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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 26, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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conservative radio host in tennessee who originally didn't think he needed to be vaccinated until his own struggle with the virus. what he's telling his listeners now. we're also following the first house committee, the hearing on the january 6th capitol riot. it is set for tomorrow. and speaker nancy pelosi is bringing another republican voice to the table. we'll tell you who it is, and talk about what's at stake. also, team usa continues its quest for more olympic medals. we'll get you up to speed on all of the action in tokyo. good morning and welcome to "morning joe," it is monday, july 26th. joe, welcome back. we missed you. we'll begin this morning with what we've been talking about as it gets worse and worse. coronavirus infections continuing to rise among the unvaccinated americans and the
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nation's top infectious diseases expert, dr. anthony fauci, says the u.s. is headed in the wrong direction. >> reporter: the worst case scenario among the unvaccinated. >> feel like we're going back in the bell again and it's definitely, it's definitely another wave. >> reporter: the highly contagious delta variant fuelling a surge of new cases across the country. dire warnings from the nation's top doctor. >> going into the fall with the delta variant, we could have a really serious problem with a considerable surge of infections. >> reporter: the variant sweeping through the south, texas, arkansas and florida accounting for 40% of new cases in the country. but in miami, thousands packing the stadium for a live concert. >> you're drowning in people. >> reporter: as the cdc said they could recommend masks for the fully vaccinated indoors. but in arkansas, a new law
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banning mask mandates goes into effect this week. >> it's important not to have the current debate about mask wearing but to have the current emphasis on getting a vaccine. >> reporter: only 49% of the country is fully vaccinated. those without the shots making up 99.5% of covid deaths. front line workers once again with urgent pleas to the public. >> we are seeing younger patients, all unvaccinated, that are sicker. >> reporter: dr. michael bolding, has been working in the covid ward in arkansas since the start of the pandemic. >> what would it mean to you and your colleagues if more people got vaccinated? >> less pain and suffering and less calls to loved ones to tell them they didn't make it. >> reporter: that's linda's greatest fear. >> i was being selfish by not
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being vaccinated. it changes your life when you feel like i may be called home. >> thanks to megan fitzgerald for that report. she mentioned florida which has been the epicenter. no state is coming close to experiencing the sunshine state's explosive surge in new cases. hospitalizations in some areas are increasing at the fastest rate since the start of the pandemic. according to the cdc florida accounts for one in five new pandemics. over 73,000 cases were reported over the weekend alone. the number of cases reported by florida have jumped more than fourfold, reaching its highest point since mid january. >> it's gotten so bad in florida that you're actually hearing ron
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desantis talking about the need for vaccinations. we've seen republicans who were quiet on this matter for quite some time who are now actually telling those in their states who are getting sick, going to the hospital and many dying, that they have to get the vaccine. so whatever risks are inherent in those vaccines, it's nowhere near as dangerous as not getting the vaccination. you see in florida and you see in other states that haven't encouraged that in the past, just an explosion, an absolute explosion in hospitalizations, 99.5% of everybody who is going to the hospital and dying haven't been vaccinated. and yet, we're still having this debate. it is surreal, and it is tragic. and for those who politicize this, the death is on their hands. i don't think there's any other
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way to put it. of course, the misinformation that continues to flow from facebook primarily, yes, i know there are a lot of people that say look at fox news, look at fox news. even their top shows get two, three million viewers out of 325 million americans. it's facebook that's everywhere. you talk to public health care officials and you ask them, what's your biggest challenge, they will say facebook. the lies spread, the misinformation that is spread. the doctor in florida who's making money by going viral spreading misinformation and lies about what's happening with covid and the vaccines. that's what's causing this. in large part. there's some underlying issues that also we have to address as a country. but we've got to get the word out and facebook, until such point that they're broken up by
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anti-trust laws the way they should be broken up by anti-trust laws, facebook needs to do more, because these deaths are on them. just like challenges to america's democracy, we'll get to that later, but nbc's meghan fitzgerald also mentioned in arkansas in her report that one of the state's candidates for governor, sarah houck by sanders got what she called the trump vaccine. she writes, based on the advice of my doctor, please get your advice from your doctor not from some idiot cousin on facebook, not from some idiot co-worker on facebook that's trying to kill you. yes, they're trying to kill you with bad information. get your information from your doctor that you've known your
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entire life. so sarah huckaby standards writes i determined the benefits of getting vaccinated outweigh the potential risks. i was also reassured after president trump and his family were vaccinated. if getting vaccinated was safe enough for them, i felt it was safe enough for me. i believe in freedom and personal responsibilities. arkansas should not be told they can't work because their businesses or jobs are not essential. our schools and churches should not be shutdown. there should not be mandates to get vaccinated or wear masks. a conservative radio host is also turning his tune after getting hospitalized. he is hospitalized with covid pneumonia, the 61-year-old is
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now urging his listeners to get the shot. a statement released by the radio station reads in part this, quote, phil would like for his listeners to know that while he has never been an anti-vaxxer, he regrets not being more vehemently more pro-vaccine. his wife gave an update on his increasingly grave condition on saturday explaining, quote, he is still not getting well. please pray for me, i am at a breaking point. and of course from what we hear, his situation keeps going up and down, up and down. our prayers are certainly with him and all others right now who are fighting covid. >> despite these kinds of testimonials, new polling shows the majority of unvaccinated americans are unlikely to be moved in their thinking. according to a new poll, 81% of
