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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 24, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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are like laugh all you want i don't have covid and the worms are almost gone. >> willie, you missed yesterday's discussion of the horse and cow deworming medication. >> i did. it's a bad day when the fda puts out a tweet that says, quote, you are not a horse. you are not a cow. seriously y'all, stop it. it is mystifying on many levels when you think there are many people in the country that will not take a now fda approved vaccine but they'll take a medication for horses and cows to be dewormed in the fight against covid. >> and it's great material for comedians, but at the same time, my god. a lot happened yesterday, though, in the fight against covid. the big development that i think a lot of people were waiting for yesterday, the fda granting full approval to pfizer biontech's two-dose vaccine yesterday for people ages 16 and up.
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the first covid-19 vaccine to pass this final regulatory hurdle. the approval was the fastest in the agency's history, coming less than four months after pfizer filed for licensing. >> and the fda's announcement started a number of new vaccine mandates with more to come. new york city now requiring all department of education employees to get at least one dose of the covid vaccine by tend of september. the effort to fully reopen the country's largest school district next month is expected to set a standard for many districts across the country. it affects more than 148,000 public school employees the deadline for staff to get at least one dose is september 27th. mayor bill de blasio will be our guest later this morning to discuss this announcement. plus the pentagon moving ahead with vaccines for all service
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members now that they have the fda approval. they said a time line for when service members must receive the shot will be in the coming days. it'll be mandated for active duty and national guard troops. there are 1.3 million on active duty and close to 800,000 in the guard, mika. >> this opens the door for the administration to put the mandates across the board. and also opening the door for people waiting for the ever precious fda approval. it is here. so if you're waiting for fda approval to get the vaccine, you got it now, you can get the vaccine if you're holding off. president biden is also asking companies to step up efforts to require vaccines for employees. speaking yesterday at the white house, biden pointed out that vaccine requirements are not something new. >> vaccination requirements have been around for decades.
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students, health care professionals, our troops are typically required to receive vaccination to prevent everything from polio, smallpox, measles, mumps. in fact, the reason most people in america don't worry about these diseases today is because of vaccines. it only makes sense to require vaccines to stop the spread of covid-19. we're going to focus on florida which became the third state in the u.s. to reach 3 million cases of covid-19. a total surpassed by only 15 countries in the entire world. florida. last week the state reported an all-time death record with 1,486 deaths nearly 15% above the record of 1,300 deaths for a week back in january during the last waves. this is florida. the state has become one of the
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worst hot spots in the nation. as the delta variant continues to climb in terms of the case count. according to the associated press, florida hospitals slammed with covid-19 patients are suspending elective surgeries and putting beds in conference rooms and auditorium and cafeteria. florida, georgia and louisiana and mississippi alone account for more than 40% of all hospitalizations in the country. and there's one common factor here. people not getting the vaccine. let's bring in, infectious disease specialist in north palm beach county, dr. leslie diaz, it's great to have you on the show. you and i have been going back and forth about what your doctors, nurses, colleagues have been going through, what you personally have been going through. tell us what exactly it's like for you right now, what are the
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hours you all have been working and tell us about the patients you see coming into florida hospitals. >> good morning and thank you for having me. it is certainly very exhausting. we are working 14 and 16 hour days. relentlessly to try to take care of patients. patients who are young, 20-year-olds, 30-year-olds, 40-year-olds, 50-year-olds. and it's devastating. to watch them die. nobody, as a doctor, as a professional provider, nobody likes to see that. not that the older generation is anything but less, they're just as important, but these are young people that still have their lives ahead of them, and they die in front of us. so without us able to do anything, we feel helpless.
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it can all be preventable. preventable by a vaccine that we know is safe and we know is very effective. >> and doctor, your patients, the ones you see coming in, the ones that you've been dealing with 14 hours a day now for well over a year, this isn't just a flash in time. you all have been going at this and it hasn't stopped for florida, these patients, you asked them if they received the vaccine, how many of them say they haven't? >> in the hospital right now, the majority of the patients are unvaccinated. i would say anywhere between 92 and 94%. which is it's very unfortunate. the vaccinated patients that are coming in are an older generation that already have been vaccinated with the beginning in the first wave of january and february, but right now, as it stands, the vaccinated are the ones that are
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mainly coming into the hospital very, very sick. >> we're at the point where we have to worry about your mental health and your physical health as doctors, but when you ask them why they didn't get the vaccine, what do you hear? >> i hear all sorts of stories. most people really are regretful and they want to, you know, make amends with themselves to say, hey, i did wrong and i want to go ahead and get it, once i recover and hopefully go home. so -- but i hear any -- any excuse that you can think of from, it's experimental is the other common one, to that they're trying to track us, i don't know who "they" are. >> yeah. >> it's really a very unfortunate situation. you know, i think that patients
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need to realize that this is still the most reliable and most effective tool that we have out there to be able to mitigate this craziness. >> and my understanding, dr. diaz, is that this delta variant is even more transmissible. it's very, very contagious. can you explain what some of the patients in the icu, because you've seen it firsthand, what they go through for hours on end and days on end as their -- if they survive, as they're being treated for covid, what is it like? >> it's sort of like a waiting game. these patients come in, quickly needing more and more oxygen delivery to sustain a viable oxygenation, and they're at their max. and they can stay at their max before going on the ventilator for a while, for days.
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and they realize that oh my goodness, i'm on borrowed time, i think, and they're fearful and it's exhausting for everybody, both for the patient, for us watching them, and they don't get better. some get better all of a sudden, after, you know, having been on a bipap mask machine, this is prior to intubation, for days, a week, two weeks, and then all of a sudden they start getting better. but then some deteriorate further, needing mechanical intubation, ventilation and going on a vent and it's unfortunate. >> doctor, thank you for the work you're doing, for being here this morning. i'm curious what you've seen in terms of the trajectory of the pandemic in your hospital.
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we've heard from politicians that the media and public health officials are overstating the problem in florida. what have you seen in terms of the way a lot of us felt in the country here came this miracle vaccine we thought would get us through this, delta variant comes back, a lot of people unvaccinated, especially across the country, now it's flaring up again, what have you seen in terms of hospitalizations and what kind of patients you've seen since we've got this vaccine? >> since the beginning i knew that we had lost the window of opportunity to be able to obtain herd immunity way back last year. so i kind of accepted that. we had several surges of -- numbers of patients coming in throughout 2020 and also through 2021. but this is truly unprecedented for our area in the south
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florida area where we never expected it would even step up a notch or two from anything that we have had in the recent past. so the numbers are astro mon cal. the amount of patients flocking the hospitals at the rate that they are doing, it is unreachable at times. i don't have enough hours of the day to be able to see everybody. and that is very disconcerning to me. the patients that we see, to be before, is that they're very young, 20-year-olds, 30-year-olds, 40-year-olds that are perfectly healthy and they come in with devastating findings in the chest x-ray, needing a significant amount of oxygen and not being able to see them get better in front of your
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eyes. so definitely a huge surge, worse than anything we've seen before, and very difficult to keep up with. and sometimes we can't. some days we just can't and we have to accept it that way. we try to do the best we can to try to take care of these patients. i don't really -- i'm not there to judge them, if they got the vaccine or not. i wish they would have gotten it because this could all be very preventable. and so, i -- you know, i do the best that i can with the 14 hour days that i'm doing to try to educate them. and i hope that i change at least one mind of the 100 patients that i see every day. >> as you say, the common denominator, 92 to 94% of the patients you're seeing are unvaccinated. what do you think now about where this is headed as we head into the fall with schools reopening, you talked about the patients being younger and younger. obviously there's great concern, you have school districts
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putting in mask mandates, crossing the governor to do that. what would you like to see in terms of mitigation, to perhaps slow the trend you're witnessing in your hospitals? >> i think that there is good data and study that says that mitigation factors that you can put in place to try to contain this -- and i'm not talking about closing down businesses or anything like that. just general overall systems put in place to be able to stop the spread, something as minimal as mask mandates. i think that that would help to try to contain the numbers, significantly coming into the fall. it worries me that the fall is coming. and, you know, we don't have much of a winter here in florida, of course, like the
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north, but it still is -- it's something that we know that people gather more because of the holidays and so forth, so there's more group meetings. so before that happens, i think it would be important to put some mask mandates, social distancing, going back to the basics. i think going back to that will help mitigate those factors of higher numbers or even another surge going into the winter. >> doctor, diaz, we've been going back and forth getting a window into your world, and you say your nurse practitioners have been relentless, you've been relentless, working 14 hour days every day, some try to rest for a few days once in a while, you don't rest, and there are, at times, unpleasant discussions with angry patients. angry patients who are so scared and that anger is probably based on fear. but that a good percentage of
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them say to you, they still won't get the vaccine. like around 30%. but yet they come into the hospital and they'll take all of this experimental medicine. i'm curious as you work such long days, during these dire situations, watching people die every day, how are you and your colleagues coping with all of this? are you okay? >> thank you very much for asking about my well being, i appreciate that. because not a lot of people do ask, and that's okay. i'm a warrior, i know what it is to work at hard times and very difficult times. so it's -- i'm used to it. i try to remove myself from judging anybody and try to just be focused, looking ahead, sort of like, you know, a horse's
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blinders type of thing to try to be able to take care of these patients with 101%. it is exhausting, though. and i know what it is to look at the face of a precipice. so i know my limitations. i haven't reached them. so that's good news. and i have a lot of people around me that give me the support that i have, my spouse, my nurse practitioners, to be able to keep me in a well -- you know, a well state. >> doctor leslie diaz, an infectious disease specialist in florida, god bless you, thank you for what you do, and thank you for coming on the show this morning. >> thank you very much for having me. appreciate it. joining us now kerry sanders who was in palm beach, florida yesterday covering the gathering
