field, though 
not enlisted soldiers, are to be subject to orders, according to the rules 
and discipline of war. 

Art. 61. Officers having brevets or commissions of a prior date to 
those of the regiment in which they serve, may take place in courts- 
martial and on detachments, when composed of different corps, according 
to the ranks given them in their brevets or dates of their former com¬ 
missions; but in the regiment, troop, or company to which such officers 
belong, they shall do duty and take rank both in courts-martial and on 
detachments which shall be composed of their own corps, according to 
the commissions by which they are mustered in the said corps. 

Art. 62. If, upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps of 
the army shall happen to join, or do duty together, the officer highest in 
rank of the line of the army, marine corps, or militia, by commission, 






FOR THE ARMY. 


509 


Articles of War. 

there on duty or in quarters, shall command the whole, and give orders 
for what is needful to the service, unless otherwise specially directed by 
the President of the United States, according to the nature of the case. 

Art. 63. The functions of the engineers being generally confined tc 
the most elevated branch of military science, they are not to assume, nor 
are they subject to be ordertd on any duty beyond the line of their im¬ 
mediate profession, except by the special order of the President of the 
United States; but they are to receive every mark of respect to which 
their rank in the army may entitle them respectively, and are liable to be 
transferred, at the discretion of the President, from one corps to another, 
regard being paid to rank. 

Art. 64. General courts-martial may consist of any number of com¬ 
missioned officers, from five, to thirteen, inclusively; but they shall not 
consist of less than thirteen where that number can be convened without 
manifest injury to the service. 

Art. 65.* Any general officer commanding an army, or Colonel com¬ 
manding a separate department, may appoint general courts-martial when¬ 
ever necessary. But no sentence of a court-martial shall be carried into 
execution until after the whole proceedings shall have been laid before 
the officer ordering the same, or the officer commanding the troops for the 
time being; neither shall any sentence of a general court-martial, in the 
time of peace, extending to the loss of life, or the dismission of a com¬ 
missioned officer, or which shall, either in time of peace or war, respect a 
general officer, be carried into execution, until after the whole proceed¬ 
ings shall have been transmitted to the Secretary of War, to be laid 
before the President of the United States for his confirmation or dis¬ 
approval, and orders in the case. All other sentences may be confirmed 
and executed by the officer ordering the court to assemble, or the com¬ 
manding officer for the time being, as the case may be. 

Art. 66. Every officer commanding a regiment or corps may appoint, 
for his own regiment or corps, courts-martial, to consist of three commis¬ 
sioned officers, for the trial and punishment of offenses not capital, and 


* Whenever a general officer commanding an army, or a colonel commanding a sepa¬ 
rate department, shall be the accuser or prosecutor of any officer in the army of the 
United States, under his command, the general court-martial for the trial of such officer 
shall be appointed by the President of the United States. 

The proceedings and sentence of the said court shall be sent directly to the Secretary 
of War to he by him laid before the President, for his confirmation or approval, or orders 
in the case. 

So much of the sixty-fifth article of the first section of “An act for establishing rules 
and articles for the government of the armies of the United States,” passed on the tenth 
of April, eighteen hundred and six, as is repugnant hereto, shall be, and the same is 
nereby, repealed .—Act 2 9th May, 1830, Sectq. 1, 2, 3. 







510 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

decide upon tlieir sentences. For the same purpose, all officers com¬ 
manding any of the garrisons, forts, barracks, or other places where the 
troops consist of different corps, may assemble courts-martial, to consist 
of three commissioned officers, and decide upon their sentences. 

Art. 67. No garrison or regimental court-martial shall have the power 
to try capital cases or commissioned officers; neither shall they inflict a 
fine exceeding one month’s pay, nor imprison, nor put to hard labor, any 
non-commissioned officer or soldier for a longer time than one month. 

Art. 68. Whenever it may be found convenient and necessary to the 
public service, the officers of the marines shall be associated with the 
officers of the land forces, for the purpose of holding courts-martial, and 
trying offenders belonging to either; and, in such cases, the orders of the 
senior officer of either corps who may be present and duly authorized, 
shall be received and obeyed. 

Art 69. The judge advocate, or some person deputed by him, or by 
the general, or officer commanding the army, detachment, or garrison, 
shall prosecute in the name of the United States, but shall so far consider 
himself as counsel for the prisoner, after the said prisoner shall have 
made his plea, as to object to any leading question to any of the witnesses, 
or any question to the prisoner, the answer to which might tend to crimi¬ 
nate himself; and administer to each member of the court, before they 
proceed upon any trial, the following oath, which shall also be taken by 
all members of the regimental and garrison courts-martial: 

“ You, A. B., do swear that you will well and truly try and determine, 
according to evidence, the matter now before you, between the United 
States of America and the prisoner to be tried, and that you will duly ad¬ 
minister justice, according to the provisions of ‘An act establishing Rules 
and Articles for the government of the armies of the United States/ without 
partiality, favor, or affection; and if any doubt should arise, not explained 
by said Articles, according to your conscience, the best of your under¬ 
standing, and the custom of war in like cases; and you do further swear 
that you will not divulge the sentence of the court until it shall be pub¬ 
lished by the proper authority; neither will you disclose or discover the 
vote or opinion of any particular member of the court-martial, unless re¬ 
quired to give evidence thereof, as a witness, by a court of justice, in 
a due course of law. So help you God.” 

And as soon as the said oath shall have been administered to the 
respective members, the president of the court shall administer to the 
judge advocate, or person officiating as such, an oath in the following 
words: 

“You, A. B., do swear, that you will not disclose or discover the vote 
or opinion of any particular member of the court-martial, unless required 




FOR THE ARMY. 


511 


Articles of War. 

to give evidence thereof, as a witness, by a court of justice, in due course 
of law; nor divulge the sentence of the court to any but the proper author¬ 
ity, until it shall be duly disclosed by the same. So help you God/’ 

Art. 70. When a prisoner, arraigned before a general court-martial, 
shall, from obstinacy and deliberate desigu, stand mute, or answer foreign 
to the purpose, the court may proceed to trial and judgment as if the 
prisoner had regularly pleaded not guilty. 

Art. 71. W r hen a member shall be challenged by a prisoner, he must 
state his cause of challenge, of which the court shall, after due delibera¬ 
tion, determine the relevancy or validity, and decide accordingly; and no 
challenge to more than one member at a time shall be received by the court. 

Art. 72. All the members of a court-martial are to behave with de¬ 
cency and calmness; and in giving their votes are to begin with the 
youngest in commission. 

Art. 73. All persons who give evidence before a court-martial are to be 
examined on oath or affirmation, in the following form: 

“You swear, or affirm (as the case maybe), the evidence you shall 
give in the cause now in hearing shall be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth. So help you God.” 

Art. 74. On the trials of cases not capital, before courts-martial, the 
deposition of witnesses, not in the line or staff of the army, may be taken 
before some justice of the peace, and read in evidence; provided the pro¬ 
secutor and person accused are present at the taking the same, or are duly 
notified thereof. 

Art. 75. No officer shall be tried but by a general court-martial, nor 
by officers of an inferior rank, if it can be avoided. Nor shall any pro¬ 
ceedings of trials be carried on, excepting between the hours of eight in 
the morning and three in the afternoon, excepting in cases which, in the 
opinion of the officer appointing the court-martial, require immediate 
example. 

Art. 76. No person whatsoever shall use any menacing words, signs, 
or gestures, in presence of a court-martial, or shall cause any disorder or 
riot, or disturb their proceedings, on the penalty of being punished at the 
discretion of the said court-martial. 

Art. 77. Whenever any officer shall be charged with a crime, he shall 
be arrested and confined in his barracks, quarters, or tent, and deprived 
of his sword by the commanding officer. And any officer who shall leave 
his confinement before he shall be set at liberty by his commanding 
officer, or by a superior officer, shall be cashiered. 

Art. 78. Non-commissioned officers and soldiers, charged with crimes^ 
shall be confined until tried by a court-martial, or released by proper 

authority. 

2S2 







REVISED REGULATIONS 


512 

Articles of War. 

Art. 79. No officer or soldier who shall be put in arrest shall continue 
in confinement more than eight days, or until such time as a court-martial 
can be assembled. 

Art. 80. No officer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall 
refuse to receive or keep any prisoner committed to his charge by an 
officer belonging to the forces of the United States; provided the officer 
committing shall, at the same time, deliver an account in writing, signed 
by himself, of the crime with which the said prisoner is charged. 

Art. 81. No officer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall 
presume to release any person committed to his charge without proper 
authority for so doing, nor shall he suffer any person to escape, on the 
penalty of being punished for it by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 82. Every officer or provost marshal, to whose charge prisoners 
shall be committed, shall, within twenty-four houi’s after such commit¬ 
ment, or as soon as he shall he relieved from his guard, make report in 
writing, to the commanding officer, of their names, their crimes, and the 
names of the officers who committed them, on the penalty of being 
punished for disobedience or neglect, at the discretion of a court-martial. 

Art. 83. Any commissioned officer convicted before a general court- 
martial of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, shall be dis¬ 
missed the service. 

Art. 84. In cases where a court-martial may think it proper to sentence 
a commissioned officer to be suspended from command, they shall have 
power also to suspend his pay and emoluments for the same time, accord¬ 
ing to the nature and heinousness of the offense. 

Art. 85. In all cases where a commissioned officer is cashiered for 
cowardice or fraud, it shall he added in the sentence, that the crime, 
name, and place of abode, and punishment of the delinquent, be published 
in the newspapers in and about the camp, and of the particular State 
from which the offender came, or where he usually resides; after which 
it shall be deemed scandalous for an officer to associate with him. 

Art. 86. The commanding officer of any post or detachment, in which 
there shall not be a number of officers adequate to form a general court- 
martial, shall, in cases which require the cognizance of such a court, 
report to the commanding officer of the department, who shall order a 
court to be assembled at the nearest post or department, and the party 
accused, with necessary witnesses, to be transported to the place where 
the said court shall he assembled. 

Art. 87.* No person shall be sentenced to suffer death but by the 


* So much of these rules and articles as authorizes the infliction of corporeal punish¬ 
ment by stripes or lashes, was specially repealed by Act of 16th May, 1812. By Act of 2d 







FOR THE ARMY. 513 

Articles of War. 

concurrence of two-thirds of the members of a general court-martial, noi 
except in the cases herein expressly mentioned; nor shall more than 
fifty lashes he inflicted on any offender , at the discretion of a court- 
martial; and no officer, non-commissioned officer, soldier, or follower of 
the army, shall be tried a second time for the same offense. 

Art. 88. No person shall be liable to be tried and punished by a 
general court-martial for any offense which shall appear to have been 
committed more than two years before the issuing of the order for such 
trial, unless the person, by reason of having absented himself, or some 
other manifest impediment, shall not have been amenable to justice 
within that period. 

Art. 89. Every officer authorized to order a general court-martial 
shall have power to pardon or mitigate any punishment ordered by such 
court, except the sentence of death, or of cashiering an officer; which, 
in the cases where he has authority (by Article 65) to carry them into 
execution, he may suspend, until the pleasure of the President of the 
United States can be known; which suspension, together with copies of 
the proceedings of the court-martial, the said officer shall immediately 
transmit to the President for his determination. And the colonel or 
commanding officer of the regiment or garrison where any regimental or 
garrison court>martial shall be held, may pardon or mitigate any punish¬ 
ment ordered by such court to be inflicted. 

Art. 90. Every judge advocate, or person officiating as such, at any 
general court-martial, shall transmit, with as much expedition as the 
opportunity of time and distance of place can admit, the original pro¬ 
ceedings and sentence of such court-martial to the Secretary of War; 
which said original proceedings and sentence shall be carefully kept and 
preserved in the office of said Secretary, to the end that the persons 
entitled thereto may be enabled, upon application to the said office, to 
obtain copies thereof. 

The party tried by any general court-martial shall, upon demand 
thereof, made by himself, or by any person or persons in his behalf, be 
entitled to a copy of the sentence and proceedings of such court-martial. 

Art. 91. In cases where the general, or commanding officer may order 
a court of inquiry to examine into the nature of any transaction, accusa¬ 
tion, or imputation against any officer or soldier, the said court shall con¬ 
sist of one or more officers, not exceeding three, and a judge advocate, or 
other suitable person, as a recorder, to reduce the proceedings and 


March 1833, the repealing act was repealed, so far as it applied to the crime of desertion, 
Which,’of course, revived the punishment by lashes for that offense. Flogging was totally 
abolished by Sec. 3 of Chap. 54, 5 August, 1861. 







5K 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 


evidence to writing; all of whom shall be sworn to the faithful perform¬ 
ance of their duty. This court shall have the same power to summon 
witnesses as a court-martial, and to examine them on oath. But they 
shall not give their opinion on the merits of the case, excepting they 
shall be thereto specially required. The parties accused shall also be 
permitted to cross-examine and interrogate the witnesses, so as to investi¬ 
gate fully the circumstances in the question. 

Art. 92. The proceedings of a court of inquiry must be authenticated 
by the signature of the recorder and the president, and delivered to the 
commanding officer, and the said proceedings may he admitted as evidence 
by a court-martial, in cases not capital, or extending to the dismission 
of an officer, provided that the circumstances are such that oral testimony 
cannot be obtained. But as courts of inquiry may be perverted to dis¬ 
honorable purposes, and may be considered as engines of destruction to 
military merit, in the hands of weak and envious commandants, they are 
hereby prohibited, unless directed by the President of the United States, 
or demanded by the accused. 

Art. 93. The judge advocate or recorder shall administer to the mem¬ 
bers the following oath: 

“You shall well and truly examine and inquire, according to your 
evidence, into the matter now before you, without partiality, favor, 
affection, pi’ejudice, or hope of reward. So help you God.” 

After which the president shall administer to the judge advocate or 
recorder the following oath : 

“ You, A. B., do swear that you will, according to your best abilities, 
accurately and impartially record the proceedings of the court, and the 
evidence to be given in the case in hearing. So help you God.” 

The witnesses shall take the same oath as witnesses sworn before a 
court-martial. 

Art. 94. When any commissioned officer shall die or be killed in the 
service of the United States, the major of the regiment, or the officer 
doing the major’s duty in his absence, or in any post or garrison, the 
second officer in command, or the assistant military agent, shall imme¬ 
diately secure all his effects or equipage, then in camp or quarters, and 
shall make an inventory thereof, and forthwith transmit the same to the 
office of the Department of War, to the end that his executors or ad¬ 
ministrators may receive the same. 

Art. 95. When any non-commissioned officer or soldier shall die, or 
be killed in the service of the United States, the then commanding officer 
of the troop or company shall, in the presence of two other commissioned 
officers, take an account of what effects he died possessed of, above his 
arms and accoutrements, and transmit the same to the office of the De- 




FOR THE ARMY. 


515 


Articles of War. 

partment of War, which said effects are to be accounted for, and paid to 
the representatives of such deceased non-commissioned officer or soldier. 
And in case any of the officers, so authorized to take care of the effects 
of deceased officers and soldiers, should, before they have accounted to 
their representatives for the same, have occasion to leave the regiment or 
post, by preferment or otherwise, they shall, before they be permitted to 
quit the same, deposit in the hands of the commanding officer, or of the 
assistant military agent, all the effects of such deceased non-commissioned 
officers and soldiers, in order that the same may be secured for, and paid 
to, their respective representatives. 

Art. 96. All officers, conductors, gunners, matrosses, drivers, or other 
persons whatsoever, receiving pay or hire in the service of the artillery, 
or corps of engineers of the United States, shall be governed by the 
aforesaid Rules and Articles, and shall be subject to be tried by courts- 
martial, in like manner with the officers and soldiers of the other troops 
in the service of the United States. 

Ar t. 97. The officers and soldiers of any troops, whether militia or 
others, being mustered and in pay of the United States, shall, at all times 
and in all places, when joined, or acting in conjunction with the regular 
forces of the United States, be governed by these rules and articles of 
war, and shall be subject to be tried by courts-martial, in like manner 
with the officers and soldiers in the regular forces; save only that such 
courts-martial shall be composed entirely of militia officers. 