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unvaccinated americans said they probably or definitely would not get the shot, just like 19% said they would likely get vaccinated. joining us is dr. peter hotez from baylor college of medicine. he's the author of the book "preventing the next pandemic, vaccine diplomacy in a time of anti-science". also with us, u.s. national editor of the financial times ed luce. and white house editor for politico, sam stein. start with peter hotez. listen, it might be -- there's no kind way to say it, there is a political divide in this country that's now -- one side of this being isolated by a deadly virus and with numbers that we've seen, 80% of people still not changing their mind of
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the vaccine, you know, your research on how to stop a pandemic or how to stop the next one, i wonder what it would take at this point to try and turn this around. >> yeah, mika, you're exactly right. it's no coincidence where this epidemic is raging right now, it's first and foremost raging in the south. if you look at the states with the lowest vaccination rates those are the states that have an enormous amount of covid. you mentioned florida but louisiana is on fire, alabama is on fire, missouri, arkansas and these are all conservative strong holds. it's not fun for people like myself to talk about republicans, democrats, conservatives and liberals, but that is the reality. this is months and months of anti-science, anti-vaccine aggression coming from the far right elements of the republican party. you saw it at the cpac
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conference where they said this is nothing more than an effort for power and control. and first they're going to force vaccines on us then they're going to take away our bibles and guns. and all of that misinformation, came out of cpac, the conservative news outlets. so when we talk about facebook as the disseminator, i agree with joe, but at the same time we have to look at the sources of who's driving this and what's driving this, first and foremost right now, are conservative groups. they're now trying to make amends after seeing the monster they've unleashed but this was not a one-off thing this went on for months and months, targeting scientists as well. they went after tony fauci and myself, and several others. this was a deliberate, coordinated, antiwar of aggression against science and scientists.
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>> doctor, it's so interesting -- it's not interesting, it's tragic. these times we're living in if have made obvious public health moves politically perilous. you hear people talking about vaccine mandates as if -- again we had the nazi analogy, every other crazy analogy, they're going to take away our bibles. i'm curious of the 300 or so million americans who got five or six vaccines before they went to kindergarten, did their parents have to trade in their bibles before their vaccines, did they have to trade in bibles when they were required, if they wanted to get a public education, to get vaccine for the mumps for polio, for diphtheria, i can name, five, six, seven. you could have called them vaccine mandates, whatever you wanted to call it. it was a requirement, show your papers. if you didn't get the vaccine, you don't get an education in
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the united states of america, except in extraordinary circumstances. so why can't we tell public schoolteachers, if you want to teach this fall, you have to get a vaccine? why don't we tell front line workers, health care workers, just a shocking number, 40 to 50% of health care workers, working with senior citizens right now in nursing homes, aren't vaccinated. why don't we tell them you have to get a vaccination, this is a public health epidemic, pandemic, or you can't work? why don't we tell our public safety officers, the same thing. this would be no more radical than what we've been doing for 60 years. whether it's facebook, if you want to blame donald trump, whoever, whoever, you know, we want to blame for this, people are acting like this has never happened before. something about these times when it comes to public health, have
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made smart people dumb and dumb people insane. so why don't we have those mandates? >> yeah, i mean, the truth is, there was never anything anti-vaccine or anti-science about the republican party. i say the national academies of sciences was launched by lincoln, nasa was launched by eisenhower. and i know where it became because it became here in texas where i am in around 2015, this was a new health freedom, medical freedom movement. somehow the anti-vaccine movement in order to reenergize. because a lot of us defeated the fake links between vaccines and autism. they needed a new angle and got themselves adopted by the republican tea party, particularly down here in texas and it just really accelerated after covid, they started
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becoming defiant of masks and social distancing and now it's extended to vaccines. and, you know, what i say is, look, i'm not politicizing, the bad guys are politicizing it. my job, as a scientist, is to call it out and say, look, this anti-science aggression benefits nobody it's self-defeating for the country and the deep red states now where covid is accelerating and trying to understand how we delink it has to be a top priority. and i'm really worried because as bad as things are right now, it's about to get worse. it's going to get worse because schools are starting down here in the south in a few weeks. we start early here in august. and we've got 17, 16, 15% of the adolescents vaks nated in the southern states, 30 to 40% of the young adults. we have the delta variant accelerating, the majority of
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the governors saying no mask mandates. we are going to see lots of young people get hospitalized in the coming weeks. >> thank you so much. >> doctor, thank you very much. >> we greatly appreciate it. hey, ed luce, i'm just wondering, i'm keep following up with the questioning. here we are going to be moving into a new school year, hearing rumble from some teachers unions, it's got to be safe. rumblings about school. we all know our children have to be in school. they have to be in school. let me ask you this, why can't joe biden have a reagan moment, a moment like reagan did with air traffic controllers and tell public schoolteachers, public university professors, tell health care workers working with senior citizens, tell all these people get vaccinated or you're going to be fired.
