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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 1, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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lawmakers. it's just baseball, no politics. >> biden was snoozing and signing and signing baseball. he left the park about an hour since he arrived that had big absent dad vibes. you looked great out there, daddy is on a work call. okay, i am going to jump on this, reese's mom is going to give you a ride home. i will order you a pizza. oh shoot, are you the one with the dairy allergy. well, just peel the cheese off, love you, love you buddy. [ applause ] >> the game was a nail biter. the democrats have a chance for a big win but at the bottom of
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the ninth, joe manchin cautioned it would be irresponsible to score. >> i am not sure if it had anything to do with the looming debt crisis but nancy is fired up. >> you listen here, you listen good, when i tell you to [ bleep ]. bring me a big pretzel with the spicy cheese. >> pelosi working the phone. you are going to love this guy. 60 years old, throwing in the 40s. i think we found our new degrom. >> good morning and welcome to "morning joe," it's friday october 1st. willie and mika is off.
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with us, we have eugene robinson and white house editor for politico. that calvinist spirit, and before we lost to the orioles again. the residue of that calvinist spirit, sam, sam, sam, the red sox is doing it again. ten years ago almost to the day, you and me were in the exact same spot when the red sox gotten beat in camden yards on the last day of the season. tampa bay raised one on a
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walk-off homer. the red sox were eliminated from the playoffs. this has that field. to go into camden and to lose 2-3 to 170 baltimore orioles is like a definitive red sox experience. brutal. it's so interesting. the yankees is two games off. they got the rays this weekend and the red sox are coming to washington. i have a feeling i may have to make it to one or two of those games myself. the red sox now two games out. so the mariners and the blue
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jays and you know -- >> look, if we win, if we win we are good. we just got to win. the offense has been the worst. pitching and especially the bullpen had not been great. it feels like i am such a pessimistic but it seems like the wheels are falling apart. i would be shocked we even won verses the nats. >> that's the plan right now. >> well, sam, for good reasons. you and lemire and myself, calvinists all. jean robinson, that's like saying if the democrats can get all together and pass a significant bill. >> right, be sure to pitch right over the plate.
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i think you should really challenge souto this weekend. you know you can take him, right? it's kind of ugly. about as ugly as capitol hill' politics right now especially if you are nancy pelosi trying to get a bill passed. >> calvinist spirit, i was lost. in the right there was no vote yesterday in the house on the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill. nancy pelosi was forced to delay the vote on the second largest reconciliation package. pelosi had spent the day hudling
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with democrats. the out reach from president biden failed to bring the two camps together generating acrimony. senator manchin left late last night insisting the bill not to be linked. >> i pray to god, there is a lot of good in both of them. we should be able to come to an agreement. >> in a statement, jen psaki says a great deal has been made this weekend. progressives in the house remains adamant reconciliation needs to be completed before they vote for infrastructure. >> we have said clearly and we reiterated this again to the
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speaker, we'll not be able to vote for the infrastructure bill until the reconciliation has passed. we have been clear that we are ready to vote for both bills. >> so they are not budging. >> after hours of meeting, the two sides are still trillions of dollars apart. how do you bridge the gap? >> yesterday of course speaker pelosi says that we have positive thinking. i hope she feels positive, joe, but of course the longer this drags on, the harder it gets. >> eugene robinson. let's step back here for a second, eugene, if you look at
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where we were nine months ago in this country. if you look at what we were talking about everyday for four years whether we are wondering constitutional the ones we'll hold in place. maybe because i am a creature o f the house. that was sort of my defining experience looking at washington. this is really beautiful to look at. oh my gosh. how shocking. you have democrats that represents west virginia and maricopa county that are more conservative. you have democrats that represents california and new york who were more progressives. and they're going back and forth, they're trying to hammer out a deal. that's what this system is supposed to do instead of what happened over the past four years. i am not running to the hills with my hair on fire. it's kind of comforting to me.
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i have the same feeling. this is how it's supposed to work, right? democrats have to embody the entire same political spectrum right now from manchin on the right and sinema to the progressives on the left. that's of a wide range of opinion and they have to work it out and it's not easy and sometimes it's not pretty but it's legislatures, that's what they are doing, they're
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legislating. congress did manage to avoid a shutdown. you can check the box. it's progress. >> you are right. she does seem to be enjoying it. the editorial board is out with a new journal, it writes "joe manchin's intervention." theover riding problem for democrats is they're trying to pass a bernie sanders' agenda with a joe biden's mandate. mr. biden won because he ran against donald trump. even then he lost coat tails as
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democrats lost seats in the house. that should have gone by a wayside with the small majorities in congress. he has no mandate for the vast expansions of the government he's proposing. if democrats somehow manage to pass after of it, they'll be crushed in 2022. joe, the wall street journal is right. the majority race are slim. >> you look at the election results. democrats underperformed in the
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house. the republicans did much better. republicans that did not do better than expected was donald trump. ron johnson explains, he turned off so many suburban republicans and independence who could not for donald trump. they were not ready to turn congress completely to democrats either. i think if you, if we can stop because it's all talking about 3.5 trillion or 1.5 trillion, the media outlets conducted polls and they look at what joe manchin was suggesting, the democrats do verses what the progressives are suggesting they do. and you start having joe manchin talking about mean testing for these programs, not giving it to everybody but making sure it's mean base and you also say we are going to focus hard on seniors at the end of life and
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children at the beginning of life at pre-k. we are going to give needs base scholarships to students. it's not going to be free college. it's going to be free college for those who needs it and those going to fields that make the united states stronger. >> i guarantee you, match that agenda up with this sort of unfocused $3.35 trillion agenda which still is polling very well. i am not sure the wall street journal's page is right. i am not sure joe manchin may be bringing good bit of balance towards this process. sam, just because progressives, hey, we wanted 6.5 trillion so we compromise to 3.5 trillion. we spent over a trillion dollars
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last year. for most americans that's starting to add up to real money. >> right. a few things to unpact here. if you told any democrats the night of january 2021, within a year they could get a $2 trillion covid relief bill and a $1 trillion transportation bill and $1.5 trillion reconciliation bill. expectations got ahead of the party too when bernie came out saying we'll stick with it. i am not sure if they have their fingers on the democratic politics. as biden's popularity has slipped badly. the thing that's consistent is the component of the bill do poll well. they do. what's ironic here is that as
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these negotiations are happening around reconciliations. the components of the bill is being paired back. as they go about this negotiation process, they should keep it in mind. >> and jean, let's follow up what sam was saying because i heard from a lot of democratic leaders, a lot of democrats that have been painfully watching this from the sidelines. my god, only we democrats can figure out a way to turn 3 or $4 trillion of spending into a loss. almost identical of what sam said. if you were to tell us at the beginning of the year we'll get
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3 or $4 billion in infrastructure and human infrastructure and covid relief and benefits we have never been able to give out at this degree before. now when we get it, the press and the republicans are going to paint it as a loss. >> yeah, i guarantee that when and if democrats do settle on a figure for reconciliation. in the end everyone will portray it as a win. and focusing on the components of the program. what all this money is going to do and not so much on the top line. i think it was a mistake to focus on so much on the top line number and then make that, you know, rather than looking at the
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functional components of the bill, what's included was not gets done and who gets helped in what way? if i were advising the speaker and i am certainly not qualified to do that and you know a lot more getting anything through the house than i ever will. but i would say that's where you should put and use your focus on the debate and actual components of this big package and talk about the top line number or talk about how much it's per year. leave the top line number out because that's getting them nowhere. >> i could not agree more. talk about the policies that are so popular and stop talking about 6 trillion or
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1.5 trillion. talk about what you are giving the american people. more information for where we are and where we'll go, let's bring in yankees fan. john, let's blow past the first part. talk about nancy pelosi, we have all been commenting while many liberal pundants have been tearing their hair out, she's doing just fine. it's almost as if john, she's done this before unlike some of the people she's having to deal with. >> exactly. pelosi is the best whip of our time. she's the best white house whip i have ever covered. she knows her caucus and politics and she knows how to make deals with and how to
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coverer. the problem here and tackle back on what you guys said, you know what, republicans would have done some kind of covid relief bill if they were running for congress. democrats are feeling $1 trillion progressives. that's not the bill they wanted. they feel like they're giving things away to manchin and sinema and they're not convinced that manchin or sinema ever going to do a deal. that's what they are afraid of here. i think pelosi and you know she's walking such a fine line here and chuck schumer. chuck schumer is in the middle of it, too. we have to mention it, too. chuck schumer who was fascinating, chuck schumer and joe manchin signed a letter on
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the reconciliation bill. i have never seen or heard anything like that. a senator having to sign a letter with their own majority leader? we were talking about this yesterday. just very interesting to us. progressives are afraid of, they give and give, they see a $1 trillion infrastructure bill. they don't love it and they don't get what they want in the reconciliation package and they lose their majority next year so this is the moment. you got to think of 2022, they're going to negotiate with the one eye on that. that's what we have to think about when we think of where progressives are at >> john, you are right about the frustration of progressives.
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sinema was saying we don't know what she wants. can i go back to jean's point, this is so important. i don't feel like the communications message around the components of this bill whether it's child care or a whole load of women who lost their jobs during covid, what was it revealed? not adequate child care in this country. they have not talked about it very much and what they want to do with climate change. no one has really talked about that. not the advertising and talking and speeches and tout reach around the country. why not? does it feel like that to you? >> i mean this is, i think you are amazingly on topic right
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here and jean's point. they got trapped in this. they're focusing on the number and not what they're going to do for people. this is the same debate they got trapped in on obamacare. this is like watching from the hill. they should have been talking from that time what they're going to do for people. they're falling into the same track here. progressives are frustrated. why are they not talking about the child care product. why are they not talking about that climate change. every young person in america is worried about this. why are they not talking about these things and sam talked about the most important components of the package that they want medicare description and drug negotiations and raising corporate taxes. those are hugely popular.