Art. 98. All officers serving by commission from the authority of any 
particular State, shall, on all detachments, courts-martial, or other duty, 
wherein they may be employed in conjunction with the regular forces of 
the United States, take rank next after all officers of the like grade in 
said regular forces, notwithstanding the commissions of such militia or 
State officers may be elder than the commissions of the officers of the 
regular forces of the U nited States. 

Art. 99. All crimes not capital, and all disorders and neglects which 
officers and soldiers may be guilty of, to the prejudice of good order and 
military discipline, though not mentioned in the foregoing articles of 
war, are to be taken cognizance of by a general or regimental court- 
martial, according to the nature and degree of the offense, and be pun¬ 
ished at their discretion. 

Art. 100. The President of the United States shall have power to 
prescribe the uniform of the army. 

Art. 101. The foregoing articles are to be read and published, once 
in every six months, to every garrison, regiment, troop, or company, 
mustered, or to be mustered, in the service of the United States, and 





516 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Articles of War. 

are to be duly observed and obeyed by all officers and soldiers who are, 
or sDall be, in said service. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted , That in time of war, all persons 
not citizens of, or owing allegiance to, the United States of America, who 
shall be found lurking as spies in or about the fortifications or encamp¬ 
ments of the armies of the United States, or any of them, shall suffer 
death, according to the law and usage of nations, by sentence of a general 
court-martial. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted , That the rules and regulations by 
which the armies of the United States have heretofore been governed, 
and the resolves of Congress thereunto annexed, and respecting the same, 
shall henceforth be void and of no effect, except so far as may relate to 
any transactions under them prior to the promulgation of this act, at the 
several posts and garrisons respectively, occupied by any part of the army 
of the United States. [Approved, April 10, 1806.] 




FOR THE ARMY. 


517 


Extracts from Acts of Congress. 


EXTRACTS FROM ACTS OF CONGRESS. 


1. If any non-commissioned officer, musician, or private shall desert 
the service of the United States, he shall, in addition to the penalties 
mentioned in the Rules and Articles of War, be liable to serve for and 
during such a period as shall, with the time he may have served previous 
to his desertion, amount to the full term of his enlistment; and such 
soldier shall and may be tried by a court-martial, and punished, although 
the term of his enlistment may have elapsed previous to his being appre¬ 
hended or tried .—Act 16^ March , 1802, Sec. 18. 

2. “That if any person shall sell, exchange, or give, barter or dispose 
of, any spirituous liquor or wine to an Indian (in the Indian country), 
such person shall forfeit and pay the sum of five hundred dollars; and 
if any person shall introduce, or attempt to introduce, any spirituous 
liquor or wine into the Indian country, except such supplies as shall be 
necessary for the officers of the United States and troops of the service, 
under the direction of the War Department, such person shall forfeit 
and pay a sum not exceeding three hundred dollars; and if any superin¬ 
tendent of Indian affairs, Indian agent, or sub-agent, or commanding 
officer of a military post, has reason to suspect, or is informed, that any 
white person or Indian is about to introduce, or has introduced, any 
spirituous liquor or wine into the Indian country, in violation of the pro¬ 
visions of this section, it shall be lawful for such superintendent, Indian 
agent, or sub-agent, or military officer, agreeably to such regulations as 
may be established by the President of the United States, to cause the 
boats, stores, packages, and places of deposit of such person to be searched, 
and if any such spirituous liquor or wine is found, the goods, boats, pack¬ 
ages, and peltries of such persons shall be seized and delivered to the 
proper officer, and shall be proceeded against by libel, in the proper 
court, and forfeited, one half to the use ot the informer, and the other 
half to the use of the United States; and if such person is a trader, his 
license shall be revoked and his bond put in suit. And it shall more¬ 
over be lawful for any person in the service of the United States, or for 
any Indian, to take and destroy any ardent spirits or wine found in the 
Indian country, excepting military supplies as mentioned in this section.’' 
—Act 80 th June, 1834, Sec. 20. 





518 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Extracts from Acts of Congress. 

3. “That if any person whatever shall, within the limits of the Indian 
country, set up or continue any distillery for manufacturing ardent spirits, 
he shall forfeit and pay a penalty of one thousand dollars, and it shall be 
the duty of the superintendent of Indian affairs, Indian agent, or sub¬ 
agent, within the limits of whose agency the same shall be set up or con¬ 
tinued, forthwith to destroy and break up the same; and it shall be law¬ 
ful to employ the military force of the United States in executing that 
duty .'’—Act 30 th June, 1834, Sec. 21. 

4. “That the twentieth section of the ‘Act to regulate trade and in¬ 
tercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers/ 
approved June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, be and the 
same is hereby so amended, that, in addition to the fines thereby imposed, 
any person who shall sell, exchange, or barter, give, or dispose of, any 
spirituous liquor or wine to an Indian, in the Indian country, or who 
shall introduce, or attempt to introduce, any spirituous liquor or wine 
into the Indian country, except such supplies as may be necessary for 
the officers of the United States and the troops of the service, under the 
direction of the War Department, such person, on conviction thereof, 
before the proper district court of the United States, shall in the former 
case be subject to imprisonment for a period not exceeding two years, 
and in the latter case not exceeding one year, as shall be prescribed by 
the court, according to the extent and criminality of the offense. And 
in all prosecutions arising under this section, and under the twentieth 
section of the act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian 
tribes, and preserve peace on the frontiers, approved June thirtieth, 
eighteen hundred and thirty-four, to which this is an amendment, In¬ 
dians shall be competent witnesses .”—Act 3(7 March, 1847, Sec. 2. 

5. “ That no annuities, or moneys, or goods shall be paid or distributed 
to the Indians while they are under the influence of any description of 
intoxicating liquor; nor while there are good and sufficient reasons for 
the officers or agents, whose duty it may be to make such payments or 
distributions, for believing that there is any species of intoxicating liquor 
within convenient reach of the Indians; nor until the chiefs and head 
men of the tribe shall have pledged themselves to use all their influence, 
and to make all proper exertions to prevent the introduction and sale of 
such liquor in their country .”—Act 3d March, 1847, Sec. 3. 


AN ACT to authorize the employment of volunteers to aid in enforcing the laws 
and protecting public property. 

Whereas, certain of the forts, arsenals, custom-houses, navy yards, and 
other property of the United States have been seized, and other viola- 







FOR THE ARMY. 519 

Extracts from Acts of Congress. 

tions of law have been committed and are threatened by organized bodies 
of men in several of the States, and a conspiracy has been entered 
into to overthrow the government of the United States: Therefore, 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the President be and he 
is hereby authorized to accept the services of volunteers, either as cavalry, 
infantry, or artillery, in such numbers,* not exceeding five hundred 
thousand, as he may deem necessary, for the purpose of repelling inva¬ 
sion, suppressing insurrection, enforcing the laws, and preserving and 
protecting the public property : Provided, That the services of the volun¬ 
teers shall be for such time as the President may direct, not exceeding 
three years nor less than six months, and they shall be disbanded at the 
end of the war. And all provisions of law applicable to three years’ 
volunteers shall apply to two years’ volunteers, and to all volunteers who 
have been, or may be, accepted into the service of the United States for 
a period not less than six months, in the same manner as if such volun¬ 
teers were specially named. Before receiving into service any number 
of volunteers exceeding those now called for and accepted, the President 
shall, from time to time, issue his proclamation, stating the number desired, 
either as cavalry, infantry, or artillery, and the States from which they 
are to be furnished, having reference, in any such requisition, to the 
number then in service from the several States, and to the exigencies of 
the service at the time, and equalizing, as far as practicable, the number 
furnished by the several States, according to Federal population. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the said volunteers shall be 
subject to the rules and regulations governing the army of the United 
States, and that they shall be formed, by the President, into regiments of 
infantry, with the exception of such numbers for cavalry and artillery, as 
he may direct, not to exceed the proportion of one company of each of 
those arms to every regiment of infantry, and to be organized as in the 
regular service. Each regiment of infantry shall have one colonel, one 
lieutenant-colonel, one major, one adjutant (a lieutenant), one quarter¬ 
master (a lieutenant), one surgeon and one assistant surgeon, one sergeant 
major, one regimental quartermaster sergeant, one regimental commissary 
sergeant, one hospital steward, two principal musicians, and twenty four 
musicians for a band; and shall be composed of ten companies, each 
company to consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieu¬ 
tenant, one first sergeant, four sergeants, eight corporals, two musicians, 
one wagoner, and from sixty-four to eighty-two privates. 

* As the exigencies of the service may, in his opinion, demand, not exceeding 500,000, 
by Sec. 1 of Chap. 17, July 25, 1861. 

2 T 







520 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Extracts from Acts of Congress. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That these forces, when accepted as 
herein authorized, shall be organized into divisions of three or more 
brigades each; and each division shall have a major-general, three aides- 
de-camp, and one assistant adjutant-general with the rank of major. 
Each brigade shall be composed of four or more regiments, and shall have 
one brigadier-general, two aides-de-camp, one assistant adjutant-general 
with the rank of captain, one surgeon, one assistant quartermaster, and 
one commissary of subsistence. 

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the President shall be author¬ 
ized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for 
the command of the forces provided for in this act, a number of major- 
generals, not exceeding six, and a number of brigadier-generals, not ex¬ 
ceeding eighteen* and the other division and brigade officers required for 
the organization of these forces, except the aides-de-camp, who shall be 
selected by their respective generals from the officers of the army or 
volunteer corps: Provided, That the President may select the major 
generals and brigadier-generals provided for in this act from the line or 
staff of the regular army, and the officers so selected shall be permitted 
to retain their rank therein. The Governors of the States furnishing 
volunteers under this act, shall commission the field, staff, and company 
officers requisite for the said volunteers; but in cases where the State 
authorities refuse or omit to furnish volunteers at the call or on the 
proclamation of the President, and volunteers from such States offer 
their services under such call or proclamation, the President shall have 
power to accept such services, and to commission the proper field, staff, 
and company officers. 

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned 
officers, and privates, organized as above set forth, shall, in all respects, 
be placed on the footing, as to pay and allowances, of similar corps of the 
regular army: Provided, That the allowances of non-commissioned officers 
and privates for clothing, when not furnished in kind, shall be three 
dollars and fifty cents per month, and that each company officer, non-com¬ 
missioned officer, private, musician, and artificer of cavalry shall furnish 
his own horse and horse equipments, and shall receive forty cents per day 
for their use and risk, except that in case the horse shall become disabled, 
or shall die, the allowance shall cease until the disability be removed or 
another horse be supplied. Every volunteer non-commissioned officer, 
private, musician, and artificer, who enters the service of the United 
States under this act, shall be paid at the rate of fifty cents in lieu of 
subsistence, and if a cavalry volunteer, twenty-five cents additional, in 


*' “ Such number of major-generals and of brigadier-generals as may, in bis judgment, 
be required for their organization .”—Act July 25, 1861. 






FOR THE ARMY. 


521 


_ Extracts from Acts of Congress. 

lieu of forage, for every twenty miles of travel from his place of enrol¬ 
ment to the place of muster—the distance to be measured by the shortest 
usually traveled route; and when honorably discharged, an allowance at 
the same rate, from the place of his discharge to his place of enrolment, 
and, in addition thereto, if he shall have served for a period of two years, 
or during the war, if sooner ended, the sum of one hundred dollars: Pro¬ 
vided , That such of the companies of cavalry herein provided for, as may 
require it, may be furnished with horses and horse equipments in the 
same manner as in the United States Army. 

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That any volunteer who may be re¬ 
ceived into the service of the United States under this act, and who may 
be wounded or otherwise disabled in the service, shall be entitled to the 
benefits" which have been or may be conferred on persons disabled in the 
regular service; and the widow, if there be one, and if not, the legal 
heirs of such as die, or may he killed in service, in addition to all arrears 
of pay and allowances, shall receive the sum of one hundred dollars. 

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the bands of the regiments of 
infantry and of the regiments of cavalry shall he paid as follows: one- 
fourth of each shall receive the pay and allowances of sergeants of engi¬ 
neer soldiers; one-fourth, those of corporals of engineer soldiers; and the 
remaining half, those of privates of engineer soldiers of the first class; and 
the leaders of the hand shall receive the same pay and emoluments as 
second lieutenants of infantry. 

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That the wagoners and saddlers shall 
receive the pay and allowances of corporals of cavalry. The regimental 
commissary sergeant shall receive the pay and allowances of regimental 
sergeant major, and the regimental* quartermaster sergeant shall receive 
the pay and allowances of a sergeant of cavalry. 

Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to each 
regiment one chaplain, who shall he appointed by the regimental com¬ 
mander on the vote of the field officers and company commanders on duty 
with the regiment at the time the appointment shall be made. The chap¬ 
lain so appointed must be a regular ordained minister of a Christian de¬ 
nomination, and shall receive the pay and allowances of a captain of 
cavalry, and shall be required to report to the colonel commanding the 
regiment to which he is attached, at the end of each quarter, the moral 
and religious condition of the regiment, and such suggestions as may 
conduce to the social happiness and moral improvement of the troops. 

Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That the general commanding a 
separate department or a detached army is hereby authorized to appoint a 
military board or commission of not less than three nor more than five 
officers, whose duty it shall be to examine the capacity, qualifications, 


* The word “regimental” is erroneously inserted. 









522 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Extracts from Acts of Congress. 

propriety of conduct, and efficiency of any commissioned officer of volun- 
teers within his department or army, who may be reported to the board 
or commission, and upon such report, if adverse to such officer, and if 
approved by the President of the United States, the commission of such 
officer shall be vacated: Provided always, That no officer shall be eligible 
to sit on such board or commission whose rank or promotion would in 
any way be affected by its proceedings, and two members at least, if 
practicable, shall be of equal rank of the officer being examined. And 
when vacancies occur in any of the companies of volunteers, an election 
shall be called by the colonel of the regiment to fill such vacancies , and the 
men of each company shall vote in their respective companies for all offi¬ 
cers as high as captain, and vacancies above captain shall be filled by the 
votes of the commissioned officers of the regiment, and all officers so elected 
shall be commissioned by the respective Governors of the States, or by the 
President of the United States A 

Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, That all letters written by soldiers 
in the service of the United States may be transmitted through the mails 
without pre-payment of postage, under such regulations as the Post-Office 
Department may prescribe, the postage thereon to be paid by the 
recipients. 

Sec. 12. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of War be, and 
he is hereby, authorized and directed to introduce among the volunteer 
forces in the service of the United States, the system of allotment tickets 
now used in the navy, or some equivalent system, by which the family 
of the volunteer may draw such portions of his pay as he may request. 
[Approved July 22, 1861.] 


AN ACT in addition to the “Act to authorize the employment of volunteers to 
aid in enforcing the laws and protecting public property,” approved July 
twenty-second, eighteen hundred and sixty-one. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the 
United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to accept the services of 
volunteers, either as cavalry, infantry, or artillery, in such numbers as 
the exigencies of the public service may, in his opinion, demand, to be 
organized as authorized by the act of the twenty-second of July, eighteen 
hundred and sixty-one: Provided, That the number of troops hereby 
authorized shall not exceed five hundred thousand. 


* All in italics repealed by Sect. 3 of Chapter 52, August 6, 1861. 








FOR THE ARMY. 523 

Extracts from Acts of Congress. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the volunteers authorized by 
this act shall he armed as the President may direct; they shall be sub¬ 
ject to the rules and articles of war, and shall be upon the footing, in all 
respects, with similar corps of the United States Army, and shall be mus¬ 
tered into the service for “ during the war.” 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the President shall be author¬ 
ized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for 
the command of the volunteer forces, such number of major-generals 
and of brigadier-generals as may, in his judgment, be required for their 
organization. 

[Approved July 25, 1861.] 


33 


2T2 




524 


REVISED REGULATIONS 


Table of Pay, Forage, &c. 


TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, ETC., ALLOWED BY LAW TO THE OFFICERS OF 

THE ARMY. 




Subsistence. 

Forage. 

Servants. 




30 cents for 

$8 per mo. for 

Pay, subsist- 



Pat. 





ence. 

and 



each ration. 

each 

horse. 

clothing of 








a private 




Act Feb. 21, 

Act Apr. 24, 

soldier, Act 








April 

24, 


Rank and Classification of Officers. 


