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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 21, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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legal equality run by the civil rights movement to help ensures every person enjoy this opportunity that this great land opportunity offers. >> in 2006 president bush signed into law in extension of the voting rights act, something approved by the senate days early by a 98-0 vote. fast forward to 2021 where senate republicans and the filibuster won't even allow a debate on the issue, let alone a vote. hopefully my husband deceded. >> good morning, along with joe and me and jonathan lemire and president of the national action network, reverend al sharpton. he's the author of the new book
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"righteous troublemakers," untold stories of the justice movement in america, available now for preorder. also with us this morning, the president on councils and foreign relations richard house. i am going to give you a clean 45 seconds. it was a bad night, i watched. >> yeah, you did. >> i knew what your mood would be, i am glad that you and john were not there. >> we are good. >> i am good and i am doing fine. >> i am okay. >> now you know, willie, i know you felt the same way, we said it before. we are lucky to be playing in october. we are uneven teams. i loved it when the red sox got
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27 yankees. houston, you sort of felt it in last night's game that you know the astros had this thing. it has gone cold for the sox. they're going down to houston a game down with two left. baseball, you can never write the ending for baseball. >> a tough night last night, 9-1 houston and now houston goes back to the home of the trash cans. that's always the x factor you have to consider when you are playing.
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>> the bitterness. what was it, 17? >> the bitterness from 17. en don't tear the jerseys off. the home of the trash. >> if you are a father with your children, what would you tell them? how do you say yes root for those guys? you got two more games left. you tell them you could not win two games in a row. you got a good team. the braves, we are sort of adopted elephants. the atlanta braves just looked great. they beat the dodgers last night and they're on the brink now. they're up 3-1 in the series. nobody saw this coming. dodgers had a great season. atlanta is one game away, they can put it away in l.a. a trip to the world series. >> you know quickly things change in baseball, two nights
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ago, everybody said the red sox were the team of destiny. everything that qique was swinging at, things were growing great, they have returned the form which we are so lucky. two nights later, it's the braves, make no mistake of it, last night they got from most teams would have been a knock out blow. credit to that team and coaching staff and for them to get off the map and take it to the dodgers last night. i don't think anybody expected that to happen, everyone braves fans. >> bellinger hits the home run and dodgers win that game. we were talking yesterday on the show we sort of felt like there
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is a real chance, 4-2 is over, they would be in the world series. 106 wins for the season. they are also suffering some injuries, they lost justin turner last night. as for the sox, it was too easy there. the bats were hot. they got ice cold. 18-3. >> not that you are keeping score. >> not that i am keeping scores. the astros, valdez was terrific and they could not hit him. their bats were not going to stay cold for long >> our bats were too high. it's the thing that i always say about baseball. it's actually, we may hate the nerds that come, the dorks and the dweebs that come from really great schools. you don't want to get this guy. the second day of october, he'll ground out. it's a game of numbers.
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>> not the same metrics. >> it's a game of numbers. the astros, a great team. one of the best teams of our times. cheaters are not. the best teams of our team. thaer not going to stay cold throughout the entire series. and same thing with the sox, but, you know i think i know we got the best in baseball. we can win two games in houston. i don't know if you knew this or not. i know you don't remember this. we were down 3-0. >> is that right? >> in 2004 against -- help me. >> it was a team that used to be relevant. do you remember who that was? >> cleveland brown. >> was it the spiders? >> anyway, it used to be a rivalry.
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they used to win. they used to call it a rivalry. we came back 3-2-0 against them. >> go ahead barnacle, put the shutters on. winner's here, i will see you in fort myers. a special day for you richard hawes, i asked you when we were rolling dice against tiffany. boom! people at tiffany's says you guys move along. i asked you last night, i said can you come on the "the joe"
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tomorrow. you said i can't because it's my wife's birthday. i said i will tell you what, we'll put a picture of your wife on the show and we'll all sing happy birthday if you come in, right? >> tell us about susan. >> susan, original producer of "night line." went on "good morning america," abc news, publisher, two wonderful kids, we got married 30 years ago. >> you married her when she was nine? >> nine years old. >> is there a statute of limitations? >> that's a crime. >> kids, when ever a woman says this is my daughter and you will be 55 or 60. oh, lordy. one of the saddest tragedy,
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children having children. you just say hold on, for you, susan's birthday does not matter but your birthday will. >> no, it matters a lot. i am just a little worried about you. >> happy birthday, susan. >> i don't get points for leaving early on your wife's birthday. now we'll get to the stories of the morning. >> yes, you are. i had to pray with jonathan and console him. i am in prayers. >> we had the choir coming in humming "amazing grace." >> you missed the big story of the day, the knicks are undefeated. >> over the celtics. >> a new york team beats a boston team. >> how about that?
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>> i don't know. they make so much money. >> she's looking good. >> mika, listen, i know you love to talk, we really want to get to republicans voting against actually voting rights bill that was a compromise that joe manchin have been working on for months to make it so republicans would actually be able to do what they did before last night voting rights bill was authorized and pushing it over at the top, what a surprise? they're not cooperating. >> yes. >> my apologies to the table, joe does not get out much, at all as you can see. >> it has been a long, cold winter. >> it's like here comes
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something. >> i have been happy, oh, i am so happy. i got out. >> willie rolling dice. >> i am telling you they are the best, we are street legals. >> senate republicans prevented the freedom to vote act from moving forward after mitch mcconnell said his party would oppose it. the bill includes provisions allowing same day voter registration, no excuse mail voting. we make election day a holiday. >> how many republicans voted for this?
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>> chuck schumer later voted no in order to suppress another vote down the line. schumer vote from the senate floor. >> every single republican senator just locked this chamber from having a debate, simply a debate on protecting americans' rights to vote in free and fair elections. a little more than a year ago, our country held the safest election in modern history. republican obstruction is not a cause for throwing in the towel. as soon as next week, i am prepared to bring the john lewis rights to enact here. what we saw from the republicans today is not how the senate was supposed to work. >> the measure scaled back by
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democrats last month to win the backing of joe manchin. those efforts, joe, failed to sway any republicans support yesterday. what does it mean and explain the position joe manchin is in right now. >> first of all, it means republicans have taken obstruction to a new level. you talk about do nothing republicans? think about this. >> they block the vote. they are sort of a schoolhouse story situation. they were like george wallace. they stood in the door way and stopped people from being able to go in and vote to expand voting rights for all americans. this would help all americans. we have white and black americans and asian-americans,
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you name it. this would help everybody. when you have the united states having lower voting turn out than most western democracy, this is a good thing. this is sort of the things when it passes and it will pass. you have people looking back 10 or 15 years, wait, why didn't america do this before? we got seat belts and air bags and all these things you had republicans and industry leaders fighting before that are now common. this makes too much sense. kind of like the same thing of making election day a holiday, having early voting and consistency across the country. this is a do nothing republican congress. again, does for that it. not just vote for expanded voting rights. they stand and block anybody from voting. it's just like we were talking about a week or two ago. it was not enough for
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republicans to say we must raise the debt ceiling and it would be irresponsible not to raise the debt ceiling. it was not enough that republicans were against voting for raising the debt ceiling. they stood in the schoolhouse door and blocked anybody from going into the chambers and voting to raise the debt ceiling. again, perhaps one of the best givers to china in a long time to communist china. giving communist china an advantage over us saying they can't come to an agreement to pay off their debts. here we have it again. here we have a republican party, i must say he's a former republican. i am not offended. i am amused when people are stupid enough. oh, republican party have always been the same. it's the same party. if you look at donald trump now, that's joe, no, you look at
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george w. bush, saving 13 million lives in america and pushing back the crisis. here is a guy after 9/11 went through a mosque and said these were americans. and, it was a republican party that voted unanimously, reverend al, to extend voting rights. now here we are in the age of trump, there is not a single republican who'll vote for it. not only that, they're standing in the schoolhouse store to stop anybody from going into vote, to let them vote their conscious, to vet for voting rights. >> when 2006 which we showed this morning when george bush signed the the voting rights act extension, i was in the white
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house lawn as a guest to george bush who was critical to george bush. everybody united around voting rights. >> we were there with him for that. voting rights is something that everyone wanted. >> exactly. >> what is so egregious of what happened yesterday is senator manchin met with some of us and said, i will come with a bill that'll be bipartisan. i can come with a compromise. he sat with seven other senators and crafted this freedom to vote bill. >> which can i just say for middle america for me and people who are conservatives slash conservatives/moderate. it's a really good bill.
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manchin comes in and he puts together a bill that's really is a compromise solution to voting rights. >> he does this. >> he acts on it. let me give us a bill. he says give me time. we said fine. yesterday, not one senator on the republican side, not one, no, nada, one, voted everyone to go forward to debate. it was not the bill. we won't let you debate the bill as you say standing in the schoolhouse door to block even the discussions around it. >> people don't want to debate it. they're blocking the vote.
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they won't allow debates on any of these bills, richard. >> technically these people could be republican voters, not technically in reality. i am old enough to remember when republicans battled in ideas. you put out a better proposal and people come out and vote for republicans. that's the marketplace of politics. the idea that republicans are trying to limit the right to right to vote. let's always remember those names. people will come out at some point and play a moderating
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voice, oh, i am a moderate, have said we'll help communist china. not just voting to raise the debt ceiling but stopping people, standing in the schoolhouse store stopping people from going into debate and vote to raise the debt ceiling. let's make no mistake who they are and what they are doing now and what they just did on voting rights and what they're going to do next week on the john lewis voting rights bill. >> and the names you just listed including lisa murkowski are the persuadable and the moderates to get democrats to 60 votes in some legislation. jonathan lemire, republicans could not make it more clear they're going to land a single votes to this effort, not just on this larger package but as joe says on the john lewis bill. what kind of pressure does it put on joe biden now? he says we don't want to change
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the filibuster. it's there for a reason. i don't want to get rid of the filibuster. we are hearing from civil rights group. the only way we can get through it is scrap the filibuster and get 50 votes and pass these there. do you think joe biden's mind has changed at all? >> mcconnell has made it clear. there will be no vote. the pressure has really grown on democrats and joe biden in particular. yesterday he put out a statement condemning this measure, the fact it did not get to a vote. nowhere in the statement was anything about doing a carve out with the filibuster. there is a bridge he does not want to cross. we know there are some in his party joined him. manchin publicly and others privately. we heard from groups who say this is not enough.