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we are -- we have reopened this country, but we are on the verge of having to shutdown again because the wreckless -- reckless 30% who will not get their vaccines. >> up until this point, president biden has taken the perfectly reasonable approach that you catch more flies with honey than vinegar and until recently that worked. you look at the curve of vaccinations it was steep until five, six weeks ago, but it's flattened off since then and as the numbers you demonstrate show well, and as all of us in our daily lives pick up, those remaining hesitant, anti-vaxxers, for the most part, are pretty strongly decided against getting a vaccine. honey is not going to catch
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them. so i think at this point, leadership, political risk taking is going to be required by biden and by others. whether that means sort of starting with, you know, imposing a ban on unvaccinated people entering federal property, including interstate travel, including flying, adding medical workers, people in residential homes and teachers to that, i don't know. it will produce -- it would produce an enormous backlash, but it would also get the job done. you see, in countries like france, where they've done that, they've imposed, essentially, a permanent quarantine on the unvaccinated or announced they're going to for going into restaurants, public transport. you've seen a massive uptake in vaccinations since president macron made that announcement.
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singapore is doing something similar. it would undoubtedly escalate the culture wars but improve the scientific situation in america. it requires risk taking and leadership. and i hope biden is beginning to confront that possibility. >> i hope so. i hope so, because it would increase the culture wars exponentially from the most crazy segment of american political culture, it would. >> well, joe -- >> but it would save lives, mika. >> the delta variant is causing a new set of concerns for the biden administration. "the washington post" reports that inside the white house, top officials are growing increasingly anxious about the state of the pandemic. they are gravely concerned about the situation spiraling out of control in some areas of the country with low vaccination rates. that's according to two people who work in the administration and two others in close touch
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with the white house. officials are now looking at models that predict anywhere from a few thousand new covid cases to more than 200,000 every day in the fall. one new forecast also estimates the u.s. could see three times the number of daily deaths from the coronavirus by october compared to now. >> and sam stein, the current seven day average by the way is 250,000 deaths per day -- 250. big difference there. >> yeah, slight difference there. >> yeah, a little bit. it's a rounding error. it seems to me that there aren't a lot of serious nations that would allow facebook and allow political extremists to get in the way from getting every
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public schoolteacher vaccinated or from getting every health care worker, who works with senior citizens in nursing homes vaccinated or getting every public safety officer in america vaccinated. making that a requirement of the job, just like again, let me say it again for idiots that suggest this is radical, this is what we've been doing with kids going into kindergarten, i have four of them, they all had to get what five, six vaccination shots in the state of florida before they could get into school, and i think every state has about the same vaccination requirements. they're your, quote, vaccine passports if that makes it sound ominous enough for the idiots pushing back on this. how are we as a serious nation not requiring this of our
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schoolteachers, of our cops, of our transportation officials, of our health care workers. we're just not a serious nation if we don't demand that of them. if they want to have a job in the middle of a pandemic. >> yeah, i mean, ed hit the nail on the head here, there is a model for this in france. what we saw in france was a rapid spike in vaccinations as soon as macron said you had these restrictions and those who chose not to get the vaccine. from anecdotal reporting we've done at politico, we sent someone to missouri for instance what would it take for you to get vaccinated, a million dollars, your mom saying do it? no. no. but the one thing, a work requirement. they bristled at it, thought it would be government overreach but said yeah i would do it if i had to travel, for instance. so there is some anecdotal data
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and then there's the france model to suggest that a more sticks approach than carrots would work here. the problem, as we discussed here, is the political backlash and the cultural backlash that might happen here. it's not just -- anti-vaccination has been a cultural emblem. what we saw in tennessee was not that they were pushing back against covid vaccinations, they were pushing back against vaccination education for all vaccines. so it's grown into this monster of sorts in which you're not just fighting people who are resistant to getting the pfizer, moderna shot, you're trying to convince that vaccinations at large are important. that's a different battle. one last thing, when you talk to people in the biden orbit, including those who work on the covid task force, they tell you more often or not, people are not going to take directives from the government that they're not going to be pushed, they
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will be prodded into getting the vaccine. they need people like pastors, family members or so on to tell them this is important. this is where the facebook problem comes in, full disclosure, my wife works for facebook, but if you are falling a certain universe of people who are anti-vaccine and that's the universe of information you get repeatedly and you're not getting outside influences, your ecosystem is going to encourage you to not get the vaccine, and it's hard for someone to infiltrate that media ecosystem. that's where the social media problem is problematic, we have the closed information circuits that don't let us get outside information that would encourage us to get the jab. >> and it's large swaths of the population. that's why i have people with advanced degrees, people with law degrees, pillars of their
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communities asking me the most ridiculous questions. i'd say, did you get that from facebook? did a friend of yours send that? yeah, it comes from facebook. it comes from social media. this misinformation that is killing people and continuing to kill people right now. and ed, i understand that this is tough politically for joe biden. i understand that it will create an explosion of the culture wars but it seems there are these old midas ads, you can pay me now or later. and joe biden can worry about people on facebook spreading lies and conspire theories. he can on worry about that now or two or three months ago about small businesses being shutdown again, restaurants being shutdown again. about closures of downtown areas again. about this economy grinding to a
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halt again. he's gonna have to make a very unpopular, a very difficult choice. it's what serious leaders do. and he's going to have to prove that on this front he's a serious leader. because, i must say, the delta variant, as you know very well, as people across the globe know very well. the delta variant is changing the rules of the game. i'm going around, i haven't started wearing a mask again, but i don't go in tight areas. i'm seeing people mask up voluntarily again, especially older americans, because everybody -- i know it's anecdotal, but that's how i got elected, i listened to anecdotal things, i didn't take polls, didn't have the money to take polls, but everybody i know knows somebody that has gotten really sick from the delta variant, and even though
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vaccinated are getting asymptomatic. basically they're asymptomatic or kind of sick. but there's no doubt, without the vaccine, they most likely would have been in the hospital and possibly dead. so we have to get serious about this had. >> i think it's a good point that the culture wars are going to happen either way. if biden does nothing drastic now, then the likelihood we're going to go back into some form of lockdown in the fall or early winter. restaurants are going to be closed again, schools are going to start being closed is going to rise very, very sharply if we allow this delta variant to get out of control. in which case there's going to be a much more serious cultural backlash about people's freedoms being inhibited.