1857, 

sec. 1. 

1816, sec. 12. 

1S16, sec. 12. 

& 





3 

a 

U 

a 



o 

S 

U, 

a «£ 

Sts 

g gj 



3 

O 'O 

S* 

2 ci 

O 

a = 
u > 

o o 

as 

>> 

3 

a 


a 


>> a 


>> a 


>> a 



a 

ft 



3 *2 

m 

2.2 

a 



a 

o 


o ■*"* 

a ci 

a £ 
o 

ci 


Pm 

*5 

3 


3 

£ 

s 

EM 

General Officers. 

$ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

$ c. 


270 00 

40 

360 00 


50 00 

4 

9S 00 

778 00 

198 00 

Aides-de-camp and Military Secretary to 1 
Lieutenant-General, each .j 

80 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 


220 00 

15 

135 00 

3 

24 00 

4 

98 00 
49 00 

477 00 

Senior Aide-de-camp to General-in-Chief..... 

80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

189 00 

Aide-de-camp, in addition to pay, &c. of Lt.. 

24 00 



1 

8 00 



32 00 

124 00 

12 

108 00 

3 

24 00 

3 

73 50 

329 50 
19 00 

Aide-de-camp, in addition to pay, &c. of Lt* 

Adjutant-General's Department. 

20 00 

3 

i 

8 00 








110 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 
49 00 

237 00 
213 00 

Assistant Adjutant-General—Lieut. Col. 

95 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 


80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 
24 50 

189 00 
138 50 

Assistant Adjutant-General—Captain. 

70 00 

4 

36 00 

1 

8 00 

i 


80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

189 00 





Inspector-General's Department. 










110 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

237 00 

Signal Department. 





80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

189 00 

Quartermaster's Department. 




Quartermaster-General—Brig. General. 

124 00 

12 

108 00 

3 

24 00 

3 

73 50 

329 50 

Assistant Quartermaster-General—Col. 

110 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

237 00 

Deputy Quartermaster-General—Lt. Col.... 

95 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

213 00 


80 00 

4 

36 00 
36 00 

3 

24 00 
8 00 


49 00 
24 50 

189 00 
138 50 


70 00 

4 

1 


Subsistence Department. 




Commissary-General of Subsistence—Col... 

110 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

237 00 

Assistant Commissary-General of Subsist- j 
enee—Lieut. Colonel.j 

95 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

213 00 


80 00 

4 

36 00 
36 00 

3 

24 00 
8 00 


49 00 
24 50 

189 00 
138 50 

Commissary of Subsistence—Captain. 

Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, in j 
addition to pay, &c. of Lieut.*.j 

70 00 

20 00 

4 

i 

1 



11 00 














Medical Department. 

















228 33 
225 00 


80 00 

8 

72 00 

3 

24 00 


49 00 





Surgeons of less than ten years’ service. 

80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

189 00 

Assistant Surgeons of ten years’ service. 

70 00 

8 

72 00 

1 

8 00 

1 

24 50 

174 50 

Assistant Surgeons of five years’ service.... 

70 00 

4 

36 00 

1 

8 00 

1 

24 50 

138 50 

Asst. Surg. of less than five years’ service.. 

53 33 

4 

36 00 

1 

8 00 

1 

21 50 

121 S3 


* Entitled to only 3 rations per day as Lieutenants. 


















































FOR THE ARMY. 


525 


Table of Pay, Forage, &c. 


TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, &o.—Continued. 




Subsistence. 

Forage. 

Servants. 


Rank and Classification of Officers. 

Pat. 

30 cents for 

each ration. 

Act Feb. 21, 

1857, sec. 1. 

$8 per mo. for 

each horse. 

Act Apr. 24, 

1816, sec. 12. 

Pay, subsist¬ 
ence, and 
clothing of 
a private 
soldier. Act 
April 24, 
1816, sec. 12. 



Per month. 

N umber of rations 
per day. 

Monthly commu¬ 

tation value. 

Number of horses 

allowed. 

Monthly commu¬ 

tation value. 

Number of ser¬ 

vants allowed. 

Monthly commu¬ 

tation value. 

Total monthly pay 

Pay Department. 

$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

$ c. 
228 83 


95 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

213 00 


80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

189 00 

Officers of the Corps of Engineers, Corps of 
Topographical Engineers, and Ordnance 
Department. 





110 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

237 00 


95 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

213 00 


80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

189 00 


70 00 

4 

36 00 

i 

8 00 

1 

24 50 

138 50 


53 33 

4 

36 00 

i 

8 00 

1 

24 50 

121 83 


53 33 

4 

36 00 

i 

8 00 

1 

24 50 

121 83 


53 33 

4 

36 00 

i 

8 00 

1 

24 50 

121 83 

Officers of Mounted Dragoons, Cavalry, 
Riflemen, and Light Artillery. 






110 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

237 00 


95 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 <00 

213 00 


80 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

189 00 


70 00 

4 

36 00 

2 

16 00 

1 

24 50 

146 50 


53 33 

4 

36 00 

2 

16 00 

1 

24 50 

129 83 


53 33 

4 

36 00 

2 

16 00 

1 

24 50 

129 83 


53 33 

4 

36 00 

2 

16 00 

1 

24 50 

129 83 

Adjutant / in addition to pay of \ 

10 00 






10 00 

EegT Qr. Master | Lieutenant.j 







Officers of Artillery and Infantry. 










95 00 

6 

54 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

222 00 


80 00 

5 

45 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

198 00 


70 00 

4 

36 00 

3 

24 00 

2 

49 00 

179 00 


60 00 

4 

36 00 



1 

24 50 

120 50 


50 00 

4 

36 00 



1 

24 50 

110 50 

Second LiAi tenant 

45 00 

4 

36 00 



1 

24 50 

105 50 


45 00 

4 

36 00 



1 

24 50 

105 50 

Adjutant, in addition to pay, &c. of Lieut.. 
Reg’l Quartermaster, in addition to pay, j 

10 00 



1 

8 00 



18 00 

10 00 



2 

16 00 



26 00 

&c. of Lieutenant. j 







1 Ti,e officer in command of a company is allowed $10 per month for the responsibility of clothing, 
arms, and accoutrements.—Act Mai'ch 2, 1827, Sec. 2. 

2. Every commissioned officer below the rank of Brigadier-General is entitled to one additional ration 
per day for every five years’ service. 

3. Paymaster’s clerks, $700 per annum, and 75 cents per day when actually on duty. 

4. Chaplains in army, $10 to $00 per month and four rations a day. 

5. Chaplains in volunteers, same as captain of cavalry. 































































526 


REVISED REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY. 


Monthly Pay of Non-Commissioned Officers, Privates, &c. 


MONTHLY PAY OF NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS, PRIVATES, &c. 



CAVALRY. 


Sergeant-Major. 


Corporal. 

. $14 00 

Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

. 21 00 

Bugler. 

. 13 00 


. 21 00 




. 20 00 


. 13 00 

Sergeant. 





ORDNANCE. 


Master Armorer, Master Carriage-Maker, or 

Artificer. 


Master Blacksmith. 

. $34 00 

Laborer. 



Armorer, Carriage-Maker, or Blacksmith... 20 00 


Sergeant-Major. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

First Sergeant. 

Sergeant.. 

Corporal. 


Sergeant. 

Corporal. 

Private, first class. 


ARTILLERY AND INFANTRY. 


$21 00 
17 00 
20 00 
17 00 
13 00 


Artificer, artillery.. 

Private. 

Principal Musician 
Musician. 


SAPPERS, MINERS, AND PONTONIERS. 

.$31 00 Private, second class. 

. 20 00 Musician. 

.. 17 00 


$15 00 
13 00 
21 00 
12 00 


$13 00 
12 00 


Medical Cadets. $30 00 Matron. $6 00 

Hospital Steward, first class. 22 00 Female Nurses, 40 cents per day and one ration. 

“ “ second class. 20 00 

Two dollars per month is to be retained from the pay of each private soldier until the expiration of 
his term of enlistment, and 12j cents per month from all enlisted men, for the support of the “Soldier’s 
Home.” 

All enlisted men are entitled to $2 per month additional pay for re-enlisting, and $1 per month for 
’neh subsequent period of five years’ service, provided they re-enlist within one month after the expira¬ 
tion of their term. 

Volunteers and militia, when called into service of the United States, are entitled to the same pay, 
allowances, &c., as regulars. 










































INDEX 


THE FIGURES REFER TO THE PAGING. 


Absence, application for leave of, endorsed, 
32. 

extension of leave of, 32. 
form of application for leave of, on ac¬ 
count of sickness, 33. 
leave of, 12. 

beyond limits of military depart¬ 
ment, 33. 

commences, when, 31. 
duty of officer on expiration of, 33. 
granted, by whom, 31. 
granted to officers, when, 12. 
not granted, when, 31. 
of commander of a post, 32. 
on account of sickness, 32. 
to chaplains, 32. 
to officers, 31. 
to schoolmasters, 32. 
limit of, 32. 

of Adjutant-General, 11. 
of any chief of a military bureau, 11. 
officers on leave of, report, when, 31. 
reports of, on account of sickness, 33. 
three months’ leave of, 32. 
time of, of officers, 32. 

Absentees, reported, by whom, 40. 

Abstract, consolidated, form of, of provisions 
sold to officers, Subsistence Depart¬ 
ment, 264. 

form of, of advances, Ac., Quartermas¬ 
ter’s Department, 187. 
of articles expended, Ac., Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, 219. 
of articles fabricated, Ac., Ordnance 
Department, 432. 

of articles issued on special requi¬ 
sitions, Quartermaster’s Depart¬ 
ment, 217. 

of articles purchased, Ac., Ordnance 
Department, 433. 


Abstract, form of, of articles purchased, Ac., 
Quartermaster’s Department, 202. 
form of, of articles received from offi¬ 
cers, Quartermaster’s Dept., 204. 
of articles received, Ac., Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, 224. 
of articles transferred, Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, 223. 
of disbursements on account of con¬ 
tingencies, Quartermaster’s De¬ 
partment, 229. 

of disbursements on account of con¬ 
tingencies, Recruiting Service, 
144. 

of disbursements on account of con¬ 
tingencies, Subsistence Depart¬ 
ment, 263. 

of disbursements, Ordnance De¬ 
ment, 445. 

of expenditure, Quartermaster’s 
Department, 186. 

of extra issues to troops, Subsist¬ 
ence Department, 258. 
of forage issued, Quartermaster's 
Department, 209. 

of fuel, Ac., issued, Quartermaster’s 
Department, 206. 

of materials expended, Ac., Ord¬ 
nance Department, 437. 
of medical and hospital property 
received, Ac., Medical Depart¬ 
ment, 314. 

of payments made by paymaster, 
Pay Department, 362, 363. 
of provisions issued to men in hos¬ 
pital, Subsistence Dept., 254,255. 
of provisions issued to troops, Sub¬ 
sistence Department, 257. 
of provisions sold to officers, Sub¬ 
sistence Department, 259. 

527 





528 


INDEX. 


Abstract, form of, of purchases made on ac¬ 
count of subsistence of army, Subsist¬ 
ence Department, 262. 
form of, of purchases, &c., Quartermas¬ 
ter’s Department, 184. 
of rations issued, Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 271. 

of rations issued to recruits, Re¬ 
cruiting Service, 143. 
of stationery, Quartermaster’s De¬ 
partment, 215. 

of straw, Quartermaster’s Depart¬ 
ment, 213. 

Account current, form of, for expenditures 
on account of contingencies, Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, 228. 

Account current, form of, of army subsist¬ 
ence, Subsistence Department, 261. 
form of, Ordnance Department, 446. 
Quartermaster’s Department, 183. 
with Paymaster U. S. Army, 364, 
365. 

Account, form of, of furniture, cooking- 
utensils, &c., Medical Department, 
317. 

form of, for commutation of rations, 
Subsistence Department, 272. 
form of, for medicines, &o., Medical 
Department, 312. 

form of, of hospital stores, &c., Medical 
Department, 315. 

of clothing, arms, &c., of patients in hos¬ 
pital, Medical Department, 316. 
of treasurer of post fund, 35. 
soldier’s, rendered immediately, when, 
38. 

sutler establishes by affidavit, when, 38. 

Accounts and papers on Recruiting Service, 
how made, 136. 

and returns in Subsistence Department, 
247. 

and vouchers for expenditures to regu¬ 
lar army, how kept, 345. 
clothing, how kept, 171. 
inspection of, 49. 

Ordnance Department, with States and 
Territories, how kept, 392. 
returns, &c., 134. 

to be rendered to Commissary-General, 
246. 

transfer of pay, prohibited, 341. 

Accoutrements, contracts for, 387. 
prices of, 397. 

Acts of Congress, extracts from, 517. 


Additional pay allowed, when, 149. 
Adjournment of court-martial, 126. 
Adjutant, appointed, how, 18. 

duties of, on dress parade, 51. 
on guard-mounting, 58. 
Adjutant-General, absence of, 11. 
blanks furnished by, 133. 
conducts recruiting service, 128. 
descriptive roll of recruits, forwarded 
to, 140. 

letters addressed to, how endorsed, 136. 
received, how, 40. 
reports officers’ accounts, when, 12. 
resignations forwarded to, 12. 
returns made to, 134. 

Adjutant-General’s Department, officers of, 

10 . 

Administration, council of, 29, 34. 
duties of council of, 24. 
post council of, 34. 

Advance guards on marches, 96. 

Advanced guard, 60. 

communication secured to, 104. 
duties of, in battle, 104. 
may aid pursuit, 105. 

Advanced post detached from police guard, 
85. 

Advances of public money, when to bo 
made, 148. 

Advances, &c., Quartermaster’s Department, 
form of abstract, 187. 

Affidavits or depositions, how taken, 153. 
Aides-de-camp, appointed, how, 13. 
buttons for, 479. 

of brevet brigadier-generals, 13. 
of major-generals, 13. 

Aim, accuracy of, how determined, 17. 
Alarm, duty of guards in case of, 62. 
Allotment of barracks and quarters, 159. 
Allowance of camp and garrison equipage, 
169. 

of clothing, 169. 

Allowances to working-parties, 127. 
Alterations in and around fortifications, 15. 
Ambulance depot, where established, 106. 
Ambulances, 289. 

position designated, 98. 

American and foreign envoys or ministers, 
honors paid to, 41. 

Ammunition and other ordnance stores, 
classification of, 398. 
care of, 16. 

damaged, to be paid for, 22. 
forbidden in hospital, 283. 






INDEX. 529 


Ammunition in transports, 121. 
not brought into hospital, 283. 

Animals, public, form of monthly report of, 
Quartermaster’s Department, 178. 

Annual consolidated inspection report, form 
of, of muskets, Ac., Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 471. 

inspection report, ordnance and pro¬ 
jectiles, form of, Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment, 466. 
returns, 69. 

Application for leave of absence, 32. 

or leave of absence on account of sick¬ 
ness, form of, 33. 

Appointment and promotion of aides-de- 
camp, 13. 

of chaplains, by whom made, 37. 
of citizens to army, 12. 
of commissioned officers, 11. 
of officers, 11. 
of sutlers, 37. 

Appointments by commander of regiment, 
18. 

on the staff, 13. 

to rank of brigadier-general and major- 
general, how made, 11. 

Apprehension of a deserter, 29. 

Armament of fortifications, care of, 15. 

Arm-chests, accounted for, how, 390. 

Armies in the field, works for movements of, 
constructed by corps of engineers, 369. 

Armories, inspections of, 390. 

Armory, charge of, in absence of superin¬ 
tendent, devolves on whom, 390. 
duties of officer in charge of, 390. 

Arms and accoutrements, issues of, 388. 
to be kept clean, 21. 
arrangement of, when not in use, 21 
care of, 22. 

in possession of companies, 22. 
inspected on transports, 122. 
in transports, 121. 

Ac., issued to militia, chargeable against 
whom, 389. 

knapsacks, Ac., inspection of, 47. 

loss or damage to, 389. 

not to be left loaded, 22. 

officers on duty under, 50. 

of the United States, 474. 

of the United States on drums, 22. 

prices of small, 394—396. 