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by doctors designed to call attention to the need to get vaccinated. what's been the reaction to that? these doctors are overwhelmed, they've been working 24/7. it's like there's two worlds in florida, the world of people who refuse to get vaccine, who live in this clueless reality that nothing will ever happen to them, who end up in the hospital dying, and these doctors having to try to save their lives every day, still now to this day. >> and then they gathered as they did, and their message got somewhat side tracked, because their simulated walk out, many people thought they just abandoned their patients and walked out of a hospital. that's not what happened. the 75 doctors or so who gathered there, many had come off their shifts, some double shifts, working in the covid ward, while others were preparing, after that gathering to then go to their shifts
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dealing with the patients. and yet somehow it all got twisted around. their message is one that's simple, we just heard it from the doctor, 92, 94% of those that wind up in the covid wards are unvaccinated. the unvaccinated are the people these doctors are trying to reach. saying listen to the science we're the medical experts here. we're urging you to get vaccinated. because if you get covid and you get vaccinated, it's unlikely you will show up in the emergency room and winding up in the icu. >> so, kerry, there are some 90 million eligible americans who have not yet received a vaccine. yet with the fda approval of the pfizer vaccine, dr. fauci suggested he thought 20 million or so might now get it. what is your sense of that how this official fda approval may change the trajectory here? >> reporter: i think a lot of us thought that would be sort of what pushes it over the top. certainly the doctors told me
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they believe this is a game changer. but the kaiser family foundation did a study before the approval by the fda asking those who were hesitant and it was about 7 in 10 said they won't get vaccinated even with the approval. 3 in 10 will get vaccinated. that's a significant number of people. in fact, i met a woman, amanda, who decided, even though she has heard now that it is approved, that it's just not for her. on top of this, her uncle is right now in the icu, a doctor held up a phone and her uncle pleaded with her to get the vaccine. and even as he's there dealing with coronavirus, in the icu, listening to the video, well, listen to what she had to say. >> you have those close to you that have coronavirus. >> right. >> but you still will not get a vaccine. >> not yet. >> even though it's now fully
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approved? >> i'm still thinking. >> what's the hesitancy? >> i'm just not too comfortable with it yet. >> therein lies the challenge for doctors and public health officials who get those who decided, even with the approval, that they're going to stand back, i guess wait or maybe not get the vaccine at all. right now in florida, having both vaccines about 52% of the population, so it's a long way to go in a state where, i think, every county now has started school and the kids are back in school, and, of course, we're seeing in many cases, huge number of kids quarantined and just an ongoing situation here, guys, that you would think the vaccine might be the solution based on what all the medical officials have told us, and yet hesitancy. >> if fda approval is not going to put you over the top, unclear what will. kerry sanders from florida this
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morning. thank you so much. there was a kaiser survey that showed only 3 of 10 americans said full fda approval would make them more likely to get the vaccine. that leaves a lot of people in the country who still, despite the announcement yet, will not get it. >> maybe a mandate will. coming up on "morning joe," dr. anthony fauci will be our guest this morning. plus new york city mayor bill de blasio will join the discussion following his announcement of mandatory vaccinations of all public schoolteachers and staff. and president biden is facing mounting pressure from congress and the international community for extending the deadline for withdrawing troops from afghanistan. you're watching "morning joe," we'll be right back. e," w.
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president biden is facing mounting pressure to extend the evacuation mission in afghanistan. at a virtual meeting with g7 leaders later this morning some allies are expected to press the president to keep troops at the kabul airport past the august 31st deadline. two officials tell nbc news president biden is expected to make a decision later today on whether to extend that deadline. the united states military informed the white house it will take 3 to 4 days to get the roughly 6,000 troops and remaining embassy staff out of kabul. that means the united states needs to move troops out by the end of this week if it wants to move the august 31st deadline. a spokesperson for the taliban told sky news yesterday the united states would be, quote, crossing a red line if the biden administration keeps troops in afghanistan past the 31st. here's what national security
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advisor jake sullivan told reporters yesterday when asked about that deadline. >> as i said, we are engaging with the taliban, consulting with the taliban on every aspect of what's happening in kabul right now. on what's happening at the airport, on how we need to ensure that there is facilitated passage to the airport for u.s. citizens, s.i.v. passports and others, ultimately it will be the president's determination on how this proceeds, no one else's. >> and "the washington post" is reporting the cia director met with the head of the taliban yesterday to talk about the conditions that may change here to move that deadline past august 31st after the taliban said yesterday it would be a red line for them if the american troops were still there. >> meanwhile, the u.s. is ramping up evacuations in kabul. nearly 11,000 people were air lifted out during a 12-hour
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period yesterday bringing the total number of people evacuated to approximately 48,000 since august 14th. nbc news foreign correspondent matt bradley joins us from germany with the latest. matt? >> reporter: thanks, mika. here at ramstine air base this is where so many of the afghans, far from the drama you're seeing at the kabul airport this is one of their destinations before they move to the u.s. or another third country and once they reach here, they're safe. they have food, water, health care, temporary shelter set up not only by the active duty troops but a lot of family members who are volunteering, like the images you're seeing in the states where people are providing goods, donating stuff, building shelters for people. you saw that here, people just volunteering out of the goodness
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of their heart. even though evacuees don't want for everything once they arrive here, what they don't have is information. they're upset about the fact they don't know when they're going to be leaving here or where they're going. so here at ramstein air base there's frustration and also some hope. chaos at kabul's airport, a crush of thousands. desperate to get out. 20 people were killed around the airport in the last week, including one during a deadly fire fight involving u.s. forces. after president biden announced the acceleration of evacuations ahead of the august 31st deadline. the taliban is calling that a red line. saying there will be consequences if troops stay longer. the u.s. embassy, which has moved to the airport, now telling those who aren't eligible for evacuation to stay away. >> if the you do not have approval for a flight, you should leave the area surrounding the airport
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immediately. >> reporter: the taliban known for its brutality releasing its own images of forces patrolling the streets of kabul and what it says are girls going to school. but the clock is ticking for international troops trying to get people out, 26 countries are helping in the effort, getting evacuees to eight transport hubs including one at germany's ramstein air base. some of these people are very angry, saying they've been abandoned by the u.s. government. he is a u.s. citizen living in afghanistan. >> i'm completely angry because they could have managed this much better way. >> reporter: on one evacuation flight, a glimmer of hope. an afghan refugee went into labor, giving birth on the tarmac. >> she was quite scared so i was
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trying to be like you got this mama, trying to reassure her the team here knew what they were doing and she had landed safely in germany. >> reporter: a moment of humanity amid so much anguish. so just to give you a sense, mika of the beauracracy we're facing here, as of last night when we checked the numbers, there were 39 flights that have come in here to ramstein air base, only two have been confirmed to have left. those numbers are changing as we speak and changing throughout the day. as you can see, there's a massive back log, this is one of the big bottlenecks here, mika. >> matt, you touched on it in great specifics here, but what these people are going through, these are the lucky ones. this is a long process and it seems so arduous, explain what it's like for these families in transition. >> yeah, we spoke with some of
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them yesterday. you know, they're out of danger when they're here. as i mentioned. that's something that we felt that palpable relief but the uncertainty is setting in now, what we started to see was, they start to wonder about what that you are lives are going to be looking like from here on out now that they're out of that immediate danger. we saw some injuries. there were people walking around in that camp yesterday that had visible injuries that they said they sustained in the scrum at the airport as they were trying to get out. of course they have medical attention from that. you heard from the nurse who helped deliver a baby here on the tarmac on a c-17 transport flight. there was just so much difficulty. so much heroism that led up to getting here. and now there's just so much uncertainty and so much frustration, and it's just adding to the gauntlet that so many of these people have already been through. mika. >> matt bradley, thank you very
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much. willie. joining us now, katty kay and columnist and editor of "the washington post," eugene robinson. good morning to you both. an extraordinary story just posted to "the washington post" a few minutes ago reporting that the cia director, bill burns, met in kabul yesterday with the head of the taliban to talk about this presumably august 31st deadline where the taliban has promised, quote, consequences if american troops are still there. allies, great britain, france, others said we need more time than one week from today to get all the people evacuated and all the troops out as well. >> the fact that the director of the cia has met with the leader of the taliban shows you how seriously the u.s. is taking this. you don't send bill burns there to meet with a group that the u.s. considers a terrorist organization, effectively, if
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you really are needing something from them. it shows that they needed really to send in their top guns to try to get an extension to this deadline. the president is going to be asked about this in this virtual meeting he has with g7 leaders coming up later today. they too want the deadline to be extended. it's great to hear the stories of the refugees coming out and, of course, the americans coming out and the people who helped the americans coming out. the number of flights being picked up, the number of people getting out now has massively improved, this is a great operation we're witnessing at the moment but most people think there are still tens of thousands of afghans and family members who helped american forces who do need to get out. read george packer's piece on the story of two afghans, one who had to come from kandahar to kabul, disguising himself as somebody who might be
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sympathetic to the taliban, then having to hide in kabul, how difficult it was to get to the airport, the attention -- it's like a lottery game where an american or british soldier happens to spot you in the crowd and you get in. there are still a lot of people that need to get out and have terrified for their lives. they think if the foreign forces leave and they have not been able to get themselves and their families out, they will be killed. these are people who helped us over the last 20 years. that's why bill burns is there trying to negotiate the deadline. >> gene robinson, she's right, the operation has accelerated quite a bit in terms of the number of people, getting commercial airliners over there so the united states can get as many people back out of the country as safely as possible. yet the deadline is one week from today. the deadline is to get american troops out, not just evacuate everyone, but also for america's
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footprint to be gone. i suspect that's why bill burns flew into kabul to meet with the taliban to extend that deadline. >> one assumes that director burns will point out to the taliban that what's in their interests, just from their point of view, is to have the united states gone and it's more important to have us gone, you know, at some point than it is on that particular date, and probably point out that it will indeed take longer than that to get everybody out from the embassy. everybody involved in processing and helping this extraordinary number of people leave the country. we're talking about air lifting out more than 10,000 people a day. i don't think that's ever been done. i can't think of when and where that has ever happened.