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versus where they get penalized for not taking the vaccine and protest and complain about those, which is worse? either way we get a culture war. better to take the hit now. we're in a race between the vaccine and variants here. time is of the essence. if we allow another winter where mutations are running rampant, the sense of frustration from americans vaccinated and unvaccinated through the restrictions that we're going to be feeling, that we don't need to be feeling, that if none of this is preordained, this is not something that has to happen. that sense of frustration is going to be enormous. of course, it will endanger the economic recovery, which is the absolute basis of the biden
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administration's success for re-election and for continuing to govern this country. so i would strongly sort of align with the direction of your -- of your questions, joe, the hit -- the political hit has got to be taken now. biden needs to step up. >> all right. thank you so much financial times ed luce, appreciate you being here. and mika, he does need to make the tough choice right now. joe biden needs to make the tough choice right now. and he needs to start in his own political backyard and he needs to tell the teachers' union that he's going to require every public health care person to get it but also starting every public schoolteacher needs to be vaccinated. if you remember last year, they kept saying, we can't go back to school, earlier this year, we can't go back to school until we're all vaccinated. that's all we heard. we have the vaccinations now.
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starting to hear some rumblings maybe we can't go back to school this fall because it's not -- no. no. no. no. >> my god. >> no. that's not an option. our kids stayed home last year from school and the results were absolutely devastating. even more devastating for the truly disadvantaged. so we have the vaccines, and the president of the united states needs to say, if you are a public schoolteacher or you teach at a public university, as a condition of your job you have to get vaccinated. we are not closing schools this fall. children will not be staying at home this fall looking at zoom classes. they're going to be in, because their teachers are going to be vaccinated. that's where joe biden needs to start. he needs to start there today.
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and then he needs to talk about health care officials who are taking care of senior citizens. we've been talking a lot, hearing a lot in the media, janice dean, fox news, has been talking about it a good bit because it's personal for her what happened with governor cuomo when he sent people back into nursing homes that were infected with covid and how devastating that was for so many new york families and families across the country. here we are, six, eight months later, and i'm seeing statistics at 40, 45% of health care workers in nursing homes are not vaccinated. are you kidding me? your putting the lives of senior citizens at risk? i mean, everybody has the freedom to do what they want to
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do. but the government has responsibility to step in. and say that those other 40% of staff that work at nursing homes, you either get vaccinated or you find another job. you know, ronald reagan did this with air traffic controllers. people thought it was going to be controversial, funny thing happened. americans actually respected the fact, overwhelmingly, that a politician made a strong decision that a lot of people thought was going to be unpopular. well, we have something much greater at stake now and that is again keeping america open in the fall. keeping our schools open in the fall. it's time for joe biden, it's time for democrats, it's time for serious republicans to start
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ignoring the ground noise and start focussing on the signal. and the signal is this, if you're a schoolteacher, if you're a nurse, if you're a cop, you need to get vaccinated. and if you don't, you need to look for another job. >> all right. still ahead on "morning joe," house speaker nancy pelosi taps a second republican for the select committee tasked with investigating the january 6th capitol riot. plus, will we see a bipartisan infrastructure bill finalized today? that's what senators on capitol hill are hoping for. with violent crime surging across the country, polling shows residents in in one major u.s. city are more concerned with public safety than police misconduct. >> it's not even close, 9 to 1
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ratio. keep our damn streets safe. >> we'll dig into those new numbers. you're watching "morning joe." we well be right back. g "mornin" we well be right back. you're strong. you power through chronic migraine - 15 or more headache days a month, ...each lasting 4 hours or more. botox® prevents headaches in adults with chronic migraine. so, if you haven't tried botox® for your chronic migraine, ...check with your doctor if botox® is right for you, and if samples are available. effects of botox® may spread hours to weeks after injection causing serious symptoms. alert your doctor right away, as difficulty swallowing, ...speaking, breathing, eye problems, or muscle weakness... ...can be signs of a life- threatening condition. side effects may include allergic reactions... ...neck and injection site pain... ...fatigue, and headache. don't receive botox® if there's a skin infection. tell your doctor your medical history, muscle or nerve conditions... ...and medications, including botulinum toxins, as these may increase the risk of serious side effects. most patients may pay as little as $0 for botox®.
