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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 2, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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♪♪ good morning and welcome to "morning joe," it is monday august 2nd and we have so much to get to this morning. breaking news from the politics. simone biles will compete again. announcing she'll get back up on the balance beam. and the women who stepped up in her absence are continuing with their impropable medal run. we'll have their incredible stories. also a different kind of international incident, a belarus sprinter is at the airport of japan alleging belarus officials tried to force her back to her home country for criticizing her team officials. we'll have the update on that. and here in the u.s. we're following comments from minority leader kevin mccarthy who now claims he was only joking when he said it would be be hard not to hit nancy pelosi with the gavel if he becomes house
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speaker. we begin in what was an overall difficult weekend for the united states in the ongoing coronavirus, the new wave is taxing hospital emergency rooms again. with health officials warning things can get a lot worse. nbc political correspondent vaughn hillyard has more. >> reporter: the united states topping 100,000 new coronavirus cases just friday. a stunning fourth wave with the number of infections and seriousness of the moment rising each day. >> things are going to get worse. if you look at the acceleration of the number of cases, the seven day afternoon has gone up substantially. >> the virus surging in states from the west to the east. cases doubling in more than 40 of them over the last two weeks. >> this is a class five hurricane. >> reporter: more florida residents tested positive for covid over the weekend than any other point in the pandemic. hospitals in jacksonville and
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orlando are already breaking previous hospitalization records. in neighboring alabama more than 1,200 people are currently hospitalized and covid unit doctors say august will be even worse. >> the number of cases by labor day will be more than twice the number of cases we saw at the worst time in january. that's what we're about to face. and the public isn't ready for that. >> reporter: and in texas, overwhelmed hospitals struggling to hire additional nurses and staff. >> they're not finding the uptake even dramatically increasing the pay they pay. >> reporter: 40% of the country is still not fully vaccinated and those individuals are making up more than 90% of covid hospitalizations. forcing hospitals today to build out new covid units. this one in baton rouge. >> in the last 24 hours we opened our fourth covid icu because of the surge of patients requiring critical care. younger and sicker quicker. they're getting sick quickly. >> reporter: amid the 100
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million not vaccinated, some encouraging news, vaccination rates doubling in some hot spots. >> this may be the tipping point for some who have been hesitant to say it's time. >> reporter: a small town in massachusetts has become one of the biggest delta variant hot spots but also direct evidence the vaccine is keeping people safe. a cdc study released on friday cited a cluster of new cases in provincetown as a key factor in its decision to issue new indoor mask guidance. less than two weeks after a busy fourth of july weekend, the town's covid-19 positivity rate reached 15%. "the new york times" said most of the cases came from men who made doctors appointments for other reasons and were surprised by their positive tests. that's because 74% of those patients were fully vaccinated
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according to the cdc. of those infected the cdc said few became seriously ill, no deaths were reported and just seven people were hospitalized. the case for the vaccines is in the national numbers. look at this, overall 99.9% of vaccinated americans have not tested positive. and .001% of vaccinated americans have died from the virus. these numbers should help people along, people who are struggling with the science of this, these numbers are proving the vaccines can keep you alive. if the numbers don't convince people, the individual stories might. for example, 55 days on a ventilator alone might change the way you view covid. and that's exactly what happened to one tennessee lawmaker. back in june of 2020, state
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lawmaker, republican david byrd accused the main stream media of sensationalizing the pandemic and later attended a multiday retreat without masks, but on friday, after a bruising bout with coronavirus he acknowledged that coronavirus is, quote, a disease that wants to kill us. as "the washington post" reports his illness ravaged his memory, muscles and organs and led him to having a liver transplant. this is just one of the many stories emerging about those who regret not being vaccinated. a new piece for "the new york times" is documenting how people who once rejected the vaccine or simply waited too long are now grappling with the consequences. among them, utah's mindy green, who says she read all kinds of things about the vaccine and was scared. her husband, however, fell
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victim to the virus and was put on life support. green posted on facebook, quote, if i had the information i have today, we would have gotten vaccinated. and this tragic story out of las vegas where a father of five spent one of his final moments sending this text message from the hospital. oh my blanking god, this is terrible. i should have gotten the damn vaccine. michael freed dy died on thursday. his widow says, quote, my kids don't have a dad anymore because we hesitated. i would take a bad reaction to the vaccine over having to bury my husband. i would take that any day. there is some good news in all of this. in areas where the delta variant is surging, vaccination rates are going up, people are hearing the message. in the past two weeks, at least
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4.7 million americans have been vaccinated. according to "the washington post's" vaccine tracker more than 806,000 doses were administered on friday, the highest daily figure since july 3rd. many of the new vaccinations are taking place in covid hot spots. on friday multiple media outlets reported that louisiana had seen a 114% increase in vaccinations. arkansas saw a 96% increase. alabama saw a 65% increase. and missouri had a 49% increase. another report now from nbc's vaughn hillyard on the rising rates of vaccines across the country. >> reporter: the country's hottest infection spots this month are also leading the country in vaccinations. across the u.s., a 31% jump this week in first doses
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administered. some of the states most responsible, places like georgia, missouri and texas. those with the lowest vaccination rates. with the delta variant sweeping through, doctors began pleading. we really need your help to help us. and republican governors taking a louder stand. >> it's time to start blaming the unvaccinated folks. >> reporter: in alabama vaccinations up 159%. and florida up 78%. a local pharmacist in missouri encouraged by the new demand. >> i can comfortably say it's gone up by at least 50% now from where it was at the end of june. >> reporter: why now? what took you these many months to finally get the shot? >> because i saw the cases are rising. i've seen more people in my family and friends have taken it and they're okay. >> reporter: one entire family in st. louis decided to roll up
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their sleeves before school starts. >> i want to protect myself and others. >> we know some that have passed. >> reporter: some states offering $100 with the shot. >> the more i research about it, the pros outweigh the cons. so that's why i decided to get it. >> reporter: an urgent push from the fda saying it's all hands on deck before it works to formally approve the pfizer vaccine. >> if that means additional people will feel comfortable getting vaccinated, that's a good outcome. florida is quickly becoming the epicenter of this fourth wave of infections, accounting for a fifth of all the new cases in the yesterday. yesterday the state broke a previous record for current hospitalizations set more than a year ago before vaccines were available. hospitals across the state are once again becoming overwhelmed. in jacksonville, for instance, hospitals have more covid
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patients than ever before, despite the availability of vaccines. "the new york times" spoke to health care workers in florida, who feel a sense of disbelief that they must endure another surge. one nurse said we are scared of seeing what we saw and this time affecting the younger population, this is the hardest thing i've ever done in my entire career. another nurse told the times, quote, it is the worst feeling ever. when you watch someone looking at you like i can't breathe, help me. and that's the worst image that i have in my mind and i never forget it. a recent survey conducted by the florida hospital association found 96% of hospitalized covid patients are unvaccinated. let's bring in the group's president and ceo mary mayhue. thank you for being on the show.
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what's going on in florida? >> what we are experiencing over the last 27 days is a dramatic increase in the number of hospitalizations. last year in 2020 it took us 60 days to go from 2,000 cases to 10,000. it has taken us 27 days to break our 2020 peak. so it has been a dramatic increase and as you mentioned, it is a much younger population being hospitalized today. so for the last 17 months, so many have heard that this is a virus that attacks our elderly, our frail elderly. right now we know that it is absolutely affecting a younger population. in jacksonville, one of our hospitals, their average age now is 42 years old. we have 25-year-olds who are in the hospital, in intensive care on ventilators. >> no. oh my god. so, mary, if i could ask you what your opinion is as to why
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people in florida are fairing worse than even other southern states where in the last week or two it seems like they're listening to their governors, their governors are coming out strongly for vaccinations. what's happening in florida where people don't seem to be getting the vaccinations that are available to them? >> again, let's just keep in mind that over the last six months we have vaccinated in the state of florida almost 10 million people, 50% of our population. huge focus on our elderly and really important to understand we have a tiny percentage of individuals with covid coming from our nursing homes, less than 3%. so we've done a great job getting some of our most vulnerable individuals vaccinated. we have to convince 25 year olds, 30-year-olds, that this is
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now life threatening for them. that is not what they saw and what we experienced last year. this is the delta variant it is absolutely taking a younger generation and is putting them in the hospital. we have to up our voices, our messaging and make sure we're loud and clear about how critically important it is for that age group to get vaccinated. >> what do you fear about where this is going in florida and could you please expound more on the younger, sicker patients, is it anecdotal? how sick are they getting? >> as we looked at the data, you have over 50% of our hospitalizations are between the ages of 25 and 55. i mean, this is the significant crux. they are it is a rapid increase, not only in the hospitalizations but in the deterioration sicker individuals, and again, pregnant
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women in our intensive care unit suffering from covid. this is just dramatically different from what we saw last year. again, as you said, 96% of those in the hospital are unvaccinated. so this is clearly -- >> my god. >> -- ripping through the unvaccinated. and it is hitting areas of the state differently. jacksonville certainly seeing it. the orlando area. but statewide we are seeing significant increases in covid hospitalization. and it is combined with, by the way, dramatic increases in other non-covid patients. very sick individuals so it is the combined pressure of covid hospitalizations, along with other significantly ill individuals in the hospital. talk to me about pregnant women.
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i'm still hearing about pregnant women scared to get the vaccine. i think i heard you say pregnant women are coming in with covid. >> as we have spoken with our hospitals around the state, i am absolutely hearing about pregnant women in the hospital very ill from covid. we know that the vaccine will keep people out of the hospital. we have to encourage individuals. this is about getting vaccinated. as you mentioned, our staff for 17 months our nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists have been working this pandemic, they're exhausted, they've been running towards the pandemic for a very long time. >> masking, can it help? if you don't want to get the vaccine, is wearing a mask 24/7 something that should happen? because i believe in florida the governor has a different position on masks?