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so, you know, we will -- we will look back on this period and i know we will remember those chaotic scenes at the beginning and the -- the sense that nobody knew what was going on, the taliban swept in, and the united states clearly seemed caught flat-footed. but i think we will also remember what could be the biggest and ultimately most successful air lift in history of people. this is really, you know, planes landing and taking off an hour later with 400 people aboard, night and day, it's an extraordinary operation that only the u.s. military could perform. coming up, after hours of negotiations, house speaker nancy pelosi failed to strike a deal with moderate democrats on infrastructure late last night. we'll talk to majority whip jim
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clyburn about the infighting among members of his party. plus after announcing new mandates meant to stop the spread of covid, hawaii's lieutenant governor has seen angry protests gathering almost nightly outside of his home. some even turninganti-semitic. he joins us next on "morning joe." orning joe. dry eye symptoms driving you crazy? inflammation might be to blame. inflammation: time for ache and burn! over the counter eye drops typically work by lubricating your eyes and may provide temporary relief. inflammation: those'll probably pass by me! xiidra works differently, targeting inflammation that can cause dry eye disease. inflammation: xiidra? no! it can provide lasting relief. xiidra is the only fda-approved non-steroid treatment specifically for the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease.
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the governor of hawaii is urging visitors to stay away from the island. cases in the state have been surging for several weeks. and the governor is now warning a lockdown could be coming as hospitals are overwhelmed. earlier this month the governor announced restrictions on gatherings for places like bars,
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restaurants and gyms as well as a mandate that state and county workers would have to show proof of vaccination or take weekly tests. that led to protests outside of the home of the lieutenant governor josh green who also happens to be an emergency room doctor. the protests have turned ugly, even anti-semitic. reports of strobe lights shined into the building where he lives with his wife and two children and people yelling at him with bull horn's. and dr. josh green joins us now. thanks for being with us. how are you doing, your family doing, your neighbors doing? >> thank you for asking. we're doing fine. it's the middle of the night here, happy to see you on the east coast. we're doing okay. it's a troubling time, scary time for people, that's probably why people are protesting. i'm a major believer in freedom
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of speech, peaceful protest is critical to us as a country but sometimes things get out of control and unfortunately that's been the circumstance here. we've been doing well with covid across the pandemic, the lowest mortality rate in hawaii, among all 50 states, the lowest case count, though it's been tough the last couple weeks, but protesters here are protesting mask wearing, vaccinations. it's a small, local minority but they're local. and they're harassing other families, in this case my building and scaring people from being vaccinated, that upsets me. >> that's a problem. if you could explain, especially why you might be somebody who they might want to listen to. you're an er doctor, explain why, perhaps the very protesters who are protesting vaccines and have decided to focus on you may want to focus on getting the vaccine. >> well, we -- like everywhere
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else in the country, have a pandemic amongst the unvaccinated. our state is third best at getting vaccinated. we're now over 70% for all of those who are eligible in the state to at least begin vaccination. but we've seen a huge surge of the delta variant across that population that is unvaccinated in our state. and weekend after weekend when i'm on call, my other role in the state, in the er, i'm seeing unvaccinated people in extreme distress. so sadly, people who are protesting getting vaccinated or protesting wearing masks are the very people that i see in the hospital. and it's the same story, mika, that you've heard across the country. people are angry about government, they're angry about mask wearing, they're angry about being asked to be vaccinated, but then it's a different story when they're lying in a desperate state in the hospital, about to be intubated and wishing they had been vaccinated. so it's tragic, because as ugly
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as the protests can be, and, of course, they turned even more ugly when they used some hate speech towards me, the tragedy is that i worry about them, i worry about those individuals who are unvaccinated because i know that they are next to catch covid. >> dr. green, it's willie geist, thanks for being with us this morning. i'm sorry you and your family are experiencing that garbage. people should know what you've given to the state of hawaii when you went to the state in 2000, worked in rural clinics, underserved parts of hawaii just to help people and you continue to do that today. can you explain a little bit for people watching across the country what happened in hawaii. late last year, early this year, hawaii was a success story, people are looking at hawaii, what are they doing, what can we do to replicate what's happening in hawaii? what's happened there the last couple of months? >> we went through two surges first a surge like everyone last
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july 4th when we had a lot of cases and hospitalizations. we went up to about 80% of our capacity in the hospital and then it came down. we had another surge over christmastime and new year's, not as severe it came down also. this fourth of july, two thirds of our people were vaccinated, one third were not, we had a surge of the delta variant because nothing will stop it. our hospitals filled up, we're at 120% of capacity and we can surge beyond that but we now have a lot of people in the hospital. i still worry about the mainland united states because even though our positivity rate is now 8.3%. it's still 3 percentage points below the mainland mostly because of the safe travels program we built. it requires people -- well, before the vaccine you had to have a test three days before, a negative pcr test and that kept covid out.
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now we have a vaccination card where people have to be vaccinated or pre-tested before coming to hawaii. we have not had many cases from travelers but the delta variant does roar through an unvaccinated population. and those of our people who have health disparities, particular people who are poor or have ethnic health disparities, they have not gotten vaccinated and they're getting crushed. >> you're a political leader and also an emergency room physician. so from your point of view, what changes the trajectory? what gets you out of the place you're at 120% capacity at your hospitals there? >> a couple things. we're hopeful the fda approval of the pfizer vaccination will insent some additional people to get vaccinated, that will help somewhat, although it may not help as much as we would like. also vaccinating children ages 5
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to 11 are going to make a difference to us. i have a 10-year-old, who's in public school and i can't wait until he's able to be vaccinated because we know there are cases there. really vaccination will make all the difference. we're doing our best to socially distance. but until people get vaccinated we will not be able to put out the fire. we ask people to wear masks, to socially distance, but we have to get to a point of comprehensive vaccination before we don't have cases. we're going to ride this terrible surge out over the next, say, four to six weeks. unfortunately we'll see more fatalities than we have recently. and we're going to appeal to everyone's better angels, whether they're protesting, not believed in vaccinations, whatever their ideologies are, we're going to ask them not to be political and come together as hawaii residents and get vaccinated because other things are happening. it's not just cases in the
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hospital that are covid related but other people can't get health care either. i was caring for a gentleman 74 years old, fully vaccinated, did not have covid, and he had a heart attack. it took hours to get him transferred to an area that had a cardiologist. another woman who has cancer in her 40s, because we have so many individuals in the hospital we're not able to do elected procedures and her mastectomy is now delayed many weeks. i'm not fixated on the angry protesters, i'm fixated on the individuals who can't get the care they need across our state and america. >> and the very people getting in the way are people who are vaccinated to go to school and other things. hawaii's lieutenant governor, dr. josh green, thank you very much for being on this morning. >> thanks for welcoming me. >> thank you. and gene robinson in your
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latest piece for "the washington post," you argue it's time for the excuses to end and mandates to start. i couldn't agree more. for me it's disheartening with everything that we are seeing, and so much that we aren't able to see, about what happens across the nation, in hospitals, inside the ers and the icus, it's incredible to me to hear like, for example, kerry sanders interviewing a health care worker who is still holding out on getting the vaccine. it's -- it's got to stop. >> yeah, it's got to stop. we're having now, this delta surge, this is an epidemic of the unvaccinated. and while delta is so pernicious and easily spread that there are many breakthrough cases where vaccinated people do get the
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infection and can pass it on but they have mild cases that -- they have mild disease. they don't generally end up hospitalized. they don't end up dying. and they don't end up monopolizing the health care sources that everybody else needs. that's what the unvaccinated are doing. and it's not fair. it gets to a point where it is not -- it is not fair. and it is not right. and talking has helped, and maybe the approval of the pfizer vaccine, the final approval, maybe that will help with some people. but i think mandates work. and they're certainly worth -- it's certainly a step it's time to move towards. so i think employers, especially, ought to say, as a condition of continued employment, you need to get vaccinated against this terrible
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disease and help us end this pandemic and end this plague. and i think a lot of people, not all, but a lot of unvaccinated people would, in the end, rather continue to have a job and be vaccinated, than be out of work and be unvaccinated. and so, mandates. i think lots and lots of mandates. it's time. >> it is time. gene thank you very much. and still ahead on "morning joe," dr. anthony fauci joins our conversation following the fda's full approval of pfizer's covid vaccine. we'll ask him where things stand with the one from moderna. plus kathy hochul has been sworn in as new york's first female governor. the transfer of power took place overnight, at 12:01 a.m.
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and she will be our guest tomorrow on "morning joe." her first tv interview as governor. "morning joe" is coming right back. oming right back ♪ limu emu & doug ♪ oh! are you using liberty mutual's coverage customizer tool? sorry? well, since you asked. it finds discounts and policy recommendations, so you only pay for what you need.
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yes. freestyle libre 14 day. try it for free. i'm dad's greatest sandcastle - and greatest memory! yes. but even i'm not as memorable as eating turkey hill chocolate peanut butter cup ice cream with real cocoa. well, that's the way the sandcastle crumbles. you can't beat turkey hill memories. beautiful shot of new york city. top of the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." it is tuesday, august 24th, katty kay is still with us, an msnbc contributor mike barnicle joins the conversation. let's begin with the fda granting full approval to the pfizer vaccine. miguel almaguer has the latest. >> reporter: expected but still
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historic full approval of pfizer's vaccine for people 16 and over marks another milestone in the pandemic coming 97 days after the fda began its official review. the first covid vaccine to move beyond emergency use authorization. the new announcement expected to move the needle on future vaccinations. >> those who have been waiting if for full approval should go get your shot now. the vaccination is free, it's easy, it's safe, and it's effective. >> reporter: immediately following fda approval, a wave of public, private and government employers announced they will now require staff to be vaccinated. among them the pentagon. affecting 1.4 million active duty troops. with many more expected to follow suit. new york city's department of education says all 148,000 educators and staff will need to be at least partially vaccinated by the end of next month.
