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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 6, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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cases in the country. i say to these governors, please help. if you aren't going to help, please get out of the way. >> joe biden has taken to himself to try to single out florida over covid. what is his big solution? what is he so upset about florida? his solution is he wants to have the government force kindergarteners to wear masks in school. he thinks that should be a decision for the government. i can tell you, in florida the parents are going to be the ones in if charge of that decision. so why don't you do your job, why don't you get this border secure and until you do that, i don't want to hear a blip about covid from you. >> what's your response to governor desantis who's using your words about don't be in the way he's saying i am in the way. what's your response, mr.
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president? >> governor who? >> desantis. >> that was president biden's reaction to florida's republican governor, ron desantis. willie, he is just -- his childish response to not just the president but other people concerned that ron desantis is passing top-down mandates, forcing people whether it's small businesses in florida to not be able to protect themselves or school boards not be able to protect themselves. he's trying to run covid like an emperor out of tallahassee, florida. one size does not fit all 67 counties. but ron desantis acting like a socialist thinking it does. >> of course, there's irony in him complaining about the top down from the white house giving orders where he's going top down at the state house telling school districts what they can
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and can't do. there are many that are different saying we're going to go ahead with the mask mandate. there's a big problem in florida right now we'll get to covid infections, hospitalizations and deaths as delta variant goes across the country. and now moderna saying booster shots may be necessary. miguel almaguer has more. >> reporter: just as new vaccination rates begin to rise in states where hesitancy is high, moderna joins pfizer saying americans will likely need a booster for winter. moderna says its vaccine remains durable six months after the second dose its efficacy dipping to 93%. >> are you surprised to hear them say that boosters are not necessary yet? >> i'm not surprised in the not
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yet. we just don't know how long that will last. >> reporter: with nearly 140 million doses of its two-shot regiment administered in the u.s., moderna says research is under way to see if boosters between the three companies offering the vaccine can be mixed and matched. the delta variant proving to be a game changer. >> i think we're pretty worried now. if you look at the delta variant, it took a surprising step. i don't think any of us three, four months ago predicted something this infectious. >> reporter: delta variant is moving the metrics in a dangerous direction with cases spiking in 40 cases, deaths, infections and hospitalizations are up roughly 40%. >> as the delta variant becomes more prolific, how do the boosters address that? >> we need to bring the delta variant into the vaccine, that way we're teaching the immune
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system what the delta variant looks like in the vaccine. >> soon children not yet old enough to be vaccinated will return to school in counties where spread is high. >> there is no question we'll see outbreaks in schools with this delta variant, the question is how many and how big will they get. >> reporter: as parents return to the office, delta is increasing the risk they too could spread the virus to children, still waiting to be vaccinated. >> children under the age of 12 are not just little adults as we know. one thing we need to figure out is what is the right dose. >> reporter: an evolving virus bringing home a new threat. the cdc is reporting the number of people in the hospital with covid has almost quadrupled to nearly 45,000. in florida nearly 13,000 people are hospitalized.
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florida is also seeing a rise in the number of pediatric cases with 135 children hospitalized. texas is the only other state to report more children hospitalized than florida a total of 242 children. texas is experiening the steepest rise in covid-19 hospitalization since the pandemic began. the surge is placing a strain on the texas health care system with hospitals now dealing with a staffing crisis. one example. quote, texas nurse jenna price gets half a dozen solicitations a day from hospitals and staffing agencies that want to pay her four times her current salary to leave her job at a suburban central texas emergency room and take a temporary assignment in another hospital that needs nurses. the covid burnout is causing nurses to leave the profession in droves. there are currently 23,000 unfilled jobs in texas for
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registered nurses than there are nurses to fill them. let's bring in the ceo of harris health system. doctor thank you for being with us this morning. give us a snapshot of inside your hospital rights now, how many cases are you seeing, and how different is that from a few weeks ago. >> good morning, thank you for having me. let me start as always by thanking our health care staff, doctors, nurses, specifically my system we've been dealing with this pandemic for now a year and a half. and also all health care staff here in harris county, texas, and everywhere, to answer a specific question, the numbers are going up, the numbers are going up rapidly. the point that i made not long ago was the fact that it's not so much that the numbers are
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going up, the rate at which the numbers are going up is unprecedented. you know, this is now our fourth wave of covid-19 and, again, the rate by which the numbers are going up is incredible. i made the point that in the previous surge for us to go from a baseline level of patients and cases in our areas to a high similar to what we have right now, took us about 12, 13 weeks. it has only taken us five weeks to do that this time around. less than a month ago, about a month ago in my system we had a total of 11 covid-19 patients. that number today is 111. so there's a ten-fold increase in the number of patients. it's just a matter of five weeks. >> doctor, we've heard this is a pandemic now of the unvaccinated. how many of the cases inside your hospital are among
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vaccinated people? >> that is probably the most important point that i would like to get across here. this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. you know, i look at my numbers this morning. unfortunately since january 1st of this year, i have lost -- my system has lost 128 people related to covid-19 infections. 128 deaths across the harris health system due to covid-19 infection. not a single person that has lost their lives due to covid was vaccinated. fully vaccinated. zero percent. >> sorry, doctor, but what about the current hospitalizations, that tells the story the number you gave us, but right now as we look at the delta variant spreading in texas, florida and other places across the country, how many of your hospitalized patients are vaccinated?
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>> less than 2%. so 98% -- more than 98% of the people currently hospitalized in the regular hospital bed or icu are those who have not been vaccinated. more than 98%. >> what's the way out of this from your view? we've seen efforts made at the federal, state and local level to get people vaccinated. you told the story right there, it's a snapshot of what's happening in the country what more needs to be done to get people vaccinated? >> really stay on point about the safety and the effectiveness of the vaccine. unfortunately you ask me what can be done right now. even if the entire population got vaccinated today. we're still talking about three weeks to a month from now when we can see the impact. but there are things that we have done collectively as a society that got us through the
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last two covid-19 surges. they were very effective, when the numbers were going up, there was a face mask mandate. there was a closure of bars, there was a capping of the restaurant, those worked. within two weeks of those mandates the numbers began to go down. we are at a point right now, this is almost like a runaway train. if we don't use everything that is at our disposal, we are heading into some really, really dark times the likes of which we have not seen previously. and i don't get the sense that the public understands that. >> the governor of your state, governor abbott, has shown an unwillingness to support mask mandates. in fact, he's fighting the idea
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of mask mandates, was one of the earliest states to open up last year and the state did well after that, what would be your message to governor abbott and others fighting the mask mandates in school. >> i think what i heard at the top of the hour is a really good message. allow the localities to what is needed to address the situation in their areas. again, not the entire state of texas is the same. there are areas doing a lot worse than others. allow the elected officials to do what needs to be done, what can be done at this point to get us over this surge. >> dr. porsa, president and ceo of harris health system in texas, thank you for your time this morning and the work you're doing inside your hospitals. one more story out of texas, a republican official in the state has lost his fight against
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covid-19 h scott apply was a member of the dickinson city council, his social media messages included anti-mask and vaccine rhetoric. he was admitted to a gal reston hospital two days after his last facebook message mocked the pandemic. a tragedy to see that gentleman lose his life and so many people we've been hearing about as they're put on respirators, put on ventilators, ask for the vaccine but it's too late. >> it's tragic and unnecessary. i know too many friends that have not gotten the vaccine and i know a friend who is struggling mightily right now without a vaccine. and at this point all you can do is pray for them.
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i sure wish that officials in their party were more aggressive in snuffing out some of the misinformation that is killing people. president biden recently announced 100 million doses of the covid vaccine have been shipped overseas to help the international battle against the virus. nbc news senior investigative legal correspondent cynthia mcfadden has why that's so important for the fight against the pandemic here in the u.s. >> reporter: an international pandemic requires an international response. and that was the idea behind covax, a multi-billion dollar alliance launched to ensure that poor countries would get access to the life-saving vaccines. it hasn't entirely worked out that way. nearly 18 months into the pandemic covax has delivered vaccine to 138 countries, but still only about 15% of the
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world's population is fully vaccinated. with the highest numbers found in the world's richest countries. >> the greatest threat to our vaccination effort at home is our failure to invest adequately in vaccination abroad. the delta variant that we are suffering now is a by-product of the virus spreading unchecked abroad. >> reporter: in march we were given exclusive access to the rollout of nearly 900,000 vaccines in uganda, enough to vaccinate about 1% of the population. distribution is time consuming and expensive which we saw as the team delivered 40 vaccines to the islands. >> it's wonderful to have this but yet a smaller amount than you hoped. >> reporter: dr. larry brilliant helped with smallpox.