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>> we need people to be smart. as with any infectious disease like this, you need to wash your hands, be careful in crowds, wear a mask as appropriate. but at the end of the day we need a vaccinated population. we need to build up that immunity. i am, we are all concerned about the variants and the increasing impact of these variants that, as i said, dramatic difference in terms of what we are seeing today from what we experienced throughout 2020. >> all right. president and ceo of the florida hospital association mary mayhew thank you for coming on. you heard in a report about the move of florida governor ron desantis. despite the record number of cases in florida that you just heard us talking about, they are number one in the nation, governor desantis signed an
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executive order on friday that blacks schools from issuing mask mandates. he argues parents have the right to decide whether their children would wear masks in schools. at least two counties said students will cover their faces when they return to school. this executive order overrules those. joining us this morning dave aaronburg and jonathan lemire. dave, i want to know what's going on in florida. i know governor desantis supports the vaccine but this masking non-mandate, whatever you want to call it, seems very counter to the science. and we have a governor flouting fauci, making fun of the top doctor in the united states. i feel he's sending a very mixed message to his constituents.
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at what point is the florida government liable for what's happening in florida? when it's so pronounced the difference in covid cases and deaths so far. >> good morning, mika. it's a real problem because you have to understand that governor desantis' primary motivation is to become the republican presidential nominee for 2024 that's why he engages in performance art instead of policy. that's why when florida became number one in the country for coronavirus last week the governor had no events focused on covid and two events where he decried mask mandates in schools. and he travelled to utah last week to speak to a conservative political conference to bash the cdc and dr. fauci and pledging he will never support restrictions stemming from coronavirus. this is all about gop primary politics. that's how you understand this, mika. it's not about public policy. he announced the executive
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orders where he said that he would defund the schools if they tried to impose a mask mandate. he announced the orders in front of a podium with a sign that said free to choose. ironically it was about the same time separately he was petitioning the u.s. supreme court to overturn roe versus wade so i guess his freedom of choice only extends to covid and not women's reproductive rights. >> so ron desantis, jonathan lemire, especially with this latest move on masking, i wonder can the white house do anything to overrule a governor when he does something incredibly stupid and dangerous for his people? ron desantis as far as i can tell doesn't seem stupid so this seems politically motivated. yet, the children of florida are the ones that are going to be in danger if schools aren't allowed
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to make choices in their communities and if there is an outbreak, asking the children to wear masks. >> the 2024 republican politics are the backdrop to all of this as dave just said. the white house, expect them to be critical but there's a limit what they can do since the beginning of the pandemic we learned with president trump last spring was deferential to the governors and the straits there, not much they can do on the federal level outside of federal property or airports. but in terms of florida schools, no, their hands are tied, despite the fact they will message that, of course, children should be wearing masks, the white house has, throughout this pandemic, since biden has taken over referred to the cdc. desantis, is someone who has said, he encouraged people to take the vaccine hasn't done it as strongly as his other counter parts. a lot of republicans have been out there saying to do so.
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we heard from president biden last week about his plans to get more people to take the vaccines. one of them was to have state and local officials give $100 to people to get shots. ron desantis said he won't do that, florida won't be involved in that program even though other states might. this is the growing concern across the country. as much as the white house is heartened by the increasing vaccinations in the states but they've got a long way to go. cases are surging, hospitals are filling up. suddenly covid is refocused as the number one priority for the white house right now but their hands are tied for what they can do for the state of florida. >> they are. this is a stretch, dave aaronburg but if you don't depend on facebook for your news so you're getting correct information on the science and not a bunch of crazy, stupid
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trump driven conspiracy theories that can kill you -- if you're a parent who doesn't do that and you want your child to go to school and be safe and have the other children wearing masks until this surge in florida, making it number one in the country for coronavirus cases and, of course, only unvaccinated people dropping dead after being on a ventilator alone in a hospital, if you're one of those parents who doesn't want that to happen for their children or bring it home to them, do you have any recourse that you want your child to go to school and not get a deadly virus at this point? >> not legally. there's sovereign immunity and the governor gets discretion in the mandates. he got a pass last session that removes local governments, the state can pre-empt them and as he. and the people who said the
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local elected officials are closest to the people and should be respected and empowered, now you see them pre-empted. sounds like the socialism that desantis and others continue to condemn. like the new law that prevents private companies from asking about their customers' vaccinations. that resembles the socialism they love to criticize. i think this could backfire in the court of public opinion because three-quarters polled said they oppose the governor's anti-vaccine passport law. so this has played to the maga base but if the covid continues to spread through florida how this hurts him in 2022 when he's running for re-election. >> dave aronberg, thank you very much. as the white house has been saying if you are the
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unvaccinated, you are the problem. it is the unvaccinated who are the problem, period, end of story, stop reading facebook, start looking at real news, follow the facts, ask your doctor, get the vaccine. the u.s. isn't the only place seeing what joe on friday described as toxic individualism, people thumping their chest in the name of freedom while thumbing their noses at any personal responsibility. we saw it france over the weekend, which saw massive at times violent protests over new laws that will require proof of vaccination to enter restaurants and other businesses. here's nbc news foreign correspondent matt bradley with more. >> reporter: in france, the fight over who needs to get vaccinated hitting the streets. demonstrators in paris pelting police who respond with tear gas and fists. at least three officers injured, nearly 20 protesters were
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arrested. they claim the choice to get vaccinated should be freedom. i have children she says i'm fighting for their future. they're outraged over a new virus pass coming into effect august 9th that would legally restrict entry in most places like restaurants, bars and theatres to the vaccinated and those with a recent negative test. i won't sell my soul to go to the restaurants, cinemas, nothing about freedom. france is battling a frightening new wave, a nation fighting the disease now fighting over civil rights. matt bradley nbc news. let's bring in u.s. national editor at the financial times, ed luce. can you try and describe what exactly is driving this fever in france. it's a little fever because people die of coronavirus when they don't get vaccinations.
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and then they catch the delta variant or different mutations of the vaccine and they are also ultimately endangering the vaccinated. because if that virus is allowed to mutate, it could create a mutation that could penetrate the vaccinated. what is going on? >> you're quite right, mika. we are as the cdc has said, many scientists point out, two or three mutations away from a variant that can get past the veen. so it's important, even though those of us who are vaccinated are not going to fall sick, it's important we don't get infected because it helps the mutations. i think the french protests, these scenes you've just shown are a response to president macron's edict in july, a few weeks ago. really a mandate, a tough draconian step, a loss of
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patience with the unvaccinated, requiring that they show proof of vaccination to enter public places, restaurants, et cetera, but also that health care workers and others cannot turn up to work unless they show proof of vaccination. so what you're seeing is the backlash to that, but if you measure the overall measures of french who responded to macron's edict, it's been a success. millions more who are waiting on the sidelines have got vaccinated since then and millions more are getting vaccinated. so it's working. tough measures do work and it might be worth looking at those numbers here in the united states. where we hit a plateau. it might be worth looking at what france has taken on. macron accepted there's going to be a backlash but he thinks it's going to be worth it and i think
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he's probably right. >> let's skip across the english channel if we may and talk about what's happening there. the delta variant which tore through england before it arrived here, there are some reports that cases have started to decline, there's a sense that the worst of the variant has come and gone. walk us through what you've heard, i know you have a lot of friends and contacts and colleagues over there, what you're hearing in terms of why that happened and should that offer some hope for the future here, perhaps this variant can also burn out sort of quickly as it did in england and tell us what the current vaccination status is in your home country. >> that's a good question, jonathan. the scientists when i was there recently were predicting that the daily infection rate would go up to 100,000, double, it was about 50,000 when i was there.
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it didn't happen, that forecast didn't take place, it's down to about 30,000 a day. so that should give us all some humility. the certainty with which we predict the course of the virus and its variant is often -- well, often belied by what actually happens. i think part of the answer to this might lie in the fact that now over 90% of adults have had at least one shot. which a very, very high rate. there are two or three countries higher but not too many. so the scope for that vaccine to circulate is more restrictive than it is here where that number is about 70%. that's quite a big difference. i think the other explanation is that schools ended. they break for the summer vacations later in britain than they do in the united states.
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and schools ended about three weeks ago. the most interesting development in britain is they've announced over the weekend, everybody over the age of 50 is going to get a booster shot of the vaccine this fall. that's another 32 million shots. and that's, you know, with the existing variant. so we're all going to be having this same debate all over again about whether people are prepared to take the booster shot. so, you know, brace yourselves for a whole nother round to convince those to get a booster shot. >> ed luce, thank you so much for being on. we'll see you soon we hope. a few other stories making headlines this morning. the justice department said russian hackers broke into email accounts some of the most
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prominent federal prosecutor's offices in the country last year. 80% of microsoft accounts used by employees in the four u.s. attorneys offices in new york were breached between may and september. the doj said the culprits were also responsible for last year's hacking of u.s. tech company solarwinds. that hack in part prompted president biden to issue new sanctions against russia in april. russia has deied any involvement in the breach. there is a new shortage hitting the country, ammunition. the ap reports the covid-19 pandemic coupled with record sales of firearms has fuelled a shortage of ammunition. which is affecting law enforcement agencies, people seeking personal protection, hunters, and new gun owners.
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many store shelves are empty and prices are rising. manufacturers say they are producing as much as they can but cannot keep up with the demand. law enforcement agencies and businesses are taking steps to conservative ammunition. the u.s. military is not affected by shortages as it produces its own supplies. a turn to entertainment news now. disney's "jungle cruise" sailed to the top of the family film genere in earning over $91 million globally through disney plus. the film starring dwayne johnson and emily blunt had a better than expected opening earning $34 million at the domestic box office. "the green knight" also beat expectations. while "stillwater" debuted with just over $5 million in ticket sales. >> just seven months from when
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the capitol was overrun, kevin mccarthy made a joke about hitting nancy pelosi with a mallet. plus former president trump reportedly pressed the justice department to declare the 2020 election results corrupt. george conway says it reeks of criminal attempt. also ahead, the latest from tokyo where team usa continued its streak in the pool and usa gymnastics confirms that we will see simone biles compete this week. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. you're watc" we'll be right back. rush hour will never feel the same.