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this is the central focus of your presidency. the white house has been disciplined and they want to stay on infrastructure and reconciliation passes and we'll hear from poseidon that we'll have to out organize republicans in next year's midterm. >> i want to ask you reverend sharpton, you have been in these groups and conferences, should joe biden be doing this? >> we have been saying that for months. when you see senator king who's a independent or very much for keeping the filibuster the same, maybe we now need to look in a car, the pressure is on now for everyone that comes back to the table including the president, not one republican would allow the debate. the ones that have put the pressure on them is not the civil rights leaders or democrats but the republicans. they are saying we are not going
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to debate it, we are not going to give you a choice. the white house, the vice president harris came out and saying we won't give up and we'll come out swinging. >> i think the republicans have put their backs to the walls and not just those who have been calling. >> i adpree. >> republicans have their backs against the wall. this looks bad for them. again, blocking the debate and votes on all these measures. it's extraordinary cynical. democrats have to be tough. mitch mcconnell did a filibuster carvel. he provided a safe guard.
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the single most important thing for conservatives, supreme court. single most important thing for conservatives. because he did that, you now have conservative dominated supreme court, right? how many of those, five of those supreme court justices that got on were appointed by presidents that didn't get a majority of the american vote. popular vote when they first got elected. so this is easy. there are some things that are not easy. a carve out for voting rights? a carve out for civil rights? this is easy. especially, when you have state legislatures across the country that are trying to put themselves in a position where they can de-certify states they don't agree with.
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you and i are institutionallists, i have been called an establishment, i was called on that on twitter. i wrote back, thank you very much, that's the kindest thing anybody have said about me for a long time. i am not a big believer in changing rules and institutions. this is an easy call with the president of the supreme court filibuster, this is really easy and vaguely to carve out. democrats need to carve out an exception for voting rights like mitch mcconnell carve out an exception for voting justices. >> voting rights now and it's legitimacy of the 24 elections. that's also what it says, ultimately at stakes here. >> i have been meeting with leaders of africa, they were
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talking about this and infrastructure bill. what was so sad of the meeting is we don't recognize the united states anymore. we are watching what's going on in the country, what's happening to you? you used to stand for something and you used to be the inspiration to us. now we look at what's going on in your country, you can't get things done. you are no longer willing to practice the way you preach. what has gone wrong? people educated here and coming here their whole lives, this is something fundamentally, we have gone so off the rails here. again, you and i spent our careers in the republican party. >> right. >> this is not what the republican party meant to stand for. it's like conservatives who are meant to be -- conservatives choose principles over immediate benefits. as they see over institutional
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and the long-term strengths of american democracy, that's simply wrong. >> they must be scared of their voters. >> i must say, i got elected four times, i won in landslide all four times, never once was i scared of my voters. i did what i thought was right. i told them this is what i am doing and it's why i am not doing it and i sit there and talk two or three our four hours. i love democracy. you know what, don't vote for me again. i am going to go back and vote this way again. i will see you in the next town hall meeting. let's focus on these people who are friends of mine, former friends of mine. they don't consider me friends anymore. these republican moderates. i would call them conservatives. these 10 or 12 people we have known who are hiding behind mitch mcconnell and donald trump
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and they're afraid to raise the debt ceiling, something that'll wreck the economy, something that'll wreck small business owners and that'll wreck retirement accounts for everybody in their districts or in their states. they're not not only voting for that, they're not letting democrats vote. they're doing the same thing on voting rights now. we can look at donald trump and we can talk against steve bannon and we can talk about it. let's make no mistake of it. >> it's mit romney's it's the ben sass and john thunes that are standing in the schoolhouse store, standing in the senate door and they are stopping voting rights bills from
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being debated. >> why do you go into public life? what do you choose here? it's bigger than infrastructure now. historians are going to debate. at stake here is the fabric of american democracy. what can be bigger? why else do you choose this line of work? they'll talk about republicans and what they're trying to do with voting rights. let my say to my republican friends who i still consider you as friends even if you don't consider me. i can love you but you don't have to love me. if you don't like the bill as it's, get in there and do what legislatures are paid to do. tell them what you don't like about the bill. what will it take, lisa,
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murkowski, to get you to a yes. just let them debate on the bill and vote on it. mit romney, what do you not like about it? i am not going to vote to help them pass voting rights. what don't you like about it? don't hold a press conference. talk to them about it. say i don't like this part of the bill. what can we do to stop state legislatures in georgia from being able to pick which precinct votes they want to count in 2024? and which precincts they don't want to count. you can hold your press conferences and bitch about donald trump all you want. maybe that makes you feel better but this is in the immortal word of texas philosopher and ross perot. this is where they hit the road.
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your press conferences, they don't matter. people on the right or left don't care. this is where the rubber hits, lisa murkowski, susan collins, mit romney, do you want state legislatures that are run by trump and be able to pick what votes they want to count in december of 2024. your words mean nothing. it's your actions. if you don't like this joe manchin's voting rights bill. pick up the phone and call joe. i know joe, he's a friend of mine. he would like to talk to you. operators are standing by right now. by the way, if you call in the next 15 minutes, you will be able to get crawfish on joe
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manchin's both. that's right, limited time, this week only. joe will only listen to your changes and amendments to his voting rights bill. he'll give you the best -- giver me a town. >> charleston. >> we are not talking about south carolina, my friend cht. >> don't give your speeches, it's too late, two years from now. >> don't complain about donald trump and state legislatures stealing the elections two years from now. this is your time. you don't want to vote for his bill. just let americans get a vote. mika. i am about to fall on the floor.
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>> he'll be back. >> all right. well -- >> we got the cake. >> that's great, joe. that was well said and i think you are being kind when you say do nothing republicans. at this point it's democracy reckoning republicans. who you are? are you really republicans by definition? joe, you had to leave a party because it left itself. at some point they may want to get back to who they are. still ahead on "morning joe," we'll be join by congresswoman jayapal, plus a live report from prince says efforts drag onto rescue.
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>> jeh johnson is joining us this morning as we go to break. >> we found a little footage. there were cameras, take a look. ♪♪ ♪♪
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a q&a with me! join for free on the xfinity app. our thanks your rewards. it's going to be a great day, here is a look at other
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stories that's making other headlines. richard blumenthal is calling on mark zuckerberg to testify before congress. a whistleblower tefred about the company to congress. that testimony centered around internal research from facebook, showing the company knows of the damage of instagram can do to the mental health of teen i can't imagine girls. blumenthal wrote, parents are deeply disturbed on ongoing reports that facebook knows instagram can cause destruction and lasting harm to many teens and children to their mental health and well-being. those parents and 20 million
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teens that use your app have the right to know the truth about the safety of instagram. a facebook spokesperson confirmed the company received the letter but gave no further response. >> there was a new discovery yesterday in the search for gabby petito's fiance, brian laundrie. sam brock. >> reporter: police spent weeks coming this national reserve searching for laundrie. there is a tent and partial human remains. >> investigators found what appears to be human remains belonging to brian laundrie. these items were found in areas
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that were in water. he's been on a run for nearly a month. after his parents say he went hiking and never returned. >> reporter: petito and laundrie were in across country road trip. petito was discovered dead with an autopsy revealing she was strangled. brian frequented, some articles belonging to brian were found. >> our evidence response team is on scene getting all available forensic resources to process the area. >> reporter: the last confirmed citing of petito was august 27th. by standers reported domestic
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violence. no charges were filed. >> death sparking national attention and a race to find laundrie ending with more questions than answers. >> the tabloid new york talked about this yesterday and dead end here. i have nothing following the story as closely as a lot of people but man, still trying to figure out what laundrie's parents part of all of this since his son returned from the west. willie. let's turn to coronavirus. the fda authorizes boosters of the moderna and johnson & johnson vaccines. miguel almaguer has the latest.
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>> reporter: authorized by the fda, booster shots for adults fully vaccinated with moderna and johnson & johnson could be days away. the fda also approves mixing and matching of boosters. children between 5 to 11 who can qualify their first shot of pfizer vaccine as early as november. >> reporter: ensuring families to have easy access to the free vaccine. >> why is vaccinated of this age group so important? >> we do a lot of vaccinations for kids, getting them vaccinated will bring infection number down across the community. >> reporter: pfizer will be used in smaller dose, the white house
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will prepackage child's vials. tens of thousands of pharmacies will be ready for distribution. the seven-year-old and her five-year-old sibling participated in the trial. >> was there any hesitation? >>, no, megan and i both vaccinated and we felt comfortable. >> we want to teach them science is important and stepping up. >> we were scared we got covid and now it will probably protect us from covid. >> reporter: a protest, most parents won't get their kids vaccinated. 32% will wait and see and 24% say they'll definitely not. >> we are not anti-vaxed. we are saying this is a new
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science quote on quote and it needs to be proven. the growing fight against it. joining me now dr. michael ohstrolm. it's great to see you. we get good news for young children for some of these booster shots. cases of hospitalizations going down. there are concerns as we head into these winter months. what's your snapshot of what we are during this pandemic? >> surges caused by this delta virus is subsiding. that's going down. it's a combination of reasons but most of all i think the
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thing we have to emphasize is the importance of vaccination, there are 65 million americans who could be vaccinated right now and are not. this will pandemic will continue early on. we'll see more surges in the future if we don't get these people vaccinated. >> let's talk about some of the states where there is trouble, the one where you live and work and minnesota is struggling right now. i know, having to ration care in some ways. what's behind that? as you say there are places where in your words, they are still human woods to burn for this virus. >> we have to have humility when we talk about this virus. we don't understand about this. >> this virus started in the ozark ocean in june. we saw it moving into the sun belt state and southeast and kind of skipped over the
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immediate northeast and hit malaysian and vermont and new hampshire. we saw the virus moves from eastern oregon and washington across the rocky mountains state. this is almost like lava flowing from the beginning of the pandemic emergency, in the ozarks. now it's subsiding. why did it start? and why did it blow up? >> we had the warmest fallen and many decades here. it has been 70 degrees. we'll be back and as much as this one will go down, we'll see a quiet period like we saw in june and all of sudden, it will be back because we have so many
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people that -- >> given the variance we are seeing abroad and given the vaccination numbers, is delta the end of it in terms of variants that we'll see here in the u.s. have that different twist to them. highly transmissible, more possibilities of breaking through vaccines, is delta the end of it in terms of variants in the u.s.? >> mika, the simple answer is we don't know. the variants will keep emerging and mutating viruses. it fits one of two bucks. they can't evade the immune protection from vaccines. right now delta which is really much more transmissible is kind of a lion king. could it change? it's probably a virus that's more infectious than delta which could be hard to imagine.