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he said we cannot wait. >> either we export vaccine manufacturers, or we import from those same countries and others variants. >> reporter: so while the gift of 100 million doses with the promise of more to come is welcome it still leaves covax under resourced. perhaps the minister of health in uganda said it best. >> every human life matters. we have to hold hands together if we are going to win this war. >> reporter: today, less than 2% of those living in the developing world have been vaccinated. and that is a problem for everyone. >> let's bring in white house reporter for the associated press jonathan lemire. this is an issue that's been bounced around the biden administration for some time they made some efforts to do it, do you suspect with us seeing the delta variant and understanding that it came from -- well, from the virus
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racing unchecked across countries overseas that we may actually be even more aggressive in getting vaccines to third world countries? >> the delta variant believe to have originated in india, joe. this is the white house has received a lot of pressure in recent months about this, the u.s. has a surplus of vaccines, can't give them away. we talk every morning about the population in the u.s. that is hesitant and refusing to take a shot while most of the world is begging for them. for the first few months of the biden administration they were not exporting anything over seas and then they participated in covax. and we have seen in recent weeks the u.s. has increased the number of vaccines they're sending elsewhere. but it's still a drop in the bucket compared with what is needed and now the looming controversy about the subject, booster shots. we heard from pfizer and moderna who believe booster shots will
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be needed here in the united states. and we heard from the world health organization this week, saying no country should be giving out booster shots now because those doses should be given to countries where people are looking for their first shot. we asked jen psaki about it this week she said the u.s. has the ability to do both, they believe they have enough doses, continue to manufacture enough vaccine, they'll be able to increase what they're sending overseas and also be able to give booster shots for those who need them. and those with underlying health conditions and senior citizens may need them by the next year. >> moderna said the next few months so there's not going to be an appetite to ship the vaccine off. president biden expressed his gratitude to the police officers who responded to the january 6th capitol attack yesterday. as he awarded them the congressional gold medal for
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their service protecting their country. >> my fellow americans let's remember what this was about, it was a violent attempt to overturn the will of the american people, to seek power at all cost, replace the ballot with brute force. to destroy, not to build. without democracy nothing is possible. with it everything is. we cannot allow history to be rewritten. we cannot allow the heroism of these officers to be forgotten. we have to understand what happened. the honest and unvarnished truth. we have to face it. >> a lot of people don't want to face it. a congressional gold medal also will be awarded to the headquarters of the u.s. capitol police and the washington d.c. metropolitan police department. the federal aviation administration is warning companies to monitor how much alcohol they're serving
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customers. it follows a spike in unruly and dangerous behavior on planes. they express concern about serving alcohol to customers in bars before take off. it comes after passengers duct taped a man to his seat on a flight after he groped two flight attendants and got in a fight with another. spirit once again cancelled hundreds of flights again yesterday. tom costello has more. >> reporter: day five of the spirit airlines melt you know. stranded passengers stuck in hours long lives weaving through lines nationwide. spirit had promised things would start to improve. instead it cancelled another 400 flights, 52% of its schedule after canceling 60% tuesday and
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wednesday, 40% on monday. more than 1,700 flights this week. >> we're not getting the flights, everybody is just on stand by. >> i lost two days of work because of this. >> spirit said the problem started sunday with whether-related cancellations, add to that the surge in summer travelers, staffing shortages and computer problems and spirits' dominos fell all week. >> spirit has never been a strong airlines in terms of operations and what happened this week exposed the problems. >> reporter: leaving passengers stranded and stuck. >> we rented airbnb so we don't have a place to stay as of now. >> tom costello reporting there. words you never want to hear about your airline, spirit has never been a strong airline in terms of operations. >> i know. not hopeful. we -- with you do hope the passengers finally get to their destinations. sad news, richard trumka,
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the leader of one of the largest labor unions in the united states has passed away. president biden said he spoke with the family and learned trumka died of a heart attack while on a camping trip with his family. the son and grandson of coal miners, he rose to become the united mine worker's of america president, and then lead the afl-cio since 2009. he was secretary treasurer of the organization for more than a decade before becoming its leader. he oversaw a federation with more than 12 million members and ushered in a more aggressive style of leadership. trumka was tough and combative, a throwback to an old guard of
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union leaders from the labor movement's heyday. he often focused on making the case for the unions to the white blue-collar workers who turned away from democrats and speaking bluntly to them. richard trumka was 72 years old. jonathan lemire, obviously the union movement has been back on its heels for some time. i knew richard trumka and worked with him some and liked him very, very much. he was aggressive, but he also -- he knew how to work with people on both sides of the aisle. no doubt, especially in these challenging times for union leaders and union members and union membership, he'll be greatly missed. >> he certainly did work with leaders on both sides of the aisle, he met with president trump when he was in office. a lot of his union workers broke their traditional ranks of
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voting for democrats and back in 2016, but he was a close personal friend of president biden, who spoke emotionally about him yesterday, charles schumer broke down on the senate floor when announcing the des death. trumka was a larger than life figure in many ways and someone who aggressively advocaing for his workers in a moment when the sway the unions have over the political process has declined. there are moments here or there where unions still matter and joe biden is trying to, on a day -- a bit of sad timing. it comes on a day where biden had an event yesterday about electric cars and the manufacturing he wants to see to lower carbon emissions. he says the key to that would be union workers. and said that would be perhaps a tribute for trumka after he has
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passed on. >> richard trumka came from a family of coal miners rose to lead a coal miners union and then the afl-cio. he died at 72 years old. still ahead we'll be joined by miguel cardona over school mask mandates. plus president biden takes a spin around the south lawn in an electric jeep. we'll look at his new executive order to help the automobile industry. also, highlights from the olympic games in tokyo and the end of an era for soccer super star lionel messi. you're watching "morning joe" we'll be right back. watching " we'll be right back. i've lost count of how many asthma attacks i've had. but my nunormal with nucala? fewer asthma attacks. nucala is a once-monthly add-on injection for severe eosinophilic asthma. not for sudden breathing problems.
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welcome back to "morning joe." that's a live picture at 7:28 in the evening in tokyo, the olympic flame. let's get through some of what's happened today. starting in the sand where american beach volleyball duo april ross and alix klineman won gold. ross a three-time olympian now has a complete medal set while clineman's debut at the game helps team usa return to the top of the podium for the first time since 2012. indoor the women's volleyball team is set to play for its first gold medal after a victory over serbia. it's now 54 olympic wins in a row for the united states women's basketball team. extraordinary. the 79-59 victory over serbia this morning earns them a chance to play for a seventh
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consecutive gold medal. and nelly korda leads the women's olympic golf tournament, she's at minus 15, three strokes ahead of the field going into this evening's final round. american women dominating in tokyo. to the news that rocked the world of soccer yesterday, lionel messi will not return to la liga and the barcelona club he has played his entire career. the team said, quote, despite club and player reaching an agreement and clear intention to sign a new contract today this cannot happen because of financial and structural obstacles. the 34-year-old messi has been with barcelona for 17 seasons during which he has won 10 league titles and won the bah len dore a record six times. you're our resident soccer expert, joe. how big a deal is this? >> it's a massive deal.
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he's 34 years old. and for most people a 34-year-old football player would be exiting the stage in a year or two, but look at what tom brady has done into his 40s. messi may not be able to do that in the same way but there are going to be a lot of clubs willing to bet a lot of money at him still being at the top of his game for two, three, four years. so the question is where does he go. and jonathan lemire, as liverpool fans i think we need to be worried about him reuniting with pep and going to man city since city has the money they need and obviously they're never held accountable. they aren't held to the same rules that the rest of the world clubs are held to. they can spend whatever money they want and for some reason they're never sanctioned so it seems they'll write a big check to messi and we'll have to deal
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with him for a couple more years. >> city has all the money. it's taken twists and turns because his departure was rumored a year or so ago. and the rumors then were manchester city would be his destination. and then there was a surprising agreement that he was going to stay with barcelona, take a pay cut, reflecting he's 34, an older age for a football player and now this sort of stunning announcement, which is absolutely an end of an era in european soccer. there are rumors that he wanted at least one act in the epl and manchester city sadly seems like the most likely destination where it will be the rich get richer and liverpool coming off a disappointing season now has, joe, likely a fiercer rival to overcome if we want to get back
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to the top of the table. >> no doubt it's going to be tough. it's hard for americans to understand what massive news this was yesterday not only in barcelona but across the globe. shocking news. and he's got to be the most recognized athlete in the world. so absolutely huge news. willie, the one question that lemire and i asked when we heard he was leaving barcelona is whether he can pitch, if he can we can put him in our starting rotation because we don't have a pitcher that can take us past one inning. >> he's a south paw may give you good innings. to put a cap on the sports section, the yankee team they're putting together with bubble gums and tape, they found these two kids, do you want a uniform, come in, they did a nice job but they're creeping up, only four
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back from the boston red sox. >> the slumping boston red sox, the embattled boston red sox. about to have their season slip away from them boston red sox. it must be nice willie to have -- speaking of unlimited payrolls to make manchester city look like a small market teams when the yankees go out and buy whatever they need. look, this is a phrase that pains me to say, credit to the yankees, though, for at the deadline trying to improve their team. they brought in a couple bats, needed lefty hitters and better fielders. the red sox needed starting pitching and they didn't do anything about it. they lost six out of second, solidly in second place. yankees coming, blue jays not far-off. we have four games in toronto this weekend, which is a huge series suddenly. >> it's remarkable when you look at the fact that we've been
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overachieving all year. i don't know what you're smirking about willie. we've been overachieving all year. if there were ever a trade deadline where a club should have picked up a player or two, this was it. we had guys that actually were overachieving. we were having pitchers giving up five, six runs a game but we were scoring nine, ten runs a game for them and that couldn't keep up the entire season. we had a shot at staying in first and doing well and going strong into the fall. but you can't do that with the starting rotation that we have where you do have pitchers giving up five, six, even runs a game and we knew that from the beginning of the year, and for some reason decided not to compete. we just didn't compete. and we're seeing -- and i can't help but think that didn't send a message to the clubhouse. that we're not going to compete.
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and we've seen how badly things have gone. but, willie, the yankees did step up and i've always said this is a long season. a couple days ago said the yankees were coming. it's because they did make the investment, i was watching the game last night, seattle up 3-2, it's a three-run home run. that's what you're supposed to do if you want to win world series, make your team better at the series and joey gallow doing an incredible job night after night and yankees stadium exploded when the ball went out of the park. >> and rizzo has been a great addition to the clubhouse as well. it felt like a lost season but they brought these two guys in had. but you still own the wild card,
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still up four games on us. i'm just poking the bear. the curse still lingers over you. >> the june swoon came in early august. >> when does college football start? >> couple weeks. coming up next, something completely different. our next guest asks the question when you contemplate the end of democracy in america, what kind of person brings it about? and the look at the must read opinion pages including one from david brooks who argues, quote, the biden approach is working. we'll see what he means when "morning joe" comes right back opinion shingles? camera man: yeah, 1 out of 3 people get shingles in their lifetime. well that leaves 2 out of 3 people who don't. i don't know anybody who's had it. your uncle had shingles.