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they are losing the war because they spent so much time negotiating themselves. if they end up passing a bill and they get swept away in 2022 and no one really realizes what they actually did. >> you know there is really no rule against democrats, just staying in the room, negotiating among themselves and not running out to cameras and airing their dirty laundry every 15 minutes. i don't get it. we'll see what happens. john, thank you so much for being with us. may your baseball team lose all three games to tampa bay. the latest of the pandemic of coronavirus, case numbers are falling in some areas of the country including florida. schools are asking for help after threats over violence in mask wearing in classrooms.
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we'll be talking to mayor bill deblasio as some are launching a fight against vaccine mandates. the new episode of my podcast is available right now and where ever you get your podcast. in this episode, i share with you of a dear john letter to a certain friend of mine who keeps on writing e-mails about politics. stop giving me your facebook links. i am not going to read them. and mika talks about the time -- she drops caviares in his lap. that's on the podcast. as we go to break, a beautiful look. my goodness. a beautiful look at new york
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the white house is lit up in pink to announce the start of breast cancer awareness month. important message to send out. i am grateful they are doing that. katty, you know we are at times, just like with the negotiations, we can look at those negotiations one of two ways. we can be distraught or thinking thank god this is sort of returning to some normalcy. there is some good news in there. and same thing with covid.
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despite the terrible death toll that continues to go up. we are seeing some positive news. we got some rates going down across the country. vaccine rates keep inching up. i saw this last week the racial disparity is all but disappeared. the number are pretty much in all the group of 72% or 73%. there is a big partisan divide unfortunately. there is some good news out there even as the death toll continues to go up. >> yeah. >> and it does look like those mandates you say do seem to be working. the pandemic overall toll. the nation suffered more than 700,000 deaths since the start of the pandemic according to an nbc news tally. on the other end as joe says a few hopeful signs as new
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infection drops by 25% wide. the u.s. is averaging 114,000 cases a day. that's a significant new number from the delta virus. a group of new york teachers is asking a supreme court to block an order requiring education have at least one vaccine dose before returning to classrooms next week. the group is arguing thousands of public school employees will be forced out of work if the vaccination mandates remained in effect by violating their fundamental right to pursue an occupation. the order does not apply to other city employees. the emergency appears to be in the hands of justice sotomayor.
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and a group of 90,000 school board officials around the country is asking president biden and other government agencies to protect school staff members who have been facing threats over covid safety protocols. >> reporter: in school board meetings across the country, parents have been angry. >> they have been yelling. >> we should take our kids and pull them out of school. >> reporter: flipping each other off. this week in minnesota parents fighting over a phone, one man shirt's getting ripped open. police had to be called in. the national school board association says they have had enough. >> actual threats in the parking lot, threatening letters and on
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social media saying things like we'll regret. >> reporter: they sent a six page letter to president biden asking for federal law enforcement and other assistance to deal with a growing number of threats and violence. >> when we are fighting over policies in schools, that's really getting into the way of providing an education for our children. we got to get back to that. >> reporter: the mayhem over masks that's been happening for weeks as school leaders decide whether students should coverer up. secretary cardona calling the attack is dangerous. >> the superintendents and educators and board members, you should know, they work tirelessly over the last 18 months to provide a safe environment. >> extraordinary things. healthcare workers increasingly
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facing threats and attacks at restaurants and hotels also facing an uptick in customers tension. jean, it's covid and people are fighting. are they fighting just to fight? at some point is it about covid or could it be about anything? >> i think it could be about anything. it's ridiculous. it's appalling and someone can get hurt. this is the kind of thing that attract the attention of merrick garland. i would not be surprised to hear something from them. >> or be a nurse or doctor. >> it's appalling.
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we say this is a fracture of the country. this is an example of it but this has to stop. this is way too far. it has to stop. >> the irony, too. the same people participate in january 6th riot or defended those and trying to stop a constitutionally protected procedure from moving forward and they peaceful transition in this country and you don't get republicans coming out wanting to investigate and wanting to figure out how police officers were getting their brains smash barbed in by the american flags. i have never seen it december desecrated in my life. here you have more just rioting or more thuggery going on at school boards and hospitals
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around this country. these people obviously don't give a damn about law and order or give a damn about keeping the peace and if they are not going to do it, we need police officers need to do it. we need the justice department to step in and protect our front line workers and people on school boards. >> yeah, it's a scary thought and it could be where we are heading. these fights are becoming emblemmatic and you step back and realize that for decades we have mandated things like vaccinations like the measles for kids to attend school. these have been institutionalized in our public system and no one cared up until now. there is something happening here nationwide where the
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pandemic has driven people frankly crazy. they feel like they have to go to school board meetings and being threatened. people trying to educate their children in the most safe possible manner. that's what sparking people t have this kind of angry visceral reaction. >> i don't know if it's covid. donald trump politicized everything. katy kay, how ridiculous are these people going in? i have friends who are educated, who have had four children and each one of them vaccinated five
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times before they went to school for mumps, measles and polio and you name it. vaccines left and right. they never once and called me up, what should i do, they want to vaccinate my son or daughter before she starts school. not one time. and then suddenly covid became politicized and these people act as if somebody opened up the top of their heads and took their memory out and closed their skulls backup. wait, i don't understand. they want to vaccinate me or they want to vaccinate 12 or 13 years old? well, they're probably not going to get it. i am not sure if they're going to get polio either. why do we do it?
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it's why we have been doing it for 50 or 60 years. i know that my entire life. you twoont go to public school. you got to get a vaccination. you have four or fiver vaccinations and nobody was shocked or stunned or deeply sadden until donald trump politicized covid a year and a half ago. how stupid were these vaccines? they were developed because of donald trump. >> all of my kids are vaccinated and all of your kids are vaccinated. some of the states they're not in school yet. some of the states with the lowest rate of vaccinations, i think you are right. it's not that covid -- yes, covid is stressing everybody out. is i nice wearing a mask on an
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airplane? no. it's not nice. i get the stress levels people are feeling around covid but i agree. this was donald trump injecting fear into the political system during the course of the four years and that exacerbated a trend in america and it went into his time in office. is this a fight about covid or a fight about in order to have a fight. >> it's a politicalization of it all. you are right, mississippi, one of the lowest rates and the governor says some of the stupidest thing of covid i have ever heard. mississippi was bragging about the fact that they have the highest vaccination rates in
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america. we are bad here in mississippi, we don't want to hear about you. we are tough on vaccines. we are not like san francisco, left wing freaks. we are tough on vaccinations and donald trump says covid is one person from china. this becomes politicized and people are running through targets and they are trashing masks and acting like all of us want to wear it. it had made smart people dumb and dumb people insane. >> it has. >> coming to the studio at 4:00 a.m., i went past the washington monument covering 20 acres. our tiny flags, one flag for each american has died from
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covid. there are more than 670,000 little flags on the monument. that's 30,000 behind the actual program as katy says we passed 700,000. it's striking and it just punches your gut every time you go past the monument and you see the devastation from what is a deadly and highly infectious disease and you want your kids to be vulnerable to that? you want your kids to be spreading that potentially and bringing it? it's insane. and yes, trump politicizes everything. come on people, take some responsibility and get real. protect yourself and your community. get vaccinated and stop, you know, all the moaning about masks because they work and they
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help cut down infection rates and you got to do it. >> and stay off of facebook. i have some smart people asking me dumb things about vaccines and masks. talk to your doctor. talk to your family doctor. why am i telling you this? why are we talking about this? when you go past those white flags, representing the 700,000 americans who died, unless you are really sick and you have a twisted mind, when you see those flags, you don't think of republicans or democrats or independence. you think of them as human beings who have died and last their lives. i have friends who didn't get vaccinated. i have friends that almost died and they come out of it all saying the same thing. it's one of the worst diseases to have. it's a horrific day to get sick. it's a horrific way to die.
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we have androgen da here. i am not going to lie. the agenda is we want you and we want your family to be safe. we don't want you to suffer and die alone. stay off of facebook. stay off of chinese religious cult conspiracy websites. talk to your family doctor. we are not saying talk to nancy pelosi or george or go to a meeting in the committee. we are saying just talk to your family doctor about the vaccine, about the mask wearing and protecting yourself and others. that's all i care about. that's all any of us care about. >> speaking of facebook. did you see some bipartisanship on capitol hill yesterday? well, you probably did if you saw senators from both sides of the isle.
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going after facebook and accusing them of disregarding their own research. harmful instagram is for so many teen girls and boys. that story is ahead on "morning joe." tory is ahead on "morning joe. hi, my name is cherrie. i'm 76 and i live on the oregon coast. my husband, sam, we've been married 53 years. we love to walk on the beach. i have two daughters and then two granddaughters. i noticed that memories were not there like they were when i was much younger. since taking prevagen, my memory has gotten better and it's like the puzzle pieces have all been [click] put together. prevagen. healthier brain. better life. vo: the damage it's causing is undeniable...