Ac., repairs of, how made, 389. 

Ac., reports of damages to, made, to 
whom, 390. 


Arms, small, and other ordnance stores, clas¬ 
sification of, 398. 
small, contracts for, 387. 

Army, formed suddenly, how, 97. 

medical supplies for, prescribed, where, 
281. 

not moving, issues to, 83. 
organization of, in the field, 71. 
pay, subsistence, forage, Ac., Pay De¬ 
partment, 348-353. 
table of monthly pay of, 524-526. 
tables of daily pay of, Pay Department, 
354, 355. 

transportation, 163. 

Arrangement of convoy, 108. 

of troops on parade, Ac., 72. 

Arrears of troops not to exceed two months, 
341. 

Arrest, commanding officers have power to, 
38. 

medical officer, when put in, 39. 
powers of commanding officers to, 38. 
prohibitions of officers under, 39. 
Arrests and confinements, 38. 

Arsenal, charge of, in absence of officer of 
ordnance, devolves on whom, 390. 
duties of officer in charge of, 390. 
Arsenals, inspections of, 390. 

Articles belonging to regiment, how num¬ 
bered, 19. 

of agreement, form of, to furnish rations 
to United States recruits, 273 
of agreement, form of, to supply fresh 
beef for use of United* States troops, 
274. 

of War, 499. 

Articles, Ac., purchased, abstract of, Quar¬ 
termaster’s Department, 202. 
Artificers, 19. 

soldiers mustered as, 19. 

Artillery and cavalry, inspection of, 49. 

and other ordnance stores, classification 
of, 398. 

buttons for officers of, 479. 
camp of, 80. 

employed in battle, how, 105. 
equipped as light artillery, trimmings 
for uniform cap, 481. 
field, registers of, 17. 
foot men, uniform coat for, 477. 
practice, 16. 

annual, number of shot and shells 
allowed for, 17. 
books of record for, 16. 





530 


INDEX. 


Artillery practice, objects of, 17. 
periods for, 17. 

uses of buoys or marks in, 16. 
regiments, colors of, 475. 

School, Fort Monroe, 19. 
trimmings for uniform of officers of, 480. 
Assistant inspectors, Ordnance Department, 
duties of, 388. 

surgeon, by whom appointed, 282. 

duty of, to examine volunteers, 495. 
requirements of, for promotion, 287. 
surgeons, appointment of, 287. 

Attack and defense of places, works for, 
constructed by corps of engineers, 369. 
made on enemy, how, 105. 

Attendants, hospital, 284. 

Authority, military, exercise of, 9. 

Average net weight of a steer, how ascer¬ 
tained, 242. 

Back rations, 246. 

Badges to distinguish rank, 484. 

Baggage, officers’, amount of, to be trans¬ 
ported, 163. 

to be transported, limited to what, 163. 
trains, 110. 

Bakeries, expenses of, paid for, how, 248. 

post, advantages of, 35. 

Balance, unexpended, of post fund, 36. 
Band kept at head-quarters, when, 19. 

uniform of, 495. 

Bands of music, 19. 
mustered, how, 19. 
number of, men allowed for, 19. 
pay of, 353. 

Barracks and quarters, 159. 

erected and altered, 159. 

Battalion, companies take place in, how, 18. 

of infantry, review of, 53. 

Battalions, review of more than two, 57. 
Bathing, 21. 

regulations in regard to, 123. 

Batteries, guns in fixed, numbered, 16. 
Battle, artillery, how employed in, 105. 
dispositions for, 104. 
duties of cavalry in, 105. 
duties of officers during, 106. 

Bearer of dispatches, duty of, 82. 

of dispatches, treatment of, 92. 

Bearers of flags, caution to be used toward, 92. 
Beef cattle to supply issues, 242. 

form of agreement to furnish fresh, to 
United States troops, 274. 
fresh, orders in regard to purchase of, 241. 


Belts, 22. 

black leather, prices of, 397. 

Betting prohibited, 148. 

Bids, time of opening sealed, 155. 

Bill, form of, of special contractor for ra 
tions, Subsistence Department, 270. 
Bivouacs, 80. 

formations of, 80. 

Black leather belts, prices of, 397. 

Blank books purchased, by whom, 134. 
certificates, in charge of whom, 31. 
discharges, 30. 
warrants, 19. 

Blanks, 133. 

printed, from Ordnance Office, issued, 
when, 393. 

Blowing charge given to shells, when, 17. 
Board and lodging, contract for, 245. 

Board for examination of non-commissioned 
officers, 18. 

for inspection of recruits, of whom com¬ 
posed, 139. 

of engineers, report of, 369. 
of examination for appointment of citi¬ 
zens, 12. 

of inspectors of recruits, 139. 
of survey, powers and duties of, 150. 
convened, by whom, 151. 

Bond, form of contractor’s, Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 276. 

Bonds, certain officers must give, 147. 

Book, commissary’s, 247. 

of council of administration, 35. 
post, of record, 16. 

Books and accounts, inspection of, 49. 

and papers, company, inspection of, 49. 

regimental, inspection of, 49. 
company, 24. 
for regiments, 20. 

kept by officers of corps of engineers 
and topographical engineers, 371. 
of record for artillery practice, 16. 
papers, and drawings relating to build¬ 
ing of fortifications, 370. 
post, 20. 
regimental, 20. 
sutler’s, 35. 

Boots, uniform, 481. 

Branded property, how branded when sold, 
150. 

Branding, regulations in regard to, 150. 
Brevet brigadier-generals, aides-de-camp of, 
13. 

rank takes effect, when, 10. 



INDEX. 


531 


Brevet, rank, when exercised, 10. 

second lieutenant, uniform coat for, 477. 
Brevets, officers having, duties of, 10. 
Brigade, duties of general of, 72. 

guards, how organized and mounted, 
59. 

how formed, 71. 

Brigades in divisions, numbered, how, 72. 
mixed, 72. 

Brigadier-general, appointments to rank of, 
how made, .11. 
funeral escort of, 43. 
place of, in a review, 57. 
received, how, 40. 
salute to, 42. 
uniform coat for, 476. 

Buildings, erection of temporary, under di¬ 
rection of chief of either corps of 
engineers, 369. 

private, in use of United States, 163. 
public, erection of, 157. 

Buoys or marks, their uses in artillery prac¬ 
tice, 16. 

Business, official, 68. 

Buttons, uniform, 478. 

Cabin passage on transports, 164. 

Cadets, medical, muster and pay rolls of, 
284. 

oath of, 287. 
quarters of, 288. 
rank and pay of, 288. 
reports of, on expiration of term of 
service, 288. 
selection of, 287. 
transportation of, 288. 

Calls, sentinel must repeat, 64. 

Camp and garrison guards, 58. 
cavalry in, 75. 
colors, 475. 

honors paid by guards in, 85. 
of artillery, 80. 
of cavalry, 79. 

depth of, how fixed, 79. 
of infantry, 76. 

officers of the day charged with clean¬ 
liness of, 85. 

of regiment of five squadrons of cavalry, 
(plate,) 78. 

of regiment of infantry, (plate,) 77. 

front of, 76. 
terms used in, 75. 

Campaign, monthly returns in, 69. 
troops in, 71. 

2TJ 


Camping party, 74. 

Camps, 74. 

establishment of, 74. 

Candidates for ordnance sergeanto, 24. 
Cannon, &c., contracts for, 387. 
Cantonments, 74. 
formation of, 81. 
limits of, by whom assigned, 81. 
Capacities of various-sized boxes, &c., Sub 
sistence Department, 277. 

Captain, funeral escort of, 44. 

promotions to rank of, how made, 11. 
to forward certificate of disability, 30. 
Captains, monthly company returns of, 69. 
must serve with their companies, 18. 
of companies, duties of, 21. 
uniform coat for, 477. 

Captured property, return of, 71. 

Care of armament of fortifications, 15. 
of arms, 22. 
of fortifications, 13. 

Casualties, 69. 

Cattle on the hoof, regulations in regard to, 
242. 

Cause of discharge, how stated, 30. 

Cavalry and artillery, inspection of, 49. 
review of, 57. 

and infantry march together, when, 97. 
buttons for officers of, 479. 
camp of, 79. 

depth of camp of, how fixed, 79. 
distribution of, in battle, 105. 
duties of general officers of, 117. 

in battle, 105. 
heavy, 72. 
in camp, 75. 

light, for what employed, 72. 
officers, duties of, during march, 97. 
patrols, duties of, 92. 
police guard in, 85. 
service, dismounted, 84. 
trimmings for uniform of officers of, 
480. 

uniform jacket for enlisted men pf, 477. 
used in escorts, when, 108. 

Ceremony, parades of, 50. 

Certificate, error of fact in, 149. 

form of, of disability for discharge, Medi¬ 
cal Department, 325. 
of inspection, Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment, 460, 461. 

of inspection of muskets, &c., Ord¬ 
nance Department, 467, 468. 
of inspection of powder, 472. 




INDEX 


032 

Certiticate, form of, to be given a soldier at 
timo of discharge, Pay Department, 
630. 

Certificates, blank, in charge of whom, 31. 
furnished to laundresses following the 
army, 112. 

inspection, Ordnance Department, to 
be triplicate, 387. 
medical, 33. 
of disability, 30. 

caution in regard to, 284. 
of inspection of supplies, 241. 
of non-commissioned officers, 19. 

Challenge of sentinel, 64. 

Challenging, duty of sentinel when, 64. 

Changes of troops to be reported, 70. 

Chaplains, 36. 

allowed to posts, 37. 
appointment of, made, by whom, 37. 
leave of absence to, 32. 
post, pay account of, 341. 
rate of pay allowed, 37, 353. 
selection of, 36. 

who eligible to appointment, 36. 

Charges against a soldier, 153. 

resignations tendered under, 12. 

Chevrons, 486. 

Chief engineer, duties of, 369. 

Justice, honors paid to, 41. 

of any military bureau, absence of a, 11, 

Children, soldiers’, at post school, 35. 

Citizen, appointment of, to the army, 12. 
witness in court-martial, pay of, 168. 

Civil courts, proceedings in, 474. 

Claims of sutlers, 37. 

Classification of ordnance and ordnance 
stores, 398. 

Cleanliness on transports, 122. 
required, 21. 

Clothing accounts, how kept, 171. 
allowance of, 169. 
and knapsack, arrangement of, 21. 
and utensils to be kept clean, 21. 
camp and garrison equipage, 169. 
equipments, <fce., 488. 
extra-issues of, charged to a soldier, 170. 
issued, how often, 170. 
not to be taken off when on guard, 62. 
receipts for, 169. 
supplied, how, 169. 

Coat, uniform, for artillery foot men, 477. 
brevet second lieutenant, 477. 
br.igadier-general, 476. 
captain, 477. 


Coat, uniform, for colonel, 476. 

commissioned officers, 476 
engineers, 477. 
enlisted foot men, 477. 
fatigue purposes, 478. 
first lieutenant, 477. 
hospital stewards, 477. 
infantry, 477. 
lieutenant-colonel, 477. 
major, 477. 
major-general, 476. 
medical cadets, 477. 
musicians, 478. 
ordnance stewards, 477. 
recruits, 478. 
second lieutenant, 477. 

Colonel, funeral escort of, 44. 

vacancies to rank of, how filled, 11. 

Color line in camp of infantry, 76. 

Color, national, artillery regiments, 475. 
national, infantry regiments, 475. 
regimental, artillery, 475. 
infantry, 475. 

Colors, camp, 475. 

displayed in trenches, when, 116. 
moved, by whom, 85. 
of artillery regiments, 475. 
of infantry regiments, 475. 
where planted in camp, 75. 

Colt’s pistols lost, &c., by enlisted men, to 
be paid for, 389. 
revolvers, prices of, 396. 

Command not assumed by what officers, 10. 
officer in highest rank, to, 10. 
officer in temporary, 11. 
or duty, succession in, 11. 

Commandants of grand guards, duties of, 91. 

Commander, communications, addressed, to 
whom, 68. 

duties of partisan, 95. 
of a regiment, appointments by, 18. 
of convoy, duties of, 108. 
of geographical department, leave of 
absence of, 32. 
of guard, duties of, 61. 
of intrenched post, duties of, 93. 
of post, leave of absence of, 32. 
written communications from, by whom 
made, 68. 

Commanders of companies accountable for 
ordnance stores, 389. 
of engineers, &c., reports of, 73. 
of fortified places, journals of, 119. 
of grand guards, duties of, 89. 



INDEX. 


533 


Commanders of militia accountable for ord¬ 
nance stores, 389. 

of posts accountable for ordnance stores, 
389. 

of regiments, duties of, 18. 
honors to, 41. 

&c., returns of, 69. 

Commanding officer of new post, duties of, 
104. 

Commanding officer of Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment, accountability of, 390. 
Commanding officer of regiment, roll fur¬ 
nished to, 140. 

Commanding officers of companies, 21. 
officers, powers of, to arrest, 38. 
officers to examine stores, 35. 

Commands, assignment of, by whom made, 
72. 

to each grade, list of, 342. 

Commissariat, pay of extra-duty men em¬ 
ployed in, 246. 

Commissaries of subsistence, quarterly state¬ 
ments of, 248. 

Commissary, book kept by, 247. 
duties of, 241. 

Commissioned officers, appointment and pro¬ 
motion of, 11. 
forage caps for, 481. 
one, always in a company, 31. 
two, in a garrisoned post, 31. 
uniform coat for, 476. 

Commissions of same date, 9. 

Communication secured to advanced guard, 
104. 

Communications, important, copies of, whero 
sent, 68. 

to a commander, addressed, to whom, 68. 
to Secretary of War, how made, 68. 
written, from a commander, by whom 
made, 68. 

Commutation of rations, 246. 

Companies, 21. 

arms in possession of, 22. 
captains must serve with, 18. 
commanding officers of, 21. 
designated on muster-rolls, how, 50. 
designation of, 18. 
duties of captains of, 21. 
interior management of, 21. 
morning reports of, 40. 
numbering of, 21. 

of artillery equipped as light artillery, 
trowsers for, 479. 
take place in battalion, how, 18. 


Companies, commanders of, accountable for 
ordnance stores, 389. 

Company books, 24. 

books and papers, inspection of, 49. 
council, 36. 

discharge of soldier absent from his, 31 
fund, 36. 

fund, supervision of, 36. 
officers in arrest, on a march, 39. 

present at dress parade, 53. 
of ordnance, form of return of, 453. 
Condemnation of public property made, by 
whom, 151. 

Condemned property sold or destroyed, by 
orders of whom, 152. 

Conduct of baggage-trains, 110. 

Confinement, close, when required, 38. 
Confinements and arrests, 38. 

Congress, extracts from Acts of, 517. 
Consent to enlistment, form of, given by 
parent or guardian, 131. 

Cooks and nurses, duties of, 284. 

and nurses for hospital, how selected, 
284. 

and nurses in hospitals, 283. 
in Medical Department, 283. 

Contract with a private physician, Medical 
Department, 338. 

Contractor, special, form of bill of, Recruit¬ 
ing Service, 142. 

special, form of bill of, Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 270. 

Contractor’s bond, form of, Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 276. 

Contractors, rules in regard to, 156. 
Contracts and purchases, 155. 

condition to be inserted in, 156. 
for cannon, projectiles, powder, small 
arms, &c., 387. 
for supplies, 241. 

made at temporary rendezvous, 245. 
made in quadruplicate, 155. 
Contributions, levied, by whom, 73. 

Convoy, attack of, 96. 

Convoys and their escorts, 108. 
by water, 109. 

duties of commander of, 108. 
halt of, 109. 
of powder, 108. 
of prisoners of war, 110. 
set on fire, if they cannot be saved from 
enemy, 110. 

Copies of all orders, sent, where, 68. 
Corporals, places of, on guard mounting, 58. 




534 


INDEX. 


Corps, meeting of two, 98. 

of engineers and topographical en¬ 
gineers, 369. 

of engineers, officers of, may assume 
command, when, 10. 
of engineers, plans of, submitted to 
Secretary of War for his sanction, 369. 
vacancies in, how filled, 11. 

Council, company, 36. 
of administration, 29. 
duties of, 24. 
post, 34. 

proceedings of, by whom signed, 35. 
post, powers of, 35. 