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>> now we're already seeing a slew of organizations starting to require it. i think this is going to be a trend and a good trend. >> with the university of virginia disenrolling hundreds of students who failed to get vaccinated. the fda's full approval will strengthen legal standing and perhaps bolster inoculation rates. >> i hope and pray it goes down in american history as a real turning point in the pandemic. >> still, despite what doctors say, many are not convinced. >> i'm hesitant because i feel it's so new and it was just approved. >> reporter: hoping to build confidence the fda fold some 20,000 pfizer vaccine recipients. there were some common side effects, the vaccine proving to be 91% effective. the fda review process taking less than half the normal amount of time. >> if you go through the information posted summarizing
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what the fda did, you'll see there were no corners cut. >> reporter: full approval for those who may not be fully confident. we will talk live in a moment to dr. anthony fauci about that fda approval and when we may see it for the other vaccines as well. we've been talking a lot this morning about florida, which recently became the third state in the country to reach 3 million cases of covid-19, a total surpassed by only 15 countries in the entire world. one mother in jacksonville, florida is pleading now for people to get vaccinated after two of her adult sons died from the virus. lisa brandon's 31 and 35-year-old sons were living with her when they contracted covid-19 late last month. she was vaccinated, had a mild case, her sons were not. their conditions deteriorated quickly. both admitted to the intensive care unit and ultimately put on ventilators. the brothers died within 12 hours of each other. brandon told a local news
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station, quote, it is a parent's worst nightmare. the only reason i'm doing this is to put the word out to please get vaccinated. mika? now to a follow-up on a story we reported on yesterday. more than 75 doctors in palm beach gardens gathered to say enough is enough. they're exhausted with the still steady stream of covid patients who are unvaccinated. in yesterday's report we referred to the doctors' event as a simulated walk out. and we learned afterwards many thought that left patients unattended. doctors wouldn't do that, they're committed, even when they're pushed by these extremes by people who do not choose to get the vaccine. those doctors gathered before going on shift or after working a long shift on the covid wards. some pulling double shift. something they've been doing for months dealing with unvaccinated covid patients. they're exhausted.
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they are people who need to be considered in this equation. they gathered yesterday to voice their frustration, to come together, to try another way to reach americans who remain unvaccinated, to try and compel them to get the vaccine, just like they do for school and other vaccines that you have in life. instead of ending up in the hospital with covid and trying all sorts of experimental drugs that they don't know what is in them. so all of their logic to not get the vaccine is leafing these doctors exhausted, dealing with countless covid patients who are dying unnecessarily. joining us now is one of the doctors who attended yesterday's gathering. the director of internal medicine. dr. daria, thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> i guess, first of all, tell me what you're seeing where you work, in terms of covid-19 patients and whether or not
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they've been vaccinated and how much they are suffering. >> the suffering all over the world is absolutely terrible. and we seem to, unfortunately, have become the epicenter of this pandemic. the cases continue to rise, our hospitals are full, our icus are full. and so, as a result yesterday we wanted to do a community outreach as a group of concerned doctors who wanted our patients in our community to know that we are there for you, we are tired, you are tired, something needs to be done now. there's no more time to wait. please, the message was, to protect yourself, get vaccinated, wear masks. vaccinations and masks are the only two things that we have that would make a difference. there is nothing else that we have. you know, in our -- in our white coats, that could save lives.
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>> we appreciate the commitment and the many, many hours and double shifts that you are working. and i'm still thinking that people in florida, especially, don't understand that you all are still on the front lines, still dealing with a pandemic of epic proportions that is now impacting the care of other patients and you would never, ever leave your shifts or leave a patient with less. but there's only so much energy you have in the day. can you explain to us the types of patients you're getting? their ages, their symptoms, and what they say to you. >> the underlying feeling here in the community is fear. people are scared. as a primary care physician, we are their first phone call. they call us with symptoms of sore throats and coughs and fevers and chills and don't know what to do, they need direction, that's what we're there for.
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aban donment in not in the vocabulary of any of the physicians you saw yesterday. this is a proactive move. as we have been and always will, to continue to help our patients no matter what. patients are calling in, we're seeing them, doing a lot of tele visits to give them direction on whether they need to stay home and quarantine or whether they're showing symptoms and signs that would require admission. we have patients in the hospital on high amounts of oxygen trying to maintain a normal oxygen concentration because of what this disease is doing to their lungs. we have younger patients testing positive. i'm getting phone calls every day from schools, even my children's school, that someone has tested positive. it seems to be escalating.
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>> so, dr. dharia, i just wrote a piece for know your value about the number of people i met in the last few weeks about people not being vaccinated and the things i heard, i'd like to share them with you, and you can respond, i think i had covid so i don't need the vaccine is one of them. i think you get covid from the vaccine. i'm waiting for fda approval but i still don't know if i -- it might have been rushed. what is your response to that compared to what you're seeing in the hospital? are these sort of people that you would -- these people feel this happens maybe to other people and not to them. >> that's right. and this can happen to any of us. this can happen whether you're vaccinated or unvaccinated. whether you're staying home or going outdoors. i think the bottom line here is this. those of us that are vaccinated
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can still get covid. but the symptoms and the signs and the level of clinical illness is not as bad as those that are unvaccinated. so obviously, we don't have a cure, but we have a very strong prevention. i think that in the last several months there's been a lot of fear amongst groups that are not vaccinated with regard to the fact that these vaccines were developed very rapidly and the concern was that it hadn't been tested and it was on an emergency approval. now that we have the approval from pfizer, my hope is that the people in the community that were holding out because of the lack of complete approval will now move quickly and rapidly and take the vaccine. >> good morning, doctor, appreciate you being with us. i want to underline one more time despite some bad faith efforts by people to twist what you did yesterday, you didn't walk out on anything, you took
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time outside of your shifts to go out and plead with the public to get the vaccine. you continue to do everything you can every day in that regard. so let me ask you about the trust between a patient and a doctor. we've heard this from many physicians over the last year and a half, which is to say doctors are among the most trusted people in our society, always have been, right up there with the american military. so what do you think has happened during the pandemic that you have people who you probably treated for years and trusted you with major decisions about their health, suddenly looking at you and saying, i'm not going to do what you say, i'm not going to take this vaccine, i shouldn't have to wear a mask. what happened? >> i think that, you know, the bond that we have with our patients is very sacred and the time we spend in the exam rooms with them, it's a very personal time and a very personal space. and a lot of times we're in there discussing treatment plans. we are, by the nature of what we
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do, advisers. we are partners with the patients and their health. and for the longest time we would discuss with them, what ailments, what diseases they would have, and what the options would be that we could put into place so they would not become sick or die. most of the things that we have, you know, at our reach are medications and treatments that have been around for years and years and years. sometimes the patients will say, how long has this drug been around, or i heard that my neighbor down the street took this and they got this side effect. it's reassurance from us to let them know that everything has a risk and benefit. and we would never prescribe something that would be more risky than beneficial if the outcome was going to lead to saving mortality. with the vaccine, because it's so new, i think that's where the lack of trust and the lack of faith, that's what it was born out of. i think that patient education
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is absolutely paramount. i feel spending time with the patients, explaining this process, explaining you can't get covid from the vaccine. explaining that, you know, there's a certain amount of time that has to pass for you to be able to harbor immunity and to explain that just because you got vaccinated, you still need to be careful because you can still get sick, these things take time and understanding. and what i found over the years is that if you spend that time with the patients and explain this to them, and you allow them to understand and ask their questions, the outcome is always better. >> as you look out over the horizon, doctor, if we muddle along at the rate we're going now, a large portion of this country decides it will never get vaccinated, what does that look like inside your hospitals, what does that look like in the state of florida? >> i'm not sure where we'll put the patients, the hospitals are
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full. we'll have to change surgery centers to covid centers. it'll look like a war zone. the most frightening thing now is that our children are getting sick. the generation that's going to take over from us, they're getting sick, falling ill and ending up in the hospital. there are patients that are pregnant that are on ventilators because they were not vaccinated, they were scared. and now they're in critical and intensive care units. so i think if we continue at the rate we're going with not increasing vaccination and protections, the outlook is dismal. >> let's hope people are listening to your message. thank you for what you do, doctor. thanks so much for your time. at least five south florida police officers died from coronavirus in just one week. 27-year-old jennifer septo died on august 14th after contracting the virus. she leaves behind a husband and
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a 2-year-old daughter. that very same day, florida highway patrol trooper lizaro feplis died. and robert williams also died from complications related to covid-19 on august 16th. miami police officer edward perez, a 25-year-old veteran of the force died last thursday. and sergeant patrick madison died last friday. it's unknown if any of those officers were vaccinated. according to the officer down memorial page, covid-19 has been the number one killer of police officers in the country both this year and last. so mike barnicle, we can take that story, put it together with what's happening across the country. we've heard just over the last hour and 15 this morning we heard firsthand accounts from two hospitals in florida, we heard an account from the lieutenant governor, also an emergency room physician in the
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state of hawaii. this is very real. you heard the concerns from the doctor there, if we continue along at this rate he says the state and hospitals will look like what he called a war zone. >> yeah, willie. these are astounding stories and sadly they are very common stories. there are several striking things we've already heard this morning. the news item about the mother in florida who lost two sons within the space of 12 hours to covid. the doctors who explained that hospitals are being turned into covid wards. there's no more maternity wards, we're on the verge of having no more emergency wards. everything is going to be covid. hospitals are going to be operating at maximum capacity. doctors and nurses are going to be physically and mentally exhausted by their chores. can you imagine the doctor we just had on from florida, the cargo of misery that he carries
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home with him each night. just the visual memories that he has each and every day that affect his life. it's got to affect enormous numbers of care providers, nurses, doctors, with just frightening impacts that they carry through their lives each and every day. and all of it leads, i think, and we've spoken about this, not only today, earlier today, but throughout the past couple of weeks, the importance of the word mandate. and i think we might be on the verge, hopefully, that the president of the united states will use the word mandate, in a much wider frame of reference. we can mandate military members to be vaccinated. because if you're a member of the military, you obey a direct order from the commander in chief. but we'll have mayor de blasio on shortly, the new york city police department i think i saw
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yesterday that up to 40% of officers out on patrol are not vaccinated. that's crazy. it's just crazy. health care providers, we've had people on tv, nurses on tv who are hesitant about getting the virus, if you're hesitant about getting the virus, stay home, you can't work. these people have to be mandated to be vaccine. i understand the fear that some people have legitimately. but the anti-vaxers in this country, i don't know what the percentage are, but they are destroying the rest of us. they are putting the rest of us at peril because of their own refusal to get vaccinated. >> they should absolutely be in a different place at this point. we want to turn to the development out of afghanistan that we mentioned last hour. cia director williams burns held a secret meeting in kabul on
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monday with the taliban's d facto leader. the meeting was first reported by "the washington post." the cia declined to comment on the meeting, but the discussions likely involved the impending deadline for the u.s. military to depart afghanistan. so katty kay, at this point we're looking at almost, what, 11,000 people moved out of afghanistan, a massive mission to get people to safety, but there's still the problem of afghanistan to deal with. how does the united states navigate this, but still stay within the zone of having pulled out? >> yeah, i mean, look, there are some short-term priorities and long-term priorities. the short-term priorities getting this evacuation completed. i guess that's why cia director bill burns flew into kabul to sit down with the de facto
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leader of the taliban, a man who had been arrested in a joint cia pakistan operation 11 years ago and put into prison for eight years, ironic that guy is sitting down with the director of the cia. but burns was there because there's pressure on the administration to extend the 31st of august deadline with the realization they're not going to get all of their own people, americans and other allies out and all of the afghans out, even at the pace they're going now. think about it, mika, it's not that they can carry on the evacuations at the last minute and everyone flies out. you have a few days where you have to shut everything down before the deadline and that could be potentially the most dangerous bit where you're collapsing the perimeter as they call it and withdrawing those u.s. forces and that makes the u.s. forces collapsing the perimeter vulnerable before they leave. so it's not really 11 days they have, it's a shorter time frame.