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. let's get you updated on the tokyo games where competition is under way this morning. the u.s. softball team has another walk off win under its belt. the homer in the 7th inning earns usa a 2-1 win over japan. u.s. softball now boasts a 5-0 record at the olympics. >> what in the world is going on with the usa basketball team. the struggle for the men's basketball team continues in
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tokyo, as team usa fell to france 83-76. seriously? we lost to france in basketball? in yesterday's opener. it ends a 25-game olympic winning streak for the u.s. i don't know what's wrong with this team. we have the best players in the world. it's not -- there's just not a close second to us. and yet we keep losing. this is embarrassing. coach, get your team together. mika, come on, france beat us in basketball. >> jumping into the pool now. caeleb dressel let off and zack apple closed the door as the anchor leg for the u.s. to capture gold in the men's 4 by 100 meter freestyle.
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katie ledecky settled for silver in the freestyle as 20-year-old strain arian titmus dealt her a loss in individual competition. australia's swimming coach went viral for his celebration after she secured the gold. very excited. some other notables for team usa. 18-year-old anastasia zolotic won the first medal in taekwondo after winning the featherweight division yet. lee keiffer defeated the reigning olympic champion to become the first u.s. to win individual gold. and 20-year-old will shaner, the
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youngest man to qualify for an olympic rifle competition to earn gold in the 10 meter air rifle yesterday. and more shooting gold for the u.s. this morning as vincent hancock regained his throne as olympic champion in men's skeet shooting. pretty good. >> not bad. and the current medal count has china on top with 15 total medals. the united states is in second with 14. but has the most gold with seven. >> we're going to catch up. we're going to catch up. team -- go team usa. sam i'm not going to blame facebook. you can tell your wife i'm not going to blame facebook for our loss to france in basketball yesterday. but if this continues i most certainly will. i blame the entire organization
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top to bottom. we need to win the basketball gold, no excuse to not do that. while olympics are a pretty big sport, of course, the biggest sport in the world, yankees red sox baseball yesterday. this has been an incredible series, up and down series, the yankees gave away a game on thursday night, about four wild pitches in a row. and then yesterday we came back, we red sox fans had something to cheer about, down 4-0 with a no hitter through seven innings and the red soxs' bats just exploded. >> that was incredible. i'm shocked alex allowed you to do the segment he must be heart broken. we were no hit through seven innings. i was at the game the day before, a heartbreak for the red sox because we had been playing well. this felt like sweet revenge.
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the swimming coach, the viral video, that's what i do when i send a good tweet. didn't seem that extraordinary to me. >> exactly. no, not at all. we've seen you do it, it is quite ugly. but the red sox, we -- so young jack and i saw -- were fortunate enough this weekend -- >> did you go? >> to see the games? >> nice. >> we went to see the games. actually first time i've ever done this in my life. friday, saturday and sunday. friday's game was great, devers two home runs, saturday ugly, the yankees doing to us what we did on sunday. but yesterday was probably the loudest i've heard it get in fenway. >> you must have been heart broken early on when they were being no hit. that was nerve racking at first. >> of course, lemire and i always believe, like you i'm
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sure, all red sox fans believe we're one pitch, swing, error away from everything happen. so lemire. >> i were texting back and forth going it was a good year while it lasted. but i tell you what, a loss would have been really bad yesterday after letting the yankees come back when they were three down in the eighth inning. so pretty fascinating stuff for everybody in america except the person i toss to right now, my lovely wife mika. >> turning to the new polling we mentioned going to break. after a year of national protests and calls for police reform, new numbers from one of america's largest cities shows residents overwhelmingly want more police officers on their streets, not fewer. in a new poll from "usa today," suffolk university and the detroit free press.