Councils of administration, 34. 

Countersign and parole issued daily, 82. 
communicated, when, 62. 
given, to whom, 61. 
interior guards receive, when, 61. 
loss of, 83. 

Courtesy indispensable to discipline, 41. 

Court-martial, adjournment of, 126. 
duties of president of, 125. 
form of order appointing, 124. 
postponement of, 124. 
president of, who, 124. 
punishment ordered by, by whom miti¬ 
gated, 126. 
record of, 125. 
witnesses for trial in, 125. 

Courts, civil, proceedings in, 474. 

Courts-martial, 124. 
expenses of, 168. 
stationery for, 167. 

Cravat or stock, uniform, 481. 

Credit, sutler forbidden to sell on, in most 
cases, 37. 

Curb bridles, Ordnance Department, 388. 

Daily duties in garrison, 39. 

Damage done to public property, 497. 

Damaged clothing, 171. 
stores repacked, 242. 

Damages to arms, &c., reports of, made, to 
whom, 390. 

Date of enlistments, 132. 

Day’s work, length of, 128. 

Death of President of United States, funeral 
honors on, 43. 

Debts due laundress and sutler by recruits, 
132. 

due to laundress, collected, how, 24. 
payment of soldiers’, 38. 


Deceased non-commissioned officer, effects of, 
28. 

officers, inventories of effects of, 28. 
soldiers, 28. 

soldiers, inventories of effects of, 28. 
soldiers, return of, 70. 

Declaration of recruit, 130. 

Defense of fortified places, 118. 

of places, works for, constructed by 
corps of engineers, 369. 

Defiles, manner of passing convoy through, 
109. 

marches through, 98. 

Delivery of cattle on the hoof, 242. 
Department, geographical, absence of com¬ 
mander, 32. 

military, leave of absence beyond limits 
of, 33. 

Dep6ts, commanded, by whom, 74. 

for collecting and instructing recruits, 
137. 

Deserter, apprehension of, 29. 

officer registered as, when, 12. 
pay of, 30. 

reckoning time of service of, 30. 
surrender of, 29. 
waiting trial, 30. 

Deserters, 29. 

clothing of, 171. 
enlistment of, 112. 
expenses for pursuing, 29. 
forfeit of, 343. 
reported, by whom, 29. 
restored to duty, how, 29. 
time lost by, 29. 
treatment of, 92, 112. 
trial of, 29. * 

Desertion of recruit, 29. 

Designation of companies, 18. 

Detachment, troops on, when, 10. 
Detachments and sentinels from old guard, 61. 

formation of, 93. 

Details for service, 83. 

Diet in hot climates, 123. 

Directions for keeping the Journal, 99. 
Disability, certificate of, 30. 

certificates of, to be given with caution, 
286. 

form of certificate of, for discharge, 
Medical Department, 325. 
for service existing prior to enlistment, 
495. 

Disabled non-commissioned officers, 30 
soldiers, 30. 



INDEX. 


535 


Disbursing officers, duties of, 147-149, 
Discharge of foreman of arsenal or armorv. 
390. 

of invalids, 30. 

of soldier absent from his company, 
31. 

Discharged soldiers, paid, how, 341. 
Discharges, authority to grant, 30. 
blank, 30. 

duplicate, forbidden, 30. 

Discipline, courtesy necessary to, 41. 
Discussions and publications, military, 38. 
Disorder, duty of sentinel in case of, 64. 
Dispatches carried by mounted soldiers, 
when, 74. 
conveyance of, 74. 
duty of bearer of, 82. 
to whom intrusted, 82. 
treatment of bearer of, 92. 

“Distance,” signification of, in Journal, 99. 
Distribution of troops, 13. 

Distributions from post fund, 36. 

Division, consists of what, 71. 

Double rations, allowed, when, 342. 

Drafted militia, requisition for, made on 
whom, 495. 

Draw-bridges, &c., machinery to be kept in 
order, 14. 

Drawings relating to fortifications, 370. 
Dress, 476. 

“Dress” and “ Undress” worn, when, 494. 
Dress parade, 51. 

dispensed with, when, 53. 
duties of adjutant on, 51. 
field and company officers present 
at, 53. 

officers to attend, 53. 

Drums, arms of United States on, 22. 

of funeral escort, 45. 

Duplicate discharges forbidden, 30. 

Duties, daily, in garrison, 39. 

of adjutant on dress parade, 51. 

on guard-mounting, 58. 
of advanced guard in battle, 104. 
of an officer of corps of engineers 
charged with a survey, 370. 
of assistant inspectors, Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 388. 
of bearer of dispatches, 82. 
of captains of companies, 21. 
of cavalry in battle, 105. 
of cavalry officers during march, 97. 
of cavalry patrols, 92. 
of chief engineer, 369. 

2TT2 


Duties of chiefs of bureaus of War Depart¬ 
ment, 149. 

of commandants of grand guards, 91. 
of commander of convoy, 108. 
of escort, 108. 
of fortified place, 118. 
of guard, 61. 
of intrenched post, 93. 
of commanders of grand guards, 89. 
of regiments, 18. 

of commanding officer of new post, 104 
of commissary, 242. 
of cooks and nurses, 284. 
of council of administration, 24. 
of disbursing officers, 147,149. 
of field officer of trenches, 114. 
of general commanding siege, 118. 
of brigade, 72. 
of division, 72. 
officers of cavalry, 117. 
of grand guard, 88. 
of guard, 60. 

of guards of trenches, 115. 
of hospital steward, 283, 288. 
of inspecting officers, Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 387. 
of inspector of troops, 47. 
of Judge Advocate, 125. 
of lieutenants, 21. 
of medical director, 106. 
of medical officers, 282, 285. 
of military store-keeper, 390. 
of musicians, 19. 
of mustering officers, 496. 
of officer highest in rank, 10. 

in charge of arsenal or armory, 
390. 

of guard in camp, 86. 
of new guard, 60. 
of old guard, 60. 
of the day, 62, 86. 
who succeeds to a command, 11. 
of officers during battle, 106. 
having brevets, 10. 
of engineers, 10. 

of Pay and Medical Departments, 

10 . 

on leave of absence, 31. 
of orderlies, 73. 
of out-guards, 90. 

of Quartermaster’s Department, 159. 
of Paymaster-General, 341, 344. 
of picket-guards, 87. 
of pioneers, 108. 




536 


INDEX. 


Duties of police guard, 85. 
of post treasurer, 35. 
of president of court-martial, 125. 
of recruiting officers, 130, 245. 
of recruiting officer when relieved, 134. 
of regimental quartermaster, 110. 
of senior medical officer, 282-285. 
of sentinels, 62, 85. 

on outposts, 90. 
of stable guard, 85. 

of store-keeper, Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment, 391. 

of Superintendent of Recruiting Ser¬ 
vice, 128. 
of sutlers, 37. 
of vedettes, 90. 
of wagon-masters, 111. 
of ward-master, 282. 

Duty, officer cannot put himself on, 10. 

of officer designated to muster militia, 
496. 

of officer on expiration of leave of ab¬ 
sence, 33. 

of sentinel in case of disorder, 64. 

when challenging, 64. 
or command, succession in, 11. 
orders to travel on, 67. 
traveling on, 31. 

Economy in public expenses recommended, 
156. 

Effects of deceased non-commissioned of¬ 
ficers, inventories of, 28. 
of deceased officers, inventories of, 28. 
of deceased soldiers, inventories of, 28. 

Embarkation of troops, 120. 

Embezzlement of public property, 153. 

Engineer Bureau, determine character of 
structures, &o., 369. 

Engineer charged with an expedition, to be 
consulted, 73. 

Engineer Department, quarters estimated 
and built by, 369. 

Engineer, duties of chief, 369. 

Engineering, disbursement of funds for pur¬ 
poses of, 370. 

Engineers and topographical engineers, form 
of receipts, 378. 

form of return of officers and hired men, 
373. 

form of statement of money received 
and expended, 374. 

Engineers, books kept by officers of corps of, 

371. 


Engineers, buttons for officers of corps o£ 
478. 

corps of, 369. 

form of abstract of disbursements 
376. 

form of abstract of forage, <fec.. 
382. 

form of abstract of materials ex¬ 
pended, 381. 

form of abstract of provisions 
issued, 383. 

form of abstract of purchases, 380, 
381. 

form of account, 377. 
form of account current, 375. 
form of return of instruments, 
books, &c., 384, 385. 
form of return of property of, 379. 
officers of, assigned to head-quarters, 
73. 

officers of, duties of, 10. 
officers of, on duty, when, 10. 
officers of the corps of, may assume com¬ 
mand, when, 10. 

printed forms, issued, when, 371. 

report of board of, 369. 

reports, &c., of commanders of, 73. 

of officers of, 370. 
topographical, corps of, 369. 

books kept by officers of corps of, 
371. 

reports of officers of, 370. 
trimmings for uniform of officers of 
corps of, 480. 
uniform coat for, 477. 

English language, volunteers required to 
speak, 496. 

Enlisted men, buttons for, 479. 

except companies of light artillery, 
trimmings for uniform of, 481. 
furloughs to, 34. 

of artillery, infantry, engineers, and 
ordnance, uniform boots for, 482. 
of cavalry and light artillery, uniform 
jacket for, 477. 

of cavalry, uniform boots for, 482. 
of light artillery, uniform boots for, 482. 
of ordnance, 392. 

sutlers sell to them on credit, when, 38. 
tents for, 488. 
trowsers for, 479. 
uniform cravat for, 481. 
hat for, 480. 
spurs for mounted, 4S2. 



INDEX. 


537 


Enlistment, form of consent to, given by 
parent or guardian, 131. 
of deserters, 112. 
of minors, 130. 

Enlistments, copies of, in triplicate, 132. 
date of, 132. 
filled up, bow, 137. 
form of, Ordnance Department, 452. 
Envoys and ministers, salutes to, 42. 
Epaulettes, 483. 

Equipment of recruits, 132. 

Equipments, &o., 488. 
borse, 476. 

Escort, commander of, duties of, 108. 
formed, how, 43. 

funeral, commanded, by whom, 44. 
of brigadier-general, 43. 
of captain, 44. 
of colonel, 44. 

of general commanding-in-chief,43. 
of lieutenant-colonel, 44. 
of major, 44. 
of major-general, 43. 
of subaltern, 44. 

Escorts, funeral, by whom commanded, 44. 
of honor, 43. 

Estimate, form of, of funds required for pur¬ 
chasing fresh beef, Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 265. 

form of, of funds, &c., Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 449. 

of funds required by paymaster, Pay 
Department, 356. 

Estimates for supplies of property, &c., 
forwarded, how, 156. 

Examination, Board of, for appointment of 
citizens, 12. 

of non-commissioned officers, board for, 
18. 

of recruit by medical officer, 286. 
Exchange or transfer of officers, 12. 
Exchanges of prisoners, 108. 

Executive Departments, Heads of, salute to, 
42. 

Exercise of regiments serving on foot, 18. 
Exercises and manoeuvres at review, 57. 
military, 82. 

Expenditures, abstract of, Quartermaster’s 
Department, form of, 186. 
confined to stated items, 136. 
orders involving, 67. 

Expenses of courts-martial, 168. 

for issue and delivery of ordnance, 392. 
for pursuing deserters, 29. 


Expenses of a soldier in a private hospital, 
246. 

of transportation of recruits, officers, 
&c., 133. 

Extension of leave of absence, 32. 

Extra-duty men, 127. 

employed in the commissariat, pay of, 
246. 

rolls for, 168. 

Extra-duty pay, 127. 

Extra issues, 244. 

Fatigue purposes, uniform coat for, 478. 
Female nurses, pay of, 284. 

Field artillery, registers of, 17. 

fortifications, constructed by corps of 
engineers, 369. 
music, 19. 

officer of the trenches, duties of, 114. 
officers present at dress parade, 53. 

under arrest on a march, 39. 
returns, 70. 

service, table for, 304-309. 

Fire, care to be observed in case a wagon 
takes, 110. 

duty of guards on alarm of, 62. 

Fires, kitchen, extinguished in camp, 86. 
of grand guards, 92. 
regulations in regard to, on board of 
transports, 121. 

First lieutenant, uniform coat for, 477. 

Flag, garrison, 475. 
recruiting, 475. 
red, indicates what, 106. 
storm, 475. 

Flags, caution to be used toward bearers of, 92. 
Flags, colors, standards, guidons, 475. 
Flankers, 95. 

Floating targets, 17. 

Flour ration, saving in, by baking, 35. 
Flying sentinel, 91. 

Food, 23. 

Forage caps, 481. 

Forage, monthly report of, Quartermaster’s 
Department, form of, 179. 
ration, 166. 

Foreign envoys and ministers, honors paid 
i to, 41. 

officers, salutes to, 42. 
ships of war, salutes to, 42. 

Foreman of arsenal or armory, discharge 
of, 390. 

, Form of abstract of articles fabricated, <fcc., 
Ordnance Department, 4o2. 






538 


INDEX. 


Form of abstract of articles purchased, Ac., 
Ordnance Department, 433. 
abstract of bill of medicine, Ac., Quar¬ 
termaster’s Department, 231. 
abstract of disbursements on account of 
contingencies, Recruiting Service,144. 
abstract of disbursements on account of 
contingencies, Subsistence Depart¬ 
ment, 263. 

abstract of extra issues to troops, Sub¬ 
sistence Department, 258. 
abstract of materials expended, Ac., 
Ordnance Department, 437. 
abstract of medical and hospital pro¬ 
perty, 314. 

abstract of payments made by paymas¬ 
ter, Pay Department, 362, 363. 
abstract of provisions issued to men in 
hospital, Subsistence Department, 
254, 255. 

abstract of provisions issued to troops, 
Subsistence Department, 257. 
abstract of provisions sold to officers, 
Subsistence Department, 259. 
abstract of purchases made on account 
of subsistence of army, Subsistence 
Department, 262. 

abstract of rations issued to recruits, 
Recruiting Service, 143. 
abstract of rations issued to recruits, 
Subsistence Department, 271. 
account current of army subsistence, 
Subsistence Department, 261. 
account current with paymaster United 
States Army, 364, 365. 
account for commutation of rations, 
Subsistence Department, 272. 
account for medicines, Ac., Medical De¬ 
partment, 312. 

account of clothing, arms, Ac., of pa¬ 
tients in hospital, Medical Depart¬ 
ment, 315. 

account of furniture, cooking-utensils, 
Ac., in use, Medical Department, 317. 
account of hospital stores, Ac., Medical 
Department, 315. 

application for leave of absence on ac¬ 
count of sickness, 33. 
articles of agreement to furnish fresh 
beefforuse of United States troops,274. 
articles of agreement to furnish rations 
for use of United States recruits, 273. 
bill of armory supplies, Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 441. 


Form of bill of special contractor, Recruiting 
Service, 142. 

bill of special contractor for rations, 
Subsistence Department, 270. 
certificate of disability for discharge, 
Medical Department, 325. 
certificate to be given a soldier at time 
of his discharge, 360. 
commissary’s receipt to contractors, 
Subsistence Department, 269. 
consent to enlistment given by parent or 
guardian, 131. 

consolidated abstract of provisions sold 
to officers, Subsistence Department, 
264. 

consolidated provision return, Subsist¬ 
ence Department, 268. 
contract with a private physician, Me¬ 
dical Department, 338. 
contractor’s bond, Subsistence Depart¬ 
ment, 276. 

engineer’s report of operations at Fort 
Jay, 372. 

enlistments, Ordnance Department, 452. 
estimate for recruiting funds, 129. 
estimate of funds required by paymas¬ 
ter, Pay Department, 356. 
estimate of funds required for pur¬ 
chasing fresh beef, Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 265. 
furlough, 34. 
guard-mounting, 58. 
guard-report, 63. 
inspection of troops, 46. 
inventory of ordnance and ordnance 
stores for inspection, 439. 