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now with so many things in the air, we talked about the negotiation bills being negotiated. let's start with first, the right to vote. the fact that the john lewis' voting rights act still not passed and signed into law. protections against run away state legislatures to say they have the power to throw out votes they don't like. nothing to protect voters from that disenfranchise. yeah, rise up. this message is more important today than ever. >> absolutely. >> one of the negative side effects of the last 48 hours back in florida where the infrastructure debate has been voting rights and other issues
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have left really the public discussion and they're fundamental because why we are arguing about whether to do the one party $2 trillion infrastructure to 3.5 is extremely porn. important. there are no voting rights bill that had really come into stop and protect that freeze debt. while many of us are saying while these senators are not acting in a way that's responsible and helpful to those mass communities that's needed. we'll vote them out. a lot of impediments to voting them out is in these bills that are not being discussed. that's why i want to bring a paper back version. we are talking about the
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fundamental thing that we need to have as leverage as citizens. they are impeding that as we talk. we don't have leverage in this discussion. >> if they can change the voting restrictions and requirements in state while we are arguing about washington and policies. >> rev, congratulations on your paper back out during an important time. what's the path forward on voting rights? are you going to continue with your activism on the issue of continue writing about it? how do we actually move forward on a federal level given the state of play in what to come. >> we'll move forward, two steps, manchin says he could not
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support the voting rights bill that was put forward without a bipartisan. he meant there was eight senators that met with senator schumer, the majority leader, they came back with a bill with freedom to vote which manchin champions. he has the political and moral obligation to see. the white house needs to come in before it. the members of congress in a senate democrat gave them the benefit of the doubt, sit there with the other seven senators and draft something you can sell. we did that ten days later, not one republican had manchin and now he has the obligation now to say we need to pass this bill with the majority vote.
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i think you are absolutely right. in this respect when i talk to lawmakers, they say look, this is it. in two years time we'll be in the minority. and this sort of institutional hurdles and voting rights law passed. we need to act big now. i am wondering as you talk to lawmakers, how much does it weigh on them, there be no votes forward. >> one level we see manchin and sinema saying we cannot go with
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the $3.5 trillion number. these are the same people block voting rights act. so as we speak, texas, georgia and other states have already changed the voting requirements and they already put in certain restrictions. many in the congressional black caucus is saying they have changed the goal line while we are debating this. we will not be able to get the same turn out, not only because we have not delivered for our constituents or infrastructure package or package that deals with child tax and child care in other issues. our voters are now facing new restrictions so if you thought we had a had time dealing with turn out before, what's going to happen with the laws that are already in place that have been changed in these states.
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the only thing will prevent them from taking into effect is federal law and the same duo, manchin and sinema. >> so much focus on those two senators. still ahead, it bound to be another dramatic day on capitol hill. key negotiations on president biden's agenda. john meacham is joining was a little historical perspective. "morning joe" is coming right now. l perspective. "morning joe" is coming right now.
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the children, the children, their health, education and the economic security of their families and the clean and safe environment which they could thrive and they could succeed. welcome back to "morning joe," it's the first day of october. happy friday. we got reverend al and katy kay is still was. let's bring in peter baker and former u.s. senator and now an nbc news and analyst and a st. louis cardinals fan. claire mckaskill. host with donny deutsche.
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jon meacham. >> katy, a lot to talk about. why don't you set us up? >> it was a busy night last night but there was no house vote yesterday on the infrastructure bill. nancy pelosi had to delay the vote after progressives made good on their promise not to support on the second large reconciliation package. the white house tried to sway moderate senators sinema and manchin. here is manchin leaving late last night. i pray to god that we come to an agreement. progressives in the house remaining adamant. >> we have said clearly and we
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reiterated this to the speaker and we are in the same place. we'll not be able to vote for the infrastructure bill until the reconciliation bill has passed. we have been clear that we are ready to vote for both bills and deliver the entirety of the president's agenda. >> leaving the capitol after midnight. >> the two sides still seeing trillions of dollars apart. how are you bridging the gap? >> joe, how do they get to another vote today and bring those to sign closer together when they were not there last night. >> well, it's a great question. if you want to get there, i would recall what john said last hour and got nancy pelosi.
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she's the best vote counter of this generation. if anybody can do it, nancy can do it. jon meacham though, with yesterday of the back and forth. a great tip o'neill moment when a young member of congress came to him and called the republicans in the house the enemy. the republicans in the house are not our enemy, they're the opposition. it's the senate who's in it. whether it's democrats in the house or the senate, this is the democrats' moment, it's passing and say what you will with mitch mcconnell and calling him cynical or whatever you want to call him. he knew after scalia's death, he had a short window to operate things. if highway to break stuff, he would do it.
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he did the same thing after ruth bader ginsburg's death. he played outside the line and he broke stuff and his side won because of it. again, very cynical. very dishonest and he went back on his words. but, republicans seemed to be able to understand when it's their time to get things done. they understand when the window is closing and they do what it takes to win. >> i don't see that with the democrats right now. i am wondering what your take is? >> i think and i don't want to be hyperbolic but it's a time for straight talk. i think the democratic caucus in the house and senate have democracy lower case d itself in their hands. one could say that about big
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votes and you know breathless about it. if you take one step back. just one. we have an american president who won by 7 million votes, a big margin, higher than truman and kennedy and nixon the first time. a big number. but, we have 55% to 60% of the americans who believe it's a lie. so, that's the setting, right? we have an american president who believes deeply in these institutions and promised the american people in so far as in human being can promise, constitutional democracy that this republic can deliver for them. something that the fact that people don't believe that is not
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one of the least factor that gave us this disrupt activity disruptivepresident from 2020 to 2021. i don't know how the argument could be made when we have our oors in the water and going in the same direction it gives me no pleasure to say this. wait a minute, this whole other party is opposed ill-liberal and non reasoning force. why do we have to give in? why do we have to compromise on everything? well, in this case, history and experience have put the fate of the constitution in your hands. and so that's why.
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this is not about politics. it's not a physical cliff. it may be a constitutional cliff. it's really tough. you had to cast votes and you have to face voters and i have not. it's easy for people like me waxing on "we the people," i understand that. i believe these bills which are popular parenthetically with the american people, each element. if you can get it done and the left on one side i think ss it or senator manchin and sinema llc, limited liability company the two most important people in the western world. if they can't come to a deal on this then president biden has a tough time making a case for what he believes. >> jon, this is what president biden has been saying since he
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took office. democracy is on trial at the moment. it's a moment where the west had had to show democracy worked for people. we were talking about the failing and democrats wrapped around the top line number. there is been less talk about what this would do to people. it's too late and probably now to stop. from your reporting, is there a plan in the white house about how to get through this gridlock today but also going forward when they look at reconciliation. >> it's a great yes. leave it to john to get the details from this conversation. yeah, this is a real issue, the
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democrats, the whole conversation has been about as number, $3.5 trillion. as if that's the bottom line. in terms of what they are trying to sell or provide to the american people. it does not have a good name like the new deal or great society, it has no been brandsed in the way president trump would have brand it. the legislation got across the importance and significance and the benefits of doing so. they have not in fact done a good job of what jon meacham have said. it's about community college and climate change and pre-k. all is about is the number 3.5 and the word reconciliation. it's a misleading name because it's not about reconciing anything. nobody is being reconciled in
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terms o f congress. >> hey, we really want this. they said they do want this and it plays to republican arguments who are facing on the cost of the country or the cost of deficits or taxes or however you want to frame it and by making it just about a number. you see the white house, and a phrase building back better and a phrase of the president's campaign last year. i don't know how provacative that is. you are right, it's late in the game sort of being explaining to the public why it's important because the public -- >> the branding and the opportunity that we with completely blown here by democrats. first, mccaskill, i love your
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insights. it's size for people outside of the political system to look at joe manchin, a guy who won a state that donald trump won by 69% point. and so why in the world is he trying to make this moderate bill a more conservative bill? kirsten sinema. there is a back and forth. they are representing their constituents when they are doing what they are doing. it does seem like as jon says, that is democratic moment, they need to step up. if they don't step up. things are going to get uglier in 2022. >> yeah, the people in congress really, everybody needs to take a deep breath. everybody there is trying to represent the people that elected them. >> just so happens all those voters are not the same.
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and so why would everybody expect him to behave identifically. let me tell you there is a lot that are going wrong right now and a lot of things that goes right. if they get a compromise done then i think everything will be okay. the biggest failure and i know donny will illuminate the story. right now in america nobody understands what the republicans did yesterday. what they did yesterday was they spent more money and they are refusing to pay for it. they are risking a default on this nation on a world of economic stage at a time that would be disasterous for the actual america. >> they are not getting no blow back whatsoever.