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now to the latest from the tokyo games. u.s. gymnast simone biles will compete in what would have been her sixth event at the tokyo olympics. usa gymnastics confirmed this morning biles will return for tomorrow's individual final on the balance beam. she most recently pulled out of this morning's event, the final for floor, after bowing out of the team final individual all around vault and uneven bars. with biles out of the competition, team usa's jade carey has won gold in the women's individual floor exercise. meanwhile, individual all around gold medalist suni lee earned bronze on the uneven bars yesterday. and veteran gymnast, mykala
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skinnard who thought she retired stepped up to win her first gold in vault. after breaking his own world record for gold in the 100 meter butter fly on saturday, caeleb dressel set a new record in his third individual gold medal of the games. he then joined the men's 4 by 100 medley relay team in a world record finish that sends the swimmer home with five gold medals from the tokyo olympics as the u.s. won the event for the 14th consecutive games. meanwhile, bobby finke charged in the final length once again to win the men's 1500 meter freestyle with along with katie
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ledecky's win completes a sweep of the distance swimming contests in tokyo. on the olympic hardwood, the u.s. women's basketball team remains unbeaten in 52 straight olympics games after defeating france 92-53 this morning as they advance to the quarter finals. on the pitch the u.s. women's soccer team is out of gold medal contention after falling to canada 1-nil in this morning's semifinal match. team usa can still take home the bronze, though. the track and field competition continues in tokyo this morning after american kenny harrison won the silver in the 100 meter hurdles and fred kerley sprinted to the gold earlier. raven saunders picked up the
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silver with her nearly 65 foot throw in the women's shot put final. and a belarus olympic sprinter is seeking to stay. the 24-year-old sprinter, who was due to run in the olympic 200 meter heats today said on instagram that she's put in the 4 by 400 relay even though she never raced in the event. he said her coaching staff showed up at her door on sunday and ordered her to pack her things. but she refused to board the flight home against her will. and sought the protection of japanese police at the airport. i was put under pressure and they are trying to forcibly take me out of the country without my consent, she said. she walked into the polish embassy in tokyo this morning
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and has applied for a visa. we will keep you posted on that. and coming up, millions of americans are facing the threat of being kicked out of their homes after an eviction moratorium expired over the weekend. we'll speak with cori bush after she spent a sleepless night on the capitol steps. plus former homeland security secretary jeh johnson will be our guest this morning after some lawmakers call for him to be named border czar. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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the house oversight committee on friday released
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documents obtained from the justice department that show former president donald trump pressed doj officials to declare the election corrupt so he and congressional allies could then try and overturn the loss of his presidency. then deputy attorney general richard donahue took handwritten notes, in which the former president pressed the officials on unsubstantiated claims over voter fraud and he then told trump the department had no power to change the outcome of the election. and according to the notes, the former president responded, quote -- and listen to this -- just say that the election was corrupt and leave the rest to me. and allies in congress, trump denied the report. the notes were provided to the oversight committee as part of
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the investigation into trump's attempts to overturn the election. let's bring in national security expert columnist at "usa today," tom nickels, author of "how the right lost its mind" charlie sykes. and alexi mchammond from axios joins us. if you could just respond to the quote from trump. that in itself says so much about how he felt he could run things as president of the united states. but does it border into corrupt, illegal? >> i'm not a lawyer, it's mafia behavior. it's mobster stuff. and that shows that, you know, he had no -- he has no issue
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simply issuing tony soprano like orders to the department of justice. it's a threat. he's talking to people who work for him that he can fire. >> jonathan lemire. >> we're seeing, it feels like, man a week doesn't go by without another revelation about trump's behavior in those final weeks while he was in office. what he would do nearly whatever he could to try to stay in power, pull ever lever of government. we saw the -- recently the fears expressed by the joint chiefs of staff that a coup was perhaps about to happen. yet very few republicans seem to want to break with him. are you seeing anything at all, with this latest revolution, -- latest revelation, this direct order say it's corrupt and i'll go from there, any republicans beyond the handful that we know
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that are going to distance themselves at all, any optimism this morning? >> i would say unlikely, i'm sorry on a monday morning to say that. but what is really remarkable, the republicans want to move on. they want to turn the page and not talk about this and as you point out, jonathan, every week we find something else. make a list of all the things that we have learned about president trump -- former president trump's willingness -- attempts to overturn this election. look, january 6th was not a one-time discreet event. you have to put it in the context of all of these other attempts. he's trying to bully the department of justice, on the phone with officials in arizona, on the phone threatening officials in georgia, trying to get legislatures in places like michigan to overturn the election. this was a concerted attempt -- not the mention the fears of people like general milley there might be a coup. so we are getting a fuller
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picture that puts january 6th into context that here you had a president of the united states doing something even after five years is still breathtaking in his attempt to overturn this election. so to answer your question, i wish i could say the republicans are going to look at this and the scales are going to fall from their eyes and they're going to say this is seditious, we cannot tolerate that but we're too deep. over time does the influence wain, does the craziness out of mar-a-lago erode that report? one would hope so. but if i'm an elected official i have to worry what else are we going to find out, learn? we have this january 6th committee that's going to be subpoenaing other individuals. think we're going to learn about other attempts to billy, other
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phone calls. this is not going away any time soon. >> charlie, if you've written about some of these folks who really can't seem to kick their conspiracy theories and other things that ever bringing america down the abyss, away from a democracy, and even saying in your piece that hillary clinton might have been right using a certain word about them. one of them is danesh who hung out many years ago with laura ingram, and these are people who continue to mock and ridicule the officers who testified. in defense of democracy -- i was going to say in defense of themselves. these men didn't care about themselves. these men put the country before everything on january 6th. these men put the country over their own families, to defend our democracy.
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and yet, these people, along with a few others, taking massive platforms and dragging their names in the mud, laughing at them, mocking at them. what -- where do we go from here when this type of thing is happening? >> this has become the norm, a way of life for many people on trump word. you think of danesh, this overgrown hip critical cal man child mocking the police officers saying they were not manly because they were crying when they described their injuries. in a rational world people would say have you no decency but i think we realized the answer is no. there is nothing tough or manly about being a sneering, mocking, playground bully. and there is nothing unmanly about men who have served their country, have put their lives on the line, who are testifying about all this. but again, this is kind of this
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new culture that you're seeing on the right. tucker carlson, cackling about his critics. laura ingram mocking the police officers. mocking simone biles as being a loser because she's not competing. can you imagine what these guys would do on the parallel bars. this is kind of the culture of the right, where it's not about ideas, it is about we will destroy and make fun of anyone who opposes us because it's all about -- it's all about power and they have cultivated this crassness, cruelty and lack of empathy. i think we're seeing this, it is an ugly view, but again danesh disuza is not going to be cast out of polite society, will probably be at the next trump rally. >> what i see between the denial of january 6th and the denial of
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this virus, the denial of the need for vaccines, this culture is killing us. and it's destroying our democracy. those are not extreme words anymore. that is exactly what is happening. and the question one could ask one self is are we going to be able to pull ourselves out of this virus with this type of culture taking over so many americans. by the way, thank you to facebook. >> yeah. i've tried to be optimistic. my optimism and my empathy are gone. i think we don't have the national character and stoicism and just to pile on to charlie's comments here, to add one more word to the sneering cruelty he's talking about, we don't have the adulthood. we don't have the maturity to deal with the -- either the virus or to come to grips with
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what happened on january 6th. we have a political movement in america that now has completely become unmoored from any kind of ideology or system of thought or policy preferences, which is always an amazing thing to see when conservatives decide that, you know, policy doesn't matter, power matters. and power and money matter so they will say or do whatever the moment requires. sometimes especially with people like desuza, ingraham and others, knowing the age of their children, it's like children trying to impress their grandparents to see if they can get written back into the will or something. there's this almost child like one upsman to see who can be the
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most extreme and the most ingratiating. that says i'm a pessimist in our society. >> speaking of all of this, house minority leader kevin mccarthy is facing strong backlash after he said this about speaker nancy pelosi at a fund-raiser over the weekend. take a listen. >> i want you to watch nancy pelosi hand me that gavel. [ cheers ] >> it'll be hard not to hit her with it. >> quote, it'll be hard not to hit her with it. his comments were recorded by main street nashville. a spokesman for mccarthy said he was, quote, obviously joking. but house democrats are calling on him to apologize.
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alexi he sounded so trumpy. >> the entire party continues to be trumpy. it's notable this language was shared at a fund-raiser because it's further evidence this is what republicans know riles up their base voters not just to support republicans through votes but giving their own money to the party and folks like kevin mccarthy, who, of course, is raising money for other people, other candidates running in 2022. there was "the washington post" reporting th that showed 700 something republicans declared their intentions to run for some type of office. over 200 of them believe in this idea and conspiracy theory that the 2020 election was rigged and stolen from donald trump. that gives you a glimpse of how the party will continue to be the party of trump. >> jokes about hitting women are not funny, period. it's amazing we have to say that this morning. it also goes to further
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poisoning the well there and the relations between the two parties on capitol hill, right? just a week or so ago we've had the tension between republicans and democrats in the house about the mask mandate. we heard kevin mccarthy fight back against that. we saw that speaker pelosi called him a moron as she stepped into a car because of his opposition to science. we saw the protest the house republicans did outside, refusing to wear masks and throwing them at staffers and reporters. such an extraordinary amount of immaturity but goes how far apart we are in these two parties working together in any meaningful way, particularly in the house. we've seen some in the senate, and it's at least progress but in the house it's a level of discourse that reflects it's the people's house. and it represents how partisan this country is and how divided we are. it's team red, team blue. and there seem to be very, very few meaningful ways to get people together.
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as a final point, let's recall it was only six or so months ago in a building not far from where i'm sitting right now which a bunch of trump-loving rioters stormed the capitol saying they are going to hurt if not kill nancy pelosi so to have kevin mccarthy now make a joke about violence against her seems to be in the pail taking us further from the base of the parties. and alexi your reporting on the boston mayoral race. tell us about it. >> just as the republicans are looking at the crop of republican candidates, democrats are doing the same on their side of the aisle. more women and people of color running in local races in particular and for the first time in history, mika, a white
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man is not in serious contention to be the mayor of boston. we're seeing from new york, seattle, cleveland, ohio, multiple people and women of color jumping into the race. and really establishing these clear ideological lanes for themselves. as you pointed out whether and how moderates can edge out progressives in a moderate field. >> alexi, charlie and tom thank you all. it's great to have you on this morning. it's just past the top of the hour on august 2nd, jonathan lemire is still with us and mike barnicle joins us as well. according to a tally last night total coronavirus cases in the u.s. surpass 35 million.