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73% of detroit residents said they will feel safer with more officers policing their neighborhoods. that's compared to just 8% who said they would feel less safe with more officers. joining us now washington bureau chief for "usa today" susan page. also with us, host of msnbc's politics nation and president of the national action network, reverend al sharpton. thanks for being with us. >> susan, this is a fascinating poll because it tells us what we have known except the numbers are so dramatic that it really underlines a points as much as eric adams winning in new york does. i want to take you back to last fall after the black lives matter marches and when the defund the police were sort of at their loudest. "the new york times" ran a series of articles where they interviewed city council people in some of the most disadvantaged parts of new york
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city and they were saying, we don't need less cops. we need more cops on the street and we need more public safety officers in our children's classrooms. we're in the most dangerous parts of new york city. they can afford to think that way in park slope, in manhattan. we can't afford to think that way where we live. it seems these numbers underline what we've been hearing from residents in truly disadvantaged neighborhoods now for the past year or so. >> what we found in this survey of detroit residents. it's not the residents of detroit give police high marks, there are concerns about response times, racial profile, but they are much more concerned about public safety, especially in the wake of this jump in violent crimes in the past year. murders up about 20% in detroit over the previous year. nonfatal shootings up more than 50% in a year and that has, of
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course, captured the attention and concern of detroit residents, we found black residents were more concerned about public safety than police reform and more concerned about public safety than white residents were. >> and for everybody watching right now jumping up and down and screaming, neither susan, the "usa today," "morning joe" nor i are suggesting that you have to make a false choice. >> right. >> you can have police reform as well as safe streets. reverend al, my gosh, this is what you've been saying every day. every day for the past year and a half. which is yes, we need police reform, but you have to take care of the people in new york and in chicago and across the nation who are on the front lines of public violence. you have to strengthen the police force while reforming the
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police force. and these numbers play out exactly what you've been telling us on this show for a year. >> these numbers are not surprising to many of us on the ground that want to see policing reimagined. but at the same time, make sure we are policing in a way that keeps the community safe. we shouldn't have to choose between the two. i've shared with you many times. three weeks after i did the eulogy at george floyd's funeral, the most celebrated of the police victims, i did the funeral of a 1-year-old kid killed by a stray bullet in a gang fight in new york. both need to be something we deal with. the poll drives it home. i'm not surprised by detroit, those there talk to me every day about the problem of gun
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violence. the real thing that is not being talked about joe is not only do we need the george floyd bill passed in the senate, we need gun laws passed. why are we ignoring the fact that these guns are even in these communities. people should be reformed, people ought to be dealt with, policing ought to be working with community, but people can't shoot guns they can't get. there needs to be something about the fact these communities are saturated with guns and we're not even seeing widespread gun busts in terms of those that are trafficking these illegal weapons in these communities. >> and rev, this is something i've never understood, i think eric adams talks about military-style assault weapons he said that's a suburban problem for the most part, it gets all the news coverage and the play, and it's a tragedy and it should get news coverage, but
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it's the illegal handguns, the illegal trafficking that's killing 10, 20, 30 people in chicago on a weekend. that's causing gun crimes to skyrocket over the past year. we -- i don't understand why -- i know republicans have cut funding for atf in the past. but i don't understand why we aren't focussing more on illegal guns. i will -- i'll tell you, we have to focus on illegal guns. that's not just true this year. that's been true the past 20 years. but also this police pull back that we saw in the newspaper article headline, the police pull back i hear about whenever i talk to law enforcement officers, the police pull back we've seen over the past year, it's causing real problems and again, rev, the media is focussing on that part of the story, but taking way too long to focus on the part of the
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story that people, again, in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods, have been worried about the last year and that is that police pull back getting cops off of streets, out of school and making life in those neighborhoods where you have to officiate the funerals of 4-year-old girls so much more dangerous. >> and the problem is that we have too many people speaking for people that they don't speak to. they're not on the ground. there are lots of liberals that sit up in ivory towers theorizing. but they're not on the streets with the mothers saying wait i don't want my kids burying a .45 weapon in the draw because he feels that's the only way to go to the school or the playground nearby. anymore than i want a policeman putting a knee on his neck. unless we understand that and
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talk to people on the ground and have laws that deal not only with police reform, which i'm at the forefront of, but also how we have the guns in our communities that don't have gun manufacturing plants. until we deal with both we'll see this escalating problem. i think this poll may be another wake up call but if you're woke, you need to be woke about crime as well as you are about police reform. be all the way woke, don't be partially woke. >> thank you. my motto too. susan, i have a question for you. you know, we talk about democratic leadership being old in in the tooth you have house speaker nancy pelosi, you have jim clyburn, of course, joe biden. they were there during the '80s and '90s when democratic politics was in a different place than it is now, i'm curious from your reporting, perceptions, how do you think that learned history from those
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decades is impacting their political approach today as you see an up tick in crimes in the city. >> i think democrats have struggled with the issue of public safety. remember there was a time in the 1990s when many democrats, including people like joe biden, took a tough on crime approach because that seemed to fit the moment and then came to rue the day, mandatory minimum sentences and some of the war on drugs. the moment now for some democrats is to both express concern, legitimate concern about holding police accountable while also keeping communities safe. one thing we found in this series of surveys we're doing in big cities, first in milwaukee and now detroit, how complicated the issue is. you can't talk about one side of it without also addressing the other side of it, sam, as the reverend said. >> susan page, thank you very much.
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bob moses, an early local leader of the civil rights movement who faced violence and intimidation to register black voters in mississippi in the 1960s died yesterday at his home in florida. "the new york times" reports in 1960 he left his job as a high school teacher in new york city for mississippi where he organized poor, illiterate and rural black residents. at one point, a sheriff's cousin bashed mr. moses head with a knife handle. he kept going, staggered up the steps of a courthouse to register a couple of black farmers. moses who was raised in public housing in harlem earned a masters in philosophy from harvard in 1957. in the early 1980s, he started a national organization called the
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algebra project dedicating to teaching math as a means to a more equal society. bob moses was 86 years old. >> rev, can you talk about what we all owe bob moses? >> reporter: we owe bob moses a lot. he was one of the activists that was in the trenches around voting rights. he never went for headlines, he was not a high profile figure. he did the work. but had he not done the work we would not have gotten the voting rights act of 1965. those of us fighting today owe a lot to bob moses, he helped to lay the trail we're walking down and continue to walk down. i was so honored, he did politics nation a few years ago. he is absolutely a historic figure and one we ought to always admire and respect. reverend al sharpton, thank you very much. coming up the stock market closed at record highs on friday
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despite ongoing public health issues. steve ratner will explain why that happened. plus, as he eyes a potential senate run in georgia, could old allegations keep football legend hershel walker out of the race? "morning joe" is coming right back. "morning joe" is coming ri back i booked our hotel on kayak. it's flexible if we need to cancel. cancel. i haven't left the house in a year. nothing will stop me from vacation. no canceling. flexible cancellation. kayak. search one and done. (realtor) the previous owners left in a hurry, so the house comes with everything you see. follow me. ♪ (realtor) so, any questions? (wife) we'll take it!