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what america sees is democrats fighting over trillions of dollars. they have no idea what's a 3 pant 5 trillion is for. everybody thinks they understand. it's about child care and expanding medicaid, it's about giving dental and eye glasses to people on medicare. >> people in america don't know this because the horse race here is which is when the media covers naturally, what's the number? >> if they don't get it together and start talking about what they are fighting for or what they are fighting about. i think they'll use an opportunity when they finally get a deal and i predict they'll get a deal. >> you are so right. >> you are so right on all points including the fact that they are going to get the teal. >> somebody that represents west virginia, he has different
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interests and he represents people who sees the world quite differently than those people brooklyn's representative. they have to come together. it's something beautiful. i am sorry, maybe it's good because i am a dork about stuff like this. >> there is something beautiful about the back and forth. this is what i have missed and what claire missed over the past five years. the back and forth. >> where you are kwieging for something that really matters. inside the line of democracy. that's beautiful. they got to bring it in for a landing. part of the democrats' problem is again, some body comes out. we need 6.5 or 3.5 or 1.5. we have talked about this. you polled on this specific
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policies. >> if you talk about those policies then we'll lives bette. that's what the debate will be around and democrats will be the winner no matter how this comes out in the eyes of the public if you look at the polling. it's a horse race battle. the media talks about numbers because these democrats are talking about numbers. talk about what they need to do to move forward. then you just, you really should not write a column or not a blog. take up table tennis or take up anything. it's about branding. people get elected and the president of the united states in a large part. because of branning and our democracy rises or falls whether
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democrats can figure out. also, republicans who love liberal democracy can figure out how to get their messages better. >> i have a specific comment. there are things in there that don't have to be in there. i don't want to face 2022 as a socialist and being able to -- i would brand it this way. i would call the children first. if you look at so many things in the billing. if you brand this, let's start with the children's first bill. so much is about the future of our country. it's hard to argue. one thing we all agree on is let's take care of the kids. i can work back so many elements of the bill and bring testimony back to children. that's a way to give it a
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nifty name. it stopped every single thing in the bill. i am still worried about inflation and i am still worried about 2022. i would take the reasonable compromise that you guys talked about in the first hour that somebody have said 3.5 or $4 trillion, we combine the three bills for spending. democrats have been doing a victory lap. i will bring in some questions. don't use it too much because you will get the whole thing through. >> that's what nancy pelosi said yesterday. it was all about children. children, children. >> rev, when you think about nancy pelosi, there was a lot of discussions yesterday about her role and whether he's going to be able to bring this in? >> how much did she spoke about this being the culmination on
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capitol hill. >> i think if she's able to bring it in and i am hopeful she will. last night will be meaningless. what weighs in is what we have been talking about. her legacy is tied to what she represented. >> fighting for children, fighting for people that would disadvantage. fighting for those who have been marginalized. what she was trying to say yes today is in many ways we have been discussing in the last hour is that if that message rather than the price tag had been out there t it would be a different argument and a different climate. i do syndicated radio everyday.
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they don't think we are arguing about children or climb change? nancy pelosi's legacy should be committed to i help stop the real fight about climate change. i protected children in the midst of a pandemic. people whether in west virginia or maricopa, don't care about the fight. we can't count that high. we do care about our kids. we do care about climate change. we do care about medicare. >> and so much of that has gotten lost. claire mccaskill yesterday, joe manchin was saying hey k it's simple. i have been telling chuck schumer where i have been since the end of july. i support pre-k and all the things for the seniors. he says something else. he wants to appeal the trump's
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tax cuts. that's something that progressives should be supportive of. >> he wants the billionaire are paying $0 every year to start paying taxes. >> and so again, it seems to me that there can be a meeting in the morning, meeting of the mind as you says. this debate has to change and it would be great, great to see joe manchin and a ledder progressives come out today in front of mike cone. let us tell you the things we agree on. >> let us tell you what the common ground is and what separates us from donald trump and mitch mcconnell and dechb mccarthy, that's all we are going to say. >> we are going back into figure out how to help climate change. we'll try to figure out how to
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help seniors. >> is it time to do something to remind americans the huge difference between where democrats stand and where donald trump's republican party stands. >> we believe pin paying our bills as a country and begin to isolate the republicans with irresponsible behavior around the debt ceiling. >> yes, i think that would be great. if the republican par i understand a narrow margin of joert is not the environment to push an agenda that was not. joe biden got the nomination for our party by being a left liberal than bernie sanders. that's how he won in par. >> and so i think that if they can do that today and really
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hone in on all the things they agree on. doing something for pre-k or expanding medicare or medicaid, healthcare stuff. if they can do that. it's a huge win for our party. behind this. i should point out, there is some deals being made here. i was on the phone most of the day yesterday. whether deals i think will end up being made, nancy will do another reconciliation bill. smaller, maybe hit on some of the atomics that joe manchin is saying no now. >> okay, still, we are going to be watching all of those events on capitol hill. it's going to be another busy day around the corner for me. if you got a teenager on
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instagram. too much screen time can be harmful to teen's mental wealth. >> yesterday, the executive of facebook facing the grilling by capitol hill. and in fact now we see following that wall street journal report, instagram and facebook aware too much instagram time can affect the mental health of teenagers especially girls. >> for tens of millions of of -- with many users racking up with millions of followers. its e if he can on team's mental
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health. facebook research found 1 and 3 teenage users says instagram contributed to their own body figure and anxiety and depression. >> 13% of british users and 6% of american users trace those taupgts to instagram use. >> in main, it worries how her three nature is affected. >> yes, filters are fun. it could be fun but do not compare yourself. they'll filter images over and over. >> republicans and democrats were united. >> we do not trust you with influencing our children. >> reporter: facebook chose to appear remotely down the street. >> we do this research and making our product better for
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young people. >> reporter: insisting far more teens benefit from essential connection on instagram. >> more teens found instagram was helpful leading into the pandemic. >> though the head of ins stram told craig this year, a younger instagram could be rolled out. >> i believer it's a good thing. instagram is worse than a popularity contest in a high school cafeteria. everyone can immediately see who's the most popular. or who's the least popular. >> yeah. instagram says it's working on ways to nudge teens away from that kind of content, that may contribute to social concerns or anxiety and depression and
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perspective and uplifting content. you have another whistle blower is set to go in. this morning, a group of teachers asking the u.s. supreme court to block a covid vaccine mandates. healthcare workers are fighting for lawsuits nationwide. >> gabe gutierrez that is more on the vaccine battle. >> reporter: good morning, we hit another somber milestone in the fight against covid. 700,000 lives lost due to the virus now. as the battle for vaccine mandates intenses across the country now. >> reporter: across the country, schools are facing increase
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violence and threats. people frustrated by masks and vaccine mandates. the attacks against the staff and students have a new form of terrorism. the local law enforcement agencies to monitor and event mutual threats. >> mean child, legal challenges to covid vaccine mandate are mounting. >> a group of teepers is asking u.s. supreme court to block a vaccine ploechlt. >> it's hard to force people to do something that you truly wish they would do voluntarily. >> nationwide while some major companies are firing employees refusing to get vaccinated.
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the majority of texas still. >> buffalo new york, nurse mallik is on unpaid leave. >> i think people have the right to choose what's going into her body. now she works as a traveling nurse in georgia. what do you think people need to do? >> the vaccines do not prevent -- >> i just don't want to take it right now. it's a personal choice. >> do you not trust the fbi? >> new york city not really. >> still, she's in the minority. 87% of hospital staffing in the state are now fully vaccinated. >> reporter: there is some breaking details with merck out
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with a new antivai pill that you take once you come down with covid systems. the company's data shows a 350% . joe, thank you so much, greatly appreciate the erroring. i would just say, we agree. whether you are a nurse or a teacher, you have the freedom to decide whether or not you get the vaccine or not. what happens you can't continue being a nurse or teachers. >> you do have that right. nobody is taking that right away from you. seems like parents and school boards and principles and hospitals have the right to decide who they want to employ and who they don't. >> yes, your choice. >> make that choice. >> everyday there are
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consequences and actions that we all learn about. >> so jon meacham. we are at a point where i remember being shocked as many people died of covid. excuse me. died in vietnam, from covid-19, we are at a pint ten times that number. has died in covid and died in vietnam and still, still we have people who are running to conspiracy website and insisting that covid is made of. >> yeah. >> you know, democracy, we used to be as high as 600,000. it's now roughly equivalent of the deadliest event single events. the other thing to think about which is unsettling, why not?
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it's friday. >> the pandemic of 1918 which remember president trump used to say was the pandemic of 1917, was one of the events that was destabilizing along with the first world war itself, the rise of the secretary clan, the antiimmigration movement. the persistent of jim crow. the motion that the in 1917 was going to send socialists to america. >> we as an attorney general in the late wilson's's years who was launching rage. the backlash was so ferocious. we got the aclu. we had the scope trial whether you can teach a certain theory in public schools. radio comes in, disruptive
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technology. people are moving from farms to cities. >> it was one of -- it was a moment of transition. dislocation and disorientation. we are living through that again 100 years ago. >> the thing about the 1920s and 30s is the country got franklin and eleanor roosevelt. they got in leadership that believed? democracy and capitalism and we are able to be voted toward as more perfect union and we are not giving up democracy for dictatorship. it was arp live debate. >> who most famous men in we recollect. >> douglas macarthur can lead
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one from the right. we got through that because had faiths basically democracy and capitol is a more word sacrifices and worth presevering and reforming. >> i think we are facing that exact conundrum today. >> we certainly are. it does continue everyday. >> and that battle being waged across the country everyday or washington. whether it's on social media or on any social media sites. the stakes could not be higher. talk about joe biden and how much further he plans to go on mandates or any other power he and the white house and the federal government could push to continue to move that vaccination rate up? >> looks like peter is frozen.
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donny, i want to go back to you. again, we are talking about getting the message out. something that republicans are really good at doing. and something that unfortunately we really have seen democrats not do quite as well. is donny frozen too? oh, he's not listening. >> katy, well, nobody is listening. >> peter is frozen. >> donny is frozen. >> i am around. >> if i can tep, joe. i am not frozen. >> you know what we need more than anything? i want to hear a story about 105 women who survived in spanish flu. >> can you dial that up for me?
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>> just so happen i have one in my back pocket. there was 105 years old survived not just the flu pandemic, she escaped italy. she has died from covid at the age of 105. the daughter of premeditated, first noted her mother was sick on september the 9th. at the time her mother's care maker who was also feeling ill. haul three have been vaccinated. the elderly women was hospitalized. >> her family later made the difficult decision not to place her on an ventilator because her chance of survival was slim. >> she died on september the 15th. her own mother died at the age of 25 from the pandemic in 2018.