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is it something else that we can show up but right now we have delta as infectious as it's. >> thank you for being with us this morning. a growing number of doctors in the u.k. are calling for the return of covid restrictions as health experts monitor a new mowation of the virus. >> the u.k. warned yesterday covid cases could rise 100,000 a day if contentious measure is not implemented. >> with the number of hospitalizations and deaths steadily rising as well. >> joining us now from london, matt bradley, what's going on over there? >> reporter: yeah, willie, what we are seeing now especially with javed.
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he says a lot of doctors are going to be implementing any new restrictions. we'll be sticking with our plan a, that means relying on vaccination and booster shots which is now being offered to people over 50 or critical care situation. that's about 30 million people here in the u.k., four million people have already received them. it also means are you going give one dose of the vaccine to healthy kids between the ages of 12 to 15 and recommending people wear a mask in crowded places. >> plan b, that's what a lot of doctors demand what's now point. >> the rise in the number of cases have not led to the huge increase that you would expect in hospitalizations and deaths. >> hospitalizations have been increased in some what, deaths remained relatively steady. the number of new cases is so
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worrying because it's so much higher than britt anyone and european neighbors. a lot of them are demanding plan b, encouraging people to work from home and communicating a need for caution. none of that -- the lockdown restrictions that were in place as early as this year, here on britain. the government says there is an unsustainable pressure on the national health service here so they are ruk toont reintroduce this measure. >> this virus is relentless. huge number of cases spiking in the u.k. we always kept an eye on europe because at the beginning of this what started from europe would head our way. the reasons doctors point out is
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you don't have the hospitalizations and deaths going up with the cases and thanks to the vaccine. >> richard, for our conversations, nothing matters east of koni island or west of santa monica beach pier. this is an international problem. i understand again. i hate to break it to them. we don't give foreign aides to other country to help other country. we give foreign aide to help ourselves and our interests. create a stable system across the globe. that where america's interests can be protected. >> if you want to boil it down and you can be cynical where
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they can talk. >> if you don't want covid on your street or coming into your house, if you don't want covid messing up your small business in topeka. we are going to have to get the world vaccinated and we are going to have the work with united nations. >> the vaccination rates across the globe is 3%. richard, our policy -- what do you think of our policies? >> you are helping her get the world's vaccinations when it's going bad in refrigerators because of idiot politicians and poll l followers will not take care of themselves. >> this country and another risk country is apply is greater than demand. in most of the world you have demand greater than supply. this is a disease that began in china. there is no such thing as local
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anymore. there and here are the same. >> this is much worse than a cold. >> that's what's happening. >> we have got to vet mask of abilitity to produce vaccines up and running around the world. >> that has not happened. >> can you explain why or at least variances. >> they're coming from other countries, we can be vaccinated and the strong variant is going to keep coming if we keep on allowing it. >> we are not 100% vaccinated. >> this country is never 100% vaccinated. >> people will have to go down. this is part of the wood work. we are not going to get to where we want to get here unless big thungs of the rest of the world
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also gets in place. things won't rise to the top, it's going to rise at the bottom. we'll continue to suffer if big part of america and the middle east. >> we are doing it for our self spress. but to help americans here. >> the fully vaccinated is still very low and particularly in certain parts of the world. we saw the delta variant emerged out of india and come aproz. >> of course, it hovers overall will be a variant that comes through and beat the vaccines. >> the longer this vaccine is allowed to be out there. >> i mean they have the number of vaccines exported. their policies throughout this have been staying at home first of all, not similar to the end of the trump administration
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point and then they certainly up dexter's sport. there is a sense that it's not enough. certain countries have not manufactures the rest of -- the company has to be pushed in some cases to set up manufacturing around the world. the big lesson for the rest of world is they cannot, we do this and it's not philanthropy. this is sell-interests. this is extended self-interests, we got to get it right. >> there issing a thing saying, think local whether i and act globally. we'll have to think globally, we'll have to think about the high percent text messages of people that are not vaccinated
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to stop the next deadly variant from coming here. >> putting more businesses out and bankrupting them and shutting down more schools. going through what we have done through the next 18 months. still ahead on morning joe, congresswoman jayapal is joining us. gop leaders are pushing a lift message. >> vote no. we'll talk to former homeland security jeh johnson about the importance of bannon's testimony and the work of the house committee. >> "morning joe" is coming right back. "morning joe"s icoming rt back
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welcome back to "morning joe," also mike barnicle is with us. >> yes, yes, everyone is in a bad mood. >> no, we are not in a bad mood. mike barnicle , how lucky with we to be playing baseball on the second half of october. >> nothing like it. we have been blessed with many victories we didn't expect and
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we are still here. >> you know joe better than most. you win some and lose some. you got to dress for all of them. we'll be dressed tonight for houston. >> you know what my grandma calls it? gracious playing. >> get lot more than we deserved. i am very excited about it. we'll take it to houston. 3-2 lead. i remembers speeding down 3-1 against cleaver land and we came back. i think we were down 3-0 and 0-4 in the alcs. hopes bring internal. if we got to put the shutters on, so be it. ? it was an incredible season. incredible run. >> look at two quick things on that. that's night was the anniversary of october 20th, 2004 when we
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beat the yankees. i have to tell you, joe, the crowds at fenway park, 37,000 people standing at each of these games and staring and yelling at each other. unafraid of covid, free, acting responsibly. that was the gift that we got this year in addition to the red sox's season. >> i have not been able to go to the game because homework and a lot of things happening with the kids. you told me early on that you have been doing for decades and you never seen anything. they're just standing up. the whole gang and so exciting. yes, we are just lucky to be
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here. susan came here and said she was drinking her tea. she was about to eat the crumket. it sounded like - with all the f-word in there. >> all this time of politics, i never heard that language. >> i know. >> speaking of -- >> yeah, no f bombs on the pod. >> no, exactly. >> so anyway, i don't know if you know this or not. i started a campaign. it's going to say jeh and joe for the southern border. >> joe, wild hungry crocrocodil.
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mr. secretary, there is a humanitarian crisis at the southern border. >> i said that on this show and in this chair, 2.5 years ago. >> it started under donald trump. bordering crossing and donald trump became president. it remained a 50-year low under obama. border crossing when jeh johnson left and obama left. it was at a 50-year low. i was playing ball during my first year. the last time they were that low during the trump administration, the crisis intensified and the biden administration it
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intensified everyone more. the biden administration does not have a grasp on this anymore than the trump administration had a grasp on this. they do not understand and just don't understand how critical this is for americans. they can say oh, the race is through this and that. no, we believe in borders. we believe in laws. we believe in order. i didn't say "law and order," don't pry. >> border out of border. it's not happening. it's humanitarian crisis and we need somebody like you and i say jeb because let's make it bipartisan to go down and bring order to a chaotic situation. it's only worse. >> i rather talk about the issue of dirty rock. >> 1.7 million this past fiscal
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year. here are the two big lessons i learned. number one, if you go and this is something that gets lost in the political debate where you have both sides screaming at each other. if you go to loretto, texas, 85% americans and 85% of democrats. they'll tell you let's take care of the daca class, dreamers, let's be humane and consistent of our values but we got to get control of our borders. i believe majority of americans believe the same thing. you can't have 200,000 a month crossing our border. it drains the community and
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catholic charity. my wife volunteers for catholic charity. it's not sustainable. the other lesson from all of this in my judgment is illegal immigration is a very information sensitive phenomenon. it reacts sharply to news about changes and enforcement policies in the united states. >> trump took it into an inhumane level. the news gets down in central america and the number falls softly. >> the correlating of that is haufr, as long as the underlying conditions exist in central america. the push factor which is overwhelmed and as long as those are under lined. the numbers are always going revert back. >> what you are saying is really
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consistent with what democratic congressman says, which is we need to send people back and need to get it on the tv. we need to send a message back to this country that do not save your children across the dessert. it's dangerous and they may die. they're only going to be turned back. >> it's unpleasant to deliver that message. i went to honduras, i stood at the bottom of the airplane to welcome people back to show we are sending people back to the honduras. >> you are saying it's unpleasant but more unpleasant. once they get there here, there is chaos. >> don't do -- do not entice
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people. let them know what they're going to see on the other side. again, ronald reagan and barack obama. i support it and its got to be organized though. there are people that'll do anything they can to get in here. >> you and i talk about the woke, sort of the woke of generations. there is always this assumption, part of the democratic party that all hispanics supported legal immigration. >> support, just as many people coming in. >> and chaotic process. that's not true. you know look along the border. all these democratic that went
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republicans. why is this happening? hispanics don't want disorders anymore than white folks want disorder or black voters want disorder. >> you have to have order and you have to have consistency to have order. i think what's happening and i think the secretary alluded to it, you can't in many ways entize people to come and the perception is some are treated deeply. >> seeing border patrol on men and horses on all and you never seen that before. it was not treated that way with others. >> haitians flown back and now you have missionary hostage. >> yes so i think you need - it will be done in a bipartisan
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way. i clearly agree with you that if you can do it bipartisan in a way that people see there's not one for some and not a asylum for others. >> haitians have real problems there. you and i tactic about woke. >> one of the things about being woke is you need to wants to get up and get manager done, not laying in the bed and daydreaming. >> those are woke and understand and understanding the practicality of getting something done. >> you need to communicate it though. secretary johnson you talked about the message coming out of washington. i think there was a difference as you said before. trump cam sane zg people were deterred. then this administration and i agree with the idea that compassionate on immigration. >> well, what happens? >> it was translated back down
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to south america. >> compassion pens, you better run there now. >> even when donald trump was in office. after he thinks in 2019 were almost 100 millions. >> they skyrocketed. >> do you think it can be true at the same time? yes, they dan. >> we can have a border policy that's humanitarian, that recognizes american values and american, recognizes basic human decencies and humanity of every person that's trying to get the united states and that border, we can show you humanity and we can have an orderly approach. >> at the end of the day, that's not only for the people that are trying to get into this country but to the americans that already live in this country on
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the border. the hispanics and other americans who have been complaining about the chaos at the southern border and impact it's having. that's why it's so important that jeh johnson be sent to the border along with jeb bush. >> now, in a few moments, we'll go live to haiti, gabe gutierrez is there and we'll update us and get the latest on kidnapped missionary. house, house voters are voting today after bannon ignored a subpoena. the vote is expected to pass. there is still uncertainty
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whether the justice department will prosecute bannon. the vice president, once again pressed her principle foe republicans to support the contempt vote. >> let me address my republican colleagues specifically. i heard from a number of my colleagues the last several days who say they don't want this argument on their back. they're trying to keep their heads down. they don't want to anger anthony, he clearly called for such a mission the week after the attack. >> i ask each one of you to step back from the brink and i urge you to do what you know is right. >> history will judge those of us in positions of public trust.