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and long term i imagine he's talking about the leverage the united states would like to hold over the taliban, there's money, 80% of the budget comes from foreign aid, that gives foreign governments a certain amount of leverage over the taliban, assuming they don't want their economy to completely collapse. and talking to other regional powers about how to contain the taliban and to make sure that afghanistan, under the taliban, doesn't once again become a safe haven for groups like al qaeda or isis who might want to launch an attack against the u.s. that's a lot. still ahead on "morning joe," top public health officials are optimistic the fda's approval of the pfizer vaccine will encourage millions of hesitant americans to get a shot. dr. anthony fauci joins us next. we'll also speak with congressman jim clyburn after
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democrats left the capital late last night without any agreement on the budget resolution. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ching "morn" we'll be right back. trading isn't just a hobby. it's your future. so you don't lose sight of the big picture, even when you're focused on what's happening right now. and thinkorswim trading™ is right there with you. to help you become a smarter investor. with an innovative trading platform full of customizable tools. dedicated trade desk pros and a passionate trader community sharing strategies right on the platform. because we take trading as seriously as you do. thinkorswim trading™ from td ameritrade.
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26 past the hour. joining us now the director of the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases and chief medical adviser to president biden, dr. anthony fauci. dr. fauci, welcome back to the show. we speak on a day that the fda has finally approved the pfizer vaccine. are you hopeful that this will increase vaccinations across the country and where do we stand? >> i do believe it will. i think there will be three elements that will be at work here. in a recent survey, it was shown that about 30% of the people who
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have not yet been vaccinated, now that 80 to 90 million people who are eligible to be vaccinated, who have not been vaccinated, have said that when they get and see the stamp of approval of the fda on the vaccine, that they would very seriously consider getting vaccinated. i think that's going to be an important group, because if you talk about 30% of the unvaccinated, that's a lot of people. next, you're going to see a lot more mandates, because there will be institutions and organizations which previously were reluctant to require vaccinations, which would now feel much more empowered to do that. that could be organizations, businesses, colleges, universities. we're even seeing it with the military already. and third the companies can now officially advertise the vaccine, which you're not allowed to do until unless you get full approval.
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i think those three elements working together are going to increase, i hope it will, believe it will, it will increase the number of people getting vaccinated. >> i'm trying to think of what i would hear from a vaccine hesitant friend probably at this point is, it was rushed, it was rushed, i'm still nervous. if you can talk about the process that this vaccine went through to get full fda stamp of approval, and then if you could also share more about what kind of mandates we will see. >> well, first of all, there's no question it was not rushed. in fact, there are some people who have said that the fda took too long, which they did not. they took the amount of time that was necessary to do the thorough job that they always do. what the fda did, they meticulously and independently went over all of the data, the data on the effectiveness, the data on the safety, and
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important things like the ability of a company to be able to reproduce consistently the proper product. so there's no question this was not rushed. this was done very, very carefully and appropriately. the fda is the gold standard of regulatory agencies throughout the world. man -- mandates will occur. you have universities and colleges reluctant to do a mandate because they didn't have the backing of a fully approved product and i think you'll see large corporations doing the same thing, if you want to work physically in this particular place you have to get vaccinated. and i think that's going to be really important. >> happened at indiana university, stood up to the scrutiny of the supreme court. we'll see if more universities follow. dr. fauci thanks for being with us this morning. let me ask the next obvious question for those of us with the moderna vaccine, what's the timetable on that?
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how soon do you think that will get full fda approval and also the j&j shot? >> i think it's going to be relatively soon, because if you look at the sequence of when the companies got their euas, and then went ahead and collected the data to submit to the fda that moderna is a bit behind pfizer and j&j a bit behind moderna. so you'll see that in a period of time. i hesitate to predict how long that will be because you don't want to get ahead of the fda. but i imagine it would be several weeks to a month or so, not much longer than that. again, with the caveat you don't want to get ahead of the fda. but i believe it's going to be around that time frame. >> that's good news if it is a matter of weeks ahead. a lot of questions for parents as schools open across the country is about that shot for
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kids, because what we've heard from doctors again and again, even just this morning is that the patients are younger than the past year, they're seeing cases of children, what does that time frame look like from where you sit? >> just so that the audience understands, from 12 and older, already one can get vaccinated from an eua. you're talking about children 11 and younger. children mostly in the elementary school situation. >> right. >> right now we're collecting data on the safety and on the ability of the vaccine to induce a proper response in the children with the proper dose. the companies are doing that most -- all of the companies, actually, are doing that. it is anticipated there will be enough data to take a look at it and make some sort of determination as we get into the mid to late fall. then it would become a regulatory decision. then the fda will have to decide the risk/benefit. they have multiple options.
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one of them is to do an eua, an emergency use authorization, we're all hoping that will be as we get into the fall, mid to late fall and at the latest early winter. but we have to see how that goes with the fda. >> as we look at the big picture, dr. fauci, what is your snapshot as you look at the data, cases, hospitalizations across the country, about where we are right now? i think there's a feeling when the vaccine came through, this is it. this is the beginning of the end, let's get vaccinated, back to regular life in the fall and along came the delta variant, with as you said, significant numbers of americans not vaccinated. what is your sense of where we are as a country right now with this pandemic? >> well, we're in a difficult situation right now, as you look at the numbers, the number of new cases we're approaching 200,000 a day, between 100 and 200,000 a day. hospitals have increased, deaths have increased.
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however, what we're seeing is that mostly that those when you talk about serious disease, that's almost exclusively, not entirely, but almost exclusively among the unvaccinated. so when you ask where we are right now it's what i said some time ago. despite the fact that we're dealing with a formidable variant, the delta variant, still we have to get those unvaccinated people vaccinated. it's entirely up to us if we do that successfully, we can turn this thing around. >> dr. fauci, i have kind of a very specific question for you, but you were mentioning about kids already 12 and over being able to receive the vaccine. and the vaccine can definitely make you feel some symptoms. some people feel kind of terrible for a day, and then it works. it continues to work. but for kids who are 12, they come in all shapes and sizes. i mean, they're 6 feet tall, 4 feet tall, skinny, heavier,
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can a small 12-year-old take the vaccine at age 12? is it safe for all kids at the age of 12? >> well, yeah. at the age of 12, that is that -- you know, that line between 21 and when you get to 11 down, we're doing a dose determination study, where you're cutting down the dose on the younger children. that's what you want to do, particularly when you get to the children 11 and younger, down to 5 years old. they're really getting a significantly lower dose on the trials that we're doing. and you're absolutely corrects. when you get down to a younger level you want to make sure you get an appropriate dose. >> mike barnicle has the next question. dr. fauci, the delta variant, the appetite of the delta variant is enormous. as you know. as everybody in america now knows.