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a number that's a slip this month by the coronavirus virus. >> she was 105, what a life she lives. >> extraordinary alive. >> and so sad ending. rev, we have seen story it is of people who are younger and who got covid and had breakthrough cases. it was difficult but we keep on hearing time and again that most of those people who got vaccinated survived and do well and don't go to the hospitals. 95% or 99 parse 99 parse of people in the rooms. people connected with the unvaccinated. >> there is a two tiers problem for some time. >> you had a lot of republicans who have refused to get the vaccines.
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and you had people of hesitance. i saw some good news this past week that shows the disparity against white americans and black and hispanic americans. all disappeared. >> black americans, 71 or 72% of white american of 73%. have gotten the vaccine. the message is getting out. it seems to me in community of people of color and it's making a huge difference. >> absolutely. >> that's gluz. it took a lot of it to work. there is a lot of hesitancy in the black community and the brown community, based on legitimate concerns. many of us had some kind of influential impact in various segments of the community were
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not out there. i probably took the vaccine and i came on your show and did mine on the weekend talking about it. ministers and all, they started getting ads in going into the churches. i think people on the ground started raising this issue and it's good news to say that it is so effective that the gap between the vaccination and the black community and the brown community is gone. >> but, that did not happen by magic. it can happen by the right messaging and the right members of the right messengers. you got to take them on. you are fighting of the life of the people you claim to lead. >> no doubt about it.
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>> just got words from michigan controller. let's try peter baker again. what's the president's plan moving forward? any more steps he can take to continue pushing that vaccination rate up? >> yes, it's a great question. we have seen some striing results from the number of days and weeks. >> he put his vaccine mandate in place and defended against challenges. you know, the differences are striking. >> the other time of a story compaing california and florida. two of the hard-it states. florida death rate was like six times california was. >> what's the difference between the two states. one state pushing more aggressive and including vaccinations and masks and the other state is not. >> you can see why administration is so intent on
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expanding these mandates and expanding the availability of vaccines to anybody that could get it. >> the bay area itself having necessary issues. >> but, broadly speaking, i think they see the mandate is the way out of this. >> yeah, donny deutsche, let's talk the messaging that's going ount here. >> let's talk about the lack and maybe it's just me, been out and i misthem. >> the lack of public service announcement about the vaccines. the past review, psa, remember george w. bush and bill clinton getting people contributing. i talked in the past about
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elvis, telling kids to get the polio vaccine. it made a big difference. i have not seen that. it's a huge impact. maybe some on the left and right together saying we ought to agree a lot publicly but sms something i agree on. >> whether you are doing it in communities of color or generally and cross america. i have fot seen it as much as i thought i would. >> why can't we do that? >> i have seen it locally. i have not seen the concerted national efforts you are talking about. there is something called the ed con sill which is where corporations kinds of keep their money to and we kind of doll out to the different charity. i don't know what the council has or has been doing. >> i have not seen that universal thing where we take the 20 biggest influences in the world from opera to this reverend here and that one.
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>> there are certain things that advisements can and can't do. this is an entrenched believe system on both sides. the single message is talk to your doctor and if their local doctor and personal doctor can't con thins them. i am not quite sure what celebrities can. i spent my life until advertising. i am not quite sure in the best of chases how much that would swing. the answers are the animates and you can't work here or go here or travel there. right now our hammer verses kind of a kiss on the cheek on both sides is what's needed. it certainly does not hurt. >> claire, follow up with it. >> one thing that does work, we found mandates. >> new york city they're not. they got few people. the numbers are coming in.
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>> very few people threatened to quit. mandates work. >> mandates work. requiring children to get vaccinations in public schools work. >> the one piece that i would add decides the doctor doctor where i am most disappointed is the religious communitity. people listening to their doctor but they also talk to people at church and they listen to their ministers or rabbi or priest. >> i think it's really important and reverend al, you know this better than anyone. the kind of influence the black industry have on people reluctant in all the right reasons. i really and because at the essence of a vaccine, joe, if
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you are a teeper or a principle. it's not about you, it's about your neighbor. >> what's that jesus is about. >> if you read the red liners is out, about doing onto others as you would have them do to you. and that's a crazy thing about masks and vaccines. all these things, they're actually, if you really think about it. it's to protect others as much it's to protect yourself. the level of selfishness is something we have been battling. it's always great to have you on the show. hole you all have a wonderful weekend. >> john meacham. i didn't get a chance to talk to
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you about, doc riverss on. my gosh, atlanta hawk fans. >> i have suffered with the hawks. i think of dallas as a hawk. >> what a great job you are doing together with this podcast. >> he's been fantastic. >> it's a serious of speeches from sports and tim tebow is out this week. we did muhammad ali and one of the things that you know talking about sports in this content is really telling, i think. a, because usually important culture for us. second, sports is about you ever a certain set of rules and you take your talents onto the field
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and the court. you do the best you can. >> there is a score. there is a result and then you leaf and you go back and play again. >> which is what the constitution supposed to be for all of us, right? >> democracy used to score at the top of the ninth and democracy is the final score. it's not just yet, oh, i am losing so i am going to take those runs they got in the sixth. it's reveal zg illuminating pros pros --process to think about. sos many sports fan going away from the basic understanding of what an covenant is. i will say do you want to do this with dc rivers. i thought he was a physician so it took a while for me. we got there. >> one other thing, john. >> i want to wish carter happy
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birthday today. what an extraordinary life he has. >> they always talked about his post president. wow, what a wonderful post presidency he's had. here we have pictures. on that picture, jimmy carter has said when they were jogging, he signs it. this is one of the few thims we were running in lock steps together. >> c vance was not on that job? >> no, he's not. >> look at two of his foreign policy achievements that have shaped the world. and that stopped after the
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accord. that has not happened since 1979. the opening to china and 1979 i was joking about it earlier today. again, the master mind between all these things. i have been reading the doctor's diary. >> how patient jimmy carter was with a man who have very sharp elbows. >> dr. krasinki was april yent and he just loves jimmy carter and ross bin carter too much. >> even reading his diaries, it shines through on every single page. >> yeah. >> 97 years old, remarkable. one of the things you are right about his presidency, he has
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done a great job of taking a look back and reassessing what we should make of that. this is not about reflecting in nostalgia. it's about one of the things that history does is it eni believes us to fog of the prese dissipates and you can actually see what are the landmark things that matter enormously. i was thinking about george w. bush the other day who you look at the president's fund for aids relief in africa. 20 million people are probably alive. and that comes to mind because jimmy carter, who had no immense love for george w. bush -- george h.w. bush was a different matter -- president carter went to the opening of the george w. bush library and gave a speech praising pepfar. there you had two presidents,
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carter had been really tough on george w. bush. went to the coretta king funeral and they talked about it and acknowledged it. they understood they were part of this unfolding experiment. i think it was quite real. george bush and bill clinton as the odd couple, but ford and carter were first. this close fought campaign in 1976. happy birthday to the man from plains. final point, his best book, i think, is about running for the state senate in georgia. it's called turning point. and it's this picture of what it was like in a red/purple state before we used those terms. >> you talk about the final
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score. it's not even the top of the ninth that matters. it's how the game ends. you look at george w. bush. we rightly talked about all the failings of his foreign policy, but history is showing us now you have to balance that with a 20 million lives in africa that he saved when he decided to aggressively go after aids in africa in a way that nobody else had ever done before. you look at the fact that a group of one-term presidents, jimmy carter with the camp david accords and the opening of u.s. relations with china, those two things, have done more to transform the world we live in today than probably anything else that's happened in quite some time. you look at george h.w. bush, the extraordinary things he did from 1989 to 1993 in bringing an end to the cold war peacefully, uniting germany and moving on to
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that new world order he talked about. and you can even go back to jimmy carter -- i mean, to harry truman, a guy who was only elected one time. it is remarkable what these one-term presidents have done. even more remarkable how history shines a bright light on their achievements long after they're out of the white house. happy birthday, mr. president. centrum multigummies aren't just great tasting... they're power-packed vitamins... that help unleash your energy. loaded with b vitamins... ...and other key essential nutrients... ...it's a tasty way to conquer your day. try centrum multi gummies. now with a new look. subway® has so much new it didn't fit in our last ad. like the new app with customization, curbside pickup and delivery. there's so much new, we don't even have time to show you who's holding this phone.
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we'll keep you ready for what's next. comcast business powering possibilities. now to the homecoming, the patriots are set to host the buccaneers in tom brady's return to new england for the first time since he left for tampa bay. let's bring in chanelle jones
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who joins us ahead of sunday's big game from gillette stadium. man what a homecoming that's going to be. >> listen, i'm enjoying your enthusiasm. i have gloves for the first time. it's football season. it's been said you can't go home again. i guess that's exactly what's happening here. obviously tom brady doing just that playing here in gillette stadium for the visitor. fans eager to see their long time hero on this field for perhaps the last time. tom brady is back, arguably the greatest quarterback ever returning to the place he built his legendary career. brady led the new england patriots for two decades helping the franchise win six super bowls. last season the three-time mvp found a new home in tampa winning another super bowl in
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his first season in florida. the celebrations in tampa included that boat parade and a trophy toss. >> dad, no! >> reporter: and a less than sturdy brady soaking in the championship. back to business this season. this matchup finds brady and former patriot tight end rob gronkowski back in gillette stadium. >> it would be great to see everyone after the game, but up until game i'm focused on trying to go win a football game. >> reporter: a raspy voiced brady speaking to reporters after practice on thursday. >> i still have a lot of great friends there, but they know i want to kick their butt this week. >> reporter: brady and gronk preparing to face their former coach bill belichick. >> i look forward to the opportunity and the challenge, and i look forward to sunday night. >> reporter: number 12 will face off against his heir apparent, mac jones, with only one win
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under his belt, jones and the pats hope to rebuild to their former glory. still, all eyes will be on brady who put the pats on the map. >> he'll get a little emotional inside and then be ready to kick some butt. >> reporter: and for a generation of pats fans who grew up watching him it will be a strange sort of homecoming. >> this will be the first time i ever root against him when the game starts but i am tom brady through and through. >> they still love batman in gotham. >> reporter: tickets were selling for over $1,300 on stub hub. he is 68 yards away from breaking drew brees' all-time passing record. if he does on sunday, it will be yet another stunning career highlight in front of the faithful fans here in new england. another special moment with the quarterback they loved and lost.