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. joining us now columnist associate editor of the "washington post" and political analyst eugene robinson. donny deutsch and staff writer ann apple balm. i want to talk about your meeting, ann, about your piece entitled the mypillow guy could destroy democracy. when you contemplate the end of democracy in america, what kind of of person do you think will bring it about? here is what you probably don't imagine, an affable, self-made midwesterner, a recovered crack addict no less who laughs when jokes are made at his expense, a patriot he says who may be doing more damage than anyone since
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jefferson davis. mike lindell is helping to create profound distrust in the electoral system, political system and american democracy. you can mock lindell, but money of them will seem funny when we truly have an illegitimate president in the white house and a total breakdown of law and order. tell us about your meeting with mike lindell, ann. what did you take from him? >> i was interested in meeting him because i have a long standing interest in ideologies and people who believe things with a fer-vence and sincerity and he seemed to be one of them. some people in that camp are opportunists or they're in it for the money. and he seems to genuinely believe at some point -- he originally said this august, now he's saying later -- the supreme court is going to vote 9-0 to
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reinstate donald trump and trump will be president again. and he believes that he has data that somebody has given him which will prove that the chinese intervened in the our election and changed the result. and nothing, you cannot offer him a single argument that will dissuade him, not even the argument that all of the -- in all of the disputed states, votes were hand counted. so there can be no -- there are no problem with the machines, it's complete fiction. and yet he remains convinced of this, and more than that, he's spending a lot of money to promote it. he tried to advertise on fox and they seem to have -- didn't want him to do it. but he's also organizing this symposium that starts in a few days in south dakota where he's going to present this evidence and the experts who have analyzed it are going to emerge. he said he spent tens of
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millions of dollars on it, he booked hotel rooms in sioux falls, south dakota and there's a long tradition of very wealthy people using their money to promote conspiracy theories and to push bad ideas. and he fits absolutely into that tradition. >> so he, obviously, mocked -- he's mocked regularly as you said, just like donald trump was mocked when he first started running for president and almost everybody said there's no way the guy could be elected president of the united states. what is -- you've written a book about this, you've written about ill liberal leaders in europe, you've written about misinformation, disinformation, what is the best approach to not only confront people like
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mr. pillow here, but also friends and acquaintances that show up in your emails' inbox that spread one conspiracy theory after another? >> so, you know, in lindell's case, it's really a form of almost religious belief. i don't want to confuse it with real religion, which is something different. but it has that quality to it. it's a form of faith and not a form of reason or logic. i think really the only way to do it is to kind of change the subject and get people to talk about things -- areas where you can agree. and slowly try to create some other areas of agreement and conversation, and only then is it possible really to try and get through to these people. but someone like lindell, it may not be possible. it's a real faith, it has a religious quality, it's not --
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he doesn't respond to contradictions or questions. and one of the scary things i think is that historically people like that, when they're predicted -- the predicted event doesn't happen, whether it's the end of the world or the messiah coming, when it doesn't occur they don't give up, they recalibrate and say it didn't happen this time because of x or y reasons or we didn't have enough faith or because the supreme court is full of chinese communists or whatever the excuse will be. and they will continue. and i -- the real thing to do i think is to get to the followers and the doubters, and the people who aren't quite as convinced and to try to show them that the things that the things that people like lindell predict don't happen. >> how does this happen? where would my friends and advanced degrees, law degrees, my family members who were
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conservative, evangelical, constitutionalists their entire life and now following whatever former reality tv host tells them to follow and believe and not take vaccine shots if that's what they think the cult demands of them. what would have happened to all of these people, including lindell if hillary clinton had gotten 50, 60, 70,000 more votes and if donald trump had never been president? >> so of course they existed before they. and that element was part of our culture and has been for a long time. i mean, what i'm afraid of is that donald trump really did change a part of the republican party. i don't want to say all the party because we have to hope that the dissidents will eventually win this argument.
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that during his presidency he repeatedly continued the lies from the highest office in the land and the continued lies, particularly about the election, that the election was stolen, the repetitive nature of that, he was the president of the united states, but that has changed a lot of people's minds for good. and it is going to be difficult to bring them back -- it's not about bringing them back into the main stream, it's about bringing them back to constitutionalism and the belief that our electoral system is functional. what i'm afraid of now is that a generation of lower level gop officials, people in charge of running elections, in states like arizona and georgia, that we are going to elect people who are willing to change results, who do believe that there's something false or fake about our system and it needs to be improved upon by the minority. the real danger is 2022 or 2024
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when we may see people begin to change the results of the elections. i think being aware of this, understanding it's possible, talking as much as possible about it, getting democrats to pay attention to the problem, thinking through in advance what the solutions might be, i think all of that is important right now. >> let's not forget how donald trump elevated the mypillow guy, too. he was at the white house just days before the inauguration of joe biden and he was talking about marshal law, and they're talking about what still can be done bringing him to a place in trump world of significance. as ann says the problem here is that these conspiracy theories persist, drive down ballot, look inside georgia or arizona or places people are still messing with voting machines, they're making laws that are going to make the back end of voting where people say that election is close, here are a group of
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officials that might be able to change it in our favorite. this stuff is our there and this mypillow guy is big in that move. >> the solution for mypillow guy and misinformation about vaccine, i'm a broken record on the show, when 50% of the people get their news from facebook, there's your problem and as far as vaccinations go, 65% of misinformation is coming from 12 sources of facebook. and so the mike lindells of the world don't exist or don't have any air without the platforms. ann, i want to ask you a question, also. i say this with such respect and reverence and your credentials speak for themselves. do we make a mistake giving this guy more air? i know it's not the solution to put our heads in the air. when i see you, somebody of your level and the atlantic, profiling him and obviously you point out -- do we -- are we -- is that going back to willie's
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question about trump, had we early on, instead of saying this is a side show and let's treat it, as opposed to cover it, this is a guy completely out of his mind, no credibility to anything he's saying, so why does he deserve an ann applebalm, that's my question? >> a lot of people did ask me that. my interest in his was kind of historical and political. who is someone like this, where does he come from, how does he think, and the article is an attempt to explain that if you read it. i think we make a mistake in ignoring this stuff. you know, qanon was ignored for a long time and this -- you know, this big lie of conspiracy theory, you could ignore it, keep it off the so-called main stream which is just a tiny fragment of the american media. you could have watchers of msnbc and readers of "the at lan tic"
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not know about it but it's important to understand because it does spread on facebook and gab and other forms of social media, and, you know, other television -- you know, other kinds of cable news. one america network or news max. and explaining to people what it is and how they think and how -- and how people's -- you know, how people like that mind's work, as i repeat, it's not unique in history at all. you can find fanatics like that all the way back to the 20th century and beyond. explaining to people how they think is part of figuring out what we do about it and preparing ourselves for the appeal of these ideas. these ideas don't go away just because you don't talk about them. >> gene robinson, we can dismiss lindell as a side show or a clown as some people have. but to ann's point right there,
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what he is saying is believed, if not all of it, but at least part of what he's dishing out is taken out as fact, as gospel for so many on the right, those folks on the right wing message boards, facebook, whatever it might be. aren't we seeing the real world consequences of that? this is the same theory, the amplification of the big lie that has led to the challenge by republican state legislatures across the country on voting rights, restricting access to the ballot. isn't that the real world reality of this? the real world implications of this? isn't that why this has to get taken seriously? >> that's absolutely the danger. and it's happening. i mean, what's happening is that these republican state legislatures are essentially assuming the power for themselves to overturn election results full stop. and election results they don't
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like. and so, we are absolutely right to be gravely concerned about what could happen in the next election or the next couple of elections. but, you know, i -- but i -- i have a question for ann. i mean, you know, on the one hand, this is deadly seriously and important, on the other hand he is a side show and a clown and a lunatic. he believes stuff that simply is not true. and so, where is that common ground? where is the entry point? the place where you can talk about stuff that might be agree about and then proceed to chip away at this bizarre and untrue belief system that he sincerely has? what did you -- did you find anything that you could talk to him about on which he made
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sense? >> if i asked him how he runs his company, i was trying to get him to talk about what his business is like. and he had a -- he talked a little bit about how he gives everybody in his company his email and anybody can -- and actually, when we went onto something more practical and pragmatic that wasn't to do with politics where he's -- as you say, some of it is really insane, everybody is a chinese communist and there's a kind of conspiracy of chinese communism inside the republican party and so on. but when you got him to talk about his business, he was a little bit more rational, and you can imagine him being a good boss and people liking him. i mean, he's an affable guy. it may be that through some kind of conversation about that that you could get to him or people like him. you could say, look, do you want your business to collapse?
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look at the -- look at the amount of money you're spending on this stuff. that's nuts. look at the people who work for you and do you really want them to suffer? i'm just making this up now, but i mean, if you took someone like that or someone who has those kinds of views, do you try to push them in a pragmatic direction and away from the culture wars and away from the craziness. we might be able to have a different kind of conversation. that's the lesson, if you look around the world, if you look at places where there's been real violence, look at northern ireland or places there's been civil wars, very often people find the way to get people to cooperate again is not by talking about what causes the civil war but, you know, how we can move forward in the future or what roads we can build and so on. it's not a perfect analogy but it's the best one that i've come up with. it may be, you know -- it may not work with lindell because
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he's so far gone in this supreme court 9-0 vote direction. but maybe with other people, people that you all know, that joe knows, that kind of conversation could be more useful. >> donny deutsch, you have spent most of your adult life getting paid to help move public opinion. and certainly, it seems that doing that in politics used to be fairly simple. i had your message, you had your candidate, you understood what issues needed to move. everybody played by the same set of rules for the most part. same set of facts. we operated from the same sort of fact base. no more. so let me just ask you, as a guy who you've spent your entire adult life in advertising and branding. what do you do if you -- if somebody asked you to represent this constitutional republic and
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save it from the conspiracy theorists, save it from the people who as ann said are trying to undermine american's faith in the democratic system, trying to undermine american's faith in your constitutional democracy? what do you do? >> joe, i wish i had some original thought other than the one that to me is so stunningly obvious. if there's a megaphone, what do you do, you take away the megaphone. i've never seen a problem that's so severe and such a clear solution, because the culprit is an easy one. without the medium, without the platform they don't exist. mike lindell is not going door-to-door, it is facebook, two people, cheryl sandberg, mark zuckerberg, haul them in congress every day, this is unacceptable. joe we could not on the show, they could not be doing the things, not on nbc, not any place else, you cannot say these
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lies. i couldn't do an ad about laundry detergent and lie about it gets clothes three times faster. it's the most stunning thing in my career of commerce and watching commerce that facebook is allowing -- all the social media platforms but particularly facebook. they're the culprit. they're as much of a culprit as mike lindell is. let's put them in the same exact box. >> thank you so much ann applebaum and donny deutsch, appreciate it. with over half of americans getting their news from facebook and all the lies and conspiracy theories that have been spread on facebook and continue to be spread on facebook, there are a lot of americans, including myself, that share donny's frustration. >> yeah. there's no question about it. and what can be done about it. what's the next step? what are the teeth that the government has, if it is the government, that's going to take the effort because facebook
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isn't willing to go far enough to stop some of that. we are at the top of the hour, 7:00 on the east coast. the biden administration is looking at every option it says in an effort to get more americans vaccinated. the white house is now considering using federal regulatory powers and the threat of withholding federal funds to get people who work at nursing homes, cruise ships vaccinated. talks are in an early phase but it's looking at the delta variant spreading more quickly than it originally envisioned. one option, whether restrictions on medicare dollars or federal funds could be used to require employees to be vaccinated. but the administration understands there may be legal constraints on the government's power and its ability to force a federal mandate. the debate over masks in schools is intensifying now.