Journal, 101-103. 

list of ordnance and ordnance stores 
condemned, 438. 

list of persons and articles employed, 
Ac., and transferred, Quartermaster’s 
Department, 240. 
medical certificate, 340. 
meteorological register, Medical De¬ 
partment, 320-323. 

monthly statement of hospital fund. 
Medical Department, 339. 
monthly summary statement of funds 
received and disbursed, Subsistence 
Department, 260. 

monthly summary statement, Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, 173. 
monthly summary statement, recruiting 
officer, 146. 




INDEX. 


539 


Form of morning report of surgeon, Medical 
Department, 336. 
oath administered to recruit, 131. 
officers’ pay-account, Pay Department, 
358, 359. 

order appointing court-martial, 124. 
orders, 66. 

pay-roll of clerks, armorers, Ac., Ord¬ 
nance Department, 443. 
prescription-book, diet-hook, <fec.. Medi¬ 
cal Department, 319. 
provision return for captain, Subsist¬ 
ence Department, 267. 
quarterly return of clothing, Ac., re¬ 
ceived and delivered, Quartermas¬ 
ter’s Department, 232-237. 
receipt for clothing, Ac., Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, 238, 239. 
receipt for issues to the militia, Ord¬ 
nance Department, 436. 
receipt of officer or soldier when dis¬ 
charged, Pay Department, 361. 
receipt of recruiting officer, 145. 
receipt, Pay Department, 366, 367. 
receipts of armory employees, Ordnance 
Department, 442. 

receipts to be rendered by paymasters. 
Pay Department, 357. 
record of recruits examined, Medical 
Department, 326. 

register, Medical Department, 318. 
relieving sentinels, 62. 
rent-roll, Ordnance Department, 440. 
report of sick and wounded, Medical 
Department, 327—335. 
requisition for medicines, Ac., Medical 
Department, 310. 

return of commissary property re¬ 
ceived, issued, Ac., Subsistence De¬ 
partment, 266. 

return of medical and hospital property, 
Mddical Department, 313. 
return of medical officers of regular 
army, Medical Department, 337. 
return of provisions received and is¬ 
sued, Subsistence Department, 250, 
251. 

return of small arms, Ac., Ordnance 
Department, 420—425. 
review, 53. 

roll of soldiers employed as cooks, 
nurses, Ac., Medical Department, 
324. 

safeguard, 113. 


Form of special requisition for supplies of 
medicines, Ac., Medical Department, 
311. 

statement of articles repaired, Ac., Ord¬ 
nance Department, 379. 
statement of moneys received, ex¬ 
pended, Ac., Pay Department, 368. 
statement of serviceable materials, Ac., 
Ordnance Department, 435. 

Forms, Medical Department, 310-340. 
for Recruiting Service, 142-146. 
for Subsistence Department, 250-277. 
of parade, 50. 

of reports, Quartermaster’s Department, 
173-240. 

printed, for corps of engineers, issued, 
when, 371. 

printed, of returns, furnished, 69. 

Fort Monroe, Artillery School at, 19. 

Fortifications, alterations in and around, 
15. 

books, papers, and drawings relating to 
building of, 370. 
care of, 13. 

care of armament of, 15. 
drawings relating to, 370. 
field, constructed by corps of engineers, 
369. 

grass on slopes of, 13. 

gullies in slopes of, to be avoided, 14. 

masonry of, care of, 14. 

wood-work of, 14. 

Fortified places, defense of, 118. 
duties of commander of, 118. 
journals of, by whom kept, 119. 

Fuel issued to officers, public property, 
161. 

Fumigations on board of transports, 122. 

Fund, company, supervision of, 36. 
hospital, 243. 

post, account of treasurer of, 35. 
balance unexpended, 36. 
distributions from, 36. 
objects of expenditure of, 35. 
raised by tax, 35. 

Funds, disbursement of, for engineering 
purposes, 370. 

form of estimate of, required by Quar¬ 
termaster’s Department, 182. 
public, regulations in regard to, 147. 
turned over to other paymasters, how 
accounted for, 345. 

unexpended, recruiting, paid over, to 
whom, 133. 


34 




540 


INDEX. 


Funeral escort of brigadier-general, 43. 
escort of captain, 44. 
ol colonel, 44. 

of general com manding-in-chief, 43. 
of lieutenant-colonel, 44. 
of major, 44. 
of major-general, 43. 
of subaltern, 44. 

escorts, commanded, by whom, 44. 
honors, 43. 

at the grave, 44. 
of officer, procession at, 45. 
of private soldier, 45. 

Furlough, form of, 34. 

Furloughs, granted, when, 34. 
prohibited, by whom, 34. 
to enlisted men, 34. 

Furniture and stationery, 134. 

Furniture for officers’ quarters, 162. 
for soldier in the field, 23. 
of mess-chest, 309. 

Garrison, daily duties in, 39. 
flag, 475. 
guards, 58. 

Garrisoned post, recruits received at, 138. 

two commissioned officers in, 31. 
General commanding army, salute to, 42. 
commanding-in-chief, interment of, 43. 
commanding-in-chief, received, how, 40. 
commanding siege, duties of, 118. 
of brigade, duties of, 72. 
of division, duties of, 72. 
officer, saluted, how often, 42. 
officers, honors paid to, 41. 
officers of cavalry, duties of, 117. 
orders, 66. 

orders not regularly received to be re¬ 
ported, 67. 
police, 112. 

Generals bivouac with troops, when, 82. 
of trenches, 113, 114. 

Geographical department, absence of com¬ 
mander, 32. 

Gloves, uniform, 482. 

Governors of States and Territories, salute 
to, 42. 

within their respective States and Ter¬ 
ritories, honors paid to, 41. 

Graduates of Military Academy, 11. 

Grand guard act as skirmishers, when, 92. 
intrenched, when, 89. 
position of, 88. 

guards and other outposts, 88. 


Grand guards, commanders of, duties of, 89. 
duties of, 88. 

duties of commandants of, 91. 
fires of, 92. 

organized and mounted, how, 59. 
proper position of, 89. 

Grass, burning of, forbidden, 14. 

on slopes of fortifications, 13. 

Grave, funeral honors at, 44. 

Guard, advanced, 60. 

communication secured to, 104. 
duties of, in battle, 104. 
may aid pursuit, 105. 
clothing not to be taken off when on, 62. 
commander of, duties of, 61. 
divided, how, 60. 
duties of, 60. 

of stable, 85. 

grand, intrenched, when, 89. 
position of, 88. 

house, sentinels at, first relieved, 60. 
inexperienced officers on, as what, 62. 
list of, guard-report, form of, 63. 
mounting, 58. 

duties of adjutant on, 58. 
officer of new, directs detail, 60. 
old, detachments and sentinels from, 61. 
on board of transports, 121. 
paraded on approach of officer of the 
day, 65. 

police, commanded, by whom, 84. 
duties of, 85. 
in cavalry, 85. 
takes arms at reveille, 86. 
prisoners in charge of, 60. 

under, when released, 39. 
relief, inspection of, 61. 

of sentinels on, 60. 
report, form of, 63. 
sentinels on, when relieved, 61. 
tent, sentinels at, first relieved, 60. 
Guards, 61. 

advanced, on marches, 96. 
brigade, organized and mounted, how, 59. 
camp and garrison, 58. 
duties of, 61. 

duty of, in case of alarm, 62. 

on alarm of fire, 62. 
furnished, how, when cavalry and in¬ 
fantry canton together, 8L 
grand, and other outposts, 88. 
duties of, 88. 
fires of, 92. 

organized and mounted, how, 59. 



INDEX. 


541 


Guards in camp, honors paid by, 85. 

interior, receive countersign, when, 62. 

officer of the day visits, when, 62. 

officers to remain at their, 62. 

of trenches, duties of, 115. 

organized, where, 58. 

picket, duties of, 87. 

rear, on marches, 96. 

relieved, how often, 58. 

stable, in cavalry, 83. 

under arms, when, 41. 

Guides of the country, treatment of, 95. 

Guidons of mounted regiments, 476. 

Gullies in slopes, &c., of fortifications, to he 
avoided, 14. 

Guns at each permanent post, 15. 
in fixed batteries numbered, 16. 
to be kept in order, 15. 

Hair worn short, 495. 

Halter, horse furniture, 491. 

Halt of convoys, 109. 

Halts made, when, 98. 

Hat, uniform, 479. 

Haversacks, how marked, 23. 

Head-gear, horse furniture, 490. 

Head quarters, 82. 

hand kept at, when, 19. 
orders, <fcc., from, indexed, 20. 

Heads of Executive Departments, salute to, 
42. 

Heavy cavalry, 72. 

Hired men in ordnance service, 391. 

Honor, escorts of, 43. 

Honors, funeral, 43. 

at the grave, 44. 
none paid in the trenches, 116. 
not paid by troops on march, 98. 
on the death of the President of the 
United States, 43. 
paid by guards in camp, 85. 
by the troops, 40. 
to commanders of regiments, 41. 
to officers of a foreign service, 41. 

Horse equipments, 476. 

for mounted service, 490. 
requisitions for, made, how, 388. 
furniture, 489. 
litters, 290. 

Horses belonging to prisoners of war, 108. 
disposition of, in camp of cavalry, 79. 
for mounted officers, where purchased, 
168. 

for ordnance service, 392. 


Horses, number of, allowed to officers, 166. 
regulations in regard to, 112. 
stolen, 112. 
transportation of, 123. 

Hospital attendants, 284. 

in the field, number allowed, 284. 
number of, allowed, 284. 

Hospital, expenses of a soldier in a private, 
246. 

fund, 243. 

issues to, 243. 

knapsack, 291. 

purposes, tents for, 489. 

regulations, by whom enforced, 282. 

soldier in, detached from his company, 

283. 

stores, furniture, <fec., account of, 315. 
tents, 290, 291. 

Hospitals, cooks and nurses in, 283. 
distribution of patients in, 282. 
established, where, 107. 
inspection of, 46, 49. 
in siege, established by whom, 114. 
standard supply table for general and 
post, 292-301. 

Hospital steward, temporary, appointment 
of, 288. 

Hospital stewards at posts, sometimes ap¬ 
pointed by senior medical officer, 

284. 

stewards, coat, uniform, for, 477. 
number allowed, 288. 
pay of, 288. 

trimmings of uniform of, 481. 
trowsers for, 479. 

Hours of service and roll-calls, 39. 

Housing, <fec., for general officers, 489. 

Implements to he kept clean, 15. 

Indians, issues to, 244. 

Individuals, salutes to, 42. 

Infantry and cavalry march together, when. 
97. 

buttons for officers of, 479. 
camp of, 76. 
in camp, 75. 

regiments, colors of, 475. 
review of a battalion of, 53. 

Tactics, recruits to be drilled in, 138. 

U. S., adopted May 1, 1861, 18. 
trimmings for uniform of officers of, 481. 
uniform coat for, 477. 

Inferiors, duties of, 9. 





d42 


INDEX. 


Insane soldiers, 31. 

Inspection and proof of ordnance and ord¬ 
nance stores, 387. 

certificates, Ordnance Department, 387. 
manner of, 47. 
of arms, knapsacks, Ac., 47. 
of books and accounts, 49. 
of buildings for use of troops, 162. 
of cannon, form of, 462-464. 
of cavalry and artillery, 49. 
of company books and papers, 49. 
of hospitals, 46, 49. 

of muskets, Ac., form of certificate of, 
467, 468. 
of picket, 87. 
of public works, 370. 
of quarters, 49. 

of recruits at depots and posts, 139. 
of regimental books and papers, 49. 
of relief guard, 61. 
of supplies, 241. 
of troops, form of, 46. 
of vessels of transport, 120. 
report, annual, form of, Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 466. 

report of musket-barrels, form of, 469. 

Ordnance Department, 387. 
report of shells, Ac., form of, 465. 
reports of, by whom made, 73. 
reports, what to contain, 71. 

Inspections during march, 97. 
of armories and arsenals, 390. 
of arsenals, 390. 
of troops, 46. 

on transports, 121. 
periodical, 46. 

Inspector-General, received, how, 40. 
Inspector-General’s Department, duties of 
officers of, 10. 

Inspector-General’s Department, officers of, 
may command, when, 10. 
Inspector-General’s Department, trimmings 
for uniform of officers of, 480. 
Inspector of troops, duties of, 46. 

Inspectors required to report, what, 71. 
Instructions for defense of fortified places, 
118. 

Instruments, surgical, for use of each medi¬ 
cal officer, 302. 

surgical, transfer of, forbidden, 303. 
Interior guards receive countersign, when, 
62. 

Interment of general commanding-in-chief, 
43. 


Intrenched posts, 93. 

Invalids, discharge of, 30. 

Inventories of condemned property, 152. 
of effects of deceased non-commissioned 
officers, 28. 

of effects of deceased officers, 28. 
Inventory of ordnance stores, required, 
when, 393. 

form of, of ordnance and ordnance 
stores for inspection, 439. 
form of, of stores, Ordnance Depart¬ 
ment, 458, 459. 

Invoice, form of, of ordnance and ordnance 
stores turned over to assistant quar¬ 
termaster, 431. 

Invoices of public stores, 164. 

Issues, 83. 

extra, 244. 

made and regulated, 243. 
of arms and accoutrements, 388. 
of ordnance and ordnance stores, 388. 
of stationery, when made, 167. 
to hospital, 243. 
to Indians, 244. 

to volunteers, Ac., how entered, 244. 
Journal, 99. 

directions for keeping the, 99. 
form of, 100, 103. 
of siege, 118. 

Journals of defense of fortified places, kept, 
by whom, 119. 

Judge Advocate, duties of, 125. 
pay of, 168. 

trimmings for uniform of, 480. 

Killed and wounded, report of, 71. 

Kitchen fires extinguished in camp, 86. 
Kitchens in camp of cavalry, 79. 
in camp of infantry, 76. 
regulations in regard to, 23. 

Knapsack, hospital, 291. 

Knapsack, Ac., place for, 21. 

Knapsacks, 22. 

Lance corporals, 138. 

sergeants, 138. 

Land, how purchased, 157. 

service of United States, models or pat¬ 
terns of ordnance for, deposited, where, 
387. 

Laundress, 24. 

amount due, noted on muster-roll, when, 
343. 



INDEX. 


543 


Laundress, charges of, 35. 

debts due by recruits to, 132. 
debts due to, collected, 24. 

Laundresses, allowance of, per company, 24. 
following the army, furnished with 
certificates, 112. 
medical attendance on, 284. 

Leave of absence, 12. 

application for, endorsed, 32. 
beyond limits of Military Department, 
33. 

commences, when, 31. 

duties of officers on, 31. 

duty of officer on expiration of, 33. 

extension of, 32. 

form of application for, on account of 
sickness, 33. 
granted, by whom, 31. 
granted to officers, when, 12. 
limit of, 32. 
not granted, when, 31. 
of commander of a post, 32. 
three months’, 32. 
to chaplains, 32. 
to officers, 31. 
to schoolmasters, 32. 

Letters, folded, how, 68. 
official, 68. 
of transmittal, 393. 

Lieutenant-colonel, funeral escort of, 44. 
uniform coat for, 477. 

Lieutenant, senior, assistant commissary of 
subsistence, 13. 

Lieutenants, duties of, 21. 

Light artillery, jacket worn by officers of, on 
undress duty, 477. 

uniform jacket for enlisted men of, 477. 
Light cavalry, for what employed, 72. 

Limit of leave of absence, 32. 

Limits assigned to officers under arrest, 38. 
List, form of, of ordnance and ordnance stores 
condemned, 438. 
of commands to each grade, 342. 
of guard, guard-report, 63. 
of prisoners, guard-report, 63. 

Lists, official, ordnance and ordnance stores, 
how arranged, 393. 

Machinery of draw-bridges, &c., kept in 
order, 14. 

Magazines, ventilation of, 16. 

Main body, place of, in a convoy, 108. 
Major, funeral escort of, 44. 
uniform coat for, 477. 

2 V 


Major-general, appointment to rank of, how 
made, 11. 

general, funeral escort of, 43. 
place of, in a review, 57. 
received, how, 40. 
salute to, 42. 
uniform coat for, 476. 
generals, aides-de-camp of, 13. 

Manuscript returns, forbidden, when, 69. 

Marauding forbidden, 112. 

March, company officers in arrest on a, 39. 
field-officers under arrest on a, 39. 
non-commissioned officers in arrest on a, 
39. 

prisoners on, guard of, 87. 
quickened, how, 98. 