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and, joe, just to put this in perspective, the average resale ticket to sunday's game is more expenive than any world series game in boston history and any nba finals game in boston history. this is obviously for a week four regular season game. it kind of puts it in perspective. >> man, that is amazing, sheinelle. what a game that will be. i have to admit, i'm kind of excited. it's getting a little cooler out there. you have the gloves on. it feels like football season finally. >> reporter: it's true. i have to tell you, i talked to a lot of people yesterday as you saw there in the piece, can i tell you every single person i talked with was pretty positive about it. they're excited to see him. they will cheer for him. it will be interesting to see if they stand up for him. once the game starts, it's all about the competition. listen, he's given them six championship. i think they're happy to see him here. >> i know they're going to love to see him. what a homecoming that will be. thank you so much. we appreciate it. still ahead we'll be talking
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last night was the annual congressional baseball game at nationals park. it was just baseball, no politics. until the republican catcher went nuts about having to wear a mask. just baseball.
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>> biden was schmoozing, snapping selfies and signing baseballs. he also spent some of the game working the phones and then left the park about an hour after he arrived. that has big absent dad vibes. you look great out there, kid. daddy is just on a work call! hold on. okay, i have to jump on this, reese's mom will give you a ride home. i'll order you a pizza. oh, shoot, are you the one with the dairy allergy? i thought that was your sister. just peel the cheese off. love you. love you, buddy. . >> the game was a nailbiter. the democrats had a chance for a big win, but in the bottom of the ninth, joe manchin cautioned that it would be irresponsible to score. >> i'm not sure if it had
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anything to do with the looming debt crisis but nancy appeared to be very fired up. >> you listen here and you listen good, i am the speaker of the [ bleep ] house, so when i tell you to bunt, you [ bleep ] bunt. do you hear me [ bleep ] for brains? tell adam schiff to bring me a pretzel with the spicy [ bleep ] cheese. >> a tough manager. >> pelosi's working the phones like the mets just hired her as a scout. you're going to love this guy. 60 years old, throws in the mid to low 40s and we could get him for league minimum. yeah, i think we found our new degrom. good morning and welcome to "morning joe." it's friday, october the 1st. mika and willie have the morning off. with us we have msnbc contributor and co-author of "the confidence code" series katty kay. and associate editor of "the washington post" and political analyst, eugene robinson. and white house editor for
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politico, a man who has that calvinist residue as peter gammons would see, of all red sox fans sprinkled all over him and, sam, this morning more so than ever. the unfilled glory gammons wrote, before we lost to the orioles again, have not wiped away the residue of that calvinist spirit. sam, sam, sam, the red sox doing it again. >> joe, you might not remember this but ten years ago, almost to the day, you, me and willie were in this exact same spot when the red sox got beat in camden yards on the last day of the season and the tampa bay rays won on a walk-off homer and the red sox were eliminated from the playoffs in that moment. this has that feel. it's not quite as bad, as big of
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a gut punch. but to go into camden and to lose two out of three to, like, what, the 50 and like 107 orioles is the definitive red sox experience it feels like. it's brutal. >> and now, of course, we will remember this, and we will always remember this but, you know, it's so interesting as we see the race for the wild card, the yankees won again against the blue jays, cooled them off fast. the yankees now two games up. they've got the rays this weekend. the red sox are coming to washington. i have a feeling i may have to make it to one or two of those games myself. and the red sox now two games out. so it's between the red sox and the mariners and the blue jays. and, you know, we -- >> if we win, we're good.
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we just have to win. the offense has been, i think the word is putrid. the pitching, especially the bullpen, has not been great. and it just feels like -- maybe i'm such a pessimist at this point, but it feels like the wheels are absolutely falling off that i would be shocked if we even win one versus the nats. that's how despondent i am right now. >> sam, for good reason. for good reason. you, lemire, myself, calvinists all. and you said if they can sweep the nats. that is actually, gene robinson, a bit like saying if the democrats can all come together today they can pass two or three significant bills. >> right. and be sure to pitch right over the plate to juan soto. you can take him, right?
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>> well, we've not challenged anybody. it's gotten ugly, about as ugly, katty, as capitol hill politics right now, especially if you're nancy pelosi trying to get a bill passed. >> yeah, you lost me on calvinist spirit, i was lost. you're right. in the end there was no vote yesterday in the house on the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill. house speaker nancy pelosi was forced to delay the promised vote after progressives made good on their promise not to support the legislation without a deal on a second larger reconciliation action. pelosi spent the day huddling with democrats' warring factions in private meetings. but the flurry of outreach sometimes from president biden personally failed to bring the two camps together generating
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acrimony among democrats' own ranks. senator manchin left a meeting with the white house officials late last night insisting the bills not be linked. >> you know, i've never linked the two bills together. let's look at each bill. we should be able to come to an agreement. >> meanwhile in a statement white house press secretary jen psaki said, quote, a great deal of progress has been made this weekend. we are closer to an agreement. we will need some additional time to finish the work starting tomorrow morning first thing. but progressives in the house remain adamant the reconciliation needs to remain complete before they vote for infrastructure. >> we have said, clearly, and we reiterated this again to the speaker and we're in the same place, that we will not be able to vote for the infrastructure bill until the reconciliation bill has passed. we've been clear that we are
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ready to vote for both bills and deliver the entirety of the president's agenda. >> so they're not budging, leaving the capitol after midnight. speaker pelosi promised a vote will be held on the bipartisan infrastructure plan today. >> after hours of meetings the two sides still seem trillions of dollars apart. how do you bridge the gap? >> we're not sure yet. >> how disappointed are you that there's no vote tonight? >> we'll see a vote today. there will be a vote today. >> yesterday, of course, speaker pelosi saying the thing is we have to have positive thinking. i hope she's still feeling positive, joe. of course the longer this drags on the harder it gets, right? >> well, who knows? i'm just so -- gene robinson, let's step back here for a second, okay, gene. if you look at where we were nine months ago in this country, if you look at what we were talking about every day for four
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years where we were wondering whether constitutional norms were going to hold in place, maybe it's because i'm a creature of the house. that was sort of my defining experience looking at washington. but this, it's really beautiful to look at. oh, my gosh. how shocking. you have democrats that represent west virginia and maricopa county that are more conservative. you have democrats that represent california and new york who are more progressive. and they're going back and forth. they're trying to hammer out a deal. that's really what this system is supposed to do instead of what happened over the past four years. and i'm not running to the hills with my hair on fire. it's actually kind of comforting to me. >> you know, i have the same feeling. this is kind of how it's supposed to work, right? yes, it's supposed to be messy and contentious and, look, as
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i've said several times, the democrats have to embody the entire sane political spectrum right now, right, from manchin on the right and sinema to the progressives on the left. and that basically is a wide range of opinion and they have to kind of work it out. and it's not easy and sometimes it's not pretty, but it's legislative. that's what they're doing. they're legislating. they managed -- congress managed yesterday to avoid a government shutdown. so you can check that box and, you know, nancy pelosi will see if she can check the other box today. yeah, it's a heavy lift. that's what she does and she, in a strange way, really seems to be enjoying this.
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and, you know, this is congress. >> still ahead, it's not just nancy pelosi, chuck schumer is also walking a tightrope in the senate. we're going to be talking about that when "morning joe" comes back. vo: the damage it's causing is undeniable... climate change. and with the build back better act, congress can tackle it head on. with tax credits for clean energy companies that create millions of new jobs... ...and ramp up new technology and clean energy manufacturing. it means families pay less for utilities... ...and america becomes the global leader in clean energy it's time to build back better. and that means taking on climate change. with clean energy jobs congress: let's get this done my nunormal? fewer asthma attacks with nucala. a once-monthly add-on injection for severe eosinophilic asthma. nucala reduces eosinophils, a key cause of severe asthma.