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nbc's gabe gutierrez has the latest from outside atlanta. >> reporter: in georgia, the new school year is under way, and students like camille are required to mask up. >> i did not want to go to school if we didn't wear masks. >> reporter: her mom agrees. >> if the alternative is to stay home and have another school year in the room, then that would have been devastating. >> reporter: today, atlanta public schools opened their doors also with a mask requirement. many large districts have similar mandates. last week the cdc changed its guidance, now recommending masks in schools. miles away, parents have been protesting in gwinnett county. holly is so furious, he's pulling her two young daughters from in-person classes. >> it's about choice. i want my children to know that mom my and daddy make their decisions for them, their health
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decisions. we would never ever put our children in harm's way. >> reporter: we spoke with her and a group of parents. >> mandate is a dangerous word. >> this is about parents taking back their power, my children, my decision, period. >> reporter: they agree with florida governor, ron desantis who banned mask mandates, even threatening to who would funding for school districts who try to do one. >> if you're coming after the rights of parents in florida, i'm standing in your way. >> reporter: now the highly contagious delta variant is spreading, just as millions of unvaccinated kids are heading back to school. >> masks do more harm than good when it comes to our children. >> our children are less concerned about wearing masks than we are. >> reporter: it's their parents' debating the pandemic's lessons. gabe gutierrez, nbc news atlanta. >> let's bring in national affair analyst, host of "the
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circus," john heileman. also presidential historian doris kearns goodwin. you have parents there, for many reasons, have become anti-vaxers or just followed misinformation. that's nothing knew. i just wonder at what point do leaders of both parties that want americans vaccinated start just showing leadership and getting americans vaccinated. this is nothing new. those parents are acting as if vaccines haven't been required for 50, 60 years. both you and i had children that would have never gotten into kindergarten if they hadn't gotten five or six vaccinations. this is nothing new. why don't we treat these people like we would have been treated if we said we have our choice we're not going to get our kids
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vaccinated and then have the school system say, okay, just stay at home. >> i think you're right, joe. the war against the virus, the delta variant has a comeback in the war. it's a war we have to fight as a people as a whole. we have to have a collective response to this thing. in the early days of the depression, one of the things, the early days of world war ii what fdr was able to do is say everything we do as a nation will get us through this. nobody liked having only one cup of coffee a day, 5 gallons of gasoline, but they knew the home front created the war front now we have to do mandates, we have to require behavior in order to get us to work together as a trained army. we are in a war against this virus, we were winning and then it pivoted and we have to pivot with the changes. this is a time we need leadership and we need to
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understand unless we operate together as a nation we're not going to get ahold of this thing and where is that collective action, that sense of wanting to be together to do this thing. >> you know, doris we look back at somebody like fdr. he made these big, bold decisions. and yes, america followed him. but it's important to remember, 35, 40%, sometimes 45% of americans loathed fdr. and he didn't care. he did what he knew was best. and he moved forward. there are going to be people that follow conspiracy theories on facebook that are not going to be able to be reasoned with. i'm just wondering, at what point does the biden administration say we're going to -- these people are never going to follow science, they're never going to follow medicine. let's move forward with a policy
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and set of proposals that will protect and save the lives of the most americans. >> you're so right, joe. we remember fdr because we know the end of the story he was able to get people to work together in the depression and world war ii but there was so many people that disliked him, they'd throw their radio out the window when the fire chat was going on, and yet he knew he had to keep moving forward. if persuasion hasn't worked, we have the divided theories, you have to use the power of presidency. that's what fdr said in his inauguration i'm going to use every power the presidency has we are at war. president biden needs to use the power. in the long run it's the good of the country we're in this together we have to make sure that everyone knows that what
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one doesn't do affects everybody. people were upset about the one cup of coffee a day, they lost the midterms because of that. but they needed the ships. >> we've been showing clips of ron desantis who enjoys every second of acting shocked, stunned and deeply saddened that a president is saying let's be aggressive since, of course, florida is the epicenter. florida is the center, it is the hot spot of all hot spots for covid once again. and so you see that back and forth. it seems that ron desantis, who's telling small business owners they can't run their businesses the way they want to run their businesses and telling local school boards they can't run their local school boards the way they want to run their that local school boards is the one now complaining and whining
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about mandates coming down from washington d.c. it's rich but it is a political play. he's trying to line himself up as the great hope for the trump faction of the republican party. >> totally. i'll say, joe, you know, interestingly you had ann applebaum on in the last hour. she was talking about it yesterday on our air, and she made a point which i thought was really smart and made me go back and look at what desantis has been saying the last couple days. pay attention to it closely from the standpoint that you guys are talking about the misinformation and disinformation problem in that segment. you know, he is really -- he is complaining for sure but the aggressiveness and the assertiveness that he's showing in running this play, in making this argument, inside that his complaints about biden, he's
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setting up the structure, a lot of the stuff is he's saying is he's creating another kind of big lie around the biden administration's policies around covid. i agree with you and doris that president biden has to do what's right for the country on the policy grounds and if that leads us in the direction of mandates, fine. but you can see that desantis, along with a lot of other republicans see an opportunity in that, in that the combination of the deep cleavages that have been opened up around covid, the damage donald trump did last year by making masks and other policies part of his culture war, that that foundation that's been laid already opens up an avenue that desantis and others in the republican party see political advantage in. they are driving towards capitalizing on that, exacerbating those divisions. building a larger framework of
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lies about the biden administration. and although i think the biden administration must do what is right for the country on public health grounds, you can see where this is going politically and it is part of the reason the biden administration is concerned about going too fast. they can see there's dangers in this for them in walking into not a trap exactly but into a place where the politics are unstable and uncertain and where republicans have some cards to play, i think they're terrible cards and they're bad for the country and i think they're irresponsible for their own citizens but there is a -- especially given the unpredictability of the variants coming down the path, there are some ways in which there are some dangers i think politically that lurk here for anybody who tries to mandate stuff as we go forward, even if that's the right thing to do. >> let's bring into the conversation, larry hogan. yesterday governor hogan
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announced new vaccination protocols for state employees, effective september 1st, they'll be required to show proof of vaccination or adhere to strict face coverings requirementsing and covid-19 testing. governor, thanks for being with us. explain this decision. >> look, this delta variant is something that we're very, very concerned about here in our state, in spite of the fact we're one of the most vaccinated states in america and have some of the lowest metrics and virus numbers, the opposite of what you've been talking about this morning we're doing great but this variant is two to four times more contagious and potentially more serious, more dangerous, more serious illness comes from it. so we took actions to protect folks in congregate living facilities, nursing homes,
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prison system, kids in juvenile justice systems and the state of maryland's health facilities. 76% of our state, everybody over 18 has been vaccinated. 94% of our seniors. but this variant is pretty scary stuff and it's spreadsing like wildfire across the rest of the country where they haven't vaccinated as well as we have. >> it's a strong move and raises questions about school. resistance from republican governors in particular about mask mandates, requiring vaccinations for teachers to be back inside school. do you think that's a step you should consider, requiring that teachers be vaccinated? >> we were the first state in the country to begin vaccinating teachers we did it in january, most of the teachers are
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vaccinated. our local school systems are elected in each county and they have the right to make decisions. we are going to get the kids back in schools. some of those school systems have made the decision to require masks and we support their ability to make those decisions based on the metrics on the ground in their particular jurisdiction. >> governor hogan, good morning, it's jonathan lemire. i want to stay on the topic of masks. where are things in terms of potential mask requirements or restrictions for other things like say indoor dining or gyms or indoor entertainment. we're seeing a fierce debate about all those things in states across the country with different outcomes. where do things stand in maryland? >> the good news is, here in maryland because we're so vaccinated. the virus is not spreading like the rest of the country. you were talking about florida with 21,800 cases in a day, we had 500. we're in a different spot from a lot of states. we lifted our mask mandate in
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may because our health metrics are so good, among the best in the country but we're recommending and urging people who are unvaccinated to wear masks indoors and in settings where they can't distance. 100% of our hospitalizations and deaths at this point are people who have refused to take the vaccine. >> a couple years ago, governor hogan, you launched a national effort to improve infrastructure across this country. and you're also the national chair of the no labels organization getting behind the bipartisan infrastructure bill. and no labels is out with a new ad that argues that american people should ignore extremes on both sides of the aisle and help pass a bill. let's look at the ad and i want to talk to you ant it. >> we've seen this movie before. >> toto -- >> no, not those movies. this one. >> we will not support
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bipartisan legislation. >> i'm telling the republican senators that we're not going to stand for it. >> the extremes on the left and right are trying to defeat a two-party solution for partisan purposes. three out of four americans want the infrastructure bill that creates jobs, helps families, doesn't raise taxes, empowers america to beat china. don't listen to the extremes. support bipartisan infrastructure now. >> there's a number in there, governor hogan, 72%, and my gosh, most polls i've seen show an overwhelming number of americans support this bipartisan infrastructure bill. joe biden's infrastructure plan. and yet you're still hearing people on both sides saying kill the bill. why should those voices be ignored? and why should we push through and pass a bipartisan bill? >> look, this is something that republicans and democrats have talked about, really for
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decades, without ever accomplishing anything. we know with the dysfunction and divisiveness in washington rarely ever do we find bipartisan compromise on an important issue. this one we have. no labels didn't just get behind the effort, we started the effort and crafted the current proposal that's about to be passed in the senate right here in the governor's mansion in anap louse. for the first time, brought democratic and republican governors, senators, hammered out this deal, the problem solvers caucus which is part of our group we have democrats and republicans trying to come up with a solution and now it's about to pass. and, of course, you have donald trump saying to blow it up, they shouldn't vote for it because he didn't accomplish anything on infrastructure for four years and you have the far left saying we didn't get everything we wanted. that's not what compromise is about, it's finding the middle
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ground we can all reach agreement and we have. we have to get it done. i'm hopeful it's going to pass the senate tomorrow. >> we have a police reform bill, several other bills that republicans and democrats are working together on. the is there a reason for us to be hopeful that congress might get things done for the people, that democrats and republicans may figure out a way to work together again in washington? >> i sure hope so. it's desperately needed. washington is broken. i think an overwhelming majority of americans are not happy with things not getting done with the extremes on both sides, calling each other names and fighting all the time. that's why i took over as the chair of no labels, focused on bipartisan solutions, common sense solutions. we have a great group of senators and congressmen that are part of the problem solvers working hard on this.