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remember that as you cast your vote. as you think about how you would answer when history asked, what did you do when a mob and congress was attacked, trying to over turn the results of an election. >> will you be able to say you did everything possible to ensure americans got the truth about those events, or did you look away. >> witnesses can not say ignore congressal subpoenas when they prefer not to attend. >> must bus do everything possible to auns that dark days in our history and to ensure to. >> despite that play from liz cheney, house leadership is advising leaders to vote no.
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>> both were asked about that yesterday, steve scalise. >> i don't few that committee as a real committee because pelosi does not let uls participate. >> most members get tired and witch hunts of the games. >> so joe, witch hunt is now back for the republicans' vernacular. a witch hinsdale county to get the facts about what happened on january 6th when the united states capitol was attacked. >> remember i guess we are seeing surprise by this. >> stop focusing on one day in january. >> mitch mcconnell have said we need to look in the future and obviously republicans don't want anything to do. for many of them they may be
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implicated. >> they were blubbering after 1.6. they were grateful and standing and they're trying to help cal top hill top, coming into the chamber and dilled condemn. >> couple weeks ago, they are trumpest again. te, it's a routine day. we know kevin is screaming at the president and squaring at him, telling him it was his people that were ransacking the capitol and begging for help. >> settle down to trump's most aggressive behavior, calling the president up to beg him. he refused to do that. one call after another. >> they don't want americans to know what they did on that day.
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they don't want the truth out. they don't want transparency. to go back, i thesz they think this is 2009 point there is stevie. it's not a witch hunt. there were a lot of americans and republicans are going to figure it out. there are a lot of former republicans who already influenced by donald trump of what happened on january 6th. i am a big believable, i believed in my first campaign and every campaign you hear enough and then you know it's true. it's like before the election, i was saying i don't believe these gols. >> i don't remember the polls. l i will tell you january 6th, a
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lot of people voted for donald trump, i am in and out. just like lindsey did on the senate floor. >> three people chasing him at the airport and he started running. donny, i love what liz cheney says. you are going to be asked, history is going to ask what did you do when the capitol was attacked? >> we are a visual world. >> as much as the republican wants to get everybody try to forget and move on and nothing to see here, nose thishl lives. >> i was looking at the camera and the screen and all of a suhhen you put thoesz images backup. >> that's something we live through 9/11. know, you and i talked about this last night. i do believe this will be trump alamo in the sense those 5 or 6 voters as you pointed out, this
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is smd that lives with them. >> the margins are so small. >> going forward when we get to 2024, those visuals and that message if i am any part of the democratic brain process will be in about every messaging out there. >> there is smlg powerful about there is something powerful of i am gajs. >> these images happening, those continue to brand the little sliver that democrats need. whether they want us to forget it or not, you will go to the video tape. >> you look at the officers the way they were treated and battered. the forevers had his head jamd inside the door. >> and agony, the other police officer getting beaten by the american flag and screaming and
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beg r for his life saying "i have children, please." . >> i know there are a lot of people out there. i know a lot of trump east that loved lying and loved trying to blame everybody else. police officer with an american flag. no, not with fire extinguishers. with american flag. >> as a fire extinguisher. >> they did not use it to bash on the head of police officer. they use the american flag that u.s. troops fought for or defended for the value which red flag represents 240 years. it was not a fire disher, you
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win. >> the perez was wrong. the times was wrong. it was an american flag. you should not just sut up and say it was a fire extinguisher. >> yeah, there is no gaslighting what happened on that day because we all saw it. it happened on camera, we have images from outside and inside the building. >> we have testimonies from systems and right on the steps right there we are looking at right now. s some where in there d a d.c. officers beaten with ace flag. >> many of the people who were so rattled because many of them are being pursued including mike spence by this. certainly today to look the other way as if what happened on that day, didn't happen before our eyes. as a country, the only explanation is they don't want
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to cross donald trump. that gos back to the core of what the party has become. >> therefore, his voters, we have lid term elections coming up. it will reflect a lot than all of us. god forbid, they're willing to look the other way of what we saw in our own eyes this morning for politics. >> willie, i am a democrat, i i will be a -- there are thousands out there and hundreds or million of americans, what we saw on january 6th, may have been the tip of the iceberg.
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that stran had not gone awong. it did not disappear on january 6th. there are some important issues they need to look into it. the failure of control, what happened and why didn't we anticipate this massive security breach? >> i thoep we don't lose site of that. >> all the attention being paid to steve bannon. >> january 6th reflects some really disturbing signs object where we are as a nation right now. >> joe, when you think of what cheney says, it brings to mind it's not lost on all of is and reverend al. i love for you to comment on this. i am sure liz cheney will consider this as a complement.
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>> she echoed a similar questions asking by why the great elijah is coming. >> he said when we were dancing with the angels, the question will be asked in 2019, what did he w we do to make sure we keep our democracy intact. that's the big question and here we are asking it again about a moment our capitol was desecrate ds and vandalized and people were killed and named and lawmakers were threatened to say we are counting the ballots. what else must we see before we answer this question? >> that's the real question. i think congresswoman cheney was right and clearly, you bring up
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the late, you know at some point of your public career, you go from what is history going to say. what is history going to say 50 or 100 years from now. >> when you look at the fact that to scli, this is not the first time we have seen in country, now, in the last year mika, i was organized two major marches on washington and the 200,000 plus we had last year for gorge floyd and we had over 50,000 on voting. >> and i am telling you, you have to intentionally organize to make sure there is no domestic violence and no disruption. >> i i know what it takes to
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organize these events. you have to essential be l.a.x.ed or encouraged what we saw because you have to work with capital police and all kinds of law enforcement. all of that was missing here. >> when you let them and others go, not prosecuted, toe me is to give a wave to people that i feel had tofr some intent along the line because it know what it takes to put that amount of people in washington and in realtime because i have done it in a same pan of time. >> we have saved documents and seen facebook post zg instagram that this was blands. groups were planning this. bannon and trump's people. >> all hell was going to break
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lose. >> you buie, susan, i want to go back again, liz is right. what do they do after the capitol attack? i know they are looking at a game show host and a game show host. i know they may be worried about a primary next year. >> but, you know the words of lincoln, "we can't escape history, we'll be remember in spite of ourselves." >> they can't out run the history of this. >> just like seven defining politicians that responded to that attack. >> i agree with you, joe. >> when you look at the two, do you think they care about
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history? >> i they this -- >> what do they care about? >> they care about reelected? >> that's a really great yes. >> they are only there to carry out what donald trump wants them to do. as far as other republicans, that's where we have to start questioning, why are we not hearing more from the ben sass and the mit romney. officials are republicans. they need to start speaking up. one thing that's great about liz cheney besides what she had said is she knows how the republicans operate. >> there is one scary thing to think about. >> financial aggression. we see what's happening across the local legislatures vai
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leapt. >> it's being teed up for the next election. this is scared to look forward as we have been looking back. >> that's owl of the thee republicans. >> think violence is the answer. >> mika. >> we'll come back to this. we want to turn back to the fight against covid now. the fda is scaling up the nation's covid 19 vaccine campaign after authorizing booster shots from moderna and joj. the agency also says any of the three authorized vaccines including pfizer can be use as a booster in a mix and match approach. this comes as the white house revealed plans to roll out vaccines for children ages. outreach to parents. joining us now dr. vivek murthy.
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thank you very much for joining us. >> let's start with the roll out of vaccines for children. how are parents getting their children vaccinated? >> i am sensing there is going to be legislative si. >> it's an important question in an important moment if you are a parent like me and millions of others who are out there who are been waiting for an zunt to get the vaccine. we see that day maybe within reach. >> the cdc is reviewing the data on chern and under 12 we anticipate within the order of weeks, they'll have a decision render. >> here is what we have been doing to prefair for that moment. >> i see support, distributions
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are, we make sure the vaccines free. >> we made sure there is adequate supply. for all the 28 million kids who fall on that range. we are taking sure there will be tens of thousands of places where people can receive the vaccines from doctor's offices or children's hospital and schools. we know so much of what's driven hesitancy and it has been misinformation as people wanting to hear from export and wanting to know what happens between their family and friends. >> we make sure people have access to credible information from sources they trust. >> and to that point, part of the messaging is if we can get this country vaccinated, when we'll ward off the potential for variants to develop in this country. >> dr. michael stolz storm.