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for more information about where we are and expect to go the next 12 to 18 hours let's bring in yankees' fan and co-founder of punch bowl news john breshnahan. john, let's blow past the first part unless you like to get a ding in and talk about nancy pelosi. we've all been commenting that while many liberal pundits have been tearing their hair out, nancy seems to be doing just fine, telling everybody relax, we're working through this. we're not that far apart. it's almost as if, john, she's
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done this before. unlike some of the people she's having to deal with. >> you're exactly right. you know as well as i do pelosi is the best whip of our time, the best house whip i've ever covered. she knows her caucus, her politics, how to make deals and how to deliver. i think democrats would be pretty well served to side with pelosi. now the problem here is, and just to tack back a little bit on what you said, republicans would have done some kind of covid relief bill if they were running congress. they would have done it. the democrats are feeling the bill is not the bill they wanted, so everything for them is stacked up on the reconciliation package, and they feel like they're just giving things away right now to manchin and sinema and they're not
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convinced that manchin and sinema are ever going to do a deal, like they never want a deal. that's what they're afraid of here. and i think pelosi is walking such a fine line here and chuck schumer. chuck schumer is in the middle, too. chuck schumer, it was fascinating yesterday to see chuck schumer and joe manchin signed a letter of the reconciliation bill. i've never seen or her anything like that a senator having to sign a letter with their own majority leader? we were talking about it yesterday. imagine george mitchell or harry reid doing something like that. it was very interesting to us. so i think what progressives are afraid of is if they give and they give and they give and they get what they see is a $1 trillion republican infrastructure bill, they still don't love it, they don't get what they really want in the
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reconciliation package, and they lose their majority next year, this is the moment. we're into -- these guys are thinking about 2022. they have one eye on 2022. they are negotiating with one eye on that. i think that's what we have to think about when we think where progressives are at. >> john, you're right about the frustration of the progressives and even some moderates are feeling with manchin and sinema and sinema in particular. i was texting someone yesterday who said we don't even know what kyrsten sinema wants. back to gene because i think this is so important. i don't feel like the communications message around the components of the bill whether it is child care, a whole load of women in america have lost their jobs during covid, and what does it reveal? there is not adequate child care in this country. they haven't talked about that very much. they haven't talked about what they really want to do on climate change and electric cars. a huge climate conference is coming up in the uk next month,
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and no one is really talking about that. it just feels there hasn't been much of a cons job around the individual components of this bill, not the advertising, not the talking, not the speaking, not the outreach around the country. why not? does it feel like that to you? >> i mean, i think your point is on topic right here. and gene's point, also. they are talking about $3.5 trillion, focusing on the number and not what they're going to do for people. this is the same kind of debate they got trapped in on obamacare, like watching it from the hill. they should have been talking at that time what they were going to do for people and instead socialized medicine. they're falling into the same trap here and i 100% agree with you. progressives are very us from
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frustrated. that's having a huge impact on poverty which they passed as part of the american rescue plan. why are they not talking about climate change. every young person is worried about this and across the globe. why are they not talking about these things? sam talked about the most important component of the package they want medicare prescription drug negotiations, raising corporate taxes, those are hugely popular. they're losing the messaging war because they've spent so much time negotiating amongst themselves and passing a bill and get swept away in 2022 and no one really realizes what they actually did. >> co-founder of punch bowl news, john breshnahan, thank you so much. the mayor of new york city is standing by. bill de blasio joins the conversation when "morning joe" comes right back.
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wall street journal" is out with joe manchin's intervention writing in part democrats may be angry, but as the days go by they may recognize that mr. manchin is doing them a favor with president biden abdicating to the left. the west virginian is providing a reality check. they are trying to pass a bernie sanders' agenda with a joe biden mandate. mr. biden won because he ran against donald trump's chaotic leadership and promised to end the pandemic. even then he lacked coattails as democrats lacked seats in the house and won the senate only because mr. trump demoralized voters into georgia races. mr. biden ran explicitly against mr. sanders' socialism in the primaries as the nominee he felt obliged to endorse a unity agenda with mr. sanders but that should have gone by the wayside. mr. biden came to believe he was
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fdr and could pass the sanders agenda as his own. if democrats somehow manage to pass even hatch of it, they'll be crushed in 2022. just because you look at the numbers in the house and the senate and the majorities are razor slim. >> the mandates aren't there, katty. you look at the election results, democrats underperformed in the house, they underperformed in the senate. republicans did much better than anybody expected in 2020. the republican that didn't was donald trump and as ron johnson explained it was because he turned off suburban -- turned off so many suburban republicans and independents who couldn't vote for donald trump, but they weren't ready to turn congress completely over to democrats
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either. i think if we could stop, because it's all been talked about $3.5 trillion or is it $6 trillion or $1.5 trillion, some media outlets conducted polls and they look at what joe manchin was suggesting the democrats do versus what the progressives are suggesting they do. and you start having joe manchin talk about means testing for the programs, not giving it to everybody but making sure that it's means based. and you also say we're going to focus hard on seniors at the end of life. we're going to focus hard on children at the beginning of life with pre-k. yes, we're going to give needs-based scholarships to students. it's not going to be free college but it's going to be free for those who need it and go into fields that make the
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united states stronger. i guarantee you match that agenda up with this sort of unfocused $3.5 trillion agenda, which still is polling pretty well. i'm not so sure joe manchin may be bringing a good bit of balance to the process. sam, just because progressives say we wanted $6.5 trillion and have compromised after we had a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill ready to be passed now and spent over a trillion dollars last year, for most americans that starts adding up to real money. >> if you told any democrat in january 2021 that within a year they could potentially get a $2 trillion covid relief bill, a $1 trillion transportation bill and a $1.5 trillion reconciliation
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package, which is what manchin wants, they would have taken it in a heartbeat, right? i think expectations got ahead of the party, too, when bernie said, no, we're going to stick with $3.5 trillion. the place i take umbrage is that as biden's popularity has slipped pretty badly, the thing that's been consistent the components of the build back better agenda do poll well. they do. what's ironic is as these negotiations have happened around reconciliation, prescription drug negotiations and taxes on the wealthy are the most popular components. the democrats are shooting themselves in the foot maybe by taking the popular stuff and pairing it back.
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as they go about this negotiation process they should keep that in mind probably. >> and, gene, let's follow up on what sam was saying. i heard it from a lot of democratic leaders yesterday, a lot of democrats that have been painfully watching this from the sidelines that said, my god, only we -- only we democrats could figure out a way to turn $3 trillion, $4 trillion into a loss. almost identical to what sam said. if you told us at the beginning of the year we were going to get $3 trillion, $4 trillion in infrastructure and human infrastructure, in covid relief, in benefits that we've never been able to give out to this degree before at the beginning of the year, we would have taken it. now when we get it the press and republicans are going to be able to paint it as a loss.
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>> look, i guarantee that when and if they settle on a figure for reconciliation in the end everyone will portray it as a win. by focusing on the components, the actual components of the program. what all of this money is going to do and not so much on the top line. i think it was a mistake to focus on the top line number and then make that not an inch further than this top line number rather than looking at the functional components of the bill, what's included, what's not, what gets done, who gets helped and in what way. if i were inviting the speaker,
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and i'm not qualified to do that -- she knows more about getting anything through the house than i ever will -- i would say that's where you should focus the debate and the discussion on the functionality, on the actual components of this big package. and talking about the top line number or how much it is per year. leave the top line number out. >> "morning joe" will be back in 90 seconds.
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today is the final day of the annual conference, a virtual gathering this year due to the pandemic. this year's focus is on eliminating disparities and expanding opportunity. let's bring in right now our friend the president and ceo of the national urban league. mark, we talk about this every year. it's always a great time to check in and sort of get the view from 30,000 feet. how do you think things are going with the issues that matter the most to you? >> well, good morning, joe. thank you for the shoutout for the national urban league conference, you can see it today.
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the previous segment puts focus on what's at stake. the biden administration has laid out a bold and imaginative agenda on a number of issues. right now things like universal pre-k, expanding the pell grant, addressing the housing affordability issue which is embedded in the biden agenda, even in the reconciliation bill or in the infrastructure bill i think would be important steps to actualize what we need in 2021 to address long-standing problems, some of which have been exposed by the pandemic and many americans pay more attention to. and there was a consciousness raising because of the death and the murder of george floyd.
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our conference, which is virtual and, i'll tell you, joe, we're reaching more people virtually than we could customarily reach. connecting people to information by technology is an important lesson learned. right now the agenda in washington whether it is the reconciliation bill, jobs and restructure, it is at the top of what we need to do not only for black america but for the nation at large. >> mark, al sharpton. >> good morning. >> congratulations on the convention, as always. one of the things i think is important in our usual virtual meetings of the civil rights organizations, you mazed the fact that we have to deal with voting rights that manchin has now come with another kind of
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compromise bill. but at the same time we have to give the priority of the infrastructure bill both the $1.2 trillion or $3.5 trillion because we are baked into the cake, so to speak, of this. you have asked us to act as though this is not unimportant because it is. there's a balancing here that we're not forgetting voting. that's of deep concern to us or policing. but we also serve in the interest of the people that are in our organizations in the infrastructure bill. >> you know, rev, the agenda around education, the agenda around jobs and housing is why people went to the polls in addition to voting, in addition
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to george floyd. i would like to encourage and see the reconciliation bill, the infrastructure bill be taken care of and passed and then all roads do, reverend sharpton, as you know, we've talked about this, lead to voting and democracy because without the right to vote, without the protection of democracy this nation is weakened. we've seen since january 6 this assault on the very foundation of american democracy. let me share this. 70% of americans who went to the polls in 2020 voted in a nontraditional means, which means they did something other than showing up at the polling place on election day to cast their vote in person. all of these, if you will, assaults on democracy focus on those methods that most americans use to be able to vote.
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for black americans and brown americans, disabled americans, young americans, it is particularly important. i want people to focus these attacks are broad based and when it comes to voting we need both bills, the freedom to vote act and, if you will, the john lewis act. >> congratulations. i understand you are getting an award for community service tonight. well done on that. well deserved. i imagine you are holding the conference and we came out of a summer of protests and not just here in the protests but trigger protests around the world and there was kind of an assumption that something would happen on capitol hill that was meaningful when it came to police reform. now it looks like that's not going to happen. and i was just wondering about the mood of the conference this year compared to last year. >> well, people are not happy that the policing bill has hit a big snag.
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let's understand they negotiated in good faith. i think tim scott, and i've had a cordial relationship with him, couldn't bring home republican support. and at the end walked away from what was an apparent compromise that would have addressed the most significant issues. what our folks are saying is don't give up on policing. they're saying continue to press policing because it's something we'll be thinking about during the 2022 election cycle. we will not give up. i see it as a momentary temporary setback with the resolve to do something on policing with the thousands of people each year to are still being killed with the rage in gun violence. we have to restore trust between law enforcement and communities. >> all right. thank you so much, as always.