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a 64% increase in cases over the week that ended on july 30th. last friday. compared to the previous week. and one of the more jarring aspects of this latest surge, how vulnerable children are to the delta variant. as one texas doctor described on twitter, quote, after many months of zero or few pediatric covid cases, we are seeing infants, children and teens with covid pouring back into the hospital. more and more each day. patients have ranged in age from 2 weeks to 17 years old. including some with covid pneumonias. the school year meanwhile is getting under way for thousands of children in several hot spots where covids is now surging, leaving parents confused and worried about how to move forward while keeping kids safe. steve patterson has the story. >> reporter: on the eve of
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school bells ushering in a return to the classroom, hospitals warn kids are far from immune. >> the numbers are going up dramatically. >> reporter: in louisiana, they've had one of their worst weeks at this children's hospital since the beginning of the pandemic. at least 68 school kids were hospitalized in july alone. >> about half have been in the intensive care unit. >> reporter: in northern california, a bay area school is reporting 15 cases after just three days back to school. since the start of the pandemic kids have accounted to about .02% of deaths but now anxiety for parents is at an all-time high as they fight through tangled rules, and mixed
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messages. the cdc said it's safe for everyone to go back to school but said everyone should wear masks. >> floridans have been and will be free to choose what's best for their families. >> reporter: florida governor ron desantis signed an executive order banning mask mandates in schools. illinois making them optional too. >> i'm anxious about back to school. >> reporter: shannon is worried about sending her 7 and 10-year-old daughters into classrooms. >> i shouldn't be in this position. we should be taking every single measure we can take within our schools to give our kids the safest environment possible. . >> reporter: parents at the cross roads of an agonizing decision risk the possibility of covid at school or miss a crucial period of educational and mental development. >> i want people to step up and protect our kids so every kid can go to school and do it
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safely. >> thanks to steve patterson for that report. let's bring in dr. vin gupta, a pulmonologist and msnbc contributor. can we start in florida, they're number one in cases right now, they're going through a surge. it's a surge mostly among the unvaccinated, 99% of those getting covid and even dying from it are unvaccinated. they have a surge in hospitals, we have hospital workers that are overwhelmed again and i have to -- i had to write this down and read it, because i can't believe it. the governor is banning mask mandates in schools. and i'm hearing reports about kids as young as 2 weeks old, getting coronavirus and getting severely ill. is this malpractice? what is going on in florida? >> good morning, mika.
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it's moronic that something like this would be considered. there should be mask mandates in schools, enforced. this should not be a parent-level decision. what ron desantis is doing makes no sense whatsoever. that must be the case. we do need children back in schools and we can make it safe relatively speaking until they get vaccinated, but that's vital that school districts are able to mandate that and enforce it. it should not be a parent level decision. this should be an example of what's allowed across the country, mika. schools can be safe but they need the ability to mandate, they need capital infrastructure and improvements to their hvac systems, mers 13 filters in the vents. these things cost 30,000 per classrooms, that's going to require a certain level of resources and commitment from state and local government. but we need it n across the country and certainly places
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where there's high rates and low vaccinations. >> we know people that will not get that vaccine. what is it that you can say that will help bring people kind of over to the other side, if i may, they don't believe the stories they're reading about the vaccine, they're not sure it's safe, some are pregnant, they're worried about their babies. and they are not going to get it. what are your concerns about the state of florida specifically, and how do we -- how do we educate people who are very well educated and are getting information that is counter to what irsaying. what you are saying? >> what i found most effective is for people, if we can do this, have direct engagement one
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on one in person, this is what i've done when i had the opportunity. i story tell, i use visuals and graphics. i show ct scans of my patients, what happens to a 20-year-old and their lungs when they have covid-19, they take a risk with a delta variant. i hear, especially from younger people, i'd rather take the risk with the virus than the vaccine. so threat perception vital to double down on but not just through citing statistics, finger wagging, but pictures, story telling. we need to make it vivid. number two, directly talking about these issues like fertility and whether the vaccine is safe, going to impact your ability to conceive or come to term. now we can cite real evidence how it's nonexistent, especially
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when it comes to pfizer and moderna. to your point, where are we headed in florida and across the country. places like florida are going to be accounting for at least 50% of potentially day over day deaths in october of about 1,000. we're headed back potentially to a place we're seeing 1,000 deaths a day in places like florida. so we really need to double down on a different communication strategy one that minimizes mask communication and maximizes that type of authentic direct to patient, direct to the individual engagement. and actually, mika if i may -- >> go ahead, doctor. >> i just think -- i just think it's really important to be clear to the american people about what success looks like, mika. and that is, we're not going to eradicate covid-19. and this is the phraseology is going to be important. i don't like the phase we have
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to learn to live with it but some riff with it is going to be true in the era of vaccines where covid will be endemic. we're not shooting for i rad >> i understand what you're saying but aren't we in a zone where we're concerned this delta variant could mutate if it's allowed to become prevalent throughout the south and throughout the country if it's allowed to grow and spread, isn't the potential that it could mutate into other viruses, other mutations of it that could then penetrate the vaccinated. we are risking falling back completely into this, are we not? >> there's always that possibility, mika. you're absolutely correct. so it is to say that there are level -- our level of testing is about 40% of its peak back in
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early january of 2021. probably a lot of cases going undetected as we speak, where you are, where i'm at right now but we're protected at the individual level if you're fully vaccinated. is there potential for mutation and continued threats, absolutely. but that's mitigated in communities that are otherwise highly vaccinated. >> mike barnicle? >> hey, doctor. as you know, it's the beginning of august, first week in august. and in some states schools will begin shortly in many other states they begin towards the end of the month or certainly early september. do you have any sense, is there a minimum age for children to receive a vaccine. could children in kindergarten receive a vaccine? do we have to wait until they're in the third, fourth or fifth grade? >> you know, mike this is an area of active investigation.
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there's no reason -- i mean, there's babies that receive different types of vaccines and go through series young before they even turn one. are we going to study that? that process is happening as we speak. i do suspect by hopefully mid september the fda is going to update their emergency use authorization right around the time full approval is rendered for pfizer and moderna for five and up. so hopefully about a week and a half past labor day that's when you'll see the eua updated for 5 and up. those younger than that, i don't think that's going to happen until later into the winter, early 2022. >> dr. vin gupta, thank you so much for coming on the show this morning. we'll see you again soon. we'll turn to alabama now where the delta variant cases are spiking. but suddenly so are vaccinations. alabama still has the lowest vaccination rate in the country but the cdc reported a 63% rise
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in the number of residents getting vaccinated last week. that is so hopeful. it came after the state's republican governor, kay ivey, tore into alabama's unvaccinated population saying they were to blame for the rise in cases. let's bring in professor of medicine at the university of alabama birmingham, dr. michael sagg. he has a new op-ed in "the washington post," this time around alabama is facing the two-front war. what is it? >> it's the virus, we've just been talking about that, the second war is against misinformation. that's the reason why people aren't getting vaccinated. i had a patient this week, on friday, who came in sick with covid and i said, have you gotten vaccinated, he said, no. but i was thinking about it. i said what kept you from
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getting it. he said i was about to get the pfizer vaccine and then i read there were all kinds of problems with the pfizer vaccine so i hesitated. i said how do you feel about that now? i wish i had gotten it. that's the war we 'fighting. it's two fronts, the virus and misinformation. >> where do you think they're getting the misinformation, what are you hearing from patients as to where they're getting this misinformation that is dead wrong? >> yeah, a lot of it is coming off of social media. i think facebook in particular -- i'll not trying to throw them under the bus -- but there is just -- anything can be posted there. and get into a link or groove of information coming to you, there's no way to validate it, people read it, get scared, say maybe i'll wait a little longer. we can't afford that. we have to have trusted voices not get assassinated in social media. so when people come on tv, write
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op-eds, whatever they do, people listen and they have a source of solid information we need that in a big way right now. >> when you have a family member who is on facebook all the time, if you could tell them what the doctor just said, anything can be posted there, and anything is. it's not news, it's not facts, it's not a good place to get information. try and save their lives. doctor, do you think what kay ivey the governor did, by coming out strongly against the unvaccinated and really making a push for vaccines has helped in terms of public health? has helped turn the tide toward more people getting vaccines? >> i think it was a very important step. but i think also the numbers are kind of scary to people. in may, 18,000 deaths in the united states. 17,850 of those were among unvaccinated people. the vaccines work, and people are seeing friends and relatives getting sick, some going to the icu. as you said earlier in the
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program just now, the kids. at children's hospital here in alabama we didn't have hardly any cases in the last wave of children going into the hospital with covid pneumonia, now we have 27 in the hospital and five or six in the icu. we didn't see that before. as you said earlier, with kids going back to school, which i want to see happen, to send them in without masks is like sending kids out into a car without a car seat. this has to be done. we have to find a way to protect kids if we want the privilege of sending them to school we have to have protections for them in my opinion right now. >> so with so many kids you have to be incredibly concerned. what do you think of a state governor banning mask mandates, specifically in schools, right now in a state like florida? >> i think it's governance malpractice, frankly.