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>> from your perspective, is delta the end? s, where we still up against a great challenge in front of us. >> that's an important question. >> what we know is we want 100% predict the future. >> most of those are not consequential, we want to avoid a possibility of another variant, that comes back to our. >> it's how we reduce likelihood of the future. >> good morning, dr., this is wylie guide. >> i know you said this should be left up to moneyalties but
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any kind of mandates for kids to be nasdaq nated and go to school. >> if your medical opinion, would it be wise for schools to mandate the vaccines? >> i know there is been a lot of discussions around vaccine requirements not just in schools but in workplaces. >> i want to put this in context. it's not new. >> we had vaccine rierchlts from school and many conditions including -- we have got to make our schools safe as well as our workplaces safe. >> we also come across circumstances where our decisions affect other people. that's what's happening right now. that's where you see requirements being put in place across the board. >> that's a bigs to scli and left up to local government to
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make ends. i sebt it to be more on these kinds of requirements. our goal is to preng our kids and keep our school safe and increase vaccination rates in our country. >> you are not going to be make an announcement. do you think it will be smart for school districts to have vaccine mandates for kids? >> i think schools should explore all options and the goal is to get our kids protected. >> this is not jst about vaccine. >> it's others to increase evidence like testing and universal masking and improving ventilations in school. we have funds to support these activities and mitigation measures in schools and billions of dollars of funds provided to the american russ cue plan. >> i noir about efforts in some
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states and some localities to move things away. >> we see schools that have a universal massing in place are likely love outbreak in schools compares to schools that don't have massing rules. >> we got to take every measure to make sure they are okay. >> dr. murthy. mike barnicle here with a question for you. >> doctor, you mentioned you are going to have a fairly extensive information program to reduce the fear factor in the administration for these vaccines for children. do you have any plans to deal with facebook? this is an open fire host of misinformation often dangerous information about the mpact of vaccines? . >> well, mike, i am glad you brought this up.
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we have seen that misinformation proliferate profoundly on social media and particular. we talked to people hey, where are you hearing these mitds about the covid-19 vaccine. they when we put the advisory up, i believe that social media platforms across the board have a responsibility to ensure misinformation is not spreading like wildfire and even though some of the companies say they are taking action, it's not nearly enough and not happening quickly enough. let me be clear, this is causing people lives. they do not share. >> help us understand how much
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misinformation is transaking. >> the cost is harming the health of americans. >> and so many ways, u.s. surgeon dr. murthy, thank you very much for coming on the show. joe, just to echo what the doctor was talking about son o many levels. >> facebook just completely any responsibility, i mean if you created a flat form that's a business physically and mentally hurt people, you would be sued, you would be wiped up the face of the earth. it was revealed things that are happening and i am going to say it victims of facebook. >> and instagram. >> all the studies have been out there for so long about how teenage girls, the mental health
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challenges that resulted nationwide because of instagram. there has been so many studies and of course facebook has their own studies. it came up with very unambiguous conclusion that instagram caused depression and anxiety and suicidal ied discrimination. risk for teenage girls and for all americans. >> just like big tobacco and the car industry, we put seat belts in the car industry and people freaked out. now, can we believe our parents just let us crawl over the seats. it's insane. why don't you give us whiskey and car keys. it's a six-year-old.
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same thing of air bags? who does not want the extra layer of safety. >> we are asking facebook gets treated like other company. >> exactly. >> if nbc news put out bad flier, they'll get sued. facebook book needs to face the same reality than every other in america. >> when the internet was new and exciting, there were some law passed and made sense 1966. let's stop pretending they do. >> before we go, mr. secretary, i want to ask you about the great american and a guy who's been praising people of all corners which really makes him a
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man of his town. that's colin powell. tell me your experience with him. >> i didn't know him that well but when i ran into washington, we used to joke. >> a lot of people used to confuse my father. my first senate confirmation hearing in 1998, my father sitting there -- >> i am not sure i like where this is going. >> go ahead. at some point, and when a 96 years old man whispered everybody in the room -- >> colin powell is representatives of what we are just talking about when it comes to the republican party. i saw a clip the other night
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that cold republican power gets a primetime address, talking about why the republican party needs to be the party of affirmative action. freedom of choice, that was 1996. right after january 6th, colin powell says i can no longer be a republican. >> rev, we have been talking about first of all, we have been talking about. >> i think some people rise above the partisan rank and i think colin powell did that. i disagree with a lot of things that colin powell did. he respected it and he knew he was someone that was truly great
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person for this country. >> i have said that in new york where he was from, you have fort hamilton and we used to say, you have four hamiltons which is a military base. they need to rename that since we are changing name of confederates. >> i have to call in file. it's important and i think secretary johnson would agree black and brown kids need figure like that that rise so high that no one can tell a school that we are not. it was important that we was the first national security advisers, testifies the first black secretary of state. >> that i remember, of joint chief. we need to celebrate the fact that even though we disagree with what we did, he operated in a level of dignity. it became out of where ever.
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>> you can be something and you won with dignity. i think all of us are celebrating his life. >> ooze san, you were talking about, he recently became a republican. >> yes, at the time i was lean ng that direction. seeing him represented diversity. it did not seem like my grandfather, it shows a strong drengs saying i am a republican. i want to use one other word because i think this is what really get to me now when i learn of his passing, is that he's such a patriot. think about the all the things we talked about. he loves this country, that's why democrats really love this country. >> former secretary of homelands security, jeh johnson. thank you very much.
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>> it's great to see you. >> we'll go down to the southern border and have a live broadcast when you and jeb bush are appointed. the joint borders. >> donts seat on the edge of your seat. thank you so much. the fate of the 17, mostly american missionaries kidnapped in haiti remains uncertain. we are getting a closer look at the efforts to free them and the growing unrest inside that country. nbc's gabe gutierrez is in porter prince. >> good morning. it's holding a place of fasting and prayers for their missionary. >> it's unclear where they are being held. the games responsible generally holds his hostages near where
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they were captured. >> this morning with parts of haiti paralyzed by game violence, the effort of returning 17 missionaries held cam tan is entering a fifth day. >> it's damaging in the long-term process. it's essential that the security dynamics changed if hay is going to make progress. >> the abductor demanded -- >> the white house says u.s. policies not the pay rent and hostages. experts say it's likely the game, the hostages includes 16 americans and one canadian. among them five children raging in ages of 8 months to 16 years old.
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we along with government authorities to find him and, making it difficult and dangerous to get arnds. >> it's pure terror to liver here. thst our country. >> humanitarian hade organization like doctors without border are struggling to keep operating. one o f their staffers here was shot dead. >> the situation is very difficult for the population to get access to healthcare. >> we met david, a missionary from florida who runs an orphange. >> do you feel like your life here? >> more now than before because i have never seen it escalate to this level. >> that's something we heard
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over and over again on the ground. i have been to haiti before. most of people personnel us, the secret games -- we have learned haitian police announced several suspected an unrelated case. a reminder of just how common this has become here. mika? >> nbc's gabe gutierrez reporting for us from haiti. thank you very much. and we'll be back in just two minutes with much more "morning joe." knows everyone's unique. that's why they customize your car insurance, so you only pay for what you need. oh, yeah. that's the spot. only pay for what you need. ♪ liberty, liberty, liberty, liberty ♪ so, should all our it move to the cloud? the cloud would give us more flexibility, but we lose control. ♪ ♪ ♪ should i stay or should i go? ♪ and we need insights across our data silos, but how? ♪ if i go there will be trouble ♪
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a picture of dr. brzezinski at camp david playing chess. one of my favorite stories where they were trying to soften he begin and dr. brzezinski said you play chess? i haven't played in 17 years. well, let's play chess. they played chess. after about three or four moves in, dr. brzezinski is going, i'm
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not going to tell him but i know begin's lying and sure enough they're playing best two out of three. his wife comes into the third game and looks down at the chess set. oh, good, he loves chess. he plays it every day to relax. oh, my gosh. your father, mika, until the very end was claiming that he let begin win so the camp david accords wouldn't go off track. >> it's so funny. that story is 100% true. it's hilarious. it shows sort of the humor in such a tense situation. >> very tense. >> also that picture of my dad, i've seen that image, you know, hundreds of times over in our house. he loved chess. in maine playing with these old guys that were his friends forever and he loved chess. they always considered it sort of a way of communicating
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effectively with people, showing strategy, sharing secrets, but also kicking some butt. he was really good at it. >> he loved chess. but you know what he really loved? winning. let's bring in -- talking about winning -- >> the same with tennis. >> former world chess champion is kicking off a master class on the multimedia chess playing and content platform. he joins us now with more on that. we will ask you more about what's unfolding across europe. before we do that i want to talk about this, is this -- and this isn't an infomercial, i want to know this. i need to know this. is this for the 13-year-old boy and 18-year-old girl, i really want to start playing chess? is this class for everybody? >> yes, this class is for everybody.
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i hope that chess can do some good online, just so many stories about negative influence online content and naturally chess could help. now we're at a time chess is having a real worldwide boom thanks to "the queen's gambit," the success of the series, i believe the series will help people get excited. it's not a typical master class. this brings together never before told stories. it's about my life. it's bringing together entertainment and education. i hope it will give a new look into the game of chess and into my own personal life and it will just show chess from the side that very few people have seen before. >> can you please talk about your personal life and what we'll learn more about in this?
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>> of course some of the most memorable games that i played at the highest level, the games that made me world champion in 1985 and 1987. one of my best games played against the bulgarian grandmaster. it's not just about the moves, it's about emotion, how i prepared myself for the greatest challenge in my life. i hope this experience will help others to learn how they can prepare themselves. >> not just in chess but anything, whether you're in college, whether you're starting a job, whatever field you're in, right? >> absolutely. at the end of the day chess is about making decisions and making choices and that's our life. every day we have to make choices, we have to understand how to make tradeoffs. and how to make sure we are
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psychologically and physically ready for the big challenge. >> i heard from the great ted lasso in the finale, him quoting john wooden that life is not about winning or losing. life is about the choices we make along the way. every single move either opens a path or shuts one down. >> let's be clear, yes, it's about winning. you said a few minutes ago. for me chess was not finding winning moves but also about making a difference. and that's what helped me to transition from chess into the life after chess. and since 2005 i wore many different hats, though chess still remains a very important part of my life.