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you can register for today's urban league conference at nulconference.org. as always, thanks so much. thank you so much. as katty mentioned tonight the internationally acclaimed universal circus is honoring you with its president's award for community service. congratulations on that as well, mr. mayor. >> i will see you on the trapeze tonight, joe. >> yeah, we shall see about that. thank you, congratulations. >> i wanted to make sure you were there, too. thank you. >> all right. thank you and good luck. katty? >> yeah. that does -- i would not want to see that. new york city public schoolteachers and staff will need to have had at least one dose of the covid vaccine before returning to work on monday. and one group of teachers is asking the supreme court to block that mandate. the group argues that thousands of public school employees will
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be forced out of work if the vaccination mandate remains in effect thereby violating their fundamental right to pursue an occupation. these teachers say the order is unfair because it doesn't apply to other city employees who routinely deal with the public and who are allowed to keep working if they submit to weekly covid testing in lieu of getting vaccinated. joining us is new york city mayor bill de blasio. mayor, thank you very much for joining the program. do they have a point that other public city workers are out there having contact with the public and not getting vaccinated, so why point the finger at teachers? >> katty, let's look at the facts, first of all. what our teachers and school staff have done, breaking news as of this morning, 90% of our department of education employees are vaccinated, at least one dose. 93% of our teachers, 98% of our principals. the bottom line is this mandate has worked and the goal was to protect kids including our youngest kids who can't be
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vaccinated yet, and to ensure that families know schools will be safe. so this is, look, our schools are precious, our kids are precious. there's nothing else in our society that is central to everything we hope for as our schools and parents when they send that child to school. that is entrusting our schools with the safety of their child. this is what we have to do and it work. the other thing, mandates work. we put in mandates for public employees. we put in our indoor dining mandate over the last two months, vaccinations in new york city have gone up 45%. and in new york city today about 83% of all adults have had at least one dose. so mandates work. they make us safer. i would urge every mayor in america do it now, get those vaccine mandates in place ahead of the cold weather when things will get tougher. do it now or you will regret it
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later. we need these mandates to keep us safe. >> and 7,000 new york city teachers vaccinated just last week. the teachers union, mayor, saying, as you know, this will lead to shortages of teachers. if you mandate people to get vaccinated and some of them don't want to, are you going to have gaps in classrooms where kids aren't getting the teaching they need? >> we are 100% confidence. we have thousands and thousands of high quality substitute teachers especially young folks who come out of schools in education looking to get into our school system permanently. they're vaccinated. they're ready. they're really pumped up to have the opportunity to serve. and we are not going to have a shortage. 93% of teachers as of this morning already qualify under our mandate. they have until the end of the day to get vaccinated. it only takes a few minutes to get that first dose. that's all we require. get the first dose. get the second one later when the time comes.
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but here is the bottom line, had we not done the mandate people would have held back and our schools would have been less safe and cities less safe. there's so much noise when you put a mandate forward. whether it's the one we did for schools or for indoor dining, the bottom line is when the dust settled, a huge number of people went out and got vaccinated and then those environments are safe. thank you, we know what we're dealing with now. we know we have environments where we're not going to have the same problem with covid because it's all vaccinated reality. >> mr. mayor, the other side of that, i think, is not discussed a lot. and you and i both have a lot of respect for the union president for the teachers. but i know from my work in national action network and our chapters around the city a lot of parents wanted to see vaccination -- and we're talking about keeping their kids home if there wasn't a mandate. i mean, talk about that side.
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and certainly we respect the teachers but we are talking about parents saying, wait a minute, i'm not sending my kid to a school and i don't know that the teachers are vaccinated. >> you hit the nail on the head. we had a lot of folks saying, wait a minute. it's not safe. i want keep my child remote. one thing president biden has done brilliantly is say, no, our kids in measuring have to get back in the classroom. i want people to think about that child for a year and a half never saw the inside of a classroom. missed out on education, physical health support, nutrition, when kids aren't in school, a lot of abomination of desolation things happen. we had to bring our kids back and knew we were not going to do remote again. having an all vaccinated environment was crucial. that's exactly what parents said to us. prove to us it's going to be safe the day i said every adult is going to be vaccinated, i heard from parents that that gave them the confidence to get their kids back in school.
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>> and as you have done that, i think the balance is certainly trying to deal with the teachers still concerned with the overwhelming majority. but you have relaxed a lot of the parents and it also encourages a lot of the parents that were resident tant to also vaccinate as well. you can't be concerned about the teacher being vx you're not doing that at home. >> when people get vaccinated, it creates momentum. when we put mandates in place, we put the inventive in place. that worked like a charm. we saw a huge uptick that continue nous. when the person in your life got vaccinated and had a good experience, that word of mouth has a huge impact. where it works, it encouraging everyone else to keep moving forward.
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and parents also are harg from their kids. you'll appreciate this. we heard a hot of this around the city. they are teenagers. almost 75% of them are vaccinated in new york city. a lot of them are convincing their parents and grandparents that it's time. they see it. they feel the urgency. they are moving the older generations to get vaccinated. this is something if there's a national priority out there, we're all talking about the reconciliation bill, we need both of those. if there's a national priority, get the fda to approve the vaccine for the 5 to 11-year-olds. our leadership believes that should happen at the end of this month. so we can start vaccinating. >> mr. may your, good to see you. i wanted to ask you a couple questions. your terms are come coing to an
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end. and want to ask you to look back and tell me what do you consider to be your gretest accomplishment and away do you consider to be your greatest disappointment?atest accomplishment and away do you consider to be your greatest disappointment? >> you guys have been great about really raising this conversation about kids and early childhood education. i want to thank you for that. my profound joy is we could do pre-k for every child for free. and now it's going to be available for free for all 3-year-olds. and that has revolutionized the in the city it's also helped so many families struggling to make ends meet. because here to send a kid to preschool is $10,000 a year or more that families just don't have. so we made a universal right.
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it has given every child the opportunity to start at the same starting line. and that's really what this country is all about. i have been honest about it. we are finally making some more profound progress, but it's homelessness. after some absolute early misunderstandings on my part that i have owned up to, we found some new strategies that are working much better to get keep off the streets. our shelter population has gone down greatly. it's much lower than when i took office. we're getting people off the streets with intense engage the that we didn't realize how to do previously. and i think we figured out how to do it going forward. the other thing i would say is over eight years, you better be learning something. so i understand a lot more today than when i started. but i have faith that you can do big and bold things. that's what i learned.
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set the bar high and go for it becausepeople said it couldn't be done, but now it's done and now we're doing the same thing for 3-year-olds. >> what an extraordinary achievement. congratulations on that. and i'm so glad you brought up homelessness because that's what i hear new yorkers talking about the most. saying we really as far as quality of life issues we need to work on homelessness. there's been this -- ien don't want to call it a progressive fantasy, be but some people would snap at you if you talked about trying to get rid of homelessness as if helping -- if it were a positive thing to have somebody with mental health challenges sleeping on grates in 15 degree weather. there's nothing humanitarian about that. there's nothing liberal about that. there's nothing progressive about wanting that in new york or san francisco or any other city. so i'm so glad you brought ta
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that issue up and talked about some improvements that are being made. but that does remain a great challenge for our cities, doesn't it? >> i agree. you and i have talked over the years. i think we see eye to eye on a number of of things. one thing i want to say to you is we have to be honest a about the point you just raised. with all due respect to our colleagues in the west coast, the idea there that you have large numbers of people living in tents or tent colonies, when they nood affordable housing, one thing we do in new york city that does work and it's right to shelter, right to housing, we make sure if someone is on the street we offer them a place and a shelter. now we have to keep making our shelters better. we have to make them environments that folks are willing to come into, but you can't start with the notion that it's okay to have thousands of people living outside. you're right, a lot of folks who live on the streets it's either mental health problem, substance misuse problem or both. what we found and it took us
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awhile, but we got there. send out caseworkers who are trained to work with people not just for a day or two but for weeks or months to figure out what that is. a lot of times a person needs to be reconnected to the family. or they need to feel the environment think will go into is acceptable and safe. or they just need to have the trust built with someone that they are going to go some place that's going to be respectful of them. you can then get people off the street. we have done it by the thousands fou and kept them off the street. but one thing we should never say, anyone living on the street is an unacceptable reality. it's saying we are not doing something right. we shouldn't act like it's normal. >> thank you so much. it's not normal. there's nothing humane about it. there's nothing progressive about it. people on the streets shouldn't have to sleep on grates in the
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middle of of the night in the winter. they shouldn't be living in tents. tstz not safe. it's not healthy. it's not good for them. thank you so much. some breaking news. supreme court justice brett kavanaugh has tested positive for coronavirus. justice kavanaugh was informed yesterday evening after a routine test. he has no symptoms and has been fully vaccinated since january. obviously, our hopes and prayers are with him for a quick and speedy recovery. that does it for us this morning 37. chris jansing picks up the coverage after a final quick break. thank you for being with us. thanks to everybody that's been with us. thank you so much for watching the show today. ay one, two! one, two, three! only pay for what you need! with customized car insurance from liberty mutual! nothing rhymes with liberty mutual. only pay for what you need. ♪ liberty. liberty. liberty. liberty. ♪
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hi there, i'm chris jansing in for stephanie. it's friday, october 1st. we're going to start with the breaking news from overnight. a major setback for the biden agenda. no vote on infrastructure, at least not yet. after pushing the target date from monday to thursday, speaker pelosi chose not to bring the bill to the floor yesterday. here's what she said as she left the capitol just after mid-fight

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