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let's get the infrastructure bill done and show them things can get done in washington and maybe tackle some of the other issues we can find people. i can tell you the two caucuses don't like the fact that democrats and republicans are sitting down and talking, they want to control the members. but i think this is the way the democratic republic is supposed to work and it's what the american people want, they want us to work together and get things done. >> governor larry hogan, thank you so much, first for your work on infrastructure the past several years and also obviously your work on trying to achieve a bipartisan compromise. we appreciate you being here this morning. willie? let's stay on the subject of getting things done in washington. david brooks' latest piece is entitled the biden approach is working. he writes the biden administration has shifted power away from the green new deal and freedom caucus show horses and lodged it with congressional workhorse, people like
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republican rob portman and democratic mark warner who are in no danger of becoming social media stars. we've come a long way since the aoc glory days of 2019. biden won the presidential nomination not bernie sanders. progressive excesses like defund the police cost democrats dearly downballot. there have been races in primaries recently, the party regs have won all of them. the problem with the progressive base mobilization strategy is that progressives think they're the base but a faction that keeps losing primaries can't be the base. joe biden is the base and they want to make the system work, american politics is in god awful shape but we're seeing an attempt to build it back better. eugene robinson, your reaction
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to the column that the biden approach is working and progressives in some ways are being marginalized? >> look, the establishment of the democratic party is certainly on a winning streak. they've been winning these primaries. they won in cleveland the other day. convincingly. when chantel brown with the support of king maker or queen maker jim clyburn defeated nina turner, backed by bernie sanders and the squad. and this has been a pattern. and david makes an interesting point, which is if -- either you're the base or you're not, right. so if you are the base, the progressives do represent the base of the party then they have to make that so. they need to bring out those
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voters. and then they become the base of the party that becomes the party's platform. they can argue that their issues and their policy positions poll well and they do. medicare for all and things like that. poll well. and you can make very logical and consistent arguments for them, but you have to bring the voters out. and so, until progressives can organize and mobilize and register and bring out more voters. i think the party's base is much closer to joe biden than it is to the democratic left. and that's who's going to continue winning these contests. and that's where the main stream of the democratic party is right now. >> doris, it's so interesting we never really know where
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political parties are going to go. i remember after the first democratic debate in 2019 where it was -- my gosh i think the most progressive group of candidates i had ever heard in my life. i had a democrat call me up and say i'm going to read you this platform you tell me if any democrat could win with this platform. he read me bill clinton's 1992 platform. here we are 18 months later, two years later and actually the democrats who are winning are winning on a bill clinton 1992 platform. they are winning as centrists, center left democrats. >> and i think one of the successful things that president biden has done is to damp down the rhetoric that might have been used on both sides the
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centrists against the progressives. by calling people in, having so many people to the white house, even if there's still not agreement between the extreme progressives and some of the more centrist people they're not screaming at each other. we've seen other times the democratic party splits itself apart. i think there's a desire for people to win, even if they don't agree what's going on, that something good is going to happen. once you make changes in the congress and you see you passed something that matters and you can tell your children or children's children we passed an infrastructure or we passed a voting rights act, it changes the way you want to make compromise and you realize that getting things done is leaving behind something to be proud of, what can people be proud of for just fighting the whole time and calling each other names, maybe it's just i'm getting older but the old days did seem better in
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a lot of ways. >> we could get a lot of things done and you could work together, even with political things going on. we worked together every day. it's now the democratic party that needs to figure out how to work together. i have commented progressives i think have been extremely patient and held their fire more than the fire brands on the right did like myself when we were in congresst did like myse were in congress and if you're a democrat -- it has to be frustrating that one centrist after another wins. the question is, how does joe biden keep the progressives engaged? how does he -- how does he keep them working hard in 2022 and beyond? if this is, in fact, turning into a centrist party on policy and a centrist party in politics where the major elections are
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won by people center left. >> well, i guess i sort of disagree a little bit with that premises, joe. i agree with the points about the fact that the main stream democrats have been beating the further left democrats at the polls and joe biden is the first example of that, the race in ohio, et cetera, we've seen a lot of these things. but the reality is the party has moved far to the left the last few cycles so progressives won a lot of battles here. joe biden is one of the rare presidential candidates who moved further not to the center after winning the nomination. his policies were further left than the ones he ran on. his climate plan for instance is way further left. he's done this where biden has an unstint of finding where the
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center of the left is. he's further to the left than he's ever been in his life. the party is further to the left, look at the spending we're talking about. if this reconciliation goes through, $3.5 trillion, think about all the spending. you made the observation, biden is governing as the most progressive democrat since lyndon johnson. that's a huge victory for progressives and now the question is, i think doris made the other right point which is that they have been -- the administration has been courting the squad, progressives aggressively to try to keep them on board and so far that balancing act has been working. i think they'll be able to keep the progressives on board if they can remind them we already won so much. >> trillions of dollars going out the door and more to come. still ahead on "morning joe," new covid concerns for nursing homes and long term care facilities amid lagging vaccinations among staff
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members. plus miguel cardona joins us as he warns the fight over masking children could impact the plans to reopen schools. we'll talk about that and more when "morning joe" comes right back. that and more when "morning joe" comes right back observing investors choose assets to balance risk and reward. with one element securing portfolios, time after time. gold. agile and liquid. a proven protector. an ever-evolving enabler of bold decisions. an asset more relevant than ever before. gold. your strategic advantage. i've lost count of how many asthma attacks i've had. but my nunormal with nucala? fewer asthma attacks. nucala is a once-monthly add-on injection for severe eosinophilic asthma. not for sudden breathing problems. allergic reactions can occur. get help right away for swelling of face, mouth, tongue, or trouble breathing. infections that can cause shingles have occurred. don't stop steroids unless told by your doctor. tell your doctor if you have a parasitic infection.
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what is your message to governors like governor desantis in florida and governor abbott of texas who have banned mask mandates. >> don't be the reason why schools are interrupted. our kids have suffered enough.
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i'm worried that decisions that are being made that are not putting students at the center and student health and safety at the center is why schools may be disrupted. we know what to do. don't be the reason why schools are disrupted because of the politicalization of reopening schools. we know what works, we have to keep our students and educators safe. >> that man joins us now, u.s. secretary of education, we just had governor larry hogan of maryland on, republican governor, saying i'm leaving the mask mandate up to individual elected school boards. what do you say to governors to build on your comments yesterday at the white house, to say this is a choice for parents not for government. >> thank you very having me first of all and thank you governor hogan. first and foremost we're going back to school. students across the country are excited, educators are excited. you know the back to school
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feeling we have is alive and well. we have to do everything in our power to make sure that we're utilizing the mitigation strategies and the strategies we know work to keep students and staff in school, safe and thriving. >> would it be your recommendation, mr. secretary, that teachers get vaccinated? >> i would want everyone above the age of 12 to get vaccinated as soon as possible. we know it's the best tool, it's off the. it's the best tool to keep the spread of covid-19 low and ensure that we can return to some level of normalcy, but until then we have to follow mitigation strategies to make sure our students are not sitting behind a computer for part or the full year. we have the tools, the resources, we know what to do. vaccination is a part of our recovery as a country. >> if we're leaving mask decisions up to individual school districts, should school districts be allowed to ask
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teachers to be required to get the vaccine? >> in terms of requiring vaccinations, i really lean heavily on our health and safety experts. they'll determine whether or not it should be required based on spread and efficacy. i know fda hasn't done their final ruling and we have to respect that process so we can have confidence in it. as an educator, as a parent, i'm encouraging all who have the eleligibility to get vaccines to get vaccinated. we know it works. we know in communities are vaccination rates are higher, there's less spread. >> what is your message, mr. secretary, to parents of children under the age of 12 who have not had the opportunity to be vaccinated yet who are nervous. they were excited at the beginning of the summer things looked good but now with the delta variant they worry about their unvaccinated child going back to school.
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what do you say to them? >> i'm a parent too and i would not put my children in harm's way either. and we know what works. we know we opened schools last year safely because we followed those mitigation strategies. we left the politics out of the decisions and did what's right for students. this is possible again. to those parents i would also say think about the impact of students not being engaged with their peers, teachers, and not being able to learn the way children learn best, which is in the classroom. >> good morning, jonathan lemire. can you walk us through how the federal government is directing money to the states to get the schools to be open. we've heard the president say for months now he wants the schools to be open. but will there be conditions that require the money we heard governor ron desantis this week about masks and mandates, will there be conditions to the
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federal funds whether it's regarding masks, vaccine or mitigation events to keep the spread of coronavirus away from kids and teachers? >> we're thrilled that the unprecedented resources in the american rescue plan provide $130 billion to our states so they can ensure a safe reopening and have what they need to make sure students and staffs can enter our schools safely and have a bolter experience than they. >> did before march 2020. we had a return to school road map that shows the steps schools should take, make sure social well being are taken into account and academic excellence is expected. however we can't mandate masks and require vaccinations. i've had conversations with governors and educators across the country to promote those best practices that we know work. we're not -- we don't have the
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authority to mandate masks but most districts understand the importance of those mitigation strategies because they used them last year. we're working with states, having conversations daily and paying attention to those states not following what we know works and the impact it can have on students and their safety. >> you can't require vaccinations but you're certainly recommending it for anyone over 12, students and teachers. >> yes. coming up, 56 years ago today, president lyndon johnson signed the voting rights act into law. we'll look at that moment in history and what the biden white house can learn from it. when we come back. when we come back.
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this act flows from a clear and simple wrong.
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it's only purpose is to right that wrong. this law, will ensure them the right to vote. the wrong is one which no american, in his heart, can justify. the right is one which no american true to our principles can deny. >> that was president lyndon b. johnson 56 years ago today, speaking about the voting rights act of 1965. the bill made it illegal to impose restrictions on federal, state and local elections designed to deny african-american the right to vote. doris kearns good win and eugene robinson are still with us. and joining the conversation
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mark upgrove and lauren leader. good morning. doris, i want to start with you on this as you watched president johnson deliver that speech august 6, 1965, you consider the pressure he was under from a lot of people not to support and push through the vote rights act, he was going to lose some of his base, the southern vote and he said, what the hell is the presidency for. >> how i remember that day, actually. i was 22 years old. if i could have ever imagined after bloody sunday when i was listening to president johnson give the joint session of congress speech that led to the passage of voting rights that a few years later i'd be working for president johnson and a few years later mary the man who helped draft those words. the basic right to vote he said is the most fundamental of all rights without which the rest are meaningless.