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i have a two-part question for you. one, can you envision a time when there will be variant specific booster shots and two, is there a time coming when the booster shots that we're receiving or about to receive have some impact on us? how many booster shots will we be able to get going forward across the years? >> well, in answer to your first question, some of the good news about boosting and we have been boosting people. right now we have a number of studies. and as you no -- and as you know, starting september 20th, there will be the beginning of the booster program for those who got the earliest vaccines, the health care workers, those with underlying conditions and the elderly. with boosting, we found thus far if you boost against the virus
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that's the original virus, not the delta or any variant, but the original virus, the original vaccine, the level of protection dramatically goes up multiple fold. and interestingly, it covers the variants. so we have found that the anti-bodies endeuced by a booster that was triggered by a vaccine against the original virus does very, very well when you look at the anti-bodies and how they react against the delta and other variants. so we may not have to get a variant-specific boost. we're preparing for it. we're doing clinical trials with it. but the data that we've seen right now indicate that we may be able to get a good response that covers the boosts by the -- that covers the variants by the original vaccine that we got. i don't think we're going to be having to boost people
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indefinitely. i believe it's entirely conceivable, that the third dose super imposed upon the two doses of pfizer and moderna, very well may allow for a prolonged period of protection. we don't know that right now but if you look at some of the vaccines that we have against other infections that require multiple shots, including, for example, a third boost, such as what we do with hepatitis b, we very well may see a situation where the response goes up and stays up for a period of time. that's what we're hoping for rather than the concern about having to boost continuously. i don't think it's going to be the latter. i think it's going to be the former. >> all right. dr. anthony fauci, thank you very much for being on the show this morning. we appreciate it. coming up, house democrats are fighting amongst themselves over how to pass infrastructure and it could have massive
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implications for president biden's agenda. majority whip jim clyburn joins us next on "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ ayy, ayy, ayy ♪ ♪ yeah, we fancy like applebee's on a date night ♪ ♪ got that bourbon street steak with the oreo shake ♪ ♪ get some whipped cream on the top too ♪ ♪ two straws, one check, girl, i got you ♪ ♪ bougie like natty in the styrofoam ♪
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welcome back to "morning joe." beautiful live picture of the united states capital, it's 7:42 in the morning. house speaker nancy pelosi left the capitol overnight without a completed vote to move forward with the $3.5 trillion budget resolution, the one democrats are looking to pass with no republican support through reconciliation. centrist democrats who have for weeks said they want the bipartisan infrastructure bill voted on first made good on their promise not to support a vote on the spending bill. speaker pelosi says the house will try again today at noon after a 9:00 a.m. caucus meeting. joining us now democratic
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congressman jim clyburn on south carolina. good morning, good to see you. this gets confusing for people trying to follow it from home, which bill is which, who supports which, who doesn't support which. from where you're sitting what is the future of these two and what are you saying to the centrist democrats standing in the way? >> thank you very much for having me. first of all, i think we're in a pretty good place. we'll meet today at noon, i think we will pass this resolution. i think one of the things that was giving us a big problem is the fact that everybody keeps reporting this as a $3.5 trillion deal. that's not exactly right. that is a budget up to 3.5. that's the ceiling. that's not the floor. and i think that people are now beginning to get a better understanding of what this is. we know that negotiations will take place. all we're doing is authorizing a process to begin so that
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discussions can take place as to how much we need to do, how much we can do. but 3.5 trillion is a ceiling in the resolution, it is not the floor. >> congressman, it's katty kay here, i was speaking to congressman boyle just a couple of hours ago this morning. and he was pointing out that, of course, the vast majority of the democratic caucus is in favor of having these two bills linked, but you've got these nine moderates holding out. how many of them do you need to persuade to come over and join you in order to get this passed? because you don't need all nine, do you? is there something you can offer some of them perhaps in order to get them to come back into the fold? >> i think everybody is on board. i think the problem has been the number. there are a lot of people who think the 3.5 trillion is just
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too big a number for them to digest. and i have been saying for several weeks now, that i think that it would be good sometimes if we would calculate the cost over the next ten years of not doing something than to calculate the cost of doing it. so i think that people are beginning to see now that the so-called bipartisan infrastructure deal, 1.1 trillion, that lays the foundation upon which to build something. for instance, if you're to take broadband, we know from all the studies that a comprehensive broad band program for the entire country would be around 95, $96 billion. but what they did in the bipartisan plan was a $65 billion program. that's two-thirds of the way. we need the other legislation to build out that other one-third. because you and i both know that
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in certain parts of the country, given certain powers to certain jurisdictions, that 65% will get spent in some communities and none will get spent in other communities. so in order for us to be fair to everybody, we should build out a comprehensive broadband program for the entire country, get everybody connected, do for broadband what we did for electricity. that's what we should do here and we need both bills in order to complete this job. >> congressman clyburn. i know we're going to be talking about a documentary you're part of, but i want to ask you with where we stand with hr-4 and voting rights, the jon lewis voting rights act. >> this resolution we're going to pass for the rule includes
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all three bills. hr-4 which is the jon lewis voting rights and advancement act, as well as bipartisan bill, infrastructure bill, as well as a 3.5 trillion budget. all three of those are wrapped into one. and after we pass that rule, we will then vote on hr-4, the jon r. lewis bill and send that to the senate. we need to do that before we leave town today so the senate will have time to figure out what they can do to protect voting rights going forward. that bill will be voted on and passed by the house today. >> all right. and as i mentioned you are featured in the recent pbs documentary downing of a flag, about the history of the
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confederate flag in south carolina. here's a clip from the doc. >> 911 what's your emergency? >> people shot down here, please send somebody right away. >> to even comprehend what he did is evil. >> i refused to pledge allegiance to that flag. >> most things in the state relate back to the confederate. >> every kid in the south has a confederate flag. >> that flag is a symbol. >> tomorrow morning at 10:00 a.m. we'll see the confederate flag come down. >> wow, let's bring into the conversation one of the producers of that documentary, founding and owner of strategic films, duane cooper. i appreciate you being on. this looks incredibly powerful. i see congressman clyburn plays a role in this as you interview everybody that's involved. tell us what inspired you to do
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this doc. >> i did work as the house democratic caucus director in 2015 during that long debate when i think the world kind of tuned in on south carolina. and since then, and what we've seen over the country since '15, you know, i think it's important that we have respectful dialogue about emotionally-charged topics. and, you know, the confederate battle flag in south carolina, across the south, and what you see when you see it across the country, i think is one of those conversations that then relate to a lot of other things. >> mike barnicle? >> congressman clyburn, if you travel through the south, i imagine still today, but traveling through the south, the confederate flag, symbol was as much a part of your
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visualization of the south, no matter what state you're talking about, south carolina, georgia, mississippi certainly, how do you go about erasing the vivid memory that's almost like in the bloodstream of the whole region of this this country? >> i don't know that you erase it. i think you should not erase it. it should remain there as a constant reminder of misinformation. we are just beginning this misinformation. i've been knowing about this misinformation for a long time, especially regarding the confederate battle flag. that has never been the confederate flag. every time that flag was attempted to give any kind of official status, it was always rejected even by the confederates' daughters of america. they rejected that flag. that is a battle flag. that's a flag that is really the
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flag of nathan flores when he became the big guy in the ku klux klan. there is some debate about whether he was a founder, so i don't know if he was a founder or not, but i do know he was the first leader. that was his flag. and that flag was popularized by the movie "gone with the wind." that flag has never had an official status. so misinformation has been around for a long time, and the confederate battle flag is one of those things that a lot of people worship and they don't know -- have any idea what it is they are worshipping. they're worshipping false gods. and we have to remember the message is very, very important. i remember being told it's ridiculous to fight about the flag because it's just a rag. the cross means something. the cross is a sign of
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christianity. but tell me it's crazy for me to be against worshipping the flag because it's just a rag, it's not. it's a symbol. >> so, dwayne, as you research this film, as you did the hard work putting it together tracing from the civil war up until today, i guess the question is why it took so long for this to happen in the state of south carolina, why it took so long for that flag to come down. it's been very painful to a lot of people for a very long time, and yet it took the murder of nine black people inside a prayer meeting at a church in charleston for the flag to come down. what was it about the history of the state? what was it about that place and that flag that took that terrible, terrible event for it to come down? >> you know, i think it's across the south, not just south carolina, and one of the very things we wanted to do is just really give a complete history of how the flag went up and how symbols across the south that go back to the confederacy went up,
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and we tried to do so in a way in which we went to legitimate experts or folks who had legitimate cases for their perspective on either side. in south carolina, like most of the south, it's always interesting to see the confederate battle flag in areas outside of the south, in california, new york and some of these other areas you will see the confederate battle flag. i think when seeing the symbol in those states, it really does hit on what the symbol itself means as what my congressman jim clyburn said. it's truly important to understand the importance of symbols. and i also think, because congressman clyburn is a great leader, it's also important to
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listen to legitimate sides of the issue. and once you do that, you're able to make sound decisions. in south carolina, it took 2015 for folks who would claim heritage to now understand or to understand that symbols become more than just what you may personally believe when you look at how they can impact, you know, overall society, our country, our government. >> the pbs documentary is entitled "downing of a flag." house majority whip congressman jim clyburn, thank you. filmmaker dwayne cooper, thank you as well. this is really powerful. we really appreciate you being on this morning. still ahead with three weeks to go until school starts in new york city, mayor bill de blasio has laid out a new vaccine mandate for teachers and school
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staffers. the mayor joins us ahead to talk about that move. plus amid calls for president biden to extend evacuation efforts in afghanistan, the taliban is warning of consequences if the u.s. exit is delayed. "morning joe" is coming right back. this is a gamechanger, who dares to be fearless even when her bladder leaks. our softest, smoothest fabric keeping her comfortable,
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after my car accident, ♪ call owondnder whahatmy c cas. eight million ♪ so i called the barnes firm. i'm rich barnes. youour cidedentase e woh than insurance offered? call the barnes firm now to find out. yoyou ght t beurprpris . the new name of the fully approved pfizer vaccine is comernity, which sounds like a drug community. yes, i'm a valued member of the community. but the vaccine isn't the only thing keeping the fda busy. they recently had to tell people not to treat covid with a drug that's given to animals with
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worms. the people taking it are saying, laugh if you want. i don't have worms and the covid is almost gone. >> willie, you missed yesterday's discussion of the horse and cow deworming medication? >> i did. it's a bad day when the fda puts out a tweet like this that reads, quote, you are not a horse. you are not a cow. seriously, y'all, stop it. it is mystifying when america won't take an fda-approved vaccine but they'll take a medicine meant for cows and horses. >> a lot happened yesterday, though, in the fight against covid. the big development that i think a lot of people were waiting for yesterday, the fda granting full approval to pfizer biontech's
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vaccine for people 16 years and up, the first covid vaccine to pass this final regulatory hurdle. the approval was the fastest in the agency's history, coming less than four months after pfizer filed for licensing. >> and the fda's announcement started a number of new vaccine mandates with more likely to come. new york city now requiring all department of education police to get at least one dose of the covid vaccine by the end of september. new york city's effort to fully reopen the country's largest school district next month is expected to set a standard for many districts across the country. the new mandate affects more than 140,000 employees. the new date to get a dose is september 27. mayor bill de blasio will be our guest this morning to discuss this announcement. plus the pentagon moving
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ahead for requiring the vaccine for all service members. they set a timeline for when service members must receive the shot and will be provided in the coming days. it will be mandated for active duty and national guard troops. there are 30 million active duty and close to 800,000 in the national guard, mika. >> this has really opened the door for the administration to put those mandates across the board. it's also opened the door to people who have been waiting for the ever precious fda approval. it is here. so if you're waiting for fda approval to get that vaccine, you've got it now. you can get the vaccine if you were holding off. president biden is also asking companies to step up their efforts to require vaccines for employees. speaking yesterday at the white house, biden pointed out that vaccine requirements are not something new. >> vaccination requirements have been around for decades.