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i feel comfortable using chess as an element to promote other agendas. >> it's interesting, your response to my question, remind me of what emanuel always says. it's not about the money. it's about the money. and i will say, i will admit with me, it's not about whether you win or lose, it's about whether you win. so we have that. and now let's talk about the fight for western democracy. let's talk about the battle that's raging in washington, d.c., a battle of ideas. it's raging in warsaw, that's being waged right now in hungary, what's happening in china and any freedoms, any liberalization of their economy is being shut down. it seems this is a worldwide phenomenon and a battle we have no choice but to win. >> absolutely. before you win you have to come
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up with a strategy. let me use the chess term again. when you play the game you have to work out the plan, a game plan, so a strategic plan, and that's why the west has one cold war. since the mid-'40s when the truman administration built institutions that could help the free world to resist the pressure from communism and then defeat it 40-plus years later. right now what we see from america, from europe, it's reaction to the aggressive moves made by china, by russia, by iranian movers, by all sorts of dictators, thugs and terrorists. and without a plan, you are weak. you talk about one country or another country and what's happening, what has been happening in the world that look at putin at xi jinping and they say why not? that's what dictators always ask, why not? >> you are right. we need a strategy.
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you can read the art of war, have tactics and strategy, you will lose in the end. you are delaying the inevitable. garry kasparov, thank you. for mon garry's master class kasparovchess.com. you have a comment about kamala harris. >> national action network we started 30 years ago celebrating at carnegie hall on november 1st. we hadded first sitting black president, barack obama. now for our 30th anniversary -- >> i thought bill clinton -- didn't he say he was the first black president? >> i said the first sitting black president. >> oh.
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the first sitting vice president, at a time dealing with police reform and black rights. spike lee will give an award to the first black composer of the met. we're going to have a lot of -- chris rock is giving an award to lauren michaels of "saturday night live," opening the door. it will be a big night for us. we're going to be on the issues of voting rights and police reform with the vice president of the united states. >> that's very exciting. we're looking forward to that. we're at the top of the hour, so let's get to the most exciting announcement. the polo bar is reopened and you were holding court last night. i'm not saying that kamala coming to talk at your 30th anniversary is not big, but, rev, donnie, the polar boy reopened and donny deutsch. >> it was the rev and yourself and myself there last night and -- >> but you kicked us out.
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>> we had to leave at 6:15 because "jeopardy" starts at 6:30. rev and i always watch it together when we are in town. i heard were you there all night holding court. >> you had to see the teenaged girls squealing when they saw joe. squealing. met clive davis, one of your heroes. >> can you talk about anything without being inappropriate? can we not lie about that and talk about clive davis, one of my heroes was there. i got to meet him. >> it's a fun scene. joe, you don't go out a lot. it was a privilege. mika, he was home tucked in bed by 7:45. >> mika, the young teenaged girls were not squealing at joe, they were squealing at me and said, reverend, get off my foot. >> there you go. >> not trying to sort through all of that, but, yeah, we eat dinner very early, the rev and i. we have things to do. go to bed. but, yeah, got to meet clive davis last night, mika.
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that was a real thrill for me. >> that's really cool. i love it. okay, just ahead in this 8:00 a.m. hour, congresswoman pramila jayapal playing a role in reconciliation negotiations will be our guest. first, a look at the push for voting rights. which had been a bipartisan deal. >> since the voting rights act was passed we made progress toward equality, yet the work for a more perfect union is never ending. we'll continue to build on the legal equality run by the civil rights movement to help ensure every person enjoys the opportunity that this great land of liberty offers. >> in 2006 president bush signed into law an extension of the voting rights act, something approved by the senate days earlier by a 98-0 vote.
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fast forward to 2021 where senate republicans in a filibuster won't even allow a debate on the issue. and we'll start right there, the bill included provisions like allowing automatic and same day voter registration, no excuse mail voting, and we make election day a holiday. the bill fell short -- >> mika, it would seem to get more people involved in american democracy. how many republicans voted for this? >> huh, let's see, i'll try to count them. >> oh, wait, none. >> the bill fell short, yeah, of 60 votes needed to advance all democrats to advance. chuck schumer later voted no in order to request another vote down the line. after yesterday's vote, schumer spoke from the senate floor. >> every single republican senator just blocked this chamber from having a debate,
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simply a debate, on protecting americans' right to vote in free and fair elections. a little over a year ago our country held the safest, most accessible, most on the level elections in modern history. republican obstruction is not a cause for throwing in the towel. as soon as next week i'm prepared to bring the john lewis voting rights advancement act here to the floor. what we saw from republicans today is not how the senate is supposed to work. >> the measure was initially scaled back by democrats last month. to win the backing of centrist democratic senator joe manchin. but those efforts, joe, failed to sway any republican support yesterday. what does it mean, and explain the position joe manchin is in right now. >> well, first of all, what does it mean? it means the republicans have taken obstruction to a new level. you talk about do nothing
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republicans, think about this, it wasn't enough that not a single republican would vote to protect voting rights for all americans to get more americans involved in american democracy, they blocked the vote. they stood in sort of a school house door situation. they were like george wallace. they stood in the doorway and stopped people from being able to go in and vote to expand voting rights for all americans. this would help all americans, white americans, black americans, hispanic americans, you name it. this would help everybody. and when you have the united states having lower vote turnout than most western democracies, this is a good thing. this is the sort of thing when it passes, and it will pass, you're going to have people looking back 10, 15 years, wait, wait, why didn't america do this
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before? like seat belts and air bags and all these things that you had republicans and industry leaders fighting before that are now common place. this makes too much sense. and it's the same thing with making election day a holiday, having early voting consistent across the country. it makes too much sense this is a do nothing republican congress that, again, it just does more than not vote for expanded voting rights. they stand at the school house door and block anybody from voting. it's just like we were talking about a week or two ago. it wasn't enough for republicans to say we must raise the debt ceiling and it would be irresponsible not to raise the debt ceiling. then they decided to not vote to raise the debt ceiling. it wasn't enough that republicans were against voting for raising the debt ceiling. they stood in the school house door and blocked anybody from going into chambers and voting
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to raise the debt ceiling, a gift, perhaps one of the great gifts to china, in a very long time, communist china, giving communist china an advantage over us saying, look, they can't even come to an agreement to pay off their debts. and here we have it again, rev. here we have a republican party, and i must say as a former republican, i'm not offended. i'm amused when people are stupid enough to say, oh, the republican party has always been the same. it's the same party. if you look like donald trump, that's joe -- no, it wasn't. you look at george w. president, vilified by the left, who saved 13 million, 14 million lives in africa with pepfar helping push back the aids in africa crisis. here is a guy after 9/11 that went to a mosque and said these are americans. we're not vilifying muslim americans because of what somebody did overseas.