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how we need that clarity right now, the fight that is being fought right now to strike down voter rights, to bring back suppression, to undo what happened in 1965 is the fundamental fight of our time right now. it's not a partisan fight in a democracy, this is the most important thing to allow individuals, otherwise what's the point of a democracy if individuals can't vote and the more that can vote freely, fairly, the more better that democracy will be, remembering this day it's an emotional thing for me because it meant so much but it should be for all the country to go back to that fight we fought back then. >> how appropriate we had doris here today. as you pointed out in the break her husband wrote the words there. can you speak to the pressure he was under at the time and how difficult a leap it was. it seems obvious in 2021 but what were the conditions around that push to get the voting rights act passed. >> he put all his political
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capital in passing the civil rights act. and there was a potent plank in the civil rights act around voting rights and he stripped it out because he knew the bill was top heavy and wouldn't pass through congress. so he looked at civil rights incrementally. let's break the back of jim crow first and then move to voting rights when we have the opportunity to do so. but he looked for every means necessary to ensure that voting rights were enforced and then bloody sunday happened, that march from selma, alabama to montgomery, alabama. led by jon lewis. and then lbj realized he had the moral authority to push something through and he gave that speech written by doris' late husband and he appealed to the country. this is not right. this is fundamentally un-american and eventually he
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saw to the passage of the voting rights act. >> mark, let me stay with you for a second. we're see right now an assault on voting rights across the country in republican state legislatures restricting access to the ballot and there's been pressure on joe biden to defend voting rights in a similar position as lbj. biden like johnson goes to the senate, knowing how the body works. and a lot of people want biden to come out against the filibuster. how do you think president johnson would have handled this? >> he would have run over it. he was a traditionalist of the senate. biden was in the senate 36 years, longer than any president we ever had. he understands the traditions and he's resistant to break them down. by the same token what we don't know right now is what's happening behind the scenes. one of the crown jewels of the
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lbj archive are the taped archives of him doing his presidency. you can hear what he's doing behind the scenes, getting people to bend to his will. joe biden may well be doing that now and we might not know it for years and years. because he has those relationships, because he understands politics, and the way things work, that may be happening as we speak. >> lauren, you and mark have an op-ed in the hill titled "lessons for biden on the 56th anniversary of the voting rights act" you write like lbj biden is a creature of the senate. if anyone can effectively get a controversial bill through a polarized senate as johnson did it's joe biden. but what 2021 and 1965 have in common is the threat against the stability and durability of democracy itself. the lesson of lbj is not that he had absolute power that he
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wielded absolutely. but instead he leveraged soft power at his disposal. to pressuring lawmakers to enlisting the grass roots across the nation to bring his kaus to the fore. he knew he would alienate southern states but did it anyway. it was that important. so different political times, media circumstances, polarization right now. but what do you look as the stakes for the voting rights and this president. >> the enfranchisement of voters has had a transformational effect on american democracy at every level, the participation of women, african-americans, minorities of every background has had an impact on what our government looks like today, how we function as a society, so any efforts that roll those back that keep people from the polls is devastating for all americans, obviously, potentially devastating for the
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democratic party going into the midterms. if he doesn't get something done now he risks the majority in the senate, the house, we risk the future of the country for years to come. it's not just about a political aim, it's about making sure that every voter is heard. one thing i find so interesting was that grass roots engagement in johnson's time, his close relationship with martin luther king and his ability to mobilize a sense of morale outrage in the country. i haven't really seen biden do that. he has not really appealed in the same way i think to that personal sense of you're about to lose a right that is sacred. and that's critical. we'll need a massive push from the grass roots, pressuring congress, the senate relentless to get anything passed. >> if you have a couple senators saying i'm not going with the big bill i'm willing to look at
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the jon lewis bill. what can the president do? >> the elephant in the room is the filibuster. he said he's not willing to roll back the filibuster. just key issues that have to do with the sustainability and durability of democracy, we have to get things done. i hope he'll come around on that. but he's going to let
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live the news on nbc 6 starts now! good morning, soufrt florida. i'm constance jones.
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green vep, california destroyed a town of about 8 hi, since the gold rush. >> it was scary. it was like one of those apocalyptic movies you see with fire and wind and people going everywhere. the towns with the fire tearing through town. you can see the scope of the devastation. residents were told to evacuate. not everybody did. >> we know firefighters are getting guns pulled out on them because people don't want to evacuate. >> the dixie fire is now the size of los angeles and the sixth largest fire in california history. more than 60 structures burned with the number expected to rise. >> there were a couple towers with flames tuleer tan trees. >> firefighters, the growing river fire hasn't seen flames in years a. plea for those in the
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fast to evacuate should the time come. >> they get a loud back in there. it's either standing or a pile of ash. that why we don't want to hear this. >> with the fire at the doorstep of another community, another tense and uncertain night lies ahead. >> steve patterson, still ahead on "morning joe", an escalating war of word between florida governor ron desantis and joe biden over mask mantates. we will show you their back and forth and union update on covid across the country. and we return after a bit of an olympic break with my sit down with one of the biggest stars in all of music. luke bryan. that's this sunday on nbc "sunday today." n nbc "sunday today. [ music playing ]
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. just two states, florida and texas account for one-third of all new covid-19 cases in the entire country. i say to these governors, please help. if you're not going to help, at least get out of the way. >> joe biden has taken to himself to try to single out florida over covid. what is his big solution? what is he so upset about florida? his solution is he wants to have the government force kindergartners to wear masks in school. he thinks that should be a
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decision for the government. well, i can tell you if florida, the parents will be the ones in charge of that decision. . [ applause ] >> so why don't you do your job? why don't you get this border secure? and until do you that, i don't want to hear a blip about covid from you. . >> reporter: governor detanr san tis is using 84 words, don't be in the way. he says, i am in the way to block too much irresponsibility from the government? >> governor who? >> that was president biden's reaction to florida's republican governor ron desantis and willie, he is, hit pet lent childish response to not just the president but other people concerned that ron desantis is passing top-down mandates forcing people, whether it's small businesses in florida, to
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not be able to protect themselves or school boards not be able to protect themselves. he's trying to run covid like an emperor out of tallahassee, florida. that just, one size does not fit all 67 counties, but ron desantis acting like a socialist thinking it does. >> of course there is iron my complaining from the top-down from the white house giving orders, he is giving olders from the top down telling school districts what they request and can't do. there many who say we are going ahead with our mask mandate even if you are threatening to take away our public funding. there is a big problem if florida. we will get to code infections, hospitalizations, deathings, all climbing as the delta variant continues to spread across the country. now the head of moderna is saying booster shots may soon be necessary. something pfizer has suggested as well. nbc correspondent miguel almaguer has more.
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>> reporter: just as new vaccination rates begin to rise in states where hesitancy is high, moderna joins pfizer saying americans will likely feed a booster before winter. moderna says its vaccine remains durable six months after the second dose. its efficacyslide slightly to 93%. >> both the cdc and fda says they are necessary. >> i don't agree that not yet, it has spread now. the data is the 73-hour vaccine is holding up against variant of concern, including delta. you don't know how long that will last. >> reporter: with nearly 140 million doses of the two-shot regimen administered in the u.s., moderna says research is under way to see if boosters between the three companies offering vaccines can be mixed and matched. the delta variant proving to be a game changer. >> i think we're pretty worried now. if you look at the delta variant, it took a surprising
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step. i don't think anye any of us three, four months ago would predict something this many more times infectious. >> reporter: delta is moving the metrics in a dangerous direction with new cases spiking in 40 states. that's infections and hospitalizations are up roughly 40%. >>'s the delta variant becomes more prolific. how do your boosters address that variant? >> one of the most important things we need to do is bring the delta variant into the vaccine. that way we are teaching the immune system what it looks like just as we did with the prior variants in bars. >> reporter: soon children not yet old enough to be vaccinated will return to schools in counties where spread is extraordinarily high. >> there is no question, we are going to see outbreaks in schools with this delta variant. the question is, how many and how big will they get? >> reporter: as parents begin to return to the office, delta is increasing the rick they, too, could spread the virus to children, still waiting to be
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vaccinated. >> children under the age of 12 are not just little adults as we all know. so one of the things we need to figure out is what's the right dose? >> reporter: in an evolving virus bringing home a new threat. >> miguel almaguer with that report for us. the cdc is reporting the number of people in the hospitals with covid quadrupled. in florida, near lynn 13,000 are hospitalized a. new record for that state. more than 2500 are in intensive care. florida is also see ac rapid rise in the number of pediatric cases with at least 135 children currently hospitalized. texas is the only other state to report more confirmed pediatric covid patients than florida. a total of 142 children hospitalized there in texas. speaking of that state, health officials are warning texas is experiencing the steepest rise in covid hospitalizations since the pandemic began. tell surge is placing a big strain on the texas healthcare system with hospitals now
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dealing with a staffing crisis. here's one example quoted by the texas tribune. quote, texas nurse jenna price gets half a dozen solicitations a day from hospitals and staffing agencies that want to pay her four times her current salary to leave her job at a suburban central texas emergency room and take a temporary assignment if another hospital that needs nurses. the covid burnout is causing nurses of all specialtys to leave the profession in droves. this currently are 23,000 more unfilled jobs in texas for registered nurses than there are nurses looking to fill them. let's bring in the president and ceo of harris health system located in southeastern texas, which includes the city of houston. thank you so much for being with us this morning. give us a snapshot of what you could of what's happening inside your hospital right now. how many cases of hospitalizations and how different is that from say a few weeks ago? >> all right. good morning. thank you for having me.
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let me start as always by thanking all our healthcare staff, doctors, nurses, especially in my system, health system, we have been dealing with this pandemic for more than a year-and-a-half and also all healthcare staff here in harris county and state of texas and the u.s. and eventually everywhere, to answer a specific question, the numbers are going up. the numbers are going up rapidly. in may, not long ago, was the fact that it's not so much the numbers are going up, the rate at which the numbers are going up is unprecedented. you know, this is now a fourth wave of covid-19 and again the rate by which the numbers are going up is incredible. i made the point that under a previous search for us to go from a baseline level, a patients and cases in our areas
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to a high similar to what we have right now. if it's about 12, 13 weeks. it has only taken us five weeks to do that this time around. less on that a month ago. a month ago in my system, we had a total of 11 covid-19 patients. that number today is 111. so there is a ten-fold increase in the number of patients. it's just a matter of five weeks. >> so doctor we've heard this is a make now of the unvaccinated. how many of the cases inside your hospital are among vaccinated people? >> that is probably the most important point i want to get across here. this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. i look at my numbers this morning, unfortunately since jurn 1 of this year, my system has lost 128 people related to covid-19 infections.