Marches, arrangements of, 96. 
mess furniture on, 23. 
night, 97. 

orders sent during, 67. 
through defiles, 98. 

Marching orders, execution of, must not be 
delayed, 97. 

“ Mark” must be witnessed by a third per¬ 
son, 136. 

Masonry of fortifications, care of, 14. 
shot-furnaces, when heated, 15. 

Materials for siege furnished, 115. 

Medical attendance, cases when not paid 
for, 287. 

attendance on servants, 284. 

vouchers for, 132, 136. 
cadet, uniform coat for, 477. 
cadets, muster and pay rolls of, 284. 
oath of, 287. 
quarters of, 288. 
rank and pay of, 288. 
reports of, on expiration of term 
of service, 288. 
selection of, 287. 
transportation of, 288. 
trowsers for, 479. 
certificate, 33. 

form of, 340. 

Department, 281. 
duties of, 281. 
duties of officers of, 10. 
form of abstract of medical and 
hospital property received, &c„ 
314. 

form of account of clothing, arms, 
&c., of patients in hospital, 316. 
form of account of furniture, cook¬ 
ing-utensils, &c., in use, 317. 



544 


INDEX. 


Medical Department, form of account of 
hospital stores, Ac., 315. 
form of account for medicines, &c., 
312. 

form of certificate of disability for 
discharge, 325. 

form of contract with a private 
physician, 338. 

form of medical certificate, 340. 
form of meteorological register, 
320-323. 

form of monthly statement of hos¬ 
pital fund, 339. 

form of morning report of surgeon, 
336. 

form of prescription-book, diet- 
book, &c., 319. 

form of record of recruits exa¬ 
mined, 326. 
form of register, 318. 
form of report of sick and wounded, 
327-335. 

form of requisition for medical and 
hospital supplies, 310. 
form of return of medical and hos¬ 
pital property, 313. 
form of return of medical officers 
of regular army, 337. 
form of roll of soldiers employed 
as cooks, nurses, &c., in hospi¬ 
tals, 324. 

form of special requisition for sup¬ 
plies of medicines, &c., 311. 
trimmings for uniform of officers 
of, 480. 

director, duties of, 106. 

officers, duties of, 282, 284. 
duties of senior, 282. 
when put in arrest, 39. 

prescriptions registered, 282. 

purveyors, duties of, 281. 

supplies, orders for, by whom given, 
281. 

supplies purchased by quartermaster, 
when, 281. 

supplies, requisitions for, how made, 
281. 

supplies, transferring of, 281. 

Medicines, form of account for. Medical De¬ 
partment, 312. 

form of special requisition for supplies 
of, &c., Medical Department, 311. 

Members of Cabinet, honors paid to, 41. 

Mess-chest, furniture of, 309. 


Mess-chest, furniture on marches, 23. 
rooms, allowance for, 161. 
soldiers’, 23. 

Messes on transports, 121. 

prepared, how, 23. 

Messing of companies, 23. 

Meteorological register, form of, Medical 
Department, 320-323. 

Mileage allowed, when, 165. 
computed, how, 165. 
for officers and men in ordnance ser¬ 
vice, 391. 

Military Academy, graduates of, 11. 
authority, exercise of, 9. 
bureau, absence of any chief of, 11. 
department, leave of absence beyond 
limits of, 33. 

discussions and publications, 3S. 
exercises, 82. 
mourning, 45. 

posts, named, by whom, 104. 
store-keeper, duties of, 390. 
store-keepers, uniform of, 494. 
stores, <fcc., sales of, 153. 

Militia and volunteers in service of United 
States, 495. 

commanders accountable for ordnance 
stores, 389. 

dispersed before payment is made, 496. 
drafted, requisition for, made, on whom, 

495. 

duty of officers designated to muster, 

496. 

mustered, by whom, 495. 

Minors, enlistment of, 130. 

regulations concerning, 344. 
Miscellaneous items, Subsistence Depart¬ 
ment, 276. 

Mixed brigades, 72. 

Models or patterns of ordnance for land- 
service of United States, deposited, 
where, 387. 

Monthly returns, 69. 

in campaign, 69. 

return, public animals, &c., Quarter¬ 
master’s Department, form of, 178. 
summary statement, recruiting officer, 
form of, 146. 

Morning reports of companies, 40. 
Mountain warfare, 105. 

Mounted regiments, standards and guidons 
of, 476. 

service, horse equipments for, 490. 
Mourning, military, 45. 



INDEX. 


545 


Music, bands of, 19. 
field, 19. 

furnished to regiments, 138. 
recruits instructed in, when, 138. 
Musicians, duties of, 19. 
uniform coat for, 478. 

Muster and descriptive roll of recruits, 129. 
for payment of militia and volunteers, 
496. 

rolls, companies, how designated on, 50. 
contain what, 496. 
embrace what, 344. 
made, how, 50. 

of soldiers in hospital, by whom 
made, 284. 
sent, where, 50. 

Mustering in, 496. 

officers, duties of, 496. 
out, 496. 

Musters, made, how, 49. 

Name and number of each soldier, how 
placed, 21. 

National color, artillery regiments, 475. 
color, infantry regiments, 475. 
salute, 42. 

on Fourth of July, 43. 

Navy, marines, and militia, officers of, com¬ 
pliments to, 41. 

Navy, officers of. salutes to, 42. 

Net weight, average, of a steer, how ascer¬ 
tained, 242. 

weight of a steer, how determined, 
242. 

Newspapers, notices inserted in, 136. 

Night marches, 97. 

Non-commissioned officer appointed ord¬ 
nance sergeant, 26. 
officer, effects of deceased, 28. 

funeral of, 45. 
officers, 18. 

and privates, form of roll of, Quar¬ 
termaster’s Department, 176. 
disabled, 30. 

furnished with certificate of rank, 
19. 

in arrest on a march, 39. 
in command of squads, 21. 
inventories of effects of deceased, 
28. 

not employed in menial service, 24. 
not sent to guard-house, 19. 
privates, <tc., pay of, 526. 
promoted, how, 12. 


Non-commissioned officers, promotion of, 18. 
officers receive additional pay, when, 343. 
reduced, how, 19. 
responsibilities of, 21. 
treatment of, 19. 
staff-officer, funeral escort of, 44. 

Notes, how made, for the record-book, 16. 
Numbering of companies, 21. 

Nurses in Medical Department, 285. 
women, pay of, 284. 

Oath, form of, administered to recruit, 131. 
of enlistment, by whom administered, 
131. 

of medical cadets, 287. 

Offensive reconnoissances, 94. 

Officer cannot put himself on duty, 10. 

commanding, of new post, duties of, 104. 
of regiment, 18. 
reports deserters, 29. 
designated to muster militia, duty of, 
496. 

detached for special duty, 31. 

from his company, how long, 13. 
dismissed from service, pay-account of, 
341. 

duty of, on expiration of leave of ab¬ 
sence, 33. 

funeral of non-commissioned, 45. 
highest in rank in army, duties of, 10. 
highest in rank in marine corps, duties 
of, 10. 

highest in rank in militia, duties of, 10. 
in arrears, pay of, stopped, 342. 
in charge of arsenal or armory, duties 
of, 390. 

in highest rank, commands, when, 10. 
in temporary command, powers of, 11. 
need not employ counsel, when, 474. 
non-commissioned, appointed ordnance 
sergeant, 26. 

non-commissioned, effects of deceased, 
28. 

of guard, duties in camp, 86. 
of mounted corps, separated from regi¬ 
ment, when, 13. 

of new guard directs detail for advanced 
guard, 60. 

of old guard, duties of, 60. 
of Pay or Medical Department, duties 
of, 10. 

of the day charged with cleanliness of 
camp, 85. 

of the day, duties of, 62, 86. 



546 


INDEX. 


Officer of the day visits guards, when, 62. 
prevented from joining post by sick¬ 
ness, 33. 

recruiting, form of receipt of, 145. 
regimental recruiting, duties of, 141. 
registered as a deserter, when, 12. 
removal of, from station assigned to 
him, 67. 

restored, account of, 341. 
senior medical, duties of, 282-285. 

records kept by, 284. 
who succeeds to command, duties of, 11. 
Officers, account of stoppages against, 345. 
and men in ordnance service, mileage 
for, 391. 

appointment of, 11. 

bear cost of their own transportation, 
when, 165. 
caution to, 19. 

cavalry, duties of, during march, 97. 
commanding, powers of, to arrest, 38. 

to examine stores, 35. 
command not assumed by what, 10. 
commissioned, appointment and promo¬ 
tion of, 11. 

commissioned by a State, 10. 
by the United States, 10. 
forage caps for, 481. 
one, always in a company, 31. 
two, in a garrisoned post, 31. 
uniform coat for, 476. 
company, in arrest on a march, 39. 
deceased, 28. 
disbursing, duties of, 147. 
disposition of, in camp of infantry, 66. 
dress allowed to, 494. 
duties of, during battle, 106. 
duties of mustering, 496. 
recruiting, 130. 

entitled to brevet pay, when, 342. 
entitled to pay, when, 341. 
epaulettes for, 484. 
exchange or transfer of, 12. 
field and company, present at dress 
parade, 53. 

field, of the trenches, duties of, 114. 

under arrest on a march, 39. 
form of report of, whose quarters, <&c., 
are commuted, Quartermaster’s De¬ 
partment, 180. 

general, trimmings for uniform of, 480. 
having brevets, duties of, 10. 
in camp, when permitted to occupy a 
vacant house, 76. 


Officers, inexperienced, on guard as what, 62. 
in the field not entitled to commutation, 
162. 

inventories of effects of deceased, 28. 
leave of absence, granted, when, 12. 
leaves of absence to, 31. 
light offenses of, how treated, 38. 
medical, duties of, 284, 286. 
military, forbidden to make contracts 
for the service, 149. 
named on rosters, how, 83. 
non-commissioned, 18. 

and privates, Quartermaster’s De¬ 
partment, form of roll of, 176. 
board for examination of, 18. 
certificates of, 19. 
disabled, 30. 

furnished with certificate of rank, 
19. 

in arrest on a march, 39. 
in command of squads, 21. 
inventories of effects of deceased, 28. 
not employed in menial service, 24. 
not sent to guard-house, 19. 
privates, &c., pay of, 526. 
promotion of, 12, 18. 
rank of, 9. 

receive additional pay, when, 343. 
reduced, how, 19. 
responsibilities of, 21. 
staff, funeral escort of, 44. 
treatment of, 19. 

not to leave the United States, 32. 
of artillery assigned to head-quarters, 73. 
tents of, 80. 

of corps of engineers, books kept by, 371. 
buttons for, 478. 

charged with a survey, duties of, 
370. 

may assume command, when, 10. 
of corps of topographical engineers, 
books kept by, 371. 

of engineers assigned to head-quarters, 
73. 

of engineers, duties of, 10. 
reports of, 370. 

of foreign service, honors paid to, 41. 
of general staff and staff corps, trowsers 
for, 479. 

of general staff, buttons for, 478. 
of Inspector-General’s Department, du¬ 
ties of, 10. 

of light artillery, jacket worn on un¬ 
dress duty, 477. 





INDEX. 


54? 


Officers of Davy, marines, and militia, com¬ 
pliments to, 41. 
of navy, salutes to, 42. 
of ordnance assigned to head-quarters, 
73. 

of Ordnance Department, duties of, 392. 
of ordnance may assume command, 
when, 10. 

of Quartermaster-General’s Department, 
command, when, 10. 
of staff corps assigned to head-quarters 
of armies, &c., 73. 

of Subsistence Department, command, 
when, 10. 

of topographical engineers, reports of, 
370. 

of volunteer service, resignation of, 
497. 

on detached duty, reports of, 70. 
on duty under arms, 50. 
on leave of absence report, when, 31. 
on leaves of absence, duties of, 31. 
on recruiting service, accounts, <fec., 
rendered by, 134. 
orders, important, carried by, 82. 
paid, how, 341. 
precedence of, 10. 
rank of, how decided, 9. 
regimental, trowsers for, 479. 
resignations of, 12. 
select quarters, how, 160. 
shoulder-straps for, 485. 
sickness of, 33. 

signal, uniform and dress of, 495. 
soldiers to pay compliments to, 41. 
staff, reports of, 73. 

reports of appointments, <fcc., of, 70. 
subaltern, duties of, 21. 
subsistence to, 245. 
sword and scabbard, uniform, 483. 
sword-knot for, 484. 
tents for, 489. 

tents of, in camp of cavalry, position 
of, 79. 

to attend dress parade, 53. 
to remain at their guards, 62. 
to wear uniform, when, 23. 
under arrest, limits assigned to, 38. 

prohibitions of, 39. 
uniform boots for, 482. 
coat for, 476. 
cravat for, 481. 
gloves for, 482. 
hat for, 479, 480. 

2V2 


Officer^, uniform overcoat for, 487. 
sash for, 482. 
spurs for mounted, 482. 
sword-belt for, 482. 

Officers’ accounts, Adjutant-General reports, 
when, 12. 

baggage to be transported, amount of, 
163. 

pay-account, form of, Pay Department, 
358, 359. 

pay, subsistence, forage, &o., 524, 525. 

Official business, 68. 
letters, 68. 

Operations at Fort Jay, form of report of, 
372. 

Orderlies, 73. 
duties of, 73. 

Orderly hours, 67. 

Order of regiments, &c., how changed, 72. 

Orders and circulars from head-quarters, 
indexed, 20. 

and correspondence, 66. 
assigning stations of officers, given, by 
whom, 67. 
enumeration of, 66. 
file of printed, kept, where, 67. 
for medical supplies, by whom given, 
281. 

form of, 66. 

for troops, addressed, to whom, 66. 
general, 66. 

not regularly received, to be re¬ 
ported, 67. 

important, carried by officers, 82. 
in conflict with other orders, 67. 
involving expenditure, 67. 
marching, execution of, must not be de¬ 
layed, 97. 

of the day, how obtained, 67. 
sent during marches, how, 67. 
sentinels take, from whom, 62. 

to report breach of, 62. 
special, 66. 
to travel on duty, 67. 
transmitted, how, 66. 

Ordnance and ordnance stores, comprehend 
what, 387. 

and ordnance stores, form of inventory 
of, for inspection, 439. 
and ordnance stores, form of invoice o£ 
turned over to assistant quartermas¬ 
ter, 431. 

and ordnance stores, how arranged in 
official lists, 393. 




548 


INDEX. 


Ordnance and ordnance stores, issues of, 388. 
requisitions for, 3S8. 
bureau, returns and reports to be sent 
to, 392. 

Department, 387. 

accounts with States and Terri¬ 
tories, kept, how, 392. 
buttons for officers of, 479. 
curb bridles, 388. 
duties of assistant inspectors, 388. 
of inspecting officers, 387. 
of store-keeper of, 391. 
form of abstract of articles fabri¬ 
cated, <fcc., 432. 

form of abstract of articles pur¬ 
chased, &c., 433. 

form of abstract of materials ex¬ 
pended, &c., 437. 

form of list of ordnance and ord¬ 
nance stores condemned, 438. 
form of pay-roll of clerks, arm¬ 
orers, &c., 443. 

form of receipt of armory em¬ 
ployees, 442. 

form of receipts for issues to the 
militia, 436. 
form of rent-roll, 440. 

return of small arms, &c., 420- 
425. 

returns of tools and materials, 
428-430. 

form of statement of serviceable 
materials, <fcc., 435. 
inspection certificates, 387. 
receipts prepared in triplicate, 392. 
record-books of, 393. 
trimmings for uniform of officers of, 
480. 

trowsers for officers of, 479. 
watering bridles, 388. 
expenses for issue and delivery of, 391. 
for land service of United States, mo¬ 
dels or patterns of, deposited, where, 
387. 

officers of, when may assume command, 

10 . 

sergeant, duties of, important, 26. 

payment of, 27. 
sergeants, 24. 

account for ordnance, when, 389. 
appear under arms, when, 27. 
appointment and removal of, 26. 
assigned to posts, how, 25. 
mustered and reported, how, 27. 