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that was a republican. and it was a republican party that voted unanimously, reverend al, to extend voting rights. now here we are in the age of trump and there's not a single republican who will vote for it. not only that, they're standing in the school house door to stop anybody from going in to vote, to let them vote their conscience. to vote for voting rights. >> when 2006, which we showed this morning when george bush signed the voting rights act extension, i was on the white house lawn as a guest. but everybody united around voting rights. civil rights leaders, we were there with them for that because voting rights is something everyone wanted. >> it's sacrosanct. it used to be sacrosanct before the trump republican party. >> what is so egregious about
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what happened yesterday is that senator manchin met with some of us, met with martin luther king iii and i, and said i will come with a bill that will be bipartisan. i can come with a compromise. he sat with seven other senators and crafted this freedom to vote bill. >> which, can i just say for middle america, for me, for people who are conservative/moderate, it's a really good bill. there was stuff in hr-1 as drafted, way too extreme. way too extreme. nationalizing elections way too much. there are things in here that make me really uncomfortable. manchin comes in and he puts together a bill that really is a compromise solution to voting rights. so he does this -- >> and he asks us for time. he said let me give a bill, many of us, including me, supported senate bill one but many felt it was extreme. he said give me time. we said fine. yesterday not one senator on the
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republican side, not one, no, not a one, voted even to go forward to debate. it wasn't even the bill. it's that we won't let you even debate the bill, as you say, standing in the school house door to block even the discussion around it. >> they're blocking the debate. they're blocking the vote. they're blocking -- richard, what does it say about the republican party, our former party, where they won't even allow a debate on a debt ceiling, they won't allow debate on voting rights, they won't allow debate on any of these bills. >> look, the debt ceiling is just pure cynicism since they voted for all the spending. what worries me about this, technically these people could be republican voters. not technically,reality. i'm old enough to remember when republicans were engaging in the battle of ideas am you put out better proposals, people come out and vote for republicans. that's the marketplace of
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politics. the idea republicans now are trying to limit the right to vote, essentially it's almost as if they've given up the competition of ideas. they basically say we can't win if we have a level playing field, so as a result we are going to tilt the playing field and make it harder for people to vote. that is a really sad statement. the fact that rob portman, mitt romney, people who know better, are supporting this, is, to me, a really sad statement. >> let's always remember those names, people that will come out at some point and play a moderating voice -- oh, i'm a moderate, whether it's mitt or any of these other people that, again, have said we're going to help communist china by letting america default on the debt by not just not vote to go raise the debt ceiling but stopping people, standing in the school house door, stopping people from going in to debate and vote to raise the debt ceiling. let's make no mistake who they are and what they're doing now
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and what they just did on voting rights and what they're going to do next week on the john lewis voting rights bill. >> and the names you just listed include lisa murkowski, theoretically the persuadable votes to get democrats to 60 votes on some legislation. jonathan lemire, republicans couldn't make more clear they're not going to lend a single vote to this effort to reform voting rights not just on this larger package but, as joe said, next week on the john lewis bill. what kind of pressure does that put on joe biden? he has said we don't want to change the filibuster. that's there for a reason. it sets a bad precedent. we're hearing from civil rights groups, for voting rights groups, from democrats that the only way we're going to get this through and maybe it's a carveout for this legislation is to scrap the filibuster and get this through? do you think joe biden's mind has changed at all on that
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question? >> the gop are in lock step on this. minority leader mcconnell has made clear there will be no votes. there occasionally are vote your conscience. the pressure has grown on democrats and joe biden in particular. he put out a statement condemning this measure, the fact that it didn't even get to a vote. nowhere in the statement was there anything about doing a carveout with the filibuster. that's a bridge he does not want to cross. we know there are some in his party who join him, manchin publicly, others privately. we've heard from groups who say this is not enough, this should be the central focus of your presidency. and the white house, to this point, has been disciplined, and they want to stay on infrastructure and reconciliation packages. we've heard from biden telling democrats we'll have to outorganize them next year in the midterms, which is not a good enough answer. i want to ask you, you've been in these conversations, in these groups. should joe biden be doing more? >> i think that we, at the point
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where you have to deal with the carveout of the filibuster, we've been saying that for months. i think when you see senator king, who is an independent, who has been very much for keeping the filibuster saying maybe we now need to look at a carveout. i think the pressure is on for everyone to come back to the table, including the president when not one republican would allow even the debate. i think that this -- the ones that have put the pressure on them is not the civil rights leaders, not the democrats, but the republicans, because they're saying that we're not even going to debate it. we're not going to give you a choice. and i think the white house -- i liked vice president harris came out said we're not giving up, we're coming out swinging, and she will be dealing with the civil rights community on this. i think the republicans have put their back to the wall, not just those of us that have been calling on them. >> i agree. and still ahead, a look at some of the other stories making
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headlines this morning including a new push to hold facebook accountable for the undenial dangers linked to social media. you're watching "morning joe." bogeys on your six, limu. they need customized car insurance from liberty mutual so they only pay for what they need. woooooooooooooo... we are not getting you a helicopter. only pay for what you need. ♪ liberty. liberty. liberty. liberty. ♪
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♪♪ democratic senator richard blumenthal of connecticut is calling on facebook ceo mark zuckerberg to once again testify before congress. the chair of the senate subcommittee on consumer protection product safety and data security sent a letter to the facebook founder yesterday, weeks after a whistle-blower testified about the company to congress. that testimony centered around internal research from facebook showing the company knows of the damage that instagram can do to the mental health of teenaged
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girls. in his letter blumenthal wrote in part, quote, parents across america are deeply disturbed by ongoing reports that facebook knows that instagram can cause destructive and lasting harms to many teens and children, especially to their mental health and well-being. those parents and 20 million teens that use your app have a right to know the truth about the safety of instagram. a facebook spokesperson confirmed the company received the letter but gave no further response. there was a new discovery yesterday in the search for gabby petito's fiance brian laundrie. human remains were found in the same area as some of laundrie's personal belongings. nbc news correspondent sam brock has the latest. >> reporter: police and fbi agents have spent weeks combing
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this natural reserve searching for brian laundrie, his last reported location. there's a tent, partial human remains, and long-awaited signs of laundrie. >> investigators found what appears to be human remains, along with personal items such as a backpack and notebook belonging to brian laundrie. these items were found in an area that, up until recently, have been under water. >> reporter: the 23-year-old is wanted for questioning in the disappearance of his fiancee gabby petito and credit card fraud charges. his parents say he went hiking in the reserve in september and never returned. >> you can't keep chocolate in utah. >> reporter: laundrie and petito were on a cross-country road trip when laundrie returned to florida without her in early september. petito was later discovered dead in a wyoming national forest with an autopsy revealing she was strangled. the laundrie family attorney said his parents went to the park this morning to search for brian, writing after a brief
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search off a trail that brian frequented, some articles belonging to brian were found. >> our evidence response team is on scene using all available forensic resources to process the area. >> reporter: the last confirmed sighting of petito was august 27th, two weeks after the moab police stopped them after bystanders reported domestic violence. >> do you want to tell me about the scratches on your face? >> reporter: no charges were filed. petito's tragic disappearance and death sparking national attention. >> that was nbc's sam brock reporting. and coming up, a new look at the white house campaign to vaccinate millions of younger school kids. dr. michael osterholm joins us next on "morning joe." age-related macular degeneration may lead to severe vision loss,
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the white house unveiled its plan to vaccinate nearly 30 million children aged 5 to 11 when approval comes down as the fda authorizes boosters of the moderna and johnson & johnson vaccines. national correspondent miguel almaguer has the latest. >> reporter: authorized by the fda booster shots for adults fully vaccinated with moderna and johnson & johnson could be days away, the stage set for the cdc's review after mixing and matching boosters was approved. it comes as the white house unveils its massive plan to begin vaccinating 28 million children between the ages of 5 and 11 who could qualify for their first shots of pfizer's first vaccine in november. the logistical rollout using sites like schools and community
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centers to ensure families have easy access to the free vaccine. why is it so important? >> we do vaccinations to keep them safe. it will bring infection numbers down. >> reporter: pfizer's vaccine just a smaller dose used for adults. the white house saying they will prepackage the child-sized vials. 100 plus hospitals and tens of thousands of pharmacies will be ready for quick distribution. 7-year-old lydia and her 5-year-old sister bridgette participated in the vaccine trial. was there any hesitation in getting your children involved in the trial? >> none whatsoever. we have both been vaccinated and felt comfortable personally. >> we want to teach them that science is important and also giving back and stepping up. >> we were sort of scared if we
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got covid, and now it will probably protect us from covid. >> reporter: but amid protest as new kaiser study says most parents won't immediately get their kids vaccinated. 32% will wait and see and 24% say they definitely will not. >> we're not anti-vax. that's not what we're saying. we're saying this is new science, quote/unquote, and it needs to be proven. >> reporter: the massive rollout to vaccinate children and the growing fight against it. >> miguel almaguer reporting there. joining us, a professor from the medical school of the university of minnesota, dr. michael osterholm. it's great to see you. we get these headlines of good news, and it is good news, the vaccine for young children, approval from the fda on some of these booster shots, cases,
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hospitalizations going down nationally and yet you say there is still reason for concern as we head into the winter months. what is your snapshot nationally where we are in this pandemic? >> clearly the surge since we've seen since june are subsizing and is going down. basically it's a combination of reasons, but most of all i think that the thing we have to keep emphasizing is the importance of vaccination. there are 65 million to could be vaccinated and are not. we'll see more surges in the future if we don't get these people vaccinated. >> let's talk about the states where there's trouble. what is behind that? i think people read the headlines, there's so much good news at the moment. as you say there are places where, in your words, there's still human wood to burn for
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this virus. >> it's very important to understand we have to have humility when we talk about what goes on with this virus because we don't understand all of it. remember, this virus started in the ozark region of the united states in june and then we saw it move to the southern sunbelt and the southeast and go up through the appalachian area. we saw it can skip over the immediate northeast and hit maine, vermont and new hampshire. at the same time we saw it move from eastern oregon and washington across the rocky mountain states and then we saw the north central states get hit. so this was almost like viral lava flowing from the beginning of the pandemic emergence. why did it start? why did it suddenly blow up we can't tell you. people talk about seasonality, we don't really have data to support that. we've had the warmest fall in decades.
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it's been in the 70s here. what it really tells us is it will be back and as much as this will go down, we will see a quiet period like in june and then all of a sudden it will be back because we have so many people not yet vaccinated. >> dr. osterholm, a different way of asking some of these questions, i think, here in the u.s. given the variance we are seeing abroad and given our vaccination numbers, is delta the enter of it in terms of variants that we will see in the u.s. that have a different twist to them? highly transmissible, more possibilities of breaking through vaccines? is delta the end of it in terms of variants in the u.s.? >> mika, the simple answer is we don't know. variants will keep emerging, and they really fit in one of three
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buckets. either more transmissible, cause more serious illness, and right now delta is the lion king of the viruses. could that change? it could. that would mean probably a virus even more infectious than delta which is hard to imagine. i think that's what we're always mindful of that something else could show up. we have our hands full with delta as infectious as it is. >> dr. michael osterholm, thank you for coming on this morning. coming up, one of the leading voices in the debate over infrastructure, chair of the house progressive caucus, congresswoman pramila jayapal joins the conversation straight ahead on "morning joe." evil dies tonight. [ chanting ] evil dies tonight.
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i always protect my voice. it's how i make my living. and you and i make a country with our voices. your vote is your voice. but more than ever, our freedom to vote is under attack. so please: call congress. tell them to pass the freedom to vote act.
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to protect our ability to have our say on the issues that matter most. so, let's pass the freedom to vote act and protect all our voices. find your rhythm. your happy place. find your breaking point. then break it. every emergen-c gives you a potent blend of nutrients so you can emerge your best with emergen-c. ♪ ♪ welcome to allstate. where everything just seems to go your way. ♪ ♪ you're in good hands with allstate. click or call for a lower auto rate today. it's another day. you're in good hands with allstate. and anything could happen. it could be the day you welcome 1,200 guests and all their devices. or it could be the day there's a cyberthreat. only comcast business' secure network solutions give you the power of sd-wan and advanced security integrated on our activecore platform so you can control your network from anywhere, anytime.
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it's network management redefined. every day in business is a big day. we'll keep you ready for what's next. comcast business powering possibilities. i was scared. >> you were? >> i was. >> he told us before he had contemplated suicide, but it was only on that test that he mentioned thoughts of homicide. we were scared.