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128 deaths across the harris health system due to covid-19 infection. not a single person that has lost their lives due to covid was pre-vaccinated. zero permanent. >> wow. >> one of the people -- >> sorry, doctor, what about the current hospitalizations, that tells the whole story the number you gave us. right now as we look at this delta variant spreading in texas and florida and other places across the country. how many of your hospitalized patients are vaccinated? >> reporter: less than 2%. so 98%, more than 98% of the people who currently are hospitalized in a regular hospital bed or icu are those who have not been vaccinated. more than 98%. >> doctor eis smael porsa in texas. thank you for joining us. next, how the biden administration is working to
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♪♪ president biden recently announced 100 million doses of the covid vaccine have been shipped overseas to help the international battle against the virus. nbc news senior investigative legal correspondent sin think xrooia /* cynthia mcfadden has more on this. >> reporter: the international pandemic requires an international response. that was the idea behind covax
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to ensure poor countries will get access to vaccines. it hasn't worked out that way. now 18 months into the moix. covax has delivered to countries, only 15% of the world's population is fully vaccinated with the highest numbers found in the world's richest companies. >> the biggest threat to our vaccination effort at home is our failure to invest adequately and vaccinate abroad. the delta variant that we have suffering now is a byproduct of the virus spreading unchecked abroad. >> reporter: in march, we were given exclusive access to the rollout of nearly 900,000 covax vaccines if you began da. enough uganda. distribution is time consuming and expensive. we saw as a unicef team
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delivered doses to the island. it's wonderful to have this. yet it's a much smaller:00 than you'd hoped? this doctor hoped to rad indicate smallpox. he says, we cannot wait to vaccinate the rest of the world. >> we have a stark choice in front of us. either we export vaccine manufacturing factories or we will import from the same countries and others variants. >> reporter: so while the biden administration's gift of 500 million doses and a promise more to come is welcome. it brings cocax'd woefully unresourced. >> we have to hold hands together if we are going to win the war. >> reporter: today less than 2% of those living in the developing world have been vaccinated and that is a problem for everyone. >> the white house reporter for
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the associated press. the biden administration made efforts, to with us seeing the delta variant and understanding it came from, well, from the virus racing unchecked across countries that we see that we say may be more. >> the white house received pressure about this. the u.s. course has a surplus of vaccines, continue give them away. we talk every morning about the population here in the u.s. that is hesitant or refusing to take a shot, while most of the world is begging for them. so for the first few months, of the biden administration, they were not exporting yaepg overseas. they participated in the covax consorium of getting it to the
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world. we seen they are increasing the number elsewhere. it's still a drop in the bucket compared to what is needed with just 2%. now growing controversy, the looming controversy about this subject, you got to get booster shots. we heard from pfizer and moderna believe they will be needed at some point here in the united states. we heard from the world health organization this week say that no country should be giving up booster shots now. because those doses should, instead, be given to countries where people are looking for their first shot to get any sort of protection. we asked white house press secretary jen psaki this weak. she says the u.s. has the ability to do both. they have the about to do both, both increase what they are sending overseas and also be able to give booster shots to those who need them. there is a growing belief that at least the most volatile populations, senior citizens may feed so by the end of the year. >> coming up, we will turn to the fallout from the january 6th attack on capitol hill.
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thousand white house is honoring officers who beat back the insurrection. plus, remembering the life and legacy of labor leader richard trumpka who died yesterday. "morning joe" is coming right back. erday. "morningoe j" is coming right back i've lost count of how many asthma attacks i've had. but my nunormal with nucala? fewer asthma attacks. nucala is a once-monthly add-on injection for severe eosinophilic asthma. not for sudden breathing problems. allergic reactions can occur. get help right away for swelling of face, mouth, tongue, or trouble breathing. infections that can cause shingles have occurred. don't stop steroids unless told by your doctor. tell your doctor if you have a parasitic infection. may cause headache, injection-site reactions, back pain, and fatigue. ask your doctor about nucala. find your nunormal with nucala. ♪ ♪ ♪
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. president biden idea expressed his gratitude to the police officers that responded to the january 6th attack. he awarded them with the congressional gold medal for tear service if protecting the country. >> my fellow americans, let's remember what this was about. it was a violent attempt to overturn the will of the american people, to seek power at all costs, to replace the ballot with brute force, to destroy not to build. without democracy, nothing is possible. with it everything is. we cannot allow istory to be rewritten. we cannot allow the heroism of these officers to be forgotten. which we have to understand what happened. the varnished truth. we have to face it. >> federal afbiation administration is warning airports across the country to the closely monitor how much
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alcohol they are serving passengers especially in to go cups. it follows a spike in unruly and dangerous behavior aboard planes. they express concern about serving alcohol in restaurants and bars, it comes of passengers duct taped a man to his seat aboard a flight in philadelphia to miami after he allegedly groped two flight aattendants and got into a physical altercation with another. spirit airlines once again chance emed hundreds of additional departures yesterday. nbc news aviation correspondent tom costello has more. >> reporter: day five of the spirit airlines meltdown. stranded passengers stuck in hours-long lines, weaving through airports yax i nationwide. spirit promised things would start to improve. instead, it coons elled another
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400 flights. 52% of its schedule. after canceling 60% tuesday and wednesday, 40% on monday, foreign 1,700 flights so far this week. >> people are getting in fights. >> i loss two days of work because of this. >> reporter: spirit says it started sunday with weather-related chance liegsles. add to that the surge of shortages of workers. spirit has never been a strong airline in terms of operations and what's happened this week has exposed the problems. >> reporter: leaving passengers stranded and stuck. >> we were represented airbnb so we don't have a place to stay as of now. >> reporter: ahead of another busy summer travel weekend. >> tom costello reporting. word you never want to hear about your airlines. spirit has never been a strong airline in terms of operations. >> not hopeful.
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but we do hope those passengers finally get to their destinations. sad news, richard trumpka, the leader of one of the largest labor unions in the united states passed away. president joe biden considered the labor leader a close personal friend and said he learned he died of a heart attack on a camping trip with his family. the son and grandson of coal miners, he rose from the coal mines to become the unite mine workers of the mortgage's president at age 33. he would eventually preside over one of the largest organizations in the worked, where he led the afl-cio since 2009. he was secretary/treasurer of the organization for more than a decade before becoming its leader. as he oversaw a federation of more than 12 million members and ushered in a stronger aggressive
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leadership. he was tough and combative, a throwback to an old guard of union leaders. but he rose into a distinctively different era as union membership declined. he often focused on making the case for unions to the white blue collar workers who hood turned away from democrats and speaking bluntly to them. richard trumpcould was 72-years-old. coming up, breaking news on the economy. the monthly jobs report closes a month from now. now we will wrap up the olympic highlights when "morning joe" comes right back. c highlights when "morning joe" comes right back
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remembers breaking economic news now, the july jobs report crossed just moments ago. the u.s. added 943,000 new jobs,
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845,000 more than expected. the unemployment rate fell to 5.4% in july. let's bring in nbc news senior business correspondent and msnbc anchor stephanie ruhle. talk about the numbers and tell us where you are coming from this morning. >> reporter: well, this is very good news. but it's complicated news wanted we have to remember, joe, this number is backwards looking. so think about automatic issues we are facing right now around the delta variant. the number are you looking at doesn't account for any of that. right now kids could face schools closing, day care closing, campus close because of the covid outbreak. that could impact the parents who have either just gotten back to work or are trying to go back this fall the biggest thing is what do wages look like? i spent the last-to-two days talking to people here in philadelphia and across the
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country and wages are going up. but they're not moving up as quickly as inflation is. try to buy anything right now out there, seeing prices are up. even though the jobs numbers are good, it's good to see people back on the job. people are very concerned they can't afford the life styles they were living even a year ago. >> of course, this is again, stephanie, good news, at the same time, these numbers are backward looking. they're before the hit that we're receiving from the delta variant. what kind of drag do you fear that may be on the economy? >> reporter: joe, it could be a very big drag. think about all of these return-to-work businesses every single day in the last week, we have been hearing from different companies pushing back their return-to-work date. that just doesn't impact families. it impacts all the ancillary businesses that are planning for businesses to go back online. when that gets pushed back, it hurts all of us and the economy.
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and for so many parents out there it's kids don't go back to in-person learning, that impacts whether they will be able to go to work. >> yeah, i'm where are you right now? >> reporter: right now i'm in philadelphia at the terminal market talking to all these vendors. they continue to have a problem hiring people. over the summer, they were actually able to hire a lot of teens, seasonal workers thinking they would the full-time workers back this number that. if covid continues to spread, the delta variant, they will have a problem. >> all right. nbc news' stephanie ruhle, thank you so much. we will be handing coverage off to you at 9:00 a.m. now, let's talk about the explosion of covid cases and hospitalizations across the country with florida leading the way. let's bring in "morning joe" chief medical correspondent dr. dave campbell. florida, my god, it is once again the epicenter like it was last summer.
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and unfortunately this summer less masking and more resistance even from the florida governor. >> that's true. and we really look to the national voice of reason, dr. frieden the former cdc director who points out that vaccines are safe. they're effective. they minimize severe disease and hospitalizations and our numbers in florida are pointing that out. we also know that in areas where mask wear is down and vaccination rates are low, that we're seeing these explosive surges of covid. florida, for example, right where i am now in palm beach county, the two hospitals right next to me have quadrupled their number of patients. gardens hospital is about double what it was at its worst last as i remember and a couple of surges ago. jupiter medical center where i
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am working has at least 50 patients in the hospital. i checked a couple months ago. they had a couple. we're exploding in south florida. some of the hospitals are stopping elective surgery. it's a big deal. i spoke to dr. leslie diaz, joe, the regional expert in infectious diseases. she had a particular take on this. as a treating doctor, she has dozens and dozens of covid patients under her care. she says it's ironic when an unvaccinated patient comes in the hospital with covid, or needs to be in the hospital. they are very willing to take experimental protocol drugs, but they were unwilling to take what they thought was the experimental vaccine. it's strange. we're all paying the price for that behavior down here in florida. >> let's talk about also again all of us know people who have
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had break-through cases, people that get vaccines have ended up getting covid, but from everything i've heard, not only across florida but across the united states, the people who are having the most severe complication and dying are almost overwhelmingly those who are unvaccinated. is that still the case in florida? >> that is. the vast majority of patients that are in the hospital are unvaccinated. we heard the figures from texas earlier today on "morning joe" and that is reflected down here in florida. it's an overwhelming figure. unvaccinated people are having hospitalizations, serious illness from covid and those that are vaccinated far, far less worry. although we, of course, have concerns about the current delta variant and future variants if we fail to reign in this explosive growth. not just in the united states, joe, but across the world.