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>> yes, jake. that's the issue. it's kind of like we have two kinds of america. we have the very vulnerable unvaccinated part. and we have the really relatively protected,vaccinated part. so if you are vaccinated you are in a different category than someone who's not vaccinated. >> as the doctor said yesterday we're talking about public health here. we're especially talking about public health for senior citizens also public health for some of those who have health care challenges. but we're also talking about the economy. something we've been talking about here for months now, get the vaccine. do what is the safest, most conservative thing to do in handling covid. so small businesses can open, restaurants can open, the economy can open. now it's reopening. but i tell you what, there's
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still blind spots in the economy. we have a way to go. there's still a lot of small business owners, entrepreneurs, a lot of family restaurants, family businesses who are still suffering right now. let's not make matters worse for them. you know, mika, i did a little research on "morning joe's" super computer that we keep in tj's basement where he keeps that and cheetos and buck shot and assorted things -- >> what did you find? >> what we found was 85, 86% of teachers in america have been vaccinated. and that's something, actually, that the white house is pushing right now. they understood that getting schools open, keeping schools open this fall was very important. so that has been a focus, quietly focused on that, probably 85, 86, maybe a little bit higher now, but we will stay after that and continue getting reports on that and get that to
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you as that number moves towards -- needs to move toward 100% because all of our public schools need to be open this fall. >> there are pockets of the american population that are still refusing the vaccine and it is potentially going to turn us in the completely wrong direction, according to dr. anthony fauci. and florida, specifically, has become the new covid-19 epicenter in the u.s. no state in the nation is coming close to experiencing the sunshine state's explosive surge in new cases. hospitalizations in some areas are increasing at the fastest rate since the start of the pandemic. according to the cdc, florida accounts for one in five new infections in the country. >> think about that for a second. one a state accounts for 20% of all new covid cases.
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and i've been hearing from friends across florida about emergency rooms, about hospitals that are jammed. that it looks like march or april of last year. that the situation has gotten so bad in the state of florida. >> in the country, over 73,000 new cases were reported over the past week alone. "the new york times" reports the situation is worrying across northeastern florida. the mayo clinic in jacksonville is on track to match or exceed the earlier record. while the children's hospital has the second highest number of admissions, 45 of them after reaching 57 in january. about 90 miles south, in daytona beach, an advent hospital has more covid-19 patients than ever before. across the advent health system in central florida, the covid-19
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patient load grew by 67% over the past week to 720 from 430. at uf health, jacksonville, one doctor said 90% of covid-19 patients were unvaccinated and 5% were not fully vaccinated. the remaining 5% were vaccinated but also had significant comorbidities or were on immuno suppressant drugs. >> let's stop there for one second, mika, as far as the vaccines go. sam stein, nobody ever said the vaccines were perfect. in fact, pfizer's efficacy rate was 95%. i think moderna, the efficacy rate, 89, 88%. at least that's what they were saying when it started. j&j lower, i think around 75%, those numbers have played out. and as we've said, as everybody said, if you don't get the
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vaccine, it doesn't mean you won't get covid again. it means it's most likely your condition is going to be far less serious, maybe asymptomatic. but here's the rub. you can pass it on to other people that haven't been vaccinated. and they're the ones that can end up in the hospital and have serious complications and die. we're seeing now many places 99% of the people who are dying have not had the vaccination. >> right. what's been particularly discouraging is that people have used these breakthrough cases in the spread of the delta variant as some sort of evidence that the vaccines themselves are not effective. in fact, it's the exact opposite. they make the case for the vaccine. those who are vaccinated are not getting terrible effects from the covid virus if they contract it. we're seeing 99.5% of those who are unvaccinated are the ones in
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the hospital and/or dying. so the rise of the delta variant, in fact, makes the case for the vaccination. but to your point, joe, the fact is we can be vectors for the disease even if we have vaccine. and that's why, if we don't get more people vaccinated we run the risk, as a society, of having to enact these onerous measures, whether they be lockdowns, closing restaurants, masks, so on and so on. but a lot is state by state so you see a terrible brew of conditions, which is states with the lowest vaccination rates are also the states least likely to institute the public safety measures. so you have florida that is never going to introduce mask mandates or being interested in going to that time and place. we're seeing a dichotomy emerge in america. which is one america where you see vaccinated people, likely to
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adopt public safety measures. and the other with people unvaccinated and public safety measures little chance of being reinstituted. >> that's why we need to do for teachers and for health officials and others, what we do with our children, we have the vaccine requirement before they get into schools. and again, over 300 million americans have done that. nobody compared little johnny getting a polio vaccine to being marched off to the gas chambers in nazi germany. again, over 50 or 60 years. this is not like this is new. >> exactly. >> they've been doing this, we've been doing this as a society because we're a serious society, like some of us still believe in american exceptionalism. we've been doing this because it's what serious societies do.