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you have to be able to give the people in the school systems, counties, the authority and ability to do what they need to do to protect kids. why take that away? i cannot imagine, outside of political motivation, there's no public health reason to do that, in fact, it's the opposite. i think we have to sit down and drill into the florida governor's ban on that and ask the question why. there's no medical reason, it can only be politics. and he's playing to his base and i think he probably has a lot of future political aspirations. what's he -- what's it costing the state of florida to follow that? in contrast governor ivey is getting out in front doing the right thing. >> doctor, it's jonathan lemire we talked about there's a hopeful rise in the vaccination rates across the state but we are, of course, hearing from people who have gotten to the
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hospital, asked for the shot and being told it's too late. you have to go on a ventilator. you just mentioned something i want to circle back to about children. can you walk us through in terms of the different populations of people you're seeing be seriously ill this time. is it indeed skewing younger? tell us how sick are these children? but also the range of people you're seeing there. it's not senior citizens anymore, these are younger folks? >> yeah, they are, jonathan. the bottom line is that the older folks are kind of wise, right. they got vaccinated. so 80% are vaccinated. we're not seeing them in the hospital. the vaccine works. we're seeing 20-year-old, 30-year-old, 40-year-olds coming in. that's the majority of our cases and, of course, a few in that 20% who were not vaccinated are the ones having problems. so we're seeing the vast majority of cases are in young adults and mid level adults. the difference in the kids is striking simply because we didn't see it before and we're
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seeing it now. and that's what has all of us sort of jumping back a little bit and saying, this could get bad. the other thing that i'd like to emphasize is that there was a study by dr. susan judd, she showed by using projections and the slope of the curve by labor day we'll have to two to three times of cases in alabama overall than we saw at the peak, the worst time, in january of 2021. two to three times. and that's all, in my opinion, coming back from july 4th when everybody went out, sparked a flame, and now we have a wildfire. >> we are seeing, doctor, prominent voices in your state, the governor, football coach nick saban, he's been outspoken about the need to vaks up and get the vaccine. what are you seeing at the local level? are you hearing from ministers, clergymen, you know, local leaders, are they also speaking out against this?
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we've talked on the show a lot about evangelicals and how some are raging against the vaccine while others have struck a note recently saying this is important you need to do it. what are you seeing in many your communities about who's pushing for the vaccine, who's opposing it, and what difference is it making? >> i think it's kind of an all-fronts approach. you're right, folks like nick saban coming out strongly in favor helps. but at the end of the day it's a one-on-one conversation people have as they're getting to the point thinking of getting the vaccine. it could be a clergy. it could be a lot of times their physician or provider who says it's important. i do it in 34i clinic all the time and it's amazing how a few words of encouragement or answering a question and the next day they're going out and getting a vaccine. i've heard tragic stories of
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where someone has died in the family and the surviving son or daughter says to the parent, you're not going through this, i'm going to make you get the vaccine, you don't have a choice. but it takes that kind of tragedy and it's boiling out one on one, that's how we're seeing people change their mind. but everyone needs to pull together in the same direction, that's what we need right now and it's urgent. >> professor of medicine and infectious diseases at the university of alabama at birmingham, dr. michael sagg, thank you very, very much. jonathan lemire mentioned evangelicals. "the washington journal" reports christians are more resistant to taking the vaccine than other major religious groups. that's according to newly released data from the public religion institute. evangelicals make up about one quarter of the population. the study shows about 24% of white evangelicals said in june
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they wouldn't be vaccinated. the journal cites one pastor who said pastors are afraid their churches will lose members or donations if they support vaccination. franklin graham told the journal, quote, i don't think i've ever seen anything that has been so controversial as this vaccine, and it's so puzzling to me because the vaccine makes sense. it's gotten political. mike barnicle, it doesn't make any sense. are all of those people with children who don't go to school? because you have to get like five vaccines to go to school. what are these all home schooled kids that aren't vaccinated? the it's crazy. vaccines are a part of our life here in america and they help prolong life and they help save life and yet these christians are refusing the vaccine?
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>> well, you know, mika, a vaccine is an individual choice. the interesting thing about the history of vaccines in this country is the sach vaccine to fight polio, created in the early 1950s. millions of americans, most americans received the vaccine. if the belief about vaccines existed now existed then, two thirds of the country would be on crutches still. the vaccine has become political, that's the crux of the problem. it's the slow destruction of the republic, really, it's the disbelief in the government. it's the disbelief in the vaccine. a vaccine that has been proven to be helpful, and in many, many cases life saving to americans and people around the world. now it's a matter of politics. masking is an element of
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politics. instead of people stopping to think about what the vaccine does for their health, for their family's immediate health and as we start to go back to school across the country, the health of their children. unless we stop to think about the reality of the veen and it's very simple, vaccines help save lives. this vaccine is a lifesaver. even if if you do get the delta variant, if you're vaccinated, it's been proven medically, repeatedly, that your life will exist longer than if you have no vaccine. but there's only so much you can do to people filled up with misinformation on facebook, anecdotally, talking to their neighbors, listening to certain tv networks, listening to certain people on tv, believing that what they say is the real news, what they dictate on their programs and on their facebook
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pages is legitimate. it's not. the only thing legitimate that we're talking about this morning and we talk about every morning is the vaccine. get it and save your life. >> well, and to the politics of this mike barnicle as we wrap up this conversation. there are two facts here, vaccines help save lives and it's been proven here in america, you can actually see that playing out if you were afraid to take the vaccine, you can watch the science play out and see the only people who are dying are unvaccinated. so there's that. and also, january 6th happened. it was an insurrection. that was deadly. that attempted to interrupt our democracy in process. those two facts are facts but they are being questioned by false information being put out on facebook and fox and news max. those are the two places that question these two facts over
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and over again and different ways and nuance and straight on flatly questioning it. flatly denying these facts. and until we have these forces in our main stream media and on fox news where they sit there making money on these lies about the vaccine, lies about the four police officers who testified about january 6th -- i mean, that's disgusting in itself, but it's also -- it's decimating our democracy. it is as dangerous as it gets. it's trump still being sort of an umbrella of power over these people. and then on facebook and places like the epic times and other publications that people read that are not based on facts, on facebook people who are on facebook all day long get incorrect information on things that could save their lives, the
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vaccine. and right now, as long as we have these factors, these platforms that spread these lies, we have a huge problem. and still ahead on "morning joe," could we see a deadly repeat of covid outbreaks at nursing homes and long-term care facilities? health officials are sounding the alarm. plus we'll be joined by congresswoman cori bush who has been on the u.s. capitol steps since friday, spending each night in a sleeping bag to protest the end of the eviction moratorium. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. g "morning " we'll be right back.
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♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ hey google, turn up the heat. ♪ ♪ ♪
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from prom dresses to workouts and new adventures you hope the more you give the less they'll miss. but even if your teen was vaccinated against meningitis in the past they may be missing vaccination for meningitis b. although uncommon, up to 1 in 5 survivors of meningitis will have long term consequences. now as you're thinking about all the vaccines your teen might need make sure you ask your doctor if your teen is missing meningitis b vaccination.
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one of the immediate impacts of covid-19 centered around renters who faced huge struggles making their rent payments every month when the pandemic hit in early 2020. at the time, the federal government stepped in to prevent people from getting evicted. but the federal freeze on most evictions enacted last year expired on saturday. as nbc news correspondent ali vitali reports it's a major battle on capitol hill. >> i'm behind four months and the land lord is, at this point, just waiting i guess for -- >> sierra green is waiting for a knock on her door. >> to them i'm already evicted. >> she is one of those awaiting to be evicted because of the pandemic. house lawmakers left town for a
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six week recess. >> we need to be brought back to the house to finish the work so people don't end up on the street. >> reporter: house speaker nancy pelosi looking to the centers for disease control. >> we would like the cdc to expand the moratorium, that's where it can be done. >> reporter: the white house, meanwhile, looking to the states. urging them to doll out billions in emergency rental funds. >> that money is there, they need to mov that money to those renters and those landlords immediately. >> reporter: land lords out $21 billion in the last year. in the meantime, urging landlords and renters to work together. >> if you know the person is working with you cooperatively it doesn't make any sense to evict. >> and the congresswoman that you saw in that report cori bush joins us now. she's protesting the end of the ban spending the past several nights on the steps of the capitol. congresswoman bush thank you for
quote
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your efforts. the last sort of buck that was passed in the piece we just aired is that it was for the states to use the money that is set aside to help with perhaps rent in future months. is that where it stands? is there money available for people who won't be able to pay their rent as this moratorium comes to a close? >> thank you, mika. there's over $40 billion that is just sitting, waiting for people to use it. people who have the need right now who have had this need for a year or more, or at least a few months. we have to get that money out to the people but i don't think that's the stand alone. i believe that we should have orders that come down from the white house and the cdc to go ahead and pen the executive order, at least give us some time to get the votes in congress to pass chairwoman maxine waters' bill to have this
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moratorium go through december 31st. >> mike barnicle. congresswoman, not that long ago in my life, i confronted being unable to pay rent, years ago, so i have great sympathy for people on the edge of being evicted. to your point the eviction ought to be extended december 31st, i suppose many people would support that, especially the renters. but my question to you is, how long can this go on? because on the other side of the story, there are landlords, not all of them big landlords, some landlords who might not be able to pay their mortgages for lack of getting their rent. so what do we do about them? >> yes. that 40 -- over $40 billion can go to them. this has already been accomplished and successful, we hear, in texas. so if we need to streamline the
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procedure, how this is supposed to happen and just say -- just put it into the text that we need to make it -- the money should go directly to landlords, if that's what needs to happen, let's do something. we should be thoughtful enough to try to figure this thing out so anywhere from 7 million people to 11 million people don't end up on the street. we haven't fixed the housing crisis that we already have, how do we put more people on the street and then in a deadly global pandemic that is surging. we keep talking about it. get the shots in arms and all of this, but the other thing is this, let's remember, the research has just shown us the communities that have the highest number of filings for evictions also have the lowest vaccination rates and we're talking about communities of color. talking about the black community being affected right now i'm exhausted, i'm sleep
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deprived. my body is physically hurting, but it's nothing in comparison to what will happen to those who are actually put out on the street and have to stay there. >> congresswoman, it's jonathan lemire. my question to you is, how do we get here? this is certainly a white house and the democrats on capitol hill for the most part have worked well together since january and on friday it was striking to see them blame each other for this impasse with the white house pointing to the supreme court decision, justice kavanaugh saying the solution has to come through the legislature. what broke down here to lead us to this dire predictment. what can be done to rectify it? >> this is not a hot potato game. keep passing it. no, it's urgent, we need to move now. so whether it's the white house and the cdc working together to get this executive order done or if it's the house, i've been asking -- we've been calling for
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the house leadership to reconvene us, have us come back. look, the chairman of the house rules committee came to capitol hill on the steps with us and said i support you all. the rules committee is ready if we get the 218 votes we're back and ready to go. and also the senate is still in session. you know, i don't understand why yesterday we were watching the senate -- we were watching their cars pull up but they didn't do anything to help. let me say this, housing is infrastructure. so the breakdown is just leadership has to do more because we're talk about the people who elected them and those that may not have but they still signed up to serve all of the people. >> congresswoman cori bush, thank you very much for your heartfelt appearance on the show this morning. we really appreciate it. and jonathan lemire, senators yesterday introduced the finished text of the bipartisan infrastructure bill after a rare
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weekend session. the bill is more than 2,700 pages long and senate majority leader chuck schumer says he wants to pass it as soon as possible. what more do you know about how this is going to move along? >> light weekend reading for us all mika as the text of the bill finally was delivered in a rare weekend session. the senator, as you just said, senator majority leader schumer is hoping for a vote later this week. we heard from joe manchin and other senators making their rounds on the sunday shows who said they believe that is possible. and then, you know, the senate is expected to be here this week maybe a into next and start pivoting towards that reconciliation bill. we're a long way from done here, this has still got to go to the house. we heard concerns from progressive wing of the house, specifically alexandria ocasio-cortez, over the weekend, expressed concerns the bill wasn't big enough, doesn't do enough and it's going to be a
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challenge for speaker pelosi to hold together these widely different parts of her caucus, moderates and real liberals together going in the same direction to get it done and certainly we know the white house is keen on getting the two tracks done nearly simultaneously, the infrastructure bill and the reconciliation package democrats only. coming up a democrat and republican are coming together with a request for president biden. they want him to appoint jeh johnson as border czar. we'll talk to him next on "morning joe."