Ordnance sergeants, payment of, 27. 
re-enlistment of, 24, 132. 
selection of, important, 26. 
transferred, how, 25. 
trowsers for, 479. 
uniform of, 27. 
service, hired men in, 391. 
horses for, 392. 

mileage for officers and men, 391. 
stewards, uniform coat for, 477. 
stores, by whom accounted for, 389. 
classification of, 398-415. 
in current service accounted for, 
by whom, 390. 

inventory of, required, when, 393. 
Organization of an army in the field, 71. 
of brigades forbidden, when, 13. 
of regiments, 18. 

Out-guards, duties of, 90. 

Outposts, grand guards and other, 88. 

Ovens, built and paid for, how, 248. 

Overcoat, uniform, 487. 

Packages, storage of, 242. 

Pall-bearers, how selected, 45. 

Parade, dress, 51. 

dress, dispensed with, when, 53. 

officers to attend, 53. 
forming of, 51. 
forms of, 50. 

Parades of ceremony, 50. 

Parapets, walking on, forbidden, 13. 

Park, situation of, 80. 

Parole and countersign given, when, 62. 

issued daily, 82. v. 

imparted to whom, 62. 

Partisans and flankers, 95. 

Patrols and rounds, march of, 91. , 
cavalry, duties of, 92. 
reports of commanders of, 92. 

Pay-account of officer dismissed from ser¬ 
vice, 341. 

of post chaplains, 341. 

Pay, additional, commences, when, 343. 
Department, 341. 

duties of officer of, 10. 
form of abstract of payments made 
by Paymaster, 362, 363. 
form of account current with Pay¬ 
master United States Army, 364, 

365. 

form of certificate to be given a 
soldier at time of his discharge, 

360. 



INDEX. 


549 


Pay Department, form of estimate of funds 
required by paymaster, 356. 
form of officers' pay-account, 358, 
359. 

form of receipts to be rendered by 
paymasters, 357. 

form of statement of moneys re¬ 
ceived, expended, Ac., 368. 
tables of daily pay of army, 354, 
355. 

table of pay, subsistence, forage, 
Ac., of army, 348-353. 
trimmings for uniform of officers 
of, 480. 

during absence, allowed, when, 343. 
forfeited, when, 344. 
of deserter, 30. 
officers entitled to, when, 341. 
of non-commissioned officers, privates, 
Ac., 526. 

provisions to secure deposit for amounts 
of, 346. 

subsistence, forage, Ac., of army, Pay 
Department, 348-353. 
subsistence, forage, Ac., of officers, 524, 
525. 

retained, due, when, 344. 
traveling, due, when, 344. 
Paymaster-General, duties of, 341-344. 
Payment, improper, to be reported, 343. 
militia and volunteers, muster of, for, 
497. 

must be witnessed, when, 341. 
of ordnance sergeant, 27. 

Payments, made, how, 341. 

to militia and volunteers, made, by 
whom, 497. 

Pay-roll, form of, of clerks, armorers, Ac., 
Ordnance Department, 388. 

Pay-rolls, how made, 50. 

of soldiers in hospital, by whom made, 
284. 

receipt on, 341. 

stoppages entered on, when, 343. 

Peace, leaves of absence in time of, 32. 
Penalty to force a safeguard, 113. 

Periods for annual artillery practice, 17. 
Permanent parties, paid, how, 138. 
Physician, private, contract made with, by 
whom, 285. 

services engaged by contract, when, 
131. 

Physicians, private, employed in certain 
cases, 286. 


Picket, 87. 

assembling of, 88. 
composed of whom, 87. 
guards, duties of, 87. 
how formed, 75. 
roll of, called, when, 87. 

Piece-work, price of, fixed, 391. 

Pioneers, duties of, 108. 

Plans and specifications of corps of en¬ 
gineers must be submitted to Secre¬ 
tary of War, 369. 

of important works submitted to corps 
of engineers, 369. 

Plundering forbidden, 112. 

Police, general, 112. 

guard, advanced post detached from, 
85. 

guard, commanded, by whom, 84. 
duties of, 85. 

in camp of cavalry, advanced post 
of, 80. 

in cavalry, 85. 

Pork for Southern posts, 248. 

Postage, public, 168. 

Post bakery, advantages of, 35. 
book of record, 16. 
books, 20. 

chaplains, pay-account of, 341. 
council of administration, 34, 
council, powers of, 35. 
fund, account of treasurer of, 35. 
balance unexpended, 36. 
distributions from, 36. 
objects of expenditure of, 35. 
raised by tax, 35. 

leave of absence of commander of, 32. 
new, report concerning, required, 70. 
school, soldiers’ children at, 35. 
sentinel not to quit, 62. 
treasurer, duties of, 35. 
two commissioned officers in a garri¬ 
soned, 31. 

Postponement of court-martial, 124. 

Posts, 104. 

chaplains allowed to, 37. 
commanders of, accountable for ord¬ 
nance stores, 389. 
intrenched, by order of whom, 93. 
military, named, by whom, 104. 
ordnance sergeants, how assigned to, 25 
Potatoes, desiccated, 243, 280. 

Powder, contracts for, 387. 
convoy of, 108. 
preserved, how, 16. 



550 


INDEX. 


Powder, proof range, where marked, 17. 
Precedence of officers, Ac., 10. 
Prescription-book, diet-book, Ac., form of, 
Medical Department, 319. 
Prescriptions of medicine and diet regis¬ 
tered, 282. 

President of court-martial, 124. 

of court-martial, duties of, 125. 
of Senate, honors paid to, 41. 
of United States, honors on death of, 43. 
saluted, how, 40. 
salute to, 42. 

Prices of accoutrements, 397. 

of small arms, 394—396. 

Prisoners and convicts, clothing for, 171. 
exchanges of, 108. 
guarded, how, 86. 
in charge of guard, 60. 
list of, guard-report, form, 63. 
messes of, 23. 
of war, 107. 

convoy of, 110. 
return of, 71. 
on march, guard of, 87. 
tinder guard, released, when, 39. 
Private soldier, funeral of, 45. 

Privates, not sentries, salutation of, 42. 
pay of, 526. 
trowsors for, 479. 

Privileges of sutlers, 37. 

restrictions in regard to sutlers’, 38. 
Proceedings in civil courts, 474. 

of council of administration, by whom 
signed, 35. 

Procession at funeral of an officer, 45. 
Projectiles, contracts for, 387. 

Promotion of non-commissioned officers, 18. 
of recruits, 138. 

Promotions to rank of captain, how made, 

11 . 

to rank of major, lieutenant-colonel, 
Ac., how made, 11. 

Proof of ordnance and ordnance stores, 
387. 

range of powder, where marked, 17. 
Property, captured, returns of, 107. 

private, of prisoners of war, respected, 
107. 

public, damage done to, 497. 
return of captured, 71. 

Proposals, duties of officer advertising for, 
155. 

Public animals not condemned for tempo¬ 
rary disease, 153. 


Public buildings, repairs of, 163. 
lands, title-papers of, 157. 
money, regulations in regard to, 148. 
postage, 168. 

property, damage done to, 497. 
laws in regard to, 150. 
money and accounts, 147. 
received by an officer, 151. 
repaired, 152. 

quarters, rent charged for, 391. 
securities, penalty for selling, 148. 
works, inspected yearly, 370. 

report of inspection of, made 
through Bureau of Corps of En¬ 
gineers, 370. 

undertaken only with sanction of 
Secretary of War, 391. 

Publications and discussions, military, 38. 
what, prohibited, 38. 

Punishment ordered by court-martial, 126. 
mitigation of, 126. 

Punishments, 9. 

Purchase of subsistence stores, form of, 
241. 

Purchases, abstract of, Quartermaster’s De¬ 
partment, form of, 184. 

Purveyors, medical, 281. 

Quarterly accounts current contain what, 
136. 

inspection report of muskets, Ac., form 
of, 470. 

return of quartermaster’s stores, form 
of, 202. 

statement of allowances, Quartermas¬ 
ter's Department, form of, 226, 227. 

Quartermaster-General, blanks furnished by, 
134. 

returns made to, 135. 

Quartermaster-General’s Department, offi¬ 
cers of, command, when, 10. 

Quartermaster may purchase medical sup¬ 
plies, when, 283. 

Quartermaster, regimental, duties of, 110. 

Quartermaster’s Department, 159. 
forms for, 173-240. 

form of abstract of articles expended, 
Ac., 219. 

form of abstract of articles issued on 
special requisitions, 217. 
form of abstract of articles, Ac., pur¬ 
chased, 202. 

form of abstract of articles received, 
Ac., 224. 



INDEX. 


551 


Quartermaster’s Department, form of abstract 
of articles transferred, 223. 
form of abstract of bill of medicine, <fec., 
231. 

form of abstract of expenditures, 186. 
form of abstract of forage issued, 209. 
form of abstract of fuel, Ac., issued, 206. 
form of abstract of purchases, Ac., 184. 
form of abstract of stationery issued, 
215. 

form of abstract of straw issued, 213. 
form of account current, 183. 
form, of account current for expendi¬ 
tures on account of contingencies, 
228. 

form of advances, Ac., 187. 
form of estimate of funds required, 182. 
form of list of persons and articles em¬ 
ployed, Ac., and transferred, 240. 
form of monthly report of forage, 179. 
form of monthly summary statement, 
173. 

form of quarterly return of clothing, Ac., 
received and delivered, 232-237. 
form of quarterly return of stores, 197- 
201 . 

form of quarterly statement of allow¬ 
ances, 226, 227. 

form of receipt for clothing, Ac., 238, 
239. 

form of report of officers whose quar¬ 
ters, Ac., are commuted, 180. 
form of report of persons and articles 
hired, Ac., 174^175. 
form of report of persons hired, Ac., who 
have deceased, deserted, Ac., 181. 
form of report of stores, Ac., 177. 
form of return of animals, Ac., 178. 
form of voucher for pay, Ac., 188. 
form of voucher to account for articles 
purchased, 203. 

form of voucher to account for clerk’s 
traveling expenses, 192. 
form of voucher to account for com¬ 
mutation of quarters, 194. 
form of voucher to account for mileage, 

189. 

form of voucher to account for postage, 
Ac., 193. 

form of voucher to account for services, 
195. 

form of voucher to account for travel¬ 
ing expenses on public business, 

190. 


Quartermaster’s Department, form of voucher 
to account for traveling expenses pur¬ 
suant to orders, 191. 
form of voucher to account sales of pro¬ 
perty sold at auction, 222. 
form of voucher to list of articles lost, 
Ac., in public service, 221. 
form of voucher to list of stores ex¬ 
pended, Ac., 220. 

form of voucher to requisition for extra 
supplies, medicines, Ac., 230. 
form of voucher to requisition for forage 
for private horses, 211. 
form of voucher to requisition for forage 
for public horses, 210. 
form of voucher to requisition for fuel, 
207-208. 

form of voucher to requisition for sta¬ 
tionery, 216. 

form of voucher to requisition for straw, 
214. 

form of voucher to special requisition, 
218. 

form of voucher to statement of forage 
issued for use of public animals, 212. 
returns in, 172. 

trimmings for uniform of officers of, 480. 

Quartermaster’s stores, Ac., delivered with¬ 
out invoice, form of voucher to, 205. 

Quarters, commutation of, 161. 

for officers, Ac., estimated for and built 
by Engineer Department, 369. 
inspection of, 49. 
selection and allotment of, 160. 

Rank and command, 9. 

badges to distinguish, 484. 
brevet, takes effect, when, 10. 
non-eommissioned officers furnished 
with certificate of, 19. 
of non-commissioned officers, 9. 
of officers, how decided, 9. 

Ration, flour, saving in, by baking, 35. 
forage, 166. 

increase of, during Southern Rebellion, 
243. 

no hired person to draw more than one, 
per day, 248. 
of what composed, 243. 

Rations, accounts for, sent in, when, 245. 
commutation of, 246. 
cost of one hundred, 248. 
double, allowed, when, 342. 
issued to recruits, form of abstract, 143. 




552 


INDEX. 


Rations, table showing quantity and bulk of 
any number of, from 1 to 100,000, 
Subsistence Department, 279, 280. 
table showing weight and bulk of, Sub¬ 
sistence Department, 278. 
women’s, not commuted, 244. 

Rear-guards on marches, 96. 

Receipt for stores, form of, Ordnance De¬ 
partment, 447. 

form of commissary’s, to contractors, 
Subsistence Department, 269. 
form of, for services of slaves, Ordnance 
Department, 444. 

form of, of armory employees, Ordnance 
Department, 442. 

form of, Pay Department, 366, 367. 
form of, when discharged from service, 
Pay Department, 361. 
on pay-roll, 341. 

Receipts, blank, forbidden for public pro¬ 
perty, 148. 
for clothing, 169. 

for issues to the militia, form of, Ord¬ 
nance Department, 436. 
form of, to be rendered by pay-masters, 
Pay Department, 357. 

Ordnance Department, prepared in tri¬ 
plicate, 392. 

Reckoning of time of service of a deserter, 
30. 

Reconnoissances, 94. 

Record-book, notes, how made for, 16. 
books, Ordnance Department, 393. 
in Journal runs, how, 99. 
of court-martial, 125. 
of recruits, 285. 

of recruits examined, form of, Medical 
Department, 326. 

Records kept by senior medical officer, 284. 

Recruit, declaration of, 130. 
desertion of, 29. 

Recruiting duties attended to, by whom, 
141. 

flag, 475. 

officer, duties of, 131, 245. 
form of receipt of, 145. 
form of summary statement of, 146. 
parties, 138. 

party consists of what, 128. 

Service, 128. 

forms for, 142-146. 

subsistence for, how obtained, 245. 

Recruits, dep6ts for collecting and instruct- 
g, 137. 


Recruits, employed only as soldiers, 139. 
equipment of, 132. 

examination of, by medical officer, 285. 
inspection of, at depSts and posts, 139. 
medical examination of, 285. 
number assigned to each regiment, 137. 
on transports, exercise of, 121. 
record of, 285. 
rejected, 139. 

sent from rendezvous to dep6ts, 132. 

to regiments, 140. 
uniform coat for, 478. 
unsound, 139. 

Re-enlistment of ordnance sergeants, 25,132. 
of soldiers, 130, 137. 

Regiment, articles belonging to, numbered, 
how, 19. 

marching of, 86. 
one sutler for each, 37. 

Regimental books, 20. 

and papers, inspection of, 49. 
color, artillery, 475. 
infantry, 475. 

quartermaster, duties of, 110. 
recruiting officer, duties of, 141. 
service, 140. 

service, blanks furnished, by whom, 
134. 

returns, how made out, 69. 
trains loaded, by whom, 111. 

Regiments, 18. 

artillery, colors of, 475. 
books for, 20. 

commanding officers of, 18. 
duties of commanders of, 18. 
infantry, colors of, 475. 
management of, 18. 

&c., order of, how changed, 72. 
recruits sent to, 140. 
serving on foot, exercise of, 18. 
vacancies in, 18. 
how filled, 11. 

Register, form of, Medical Department, 318. 
Registers of practice of field artillery, 17. 
Rejected recruits, 139. 

Relief guard, inspection of, 61. 

of sentinels on guard, 60. 

“ Remarks,” signification of, in Journal, 99. 
Rendezvous, branch, expenses of subsistence 
at, 245. 

Rendezvous, close of a, 129. 

quartering and subsisting recruits, 133. 
rent of, 133. 

temporary contracts made at, 246. 



INDEX. 


5o3 


Rent charged for public quarters, 391. 
of rendezvous, 133. 

roll, form of, Ordnance Department, 440. 

Repairs of arms, <fec., how made, 389. 
of public buildings, 163. 

Report, form of, of sick and wounded, Medi¬ 
cal Department, 327-335. 
guard, form of, 63. 

in special and offensive reconnoissances, 
95. 

inspection, Ordnance Department, 387. 
of board of engineers, 369. 
of board of inspection in cases of rejec¬ 
tion, 140. 

of forage, Quartermaster’s Department, 
form of, 179. 

of inspection of public works made 
through bureau of corps of engineers, 
370. 

of killed and wounded, 71. 
of officers, whose quarters, <fec., are com¬ 
muted, Quartermaster’s