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but i was trying to see the best possible outcome. >> we should have done something then. we should have. >> of course now, but what? and i couldn't accept that he would throw away his future because of a homemade bomb, linda, please. >> where did this interest in bombs come from? didn't it surprise you at all? >> yes. >> we didn't know anywhere. yes it surprised us, shocked us. >> he said he read it online. he was bored. >> he said it was something to do. >> i'm not the only one. >> that's what he said. once he made it he figured eat set it off. he went back to the woods. >> where we used to live. >> no one was around. he wasn't trying to -- he -- we hoped it was what he said it was. >> that was a clip from the new film "mass." a tense chamber drama following four parents who meet for the first time years after one of the couple's now deceased son was responsible for a mass
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shooting. the film premiered at sundance to great acclaim and early awards buzz. joining us now stars of the film, it's really good to have you on the show today to talk about this film and this topic. >> thank you, thank you. >> i can't imagine a harder -- i can't imagine a harder role to take on than the parents of a son who commit add mass shooting. ann? >> yes, it was certainly a challenge, but a wonderful one. and given the way things work for actors when you are in the hands of a very, very fine writer and director, a character who is beautifully written, a lot of things came in to play that made it an extraordinary
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experience, the actors, the circumstances. i'm a mother of children and, again, the gifts which is to say when we go home we don't carry the consequences of the story. my children are alive. we can take that deep dive and that's the privilege of what we do, if that makes any sense to you. >> well, yeah. and, reed, for you, she called it a beautiful journey. i think actors always relish the challenge to take on roles that make them think about every dimension of their humanity. >> when you're lucky you can get a part that not only is a great part but you feel is
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contributing something to the consciousness of the world. i know that whenever one of these shootings has happened, my first response is to think how are the families coping with this, these parents whose lives are instantly changed forever. we as actors have gotten the chance to explore that and the fact the movie is being received and resonating in such a way makes me think that a lot of people are interested in how people endure and forgive each other and move forward with whatever it is that has happened to them in their lives. >> ann, for, i think, what reed just talked about, mass shootings are practically a daily event and there are always
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the victims and the shooter. often the shooter does not survive as well. often they do. there are the people in the family connected to the person who commits this act of violence and does the film take a look at how we've gotten here? >> how we've gotten to the place where mass shootings occur so regularly? >> yeah. and there are these kids who are bringing themselves to this point, because often they fit a profile, and i don't say that in a negative way, but there are certain aspects of our society that are feeding into this problem. >> exactly. vulnerable people who are not in control of their emotions, their lives, they've given up somehow have the power to harm not only themselves but so many others.
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how does one -- you know, if i had to have a conversation with people, for instance, about why aren't you wearing a mask again? what are you afraid of with the vaccine, help me to understand, or guns what is the need for all of these guns? what's going on? the minute i voice that opinion to myself, i remind myself, you are not in a place where that conversation is going to move forward because there has to be common ground. what fran does in this film is look at the possibilities of healing when there is true connection. if we could honestly put down our rage, our assurance that what we think is right, our fears whatever they are, if it's possible to do that, then there
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is always a way through because then the armor drops and suddenly you're connecting to human beings. then there's a way to move forward. are we very far away of that in terms of guns, in terms of everything? i think we are and i hope we can find a way. >> what are you hoping, i think that might be the answer, viewers will take away from this film? >> there is always a way forward. at the end of the day we are human beings. and our fears run deep and strong, and the walls are strong and tall, but we can drop the armor. we can find a way through and we'll be safe to do so. >> i think that ann is absolutely right, of course, and to build on that, i think the movie is really talking about how we as people connect and
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forgive, and there's a great line in herald and maude where harold says to her, how are you -- how do you love people so much? and ruth gordon says, they're my species. and i feel like that's what the movie is about. we're all the same species and we've somehow or other broken down into two different species. i think the movie is really about loving each other and forgiving each other. >> the new fill being is "mass." it is a compelling topic with the greatest actors you could ever imagine ann dowd and reed byrny, thank you very much. we'll be back with more "morning joe."
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regina approaches the all-electric cadillac lyriq. it's a sunny day. nah, a stormy day. classical music plays. um uh, brass band, new orleans. ♪ ♪ she drives hands free... along the coast. make it palm springs. ♪ cadillac is going electric. if you want to be bold, you have to go off-script. experience the all-electric cadillac lyriq. these bills are not about left versus right. or moderate versus progressive. these bills are about competitiveness versus complacency. they're act expanding opportunity, not having opportunity denied. >> that's president biden in his hometown of scranton, pennsylvania, yesterday promoting the party's build back
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better plan why democrats continue to work toward agreements on both a bipartisan infrastructure bill and a social spending bill. at the forefront of the negotiations the chair of the congressional progressive caucus pramila jayapal met with the president again this week and joe manchin of we have we have to bridge the gap and reach a deal. and the washington state congresswoman joins us now. great to have you on with us. you have been shuttling back and forth. a lead negotiator here. as this bill, the big bill, what started at $3.5 trillion is pared down and the child tax credit not long term and some things that were priorities and yet you said the other day i'm happy to say the priorities remain in the bill. so what are those priorities and what are you looking to save as the price tag continues to come down?
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>> willie, that is great to see you. thank you for having me on. the priorities we laid out were the care economy and within that, that is universal child care for every family so no parent is going to pay more than 7% of the income on child care. universal pre-k. home and community based care to get the 800,000 person waiting list for medicaid home care down. and then paid leave. that's all within the care economy. the second priority is taking on climate change. third is investments in housing across the country so we can increase the supply and make sure that we're taking people from off the streets and putting them in homes. fourth is health care. we prioritize medicare expansion, didn't tall, hearing and vision benefits for seniors and finally immigration. just very happy to say they're all in the bill. of course they're not for as
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long as we want. that was our -- if we needed to bring down the price tag we said do it by shortening the number of years that a program is funded. let's deliver the benefits to people immediately and so thrilled that the president agreed with us and what's on the table right now. >> congresswoman, the progressives have shown -- i said it since the beginning, great deal of patience and working with others in their caucus despite the priorities aren't being met and continue to show patience. is the calculation that like the affordable care act that if you get the bills before the american people, if they become law they will be so popular that it will be impossible for congresses in future sessions to vote them down? >> joe, it is obviously a big risk but the real calculation here is about how we deliver some immediate relief to the
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number of constituencies that need that relief. right? like seniors need the dental, vision and hearing. young people in particular need to know they will have a planet to live on. families need child care. let's get done what we can get done together. it is not the ten years we would have liked. some programs not on the priority list but care deeply about like the extension of the child tax credit for longer or community college, the first lady cares about this and the president. we may not get all of those things in at the levels we want but let's get this done so that people wake up tomorrow and feel -- the day after we pass the bill and feel the difference in their lives and that helps renew trust in government, trust in democracy that we can get something done when voters delivered us the house, the
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senate and the white house. >> congresswoman, al sharpton, a thing that impressed me is your leadership and the progressives showing that they're mature and not irrational but asking for rational things. do you think as you talk to senator manchin and others that we are going to have to deal with this question of filibuster? or carveouts to get some things through ultimately in the senate? or will you be able to get enough without that? >> reverend, great to see you. we will get this bill done through reconciliation. we need 50 democrats in the senate and the vice president to break the tie and this will be a reconciliation bill. but your point about the filibuster is critically important because as you know i have been a civil rights activist my whole life and i believe the one thing to do is voting rights. we have to get the voting rights bill through and i don't think
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that even with the bill senator manchin put together, this is now his bill, the freedom to vote bill, that bill will not get ten republicans so as soon as we get through the build back better act we have to deal with the filibuster if we can't find ten republicans to even allow us to move forward the compromise bill that senator manchin put forward on voting rights. >> good morning. it's jonathan lemire. a concern for you is climate change and in the negotiations recently the clean energy provisions seems to have fallen out of the bill. can i get your take on that? but also, what replacements will go in there and will they be adequate enough? >> jonathan, i think this issue is critical and we will make significant progress on climate in this bill. i have spocken to senator manchin now several times this week and i think we will have
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clean energy tax credits which we were supportive of and hoped to have is a clean electricity performance plan. we are going to have to replace that because senator manchin has a different view on that but we are trying to find some alternatives that will still allow us to bring down carbon emissions with not perhaps not as much in our view as we would have done with the cepp but will say we're investing half a trillion dollars into taking on climate change and we will bring down carbon emissions through these other things so, for example, if we were to allow states and localities to have some funding that they could drive movement on carbon emissions reduction, if we could invest in the transmission piece of this which we already had a small piece in the bipartisan
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bill, that's something that could get done here and that combination with the civilian climate corps on the table, all things will be significant movements forward on climate and i believe that senator manchin can get there. we may not want what we thought was the best way but listen. we are 50 democrats. we need in the senate and we need all of us in the house, as well. we have a three-vote margin and proud that we are driving towards what i think will close here soon and that we will get significant movement forward that again as the president said this is about showing the world that democracy can work and in order for democracy to work we have to be able to get these things done and really they will be transformative for people. >> congresswoman pramila jayapal of washington, right smack dab in the middle of the negotiation, thank you. we'll talk to you soon.
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the congresswoman sounded like you saying we won't get everything we want but this is how negotiations work and how congress works. we are a big caucus and got to work together to get something. i get something. joe manchin gets something and we have a bill to help a bunch of people. >> this is how responsible parties work. they're compromising. giving up a lot but understanding that perfect is the enemy of good. that's where they're going. getting things done and going back to earlier today with republicans not only voting no on everything, they are stopping votes from happening. >> at the end of the day whatever constituency base we talk to or for they want us to deliver and get something done. all of the yelling, screaming and noise is good if you get something done and means nothing if you get nothing done. >> it's a game changer for
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biden. >> with a team player, progressives willing to sacrifice to make this happen. climate change with manchin. sinema and the taxes and more optimism than in weeks the deal is done. >> thanks for being with us today. that does it for us. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. ♪♪ hi there. i'm stephanie ruhle live at msnbc headquarters here in new york city. it is thursday, october 21. we have got all the facts you need to know so let's get smarter. the five week manhunt for brian laundrie could be over. investigators working overnight after human remains were discovered in a florida reserve. we'll go live to the scene. what one expert is calling the biggest threat to financial markets and society. rising prices, inflation hitting everything from groceries to

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