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me. they don't have to listen to me. the administration doesn't need to listen. i've been very respectful, very supportive of the administration. but something has to change when it comes to border immigration issues. we're not criticizing anybody that deals with the border. by we do need a new set of eyes. we've had border czars in the past. and i think bringing somebody like jeh johnson, i think you heard me, i said jeh johnson we said we agree on him. and he was compassionate, but he followed the law. >> all right, democratic congressman of texas says something has to change and the administration's approach to handling the surge in illegal crossings at the southern border. he and south carolina republican senator lindsey graham sent a letter to the white house on friday asking the president to name former homeland security secretary jeh johnson, or someone with similar credentials, to coordinate the
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efforts to combat the influx of migrants coming through mexico. "the washington post" says that although they say the request is not critical, they are asking the president to toughen his posture. they say homeland security facilities are overwhelmed and expressed concern about the spread of covid. and former secretary of homeland security, under president obama, jeh johnson joins us now. i guess first of all would you do it? have you been reached out to by the biden administration? and what are the issues at the border that would suggest that one with your credentials would be needed? >> on friday, mika, when i saw the news reports, i called henry and i said, hey, i thought you guys liked me. there's a less than zero chance that i would take that role on.
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effectively i had that role for three years. the current secretary of homeland security, alejandro mayorkas is the border czar, he controls the federal government's assets, land, sea and air, on our southern border. he understands the positives, he's sensitive to the problem and he's addressing the issue. mika, from owning this problem for three years, i know this, and it -- to be sure, it does get simpler when you leave office from the vantage point of private law practice. but we can do certain things on our southern border to enhance enforcement, the trump administration obviously went way too far, they were cruel and inhumane. but we can do things to enhance enforcement, deter illegal crossings, but it will have only
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a short term effect on the numbers so long as the underlying conditions in central america persist. we saw that during the obama administration, president trump saw that as well. and so, the answer to this problem has to be addressing the poverty, the violence in central america. otherwise we're going to continue to see these kinds of spikes for the foreseeable future. >> good morning, it's jonathan lemire. two questions for you, one quick one. you said you wouldn't be interested in this post but do you think an extra set of eyes, that border czar beyond people already working for the government, do you think that's necessary? and secondly you just said it's the underlying conditions that need to be addressed, i think experts agree with you and vice president harris has spent some time down there on that issue. we're talking years and years likely before anything meaningful happens on those --
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on that end, the other end of this to change the situation. so what are some of the things that can be done in the short term? >> in the short term, jonathan, the current secretary of dhs controls the border patrol, controls immigration enforcement, controls assets land, sea and air, and there is emergency authority in times like this for the secretary and fema to coordinate a broader response that includes the defense department, hhs. i know that from my own experience when we had a similar but smaller spike in migration in 2014. people in washington want quick answers. they want easy fixes like shutdown the border, things of that nature. this is not an easy fix. it requires a dedicated, sustained effort over multiple administrations to address the push factors. i know from personal experience that the push factors are always
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more powerful than any level of deterrent you can throw at the problem on the southern border. people in central america are making the very basic decision to flee a burning building, send their kids up here, even if it means they only stay for three years during the pendency ofund situation. it may take years but that is the answer. >> mike has the next question for the secretary. >> you had a long honorable and distinguished career of service to the united states of america. what do you think is a larger danger to the country today. we have covid-19 and the delta variant, people not getting a vaccine. we also have one of two major political parties in denial, a certain percentage of those republicans in denial of the
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fact that joseph r. biden is the legitimately elected president of the united states. we had a member of that party, the former president, actually engaged in trying to perpetrate a coup against the existing federal government. given that we have a vaccine for the virus, and there seems to be no vaccine for the illness that has seized the republican party, what is the bigger danger that we face as a country? >> mike, in my judgment the biggest danger we face as a country right now is the very problems we're having with our democracy. social media, the internet, enables us to hold the world in our entire hand. on the other hand the internet
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enables us to believe what we want to believe. we go to sources for information that do no more than validate our own prejudices and biases. and that's how you end up in surveys and such that show a large number of americans believe the election was stolen. one sixth of america apparently believes the qanon theory, and there are a lot of americans out there think that the vaccine that saves lives is dangerous. which is how we end up in situations like the one we're in now where we're seeing a spike. it is worse now than it was a year ago when we were still in lock down. it doesn't have to be that way. if we were all science and fact
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based. so what you're siting is the problems that we're having with america and america's decisions about what to do. >> it sounds like you say we're no closer to saving our democracy until we deal with platform that's give the information. >> i think we have to deal with the platforms, but bottom of all of this is the very basic responsibility of citizens. e be informed, be responsible, not just think of themselves. think of their patients, their health care workers, let's not think about ourselves here. so yes, there is a u lot of scrutiny right now, but it is
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incumbent on us to be responsible when it comes to our day to day lives. >> jeh johnson, thank you very much. one thing i will add is that people are reading facebook and they think they are educating themselves. they think they're getting their news from facebook. they're getting lies and disinformation and it's not a platform that has standards like publishers do. they have no accountability. and they put up things there that are false, deplan that tire, and are out of the possibilities. florida has record high covid hospitalizations, but governor de santis still thinks that
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welcome to "morning joe." we have so much to get to. breaking news from the politics. simone biles will compete again, she will get back on the balance
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beam. and the women that stepped up in her absence are continuing with their improbable medal run. there is also a different international incident playing out at the games. a sprinter from belarus. she says they're trying to force her back to the country for criticiing team officials. here in america we're following comments from kevin mccarthy who said it would be hard not to hit pelosi with the gavel if he becomes house speaker. it was a tough weekend for the united states and the coronavirus. the virus is taxing emergency rooms again. nbc political correspondent vaughn hilliard has more.
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the united states is topping previous numbers as we look at a 4th wave. >> the seven-day average went up substantially. >> the virus surging in states from the west to the east. cases doubling in more than 40 of them over the last two weeks. >> more florida residents tested positive for covid this weekend than at any other point during the pandemic. hospitals in jacksonville and orlando are breaking previous hospitalization records. in alabama more than 1200 people are currently hospitalized. and some doctors say las vegas be even worse. >> the number of cases by labor day will be more than twice the number of cases we saw at the worst time in january. that's what we're about to face. and the public isn't ready for
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that. >> in overwhelmed hospitals -- >> it's about finding the uptake and increasing the pay they pay. >> 40% of the country is not fully vaccinated and those individuals are making up more than 90% of covid hospitalizations. forcing hospitals today to build out new covid units. >> in the last 24 hours we opened up our fourth covid icu because of the surge of patients requiring critical care. they are getting sicker quicker. >> some encouraging news, vaccination rates doubled this week in several hot spots. >> this may be a tipping point for those that have been he has tent for those saying it is
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time. >> one hot spot is direct evidence that the vaccine is keeping people safe. in provincetown that are issuing new indoor mask guidance. less than two weeks the positivity rate reached 15%. the "new york times" says most of the new cases came from men who made doctor's appointments for other reasons and were surprised by their positive tests. that's because 74% of those patients were fully vaccinated according to the cdc. of those infected the cdc says few became seriously ill. no deaths were reported and just 7 people were hospitalized. in the case for the vaccines, there is evidence in the national numbers. look at this. overall 99.9% of vaccinated
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americans have not tested positive. and 0.077% of vaccinated americans have been hospitalized. these numbers are proving the vaccines can keep you alive. if the numbers don't convince people, the individual stories might. for example, 55 days on a ventilator alone might change the way you view covid. that is exactly what happened to one tennessee lawmaker back in june of 2020. state lawmaker david bird accused the mainstream media of sensationalizing the virus. on friday after a bruising bout with coronavirus he acknowledged that covid is "a disease that
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wants to kill us." as "the washington post" reportingillness ravages his memory, muscles, and or organs. a knew piece for the "new york times" is documenting how people who once rejected the vaccine or simply waited too long are now grappling with the consequences. among them utah's mindy green who says she read all kinds of things about the vaccine and was scared. her husband, however, fell victim to the virus and was put on life support. green posted on facebook "if i had the information i have today, we would have gotten vaccinated." and this tragic story out of las vegas where a father of five spent one of his final moments
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sending this text message from the hospital. oh my blanking god, this is terrible. i should have gotten the damn vaccine. he died on thursday. his widow says my kids don't have a dad any more because we hesitated. i would take a bad reaction to a vaccine over burying my husband any day. there is some good news in this. in areas where the delta variant is surging. vaccination rates are going up. in the past two weeks, 4.7 million americans have been vaccinated. according to the washington post vaccine tracker more than 856,000 doses were administered on friday. the highest daily figure since july 3rd. many of the new vaccinations are taking place in covid hotspots.