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students, health care professionals, our troops are typically required to receive vaccination for everything from polio to smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella. in fact, the reason most people in america do not worry about polio, smallpox, measles, mumps and rubella today is because of vaccines. it only makes sense to require a vaccine to stop the spread of covid-19. >> we're going to focus on florida now which recently became the third state in the u.s. to reach 3 million cases of covid-19, the total surpassed only by 15 countries in the entire world. florida. last week the state reported an all-time death record with 1,486 deaths, nearly 15% above the previous record of nearly 1,300 deaths for a week back in january during the last waves. this is florida.
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the state has become one of the worst hot spots in the nation as the delta variant continues to climb in terms of the case count. according to the associated press, florida hospitals slammed with covid-19 patients are suspending elective surgeries and putting beds in conference rooms and auditoriums and the cafeteria. florida, georgia, louisiana and mississippi alone account for more than 40% of all hospitalizations in the country. and there's one common factor here, people not getting the vaccine. let's bring in infectious disease specialist in north palm beach county, dr. lesley diaz. it is great having you on the show. dr. diaz, you and i have been going back and forth about what your colleagues have been going through, what you personally have been going through. what exactly is it like for you
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now? what are the hours you all have been working and tell us about the patients you see coming in to florida hospitals. >> good morning and thank you for having me. it is certainly very exhausting. we are working 14 and 16-hour days relentlessly to try to take care of patients, patients who are young, 20-year-olds, 30-year-olds, 40-year-olds, 50-year-olds, and it's devastating to watch them die. nobody as a doctor, as a professional provider, nobody likes to see that, especially -- not that the older generation is anything less, they're just as important, but these are young people that still have their lives ahead of them and they die in front of us without us being able to do anything. we feel helpless. it can all be preventable,
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preventable by a vaccine that we know is safe and that we know is very effective. >> dr. diaz, your patients, the ones you see coming in, the ones you've been dealing with 14 hours a day now for well over a year, this isn't just a flash in time. you all have been going at this, and it hasn't stopped for florida. these patients, you ask them if they've received the vaccine. how many of them say they haven't? >> in the hospital right now, the majority of the patients are unvaccinated. i would say anywhere between 92% and 94%, which is -- it's very unfortunate. the vaccinated patients that are coming in are an older generation that already have been vaccinated with the beginning of the first wave in january and february. but right now as it stands, the vaccinated are the ones that are
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mainly coming in to the hospital very, very sick. >> i mean, we're at the point where we have to worry about your mental health and your physical health as doctors. but when you ask them why they didn't get the vaccine, what do you hear? >> i hear all sorts of stories. most people really are regretful and they want to, you know, make amends with themselves to say, hey, i did wrong and i want to go ahead and get it once i recover and hopefully go home. but i hear any excuse that you can think of, from it's experimental is the other very common one, to that they're trying to track us. i don't know who "they" are. but it's really a very unfortunate situation. you know, i think that patients
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need to realize that this is still the most reliable and most effective tool that we have out there to be able to mitigate this craziness. >> and my understanding, dr. diaz, is that this delta variant is even more trance miss i believe. it's very, very contagious. and can you explain what some of the patients in the icu, because you've seen it firsthand, what they go through for hours on end and days on end as they're -- if they survive as they're being treated for covid? what is it like? >> it's sort of like a waiting game. these patients come in quickly needing more and more oxygen delivery to sustain a viable oxygenation, and they're at their max, and they can stay at their max before going on the ventilator for a while, for
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days, and they realize that, oh, my goodness, i'm on borrowed time, i think, and they're fearful, and it's exhausting for everybody. well, for the patient, for us watching them, and they don't get better. some get better all of a sudden after, you know, having been on a bipap mask machine prior to intubation for days, for weeks. some get better, but some need intubation and go on a vent. it's very unfortunate. >> dr. leslie diaz, an infectious disease specialist in palm beach county. thank you for everything you do.
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still ahead, correspondent matt bradley joins us as the u.s. ramps up evacuation efforts in kabul. but first let's go to bill karins for a check on the forecast. >> we continue to watch the devastation of henri. overnight henri is finally pushing past the coast of cape cod. it went across the catskills and crossed where it was at rhode island nearly two days ago. we have three areas to watch. the only area i'm concerned with is possible development in the lower caribbean. this could sneak up to the yucatan and possibly south texas in about a week from now. we'll watch that. otherwise it's the dog days of summer. 30 people under heat warnings today and it's going to be especially hot in areas of the
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deep south. look at new orleans, 112 degrees, 108 in st. louis, and that heat is spreading all the way to the east coast and the northeast from henri. also we have the floods in tennessee. sam brock joins us from tennessee. >> reporter: the city of waverly is in a state of shock. >> there's people their whole lives are gone. >> look at that. >> reporter: floodwaters carried homes, upended businesses and stole precious human life, including infant twins, riley and ryan, two of the 21 confirmed deaths with dozens of loved ones still missing. >> we're going to be overwhelmed for the next probably 30 days, at least. overwhelmed. >> reporter: caleb mccourt chased after his family in a boat but couldn't reach his two-year-old stepson who was clinging to his mom. >> she had him in her arms whenever he got swept away. i couldn't get back to him, but she managed to save our other
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four children. if it wasn't for her, i wouldn't have any children right now. >> reporter: some survivors shaken to their core. >> i was in it for myself. they were stuck up there. i've never seen anything like it and all i could think was how am i going to get out of here? >> reporter: others seeking refuge on top of janet rice's rooftop, rescued by helicopter as conditions deteriorate. you hear the term buckled roads all the time. what is that in practice? asphalt ripped up, concaves at this bridge, physical damage to match the emotional toll. even with the broken hearts, a gift from seemingly out of nowhere. family pictures recovered miles away, a reminder of love in the middle of disaster. >> that was nbc's sam brock. we need to talk about the
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connection between climate change and all these deadly flash flooding events and how they're becoming more frequent. we had three extreme rainfall events in this past week, one we just showed you in waverly, and they're all connected with these jet stream patterns and blocking and how the atmosphere can hold more water. in waverly, tennessee, they had heavy rainfall totals. in new york city, they had 8 inches of rain, and tropical storm fred brought 10 inches of rain in harwood county. we leave you a picture of new york city, hot and sunny. we'll be right back. and sunny we'll be right back.
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president biden is facing mounting pressure to extend the departure from afghanistan. some of america's top allies are expected to press the president to keep american troops at the kabul airport past the august 31st deadline, which is one week from today. two u.s. officials tell nbc news president biden is expected to make a decision later today on whether to extend that deadline. the united states military has informed the white house it will take three to four days to get the roughly 6,000 troops and remaining embassy staff out of kabul. that would mean the united states would need to start moving troops out by the end of this week if it wants to meet that august 31st deadline. a spokesperson for the taliban told sky news yesterday the
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united states would be crossing a, quote, red line if the biden administration keeps troops in afghanistan past the 31st. here is what national security advisor jake sullivan told reporters yesterday when asked about that deadline. >> as i said, we are engaging with the taliban, consulting with the taliban on every aspect of what's happening in kabul right now, on what's happening at the airport, on how we need to ensure that there is facilitated passage to the airport for american citizens, sivs, third country nationals and so forth. we'll continue those conversations with them. ultimately it will be the president's decision how this proceeds, no one else's. >> and, mika, the "washington post" is reporting that the cia director met with the head of the taliban yesterday to talk about the conditions that may change here to move that deadline past august 31st after the taliban said yesterday it would be a red line for them if the american troops were still
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there. >> meanwhile, the u.s. is ramping up evacuations in kabul. nearly 11,000 people were airlifted out during a 12-hour period yesterday, bringing the total number of people evacuated to approximately 48,000 since august 14th. matt bradley joins us from outside ramstein air base in germany with the latest. matt? >> reporter: thanks, mika. here at ramstein air base, this is where so many of those are far from the drama you see at kabul airport. this is one of their destinations before they move on to the u.s. or another third country. once they reach here, they're safe. they have food, water, health care, temporary shelters set up not only by the active duty troops but by family members that are volunteering. unlike the images you see in the states where people are providing goods, donating stuff,
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building shelters for people, we saw that in here, just volunteering out of the goodness of their heart. but even though afghan evacuees don't really want for anything once they arrive here, they have everything taken care of. what they don't have is information, and a lot of the people i spoke with were very upset about the fact that they don't know when they're going to be leaving here or where they're going to be going. so here at ramstein air base, there is a lot of frustration, but as you're also about to see, also some hope. chaos at kabul's airport, a crush of thousands desperate to get out. 20 people were killed around the airport in the last week, including one during a deadly fire fight involving u.s. forces. after president biden announced the acceleration of evacuations ahead of the august 31st deadline. the taliban is calling that a red line, saying there will be consequences if troops stay longer. the u.s. embassy, which has
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moved to the airport, now telling those who aren't eligible for evacuation to stay away. >> if you do not have approval for a flight, you should leave the area surrounding the airport immediately. >> reporter: the taliban, known for its brutality and mysogeny, releasing its own images of forces patrolling the streets of kabul when girls are going to school. but they're trying to get people out. 26 countries are helping in the effort, getting nearly 17,000 evacuees to eight transport hubs, including one at germany's ramstein air base. these people have been through a massive ordeal. some are american citizens and some of them are very angry. they say they've been abandoned by the u.s. government. kamir shazai is an american citizen living in afghanistan. on one evacuation flight, a
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glimmer of hope. an afghan refugee went into labor, giving birth on the tarmac. >> she was understandably quite scared. i was just trying to be with eye contact, you got this, mama, and trying to reassure her that the team here knew what she was doing and that she had landed safely in germany. >> reporter: a moment of humanity amid so much anguish. just to give you a sense, mika, of the kind of bureaucracy that we're facing here, there were, as of last night when we checked these numbers, there were 39 flights that have come in here to ramstein air base. only two so far have been confirmed to have left, and we're going to get those numbers. those numbers are changing as we speak and they're going to be changing throughout the day, but as you can see, there is a massive backlog. this is one of the big bottlenecks here, mika. >> matt, you've touched on really great specifics here, but what these people are going through, these are the lucky ones. this is a long process and it seems so arduous.