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>> yeah, unfortunately, there are other variants out there that may be even more dangerous delta variant that could be coming our way, if we don't get vaccinated. dr. dave campbell, as always, it's great to talk to you. i know people highest among vaccine hesitancy, the evangelical community, the research institute poll nearly one-fourth of evangelicals weren't willing to get the vaccine. they are tied for the most vaccine-resistant groups included in the survey. the fear and skepticism is due in most part from tennessee. >> the delta variant is nonsense then. it is nonsense now. you will not wear a mask in this
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church. i am telling you right now, do not get vaccinated. do not get vaccinated! >> let's bring in right now senior editor of the dispatch statement, you and i have both been mainstream evangelicals for a long time. people say no such thing. we know there are. we're main stream evangelicals. so they have always been crazy, crazy people out on the fringes. unfortunately, the fringes seem to be coming more to the middle, one in four evangelicals, these are people you and i have grown up with, that we have loved. that we were surrounded with our entire life. i can tell you if my case, unfortunately, some that have not been vaccinated are facing really dire circumstances right now and so spending time praying for them. this is just an out and out tragedy. how did this happen to us, david? how did this happen to our
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people? how did this happen to our church? >> well, i think we have to go all the way back to the beginning of the pandemic and, joe, like you, i know unvaccinated people in my community who are fighting for their lives right now. it's just heart breaking. and i think you have to go back to the begining of the pandemic. what you find at the beginning of the pandemic, there was a -- especially amongst, for example, a lot of donald trump's most sincere supporters and evangelicals are disproportionately in that number, a minimizization of the coronavirus. so what ends up happening. i talked to a lot of people that are skeptical and will refuse the vaccine. what you end up doing is you kind of end up playing whack-a-mole with the various theories and ideas. but at the bottom line of it all, the bottom line of it all is they are more worried about vaccine than the disease and that actually goes all the way back to the beginning of this
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pandemic where people believed that covid was being hyped. that it was not as dangerous as people in the media said that it was. and so we are still living with the legacy of that original covid culture war. >> you know, david, first corinthians, when i was a child, i thought like a child, i talked like a child. when i became a man i put away childish things. this verse keeps coming back to me, when i am making, i am having a discussion with my friends, begging them, it's like saying you don't need to follow conspiracy theories. you've got the greatest story ever told to embrace. it's like and again, they are doctors, they are lawyers, they have advanced degrees. they are people i have known my entire life at my church. they reason like children and you are right, their response
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is, uh-huh to what the doctors tell them. >> well, if you knock down one thing, here comes another thing. if you knock down that thing, you have to knock down another thing. folks have to realize vaccine hesitancy and resistance heavily geographically concentrated in the evangelical south is what's happened and for a lot of folks, the minimizization of the coronavirus, the defiance of the coronavirus, has become almost an identity marker, a cultural marker, a part of the way you interact in your community. i remember in the height of coronavirus in the south before the vaccine, you would go to some communities, if you were wear ac pacific indoors, you would be glared at. in some blue states, if people weren't wearing a mask outside.
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so it became really an identity marker. it became a part of what this community was, was very defiant of the coronavirus. but the virus doesn't care if are you defiant. the virus doesn't care if you minimize it. it's going to do what it's going to do. and it's still doing it right now. and we have hundreds of people a day who are still dying of this who don't have to be in the hospital. it's one of the post-devastating heart breaking things. when you see it up close happen in our own community, it's just all that much more heart breaking. >> it is tragic. i did get a sense of i won't say relief. but i was at least pleased to see franklin graham, somebody who at times took some, let's just say, some circuitous routes during the trump presidency coming out saying, i don't think
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i've ever seen anything that's so controversial as this vaccine and it's so puzzling to me because the vaccine makes sense. it's gotten political. is that -- does that give us hope, david, that even pastors that blindly followed donald trump from one bad end to another actually are getting engaged, more engaged now that try to perfect the lives of those in their flock? >> you know, there is some very trumpy pastors, robert jeffreys down in texas who have been very out front advocating the vaccine, advocating the vaccine. there is a big break between evangelical leadership, which has been predominantly with the folks that led this segment, predominantly pro-vaccine. there has been a lot of a break in the rank and file, that is a lot of what you seen for example
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up to the 2016 election. a lot of the rank and file as soon as an issue becomes political, it's deemed political. they start to follow other voices other than religious voices, other than necessarily their own pastors. and this is something that again i keep going back to it. this is, we are living with the same culture war that we have lived with since the onset of coronavirus. it's just gone through different iterations from lockdowns to masks to vaccines. as soon as this got political. at least in some evangelical's minds, then who they listen to, the voices they hear are changing and move over from religious leaders to sort of the political leaders and that's been a real problem in the evangelical community for a while. >> yeah. they don't listen to their religious leaders. they don't listen to their own family doctors that who they've trusted for years. and, yet, they decide in this
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case they're going to listen to conspiracy theorists and websites run by chinese cults. it's really the strangest thing i've ever seen in my life. david, it's tragic. my friends go out to your friends and i appreciate prayers from you for mine who are suffering through this right now. thanks for being on, david, i always appreciate it. still ahead, we're going to tell you about u.s. track star allyson felix and what she did in her race at the olympics today. as we go to break, a message to team usa ahead of sunday's closing ceremony and message comes from the president. >> we are made up of people of every background, from every part of the country. we are a people who dare to dream, who do hard things, and do extraordinary things.
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to all of you, thank you for showing what we can do together as one america as one team. god bless you all. we look forward to hosting all of you at the white house when you come. thank you. thank you. >> just seems to go your way. ♪ ♪ you're in good hands with allstate. click or call for a lower auto rate today. (school bell rings) day one. ponytail game, tight. color pencil game, sharp. folders, alphabetically ordered by subject. the squad is back and we're about to slay fifth grade. spend less, smile more, when you shop back-to-school at amazon. >> tech: every customer has their own safelite story. this couple was on spa camping trip...ore, ...when their windshield got a chip. they drove to safelite for a same-day repair. and with their insurance, it was no cost to them. >> woman: really? >> tech: that's service you can trust. >> singers: ♪ safelite repair, safelite replace. ♪ i was drowning in student loan debt.
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the bronze is the tenth olympic medal and earned her the most decorated track and field athlete in history. she will have another chance at another medal on saturday with the 400-meter relay. and before today's race, nbc's lester holt sat down with the five-time olympian. >> reporter: allyson felix says her fifth olympics is more than medals. she is running for progress, for equality and for her daughter. >> i feel like becoming a mother changed me in every possible way. it showed me how strong i was. >> reporter: in 2018, felix, just 32 weeks pregnant, was admitted to the hospital with severe preeclamsia. her daughter was born weighing 3 pounds and 7 ounces.
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>> i'm sure nothing else mattered. >> running was the further thing from my mind. all my energy was making sure she was okay. >> reporter: cameron spent a month in the nicu. >> then lo and behold, she is watching you run. >> reporter: the road back to competition wasn't easy. felix could barely walk. 30 minutes on the treadmill left her in tears. >> people expect you to be super woman. >> you expect yourself to be super woman. you go through a real-life experience. >> reporter: that experience also led felix to activism. testifying about black maternal mortality. >> we need more support during pregnancy. >> reporter: pending a raw op-ed
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with nike. if i, one of the widely marketed athletes could not secure protections, who could? nike declined. >> the way you stood up for women. women of color. mothers. a big risk. >> terrifying. there has been silence around the culture of pregnancy and sport for too long. what i was experiencing, i could not sit back and let it go. >> reporter: soon after she and others spoke out, nike announced expanded protections for women. this career, felix started her own shoe company on her terms. now admired as much for advocacy and athleticism. >> this is bigger than running fast. it is showing women we can be present at home and we can also thrive in our profession. it is showing my daughter can
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you stay the course and can you keep doing things the right way with character and integrity. >> what a great, great story. great ending to that story. let's bring in kerri champion and kenny mayne. kerri, we know something about preeclampsia and preemies. it is life threatening and it is hell for the mom, especially. the entire family. she has gotten through that and i'm sure that incredible story is something that you've already talked about on "tokyo tonight" on peacock. talk about her big win today. >> i think what allyson -- we got it right this time. we have been, you know, promoting her in a way in which she deserves her nowflowers.
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allyson's story is what you showed. how she stood up for mothers and this win, to me, solidifies her place in history in terms of the greatest. what she is doing as an athlete and mother is unheard of. there is hesitation for a lot of athletes to have a kid. can i go back and recover. is it considered taboo? she is making it en vogue, if you will. she responsible sponsored nine other athletes to bring their children there. ultimately, turn around and get a bronze and could be the most decorated if she wins in the relay and all the while being such a very wonderful avocate
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for mothers and athletes. this is a phenomenal story. >> kenny, it is a great story. when she was at the beginning of the packages with lester holt talking about i found out how tough i was when i was a mother. yeah, that will show you how tough you were. then preeclampsia and in the nicu for a month. i can't imagine as a parent going out after that and getting back to top world class form. then taking on nike and fighting nike for other women. and keeping her head down and plowing ahead and achieving this today. my god, this is such a great story. >> yeah. we're big fans. i got to interview her long ago. cari knows her better than i. she has done amazing things.
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sue bird with the wnba. by the way, i want to thank you for running a commercial and piece between us and the right-wing pastors to get separation. >> sure. >> you know, look at what meg rapinoe and the soccer plays had to do. the last president cheering openly against them. you talk about mental pressure. 40% of your country is against you as you represent your country? they got bronze. i think the best and the worst of america is reflected every day. >> cari, one of the story lines here is the success of the american women in the games. allyson felix, of course, soccer team medaled. the basketball team. beach volleyball. the list is on and on. women's sports have really done well in tokyo. beyond that, what are your thoughts on what is the legacy
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of these games as they are about to wrap up? they have been playing in the shadow of the pandemic so far, knock on wood, there have been covid cases, but not a huge outbreak. what will you take from the games and remember tokyo? >> that is a great question. we had talked about so many guests on the show these past two weeks. i said what do you think about these games. what does it feel like? what do you remember? most have said in the most honest way they had such a tough year and a half with the pandemic and it was so hard for them to train. training wasn't the same. they didn't have the same access or resources and they are grateful they are able to be here. my biggest take away is with the women is resiliency. they have been able to push through. allyson at one point, she was training in her neighborhood running on the pavement in her
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neighborhood early on in the pandemic. i think no matter what you take away from the games with the pandemic, the resiliency of the athletes and willing to push forward and their authentic selves. simone biles talk about it. i'm not okay. we had naomi osaka say that. this is a wonderful juxtaposition of the warrior we are supposed to see as athletes and the human and that humanity because they have to be honest with who they are. if anything, this taught us that. >> kenny. >> i'm going to e echo what car said. and mika, your brother in poland with the ambassador ship. it didn't work out this time. i'll be back.
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>> next time, kenny. cari champion and kenny mayne, thank you. we will see you as we always do on "tokyo tonight" at 7:30 p.m. on peacock. we love having you on. that does it for us. stephanie ruhle picks up coverage right now. ♪♪ good morning. i'm stephanie ruhle. reporting live from philadelphia's reading terminal market. it is friday, august 6th. we start with breaking news. the july jobs report is out. it is above expectations. above the massive number we saw in the month of june. the united states adding 943,000 jobs in july. the unemployment rate falling half a percentage point to 5.4%. today, i am at the reading terminal market. it is here in downtown philly for more than 120 years. making it one of the oldest markets in

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