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on friday multiple media outlets reported that louisiana had seen a 114% increase in vaccinations. alabama saw a 65% increase and missouri had a 49% increase. a new report now from vaughn hilliard. >> the country's hottest insurrection -- infection areas are also seeing the highest increase in vaccination rates. with the delta variant sweeping through, doctors started pleading. >> we need your help to help us. >> it is time to start blaming the unvaccinated folks.
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>> now data showing progress this weekend. in alabama vaccinations are up 159% compares to three weeks ago. florida up 78%. one local pharmacist encouraged by the new demand. >> i said it is going up by plaes 50% now from the end of june. >> but why now? >> what made you finally decide to get the shot? >> because i saw the cases are rising. i have seen more people in my family and friends take it and they're okay. >> one entire family in st. louis decided to roll up their sleeves before school starts. >> i want to protect myself and i wanted to protect other people. >> we know some that are close that have passed. >> in some states offering $100 with the shot. >> the more i researched about it, that's why i decided to get it. >> an an urgent push from the
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fda saying it is all hands on deck as they work to approve the pfizer vaccine elevating it from it's current emergency use status. >> if that means adecisional people feel comfortable getting vaccinated i think that is a good outcome. >> florida is becoming an epicenter. yesterday the state broke a previous record for current hospitalizations set more than a year ago before vaccines were available. hospitals across the state are once again becoming overwhelmed. >> in jacksonville hospitals have more covid patients than ever before despite the availability of vaccines. the new york times spoke to health care workers in florida that feel a sense of disbelief that they must endure another surge. one nurse said we're scared of seeing what we saw and this time affecting the younger population
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in is the hardest thing i have ever done in my entire career. another nurse told the times "it is the worst feeling ever. when you watch someone looking at you like i can't breathe, help me. and that is the worst image that i have in my mind and i never forget it. a recent survey conducted by the florida hospital association found 96% of hospitalized covid patients are unvaccinated. let's bring in the group's president and ceo mary maheiu. what is going on in florida? >> what we're experiencing in the last 27 day social security a dramatic increase in the number of hospitalizations. last year in 2020 it took us 60 days to go from 2,000 cases to 10,000. it took us 27 days to break our 2020 peak. it's a dramatic increase.
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as you mentioned it is a younger population that is being hospitalized today. so for the last 17 months so many heard this is a virus that attacks our frail and elderly but right now we know it is absolutely affecting a younger population in jacksonville. one of our hospitals in jacksonville their average age is 25 years old. so if i could ask you what your opinion is for why people in florida are fairing worse than in the southern states where it seems in the last week or two they're listening to their governors, they're coming out strongly for vaccinations, what is happening in florida where people don't seem to be getting
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the vaccinations available to them. >> yeah, let's just keep in mind that in the last six monthsed nearly 50% of our population, a huge focus on our elderly and it is really important to understand we have a tiny percentage of individuals with covid coming from our nursing homes. less than 3%. so we did a great job getting them vaccinated. we have to convince 25-year-olds and 30 year olds that this is now life threatening for them. that's not what we saw or experienced last year. this is the delta variant, it's attacking a younger population and it's putting them in the hospital. we have to up our voices, our messaging and make sure we are loud and clear for that age
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group to get vaccinated. >> what do you fear about where this is going and the younger and sicker patients. what are the numbers you're seeing and how sick are they getting? >> we looked at the data and you have over 50% of hospitalizations between the ages of 25 and 55. this is a significant construction. it is a rapid increase in the hospitalizations but in the deteriorations. sicker individuals and pregnant women suffering from covid in is just dramatically different from what we saw last year. again as you said 96% of those in the hospital are unvaccinated. so this is clearly ripping
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through the unvaccinated and this is ripping through areas of the state. it is showing a significant increase and it is combined with dramatic increases in noncovid patients. so it is combined pressure of covid hospitalizations and and other significantly ill individuals in the hospital. >> president and ce, of the florida hospital association, thank you. please come back. up next, another major angle to the story. how much is politics playing into that policy? you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. right back.
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you heard earlier vaughn hilliard's report about the move from governor ron desantis. he signed an executive order on friday that blocks schools from issuing mask mandates. he argues that parents have the right to decide if their children where face coverings in school. at least two counties in the state required students to cover their faces when they return to class next month in new order overrules those orders.
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joining me now is dave and jonathan. i want the white house's point of view in a moment. dave, what is going on in florida. i know governor ron desantis supports the vaccine, but the masking nonmandate or whatever you want to call it seems very counter to the science. and also we had a governor who has been flouting fauci. making fun of the top doctor in the united states. i feel like he is sending a very mixed message to his constituents. at what point is the florida governor liable for what is happening, the difference in covid deaths so far. >> it's a real problem. his primary motivation is to become the republican nominee for president in 2024 and that's why he engages in this performance art instead of good
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public policy. that's why while florida became number one in the country last week, the governor had no public events focused on covid. instead he had two events where he decried mask man dayed in schools. and he travelled to utah last week to speak to a conservative political conference. and pledging that he will never support restrictioning stemming from coronavirus, and this is all about gop applicants. he announced these orders where he said he would defund the schools if they tried to impose a mask mandate. it was act the same time that he was petitioning a u.s. supreme court. so i guess his belief in the freedom of choice extends to
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covid by not women's reproductive rights. >> with this, especially this latest move on masking, i just wonder can the white house do anything to overrule a governor when he does something incredibly stupid and dangerous for his people? if schools are not a lowed to make choices about what they do. >> certainly the 2024 republican backdrop to all of this as dave just said, we expect them to be critical of the decision. and we learned this when president trump last spring. the governors and the states
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there, there's not so much they can do there. outside of say federal property or things like airports and thinkings like that. children should be wearing masks, and the white house has throughout this pandemic. that's what they want them to do. desantis said he encourages people to take the vaccine. a lot of republicans in recent weeks have been out there saying they should do so. we heard about some of the plans to take the vaccines. one of them was to have local officials to give $100 to people to get their shots. he says he won't be involved in that. but this is underscoring the great level of concern across the country.
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as much as they're heartenned, they have a long way to go. the cases are surging, hospitals are filling up, and this is suddenly covid, of course, refocused as a number one priority. >> dave, thank you very much. we're seeing a similar dynamic playing out overseas where france is struggling to contain both the virus and a dangerous strain of toxic resistance to science and the vaccine. details on that are straight ahead on "morning joe." it's dry. there's no dry time. makes us wonder why we booked fifteen second ad slots.
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baaam. internet that keeps you ahead of the game. that's cute, but my internet ystreams to my ride.e. yeah, well mine's always got my back.
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okay chill, 'cuz mine's so fast, no one can catch me. speed? we'll show you speed. wow! -that's nothing... ...because my internet gives me a flex 4k streaming box for free. impressive! that's 'cuz you all have the same internet. xfinity xfi so powerful, it keeps one-upping itself. can your internet do that? people thumping their chests in the name of freedom and thumbing their -- and we saw protests over laws that will require proof of vaccination to enter restaurants and other businesses. sheer matt bradley with more.
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>> in france the fight over who needs to be vaccinated hitting the streets. demonstrators pelting police and responding with tear gas and fists. three officers were injured and 20 protestors were arrested. they claimed the choice to get vaccinated should be a freedom. >> she says i have children and i'm fighting for their future. they're outraged over a new virus pass that would restrict entry to places like restaurants for those who are vaccinated. >> cases liming to 24,000, a nation fighting the disease now fighting over civil rights.
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>> let's bring in the u.s. national editor ed loose. can you explain what is driving this fever in france if is a fever because people die of covid when they don't get vaccinated, and they're endangering the vaccinated. if that virus is allowed to mutate it could create a mutation that could penetrate the vaccinated. >> you're quite right. we are as the cdc recently said, two or three mutations away from a variant that can get past the vaccine. it's really important that people will not fall sick. but it is really important that we won't get infected because it
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helps the protests. i think this is a response to what he said in july a few weeks ago. really a mandate, a tough step. a loss of patience. but also that hb workers and others cannot turn up to work unless they show proof of vaccinations. but if you measure the overall numbers of the french, it is a success. they have gotten vaccinated since then and millions more are getting vaccinated. so it is working. tough measures do work and it might be worst looking at those
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numbers here where we hit a plateau. it might be worst looking at what france has taken on. he accepted there will be a backlash, but hi thinks it is worth it. i think he is probably right. >> let's skip across the english channel if we may and talk about what is happening there. the delta variant that tore through england some weeks ago, there is seemingly some reports that cases have started to decline. the worst of the variant has come and gone. you have a lot of friends and contacts there, should that offer some hope for the future here? perhaps this variant could also burn out fairly quickly? and tell us also what current vaccinate status is in your home
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country. >> that is a good question. the scientists when i was there recently were predicting that the daily infection rate would go up. that has not happened. that didn't take place. and it is down to about 30,000 today. and so that should give us all some humility. the sadness with which we predict this course and it's variants are be lined by what actually happens. i think it might lie in the fact that now over 90% of adults have had at least one shot. it is a very, very high rate. there is two or three countries that are higher, but not too many. so the scope for that to circulate is more restrictive than it is here.
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that number is about 70%, and that is quite a big difference. i think that the other explanation is that schools start later in britain than in the united states. schools ended about three weeks ago. the most interesting development is they announced over the weekend that everybody over the anyone of 50 will get a booster shot of the vaccine this fall. and this is another 32 million shots, and that is, you know, with the existing variants. so we're all going to be having this debate all over again about whether or not people are prepared to take the booster shot. so you know, brace yourselves for a whole another round of trying to persuade the unvaccinated to get vaccinated in the first place and then to get a booster shot.