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tell us -- explain to us what it's like for these families who are in transition. >> reporter: yeah, i mean, we spoke to some of them yesterday. they're out of danger when they're here, as i mentioned. that's something that we felt that palpable relief. but the relief, the uncertainty is setting in. now what we see is they start to wonder what their lives are going to be looking like here on out now that they're out of that immediate danger. we saw some injuries, there were people walking around that camp yesterday who had visible injuries they said they sustained during that horrific scrum at the airport as they were trying to get out. they had medical attention from that. you heard about the nurse who helped deliver a baby right here on ramstein air base on a tarmac on a c-14 transport flight. there is so much difficulty, so much heroism that led up to getting here.
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now there's so much uncertainty and so much frustration, and it's adding to the gauntlet that so many of these people have already been through. mika? >> nbc's matt bradley, thank you very much. coming up, we'll speak to new york city mayor bill de blasio about the state's new governor as well as the new vaccine mandates for public schoolteachers and staff. "morning joe" is back in a moment. a moment
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cnn's dominic chu joins us now. what do you ever? >> we're watching companies step in in that massive evacuation effort from afghanistan. the latest is airbnb. they are planning to start housing 20,000 afghan refugees around the world free of charge. airbnb's ceo brian chesky said the properties will be listed on the company's website and the stays will be funded by airbnb. chesky did not elaborate how much they plan to spend on the program or how long it will last but did say, quote, the displacement and resettlement of afghan refugees in the u.s. and elsewhere is one of the biggest humanitarian crises of our time. we feel a responsibility to step up. meanwhile disney is reaching a deal with its unions to require all employees at disney world resorts that are unionized to be fully vaccinated against covid by october 22nd. the services trade council union which represents around 43,000
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so-called cast members in their florida resorts say disney will host on-site vaccine events over the next few weeks. this move comes about a month or so after disney said all salaried and non-union hourly workers must be fully vaccinated by september. there is currently no deal struck with union members in california that represent disneyland in anaheim. finally, walmart is launching a business to connect other retailers with their consumers. it will be a white label service meaning goods won't be delivered in walmart brand in vehicles. the company said it will offer competitively priced shipping within two hours as well as a two-day shipping option. they will be handled by current walmart employees and other companies that they may outsource the work to. they expect to be shipping by the end of this year, and the delivery fleet will include new
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technologies like self-driving vehicles and drones as well. mika, getting into the delivery business. it could be a game changer for some of the folks out there. >> it could. cnn's dom chu, thank you very much. speaking yesterday after the fda fully approved pfizer's covid vaccine, president biden talked about the best way for parents to keep their children safe during the pandemic. >> i know the parents are thinking about their own kids. it's not as reassuring as anyone would like it to be. so let me say this to the parents. you have the tools, you have the tools to keep your child safer, and two of those tools above all are available to you. one, make sure that everyone around your child who can be vaccinated is vaccinated. parents, adults, teens. two, make sure your child is masked when they leave home.
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that's how we can best keep our kids safe. as i've said before, the pandemic of the unvaccinated is a tragedy that is preventable. people are dying and will die who don't have to. so please, please if you haven't gotten your vaccination, if you haven't gotten vaccinated, do it now. you can save your life and the lives of those you love. >> get vaccinated, make sure your children wear masks. it's so simple. but the masking of students remains controversial, at least in florida, where school board members for broward county have until 10:00 this morning, that's an hour and ten minutes from now, to either adhere to the state's ban of mask mandates in school or face financial penalties. joining us now, school board chair for broward county, florida dr. rosalind osgood.
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dr. osgood, what do you plan to do? >> well, we are responding. we will give a written response to the letter that we received on thursday. we have voted to to mandate mas. we opened schools. we saw what happened in schools that didn't mandate masks. we are continuing to mandate masks. we believe we are in compliance with the executive order and the rule from department of education because we have options for students who have medical notes from doctors and ieps or 5014 plans. we are moving on what we voted on. we asked our legal counsel to seek legal avenues to challenge the executive order and rule from department of education. we believe the governor is overreaching his authority. we believe the constitution
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gives local school boards the authority to make decisions for local school districts. >> dr. osgood, that means you're going to lose your salary. why are you doing this? >> well, we're doing it because we really believe we're doing the right thing for the people of broward county with positivity rates being higher than they've ever been before, having the experience of people dying from covid, people impacted by covid, being left with negative positivity rates, we can't risk people's lives with this pandemic. you know, for me personally, it is really simple. if you don't wear a mask, you have potential to lose your life. wearing a mask, we have not one incident where somebody has died from wearing a mask. so we believe that mask is a
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mitigation tool we must use especially when children under 12 cannot be vaccinated. >> what are you hearing from parents about this and especially those that may choose not to be vaccinated. are you hearing vocally from people in your community about this? >> yeah. we're hearing vocally and through emails when you're out in the community. i'm in a sorority with educators, they're so happy we're using masks as a mitigation tool. we know there's a large number of people that are not vaccinated and we just can't put others at risk. we have to continue to push vaccinations like president biden has been doing. we also have to use masks to protect people to mitigate damage and potential of the airborne pandemic of making people sick or killing them.
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>> what do you think of the governor's anti-mask mandate, what do you think he is doing here? is there anything positive to it. i don't understand it. do you? >> i really don't understand it, especially the whole thing about parents' rights because in schools we have something called local parentes, the teacher is like the quasi parent. we know that any of our individual rights stop when it has potential to harm others. when i get into a car with my grandchildren, i have to put them in a car seat. there are many cultures that practice drinking wine and those types of things in their homes with kids that are 15, 16, 17, but they can't drink or use alcohol when they're at school so i really don't understand it. i don't know what the governor is thinking but for me, it's really not about the governor, it's about lives of the people
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that work in our district and students that attend school and we have to use masks and keep them safe. we did it when the positivity rate was a lot lower. why not use masks now when the positivity rate is higher than it's ever been, when florida continues to break records by having the largest number of covid cases day by day by day. >> willie geist, thanks for being with us this morning. this all sounds insane to a lot of people watching. you're trying to take care of your kids in your school, trying to protect them and your teachers and you're about to be penalized. the school board voted 8-1 in favor of masking. department of education now says we're going to fine you if you go through with that decision. what does that mean specifically? say you keep masks in schools like it sounds like you're going to do. what happens next? how much money are you fined, who is fined, what does it look like?
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>> so it averages about $31,000 a month for the eight of us that voted no, that voted to mandate masks, and they will start withholding that $31,000 a month. president biden has said that he will allow us to take it from our elementary and second degree education relief funds, but even taking it from another pot, those funds could be used to help our students in the classrooms. it is just a ridiculous thing that we're going through right now. you know, our community like all this nation has been really, really traumatized by the covid-19 pandemic. and we really just want to protect our students, our staff, get back to educating our kids so we can help accelerate learning to make up for some covid slide, but we're having to spend a lot of time dealing with
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this mask issue. why not allow us to implement our plan. we agreed we would revisit it after labor day. why not allow us to do it to see what kind of results or data we get and then if it is not working, make a change. but what we've seen is the reverse. school districts that opened up with masks optional, now many of them have come on board because of the covid outbreaks. there was a young kid that died this week, last week rather in tallahassee that died from covid. a three or four-year-old kid. we just don't want that to happen in broward county public schools. >> totally understand. school board chair for broward county, florida, dr. roselind osgood. thank you for the commitment to the children you serve. i put a piece on twitter for know your value for people i
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care about, hope they get the vaccine. i am getting a warning from twitter that replies may contain offensive content. all you need to know. that does it for us this morning. chris jansing picks up coverage after a quick final break. overa after a quick final break. without my medication, my small tremors would be extreme. i was diagnosed with parkinson's. i had to retire from law enforcement. it was devastating. one of my medications is three thousand dollars per month. prescription drugs do not work if you cannot afford them. aarp is fighting for americans like larry, and we won't stop. that's why we're calling on congress to let medicare negotiate lower prescription drug prices. i always wanted to know more about my grandfather. he...was a hardworking man who came to new york from puerto rico when he was 17. with ancestry, being able to put the pieces of the puzzle together... ...it's amazing. it's honestly amazing.
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servicenow. hi there, chris jansing in for stephanie ruhle. it is tuesday, august 24th. we start this morning with major breaking news in afghanistan. nbc news just confirmed that cia director welcome burns held a secret meeting with the taliban de facto leader in kabul. it comes as president biden faces growing pressure to extend our troop withdrawal deadline past august 31st. and he needs to decided to if he'll do that, otherwise the pentagon probably won't be able to get u.s. troops out

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