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>> wow, ed, thank you so much for being on. we'll see you soon we hope. coming up. from the u.k. to california, vaccine hesitancy with people answering the question of "what took you so long?" took you so long?"
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welcome back, another angle that we're following concerning the rise of the delta variant. what it means for the elderly in nursing homes. cathy park has that story. >> worries over a dangerous and
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deadly repeat as a delta variant tightens it's grip. >> it's very scary, are we going to go think this all over again. even residents died from the fie rus and an unidentified facility. among staff, the number is around 58%. and experts worry that the unvaccinated group. they put all of that together and it is just a lot. >> they are visiting her 83-year-old mother at a nursing home. >> they're going to go back to
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locking us out again and that was the most or riffic year ofly life. >> but the trends that we're seeing now is major. cases in nursing homes fell more than 65%. but back in florida growing challenges for people like jodi caught in the vaccine divide. >> it is frustrating because they don't realize their behaviors are keeping us from our family members. >> cathy park with that report. we told you one of the heartbreaking stories from the "new york times." it is titled they spurned the vaccine and now they want you to know they regret it. some people who were quick to embrace the vaccines are now
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choosing to speak out about family members that did not. erica thompson, a mother from st. louis, died after she had what she thought was a bad asthma attack. i really think my daughter would want know say go get vaccinated. her mother said that she had been areay about how they rolled ut and thee believed the government run campaign was a plot against black people like her. let's bring in jack healey. also britney mahia.
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she is covering why it took some people so long. back to the case of that mom. where was her daughter getting her information? >> like a lot of people, she was getting information from social media there has been a wealth of disinformation circulating that encouraged people's he has daegss and lead to people having their doubts reinforced. in this case there was nothing that her mom could do to convince her to get the vaccine. even though her mom got it and basically in this case her daughter said, you know, i'm just not certain, i'm just not certain, and her mom tried to tell her that nothing in life is certain, but this is the best we got. ultimately she didn't listen, she didn't get the vaccine and
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she ended up in the hospital. it was really heartbreaking because of what kimberly told me was that her daughter didn't want to be sedated, didn't want to go on a ventilator, and the day they finally had to do it her mom said bill there when you wake up, and saying to her, as they sedated her and put her under, and of course she just, she never really woke up until her last moment when they finally took her off of the vent and she passed away. and what kimberly told me her daughter's last words were were "mama i can't breathe." the stories are heartbreaking. the reason i wrote this piece is that families are trying to speak out to say don't be like us, don't go through this journey that we have been forced to go through. >> and over time the answer is
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the same, it comes from social media. from places like facebook that are carrying bad information every day. reading more from your peace, where coronavirus cases spiked, he sat in a down, and offered a pro vaccine testimonial in a hospital video. and jackson also described one woman's hesitancy saying in a shaking voice, a hospital clinic investigationer in rural utah described how she was publed by double pneumonia and sepsis.
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she did so using only her first name because she worried that covid deniers would say she was making it all up. i was absolutely fearful of the negative aspects that come come from it, she said in an interview this week. i was part of a problem that i was trying to avoid. britney, to your piece, which entitled "why haven't you been vaccinated? people explaining why it took so long." what took so long? >> yeah, i feel like what i learned second-degree that the unvaccinated are not a monolith. a lot of what i was hearing was that they already got covid. so in their mind they're like i don't understand if i need to get it or if i have immunity.
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other people didn't have time to take off of work and happened to give up their lunch hour that friday to get vaccinated. so there was a desire, it was about access and convenience. i think that is manage we have to consider. people are getting called selfish for being unvaccinated, but there is varying reasons for why that is, and it is easy to call them selfish than to findout it is. >> one woman said she was waiting to see how other people reacted to it. she saw on tv one man waited and he got sick before he got the shot. that motivated me, i didn't want to keep thinking about it. so there is, and you write about
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marco figueroa who completed five deliveries for work when he saw the sign he had been waiting for. free covid vaccines. he was waiting to avoid taking a day off from work. he would tell his friends, later, later. when he spotted the poster board affixed to a utility pole he decided to give up his lunch hour to get vaccinated. they parked their truck in a loading zone on 12th street and waited as he headed to the blue tents where two nurses were giving vaccines. as he waited the ten minutes, he gripped the sides of the black folding chair where he sat not because he was scared, he said, but because he was worried about falling behind on the deliveries he had left. the issue is as much as possible
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it needs to be made available. i know the biden administration was committed to trying to make vaccines available within five miles of most americans, but it is still hard for those living paycheck to paycheck to get the time to do it. >> yeah, definitely. that is exactly what is happening. after this piece ran. he said he was inspired to do this at home depot. it is important to bring the vaccine to the people teen have conversations about this very thing. i was hearing from people telling me they heard misinformation in their own homes. and i thought jack's piece was so great. it touched on all of that and shared these stories that really make a difference. i think people hear about others that waited and got the delta variant and got sick, and it's a motivating factor. that was a big push for a lot of
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people that came to the clin take day to get vaccinated. . >> jag, we're hearing more stories of people who it is too late for them, but they're telling others hey, don't be like us. encouraging others to get those shots. we are seeing a rise doing. we are seeing a rise in cases, but a rise in vaccinations in some of the states. what's your sense, are the appeals working. the people that you've talked to, do you have a sense whether they're friends, relatives, coworkers, neighbors. are they seeing these stories of suffering and deciding, okay, now i will get the shot. >> some of the people that are closest to the families that i've been talking to, it absolutely made a difference for them. a cousin or a neighbor who watched some of these families go through what they've gone through.
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and what was so great about brittany's story, all of this encompasses what a house-to-house, family-to-family battle this is at this point. it's just convincing people by people, of the amount of effort that it takes to bring through this hesitancy or the lack of access. i talked to some public health experts who were really skeptical about whether even stories of like incredible suffering and even deaths from people who had gone through this would penetrate the layers of determination and misinformation and just resistance that have really hardened over these last months, with like a large, large segment of the population. and a story of watching, you know, someone who used to be vaccine resistant, you know, having their loved ones fall sick or die, if that doesn't break through, then what's it going to be? and that was a real, real tough question for some of these
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public health experts. >> "the new york times'" jack healey and the "l.a. times'" brittany mahea, thank you both for your reporting this morning. and up next, most americans are dining out again and restaurants are welcoming the return of customers. but with the good comes the bad. we'll explain that next. we'll explain that next. from prom dresses to workouts and new adventures you hope the more you give the less they'll miss. but even if your teen was vaccinated against meningitis in the past they may be missing vaccination for meningitis b. although uncommon, up to 1 in 5 survivors of meningitis will have long term consequences. now as you're thinking about all the vaccines your teen might need make sure you ask your doctor if your teen is missing meningitis b vaccination.
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with less than a month to go before the u.s. mission in afghanistan ends, the taliban is ramping up pressure on the country's largest cities. the group launched rockets at the airports in the cities of kandahar and herat over the weekend. most of the taliban's recent military action has previously focused on smaller cities, afghan forces responded with air strikes, one of which reportedly hit a small hospital, killing one person. afghan officials told "the washington post," they fear more attacks in the coming weeks, in part due to the removal of an american anti-missile system. president biden said last month that all u.s. troops would exit afghanistan by august 31st. now to some disturbing scenes playing out in restaurants across this country.
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nbc news senior business correspondent stephanie ruhle explains. >> a violent altercation at a mcdonald's in indiana. a customer spitting on a hostess in san jose. even a brazen dine and dash attempt in new jersey. we're seeing it across the country. unruly customers acting out and restaurant workers say they're fed up. >> a woman said, this is the worst coffee ever. >> it's a verbal smackdown. >> took the food and dumped it out of the to go back. >> reporter: drunk guest turned abusive when the owner asked them to leave on the fourth of july. >> lots of really terrible words that you shouldn't say to a female. >> they later snuck through the kitchen door, past security. >> by the time he got here, they were ripping this pantry down, throwing mustard on the ground. >> reporter: the run-in rattled her. >> we've definitely had circumstances where people are very unhappy. i've never had someone try to break into my restaurant before and actually do some damage.
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>> reporter: her server, dana olet, say people simply don't understand the situation. >> we're understaffed and trying as hard as we can to make everyone happy. >> reporter: customer satisfaction is reaching new lows. 43% report being frustrated with staffing shortages. 66% were increased about increasing prices. and 50% say masking wasn't being enforced. >> it's kind of this perfect storm of things that are happening. >> reporter: just down the street, app cape cod closed their doors for a day of kindness. >> there's still so many people that are grateful to be back, but the ones that aren't are indignant about what they want and what they deserve. >> reporter: the solution, experts say, is an exercise in empathy. >> expect that you're going to have waves. >> there's no reason to make someone cry because your burger took longer than you thought it should. >> just relax. you remember what it was last year? >> try to show a little empathy. >> reporter: because tipping with gratitude is always free.
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>> all right. there was stephanie ruhle reporting. jonathan lemire, give us a sense of what you're looking into today. >> my reporting is that a bunch of outside groups that are in favor of the biden agenda are going to spend $100 million over the next month, august, when congress will be out of session. and these lawmaker are home in their home districts. these groups will blanket the airwaves and online ads, pushing them to keep their vote for the infrastructure bill, both the bipartisan hard infrastructure, the bigger reconciliation democrats only, to tout what biden has done to this point. but also keep those lawmakers on task and remind them that these pieces of the biden agenda are very popular, polling says, among their constituents. even if we know not that many republican lawmakers are going onboard. >> all right. jonathan lemire, thank you very much. and for those who have family members and friends who are
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vaccine hesitant, time is of the essence. beg them to get the vaccine. beg them to do something other than read facebook and get real information on that vaccine. you are begging at this point for their lives. that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. hi, there. i'm stephanie ruhle. it's monday, august 2nd and this morning we are covering several major stories. in washington, the bill is in. late yesterday, a group of senators unveiling the details of the nearly $1 trillion infrastructure package that they could vote on as early as this week. we'll be diving into exactly what made it into the more than 2700-page bill and if it's going to make its way to the president's desk. >> and very good news for team usa in tokyo. usa gymnastics announcing that simone biles will participate in

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