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it's what serious civilizations do. they protect their populations. and, mika, are there side effects? yeah, there are side effects. you never see a drug commercial where they won't go -- >> blah, blah, blah. >> it will make your life better, make your backswing better and reduce male pattern baldness. it may make your arm fall off -- and they go on for 45 minutes. there are some side effects to the safest of drugs and there are side effects to this. but it's not the rule. vaccinations are the safest way to go, despite all of the lies and the misinformation that's being spread on facebook and social media. >> all right. so at the hospital that we just mentioned, uf health jacksonville as of wednesday 18
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covid-19 patients have died this month. that's compared to four deaths in if june, all of them were unvaccinated. and i just want to update the teacher situation and the white house, joe, is saying that one of the things they're going to learn from as they work on dealing with the delta variant across the country, they prioritized teachers early on and they're focused on getting teachers 100% vaccinated. >> great. >> 100% of schoolteachers before schools open in the fall. there are mitigation steps that the cdc has recommended, that secretary of education and their team have been putting in place, they fought for funding in the american rescue plan to make sure schools had the resources they needed. but the focus, at 86% vaccinated right now. and they want 100%. they think they can make it by the time schools open.
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that's going to be tight. let's bring in former obama white house adviser for policy and provost at the university of pennsylvania. dr. ezekiel emmanuel. zeke it's good to have you back and bad to have you back. because you come on when things get really serious. i guess i'd like to start by asking you, where do we stand with this delta variant and if things don't dramatically change and people don't start working hard to get the vaccines all across america, including the vaccine hesitant, what's going to happen with this virus? >> well, the delta variant is about 100 times more transmissible, which means earlier in the infection people transmit it and they transmit a large amount of virus and that means it spreads very, very easily and it does spread including to people who have been vaccinated. and that's been one of the
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drivers of the explosion in florida. the other thing that it's done, and i think i would emphasize is you're seeing a lot of younger people in the hospital. reports all over the country, including in florida, is that it's not the elderly because we largely got them vaccinated but it's younger and younger people now entering the hospital and that is very distressing to health care workers and their course is much more precipitous. so they go along and they really get sick very, very quickly. so we report on hospitalizations. we report on the deaths. but remember, it's changed since last march because of more younger people and much more rapid declines. they don't linger for days and days in the icu. >> so new york mayor, bill de blasio is urging the city's private businesses to require their workers to get vaccinated against covid-19 and signals that he would introduce similar measures for hundreds of
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thousands of municipal employees. this is according to "the new york times." the mayor's comments came days after he announced that all employees in the public hospital system would have to either receive a vaccine, a virus vaccine or submit to weekly testing. so you say you're a strong proponent of the vaccine mandate for medical personnel that mayor de blasio has implemented and you'd like to see the private sector do the same. explain your position on this. >> way back april 14th, the day we had the highest vaccination rates in the country i came out with an op-ed that health care workers have to be mandated to get the vaccine. we pledge to put patients first. that's our primary obligation as health care workers and we have to put patients first getting a vaccine not risking infecting them and i think the mandate is just part of having us enforce
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that obligation and making it from ethical to a requirement. and vaccines are effective. hospitals that have vaccinated their workers, they haven't seen a big problem. you have houston methodist, my own health system, you get 99% vaccinated, there are a few who for medical reasons can't get vaccinated and we understand that. similarly long-term care officials where they have required their workers to get vaccinated, they're 95% or 100% vaccinated without lots of people going for the doors and quitting. i agree with mayor de blasio, we need to move on, first responders, the military. i think if we made vaccination a requirement before you boarded an airplane you would see lots of americans get vaccinated. this has to be a whole of america effort to really beat
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this coronavirus. we want to put it in the rear view mirror, vaccination is the best, fastest, primary way we're going to put it in the rear view mirror. >> tell us specifically about the delta variant and its impact on young people. we're hearing, you know, anecdotal reports from hospitals that the patients that they are getting are younger and sicker. >> yeah. that's absolutely right. again, it seems to reproduce much earlier and much larger and, therefore, you become infectious really just a few days after getting the transmission, and you spew out, in your voice, air, lots more virus and that causes a lot faster transmission and i think, again, younger people somehow think they're invincible because early on this was primarily a virus that really devastated elderly people and the young
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somehow thought they were immune to it, it would be a mild case. it may be a mild case but as we're seeing in florida and many other young people, lots of young people get serious infections and unfortunately can die from it. we have to take that as a message, we can't leave out anyone. the other thing that's important to say, when you get vaccinated, you're protecting children who can't get vaccinated, immunocompromised people who can't get vaccinated. elderly people where their immune response doesn't protect them as well. you're helping other people who you love and who are near you. that's a really important thing. we all have an altruistic streak and we have to appeal to that too. >> we're reading unfortunately one tragic story after another about children dying. others dying that can't get the vaccine. and they're dying because people aren't them are not getting the vaccine.
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and covid is being passed around. i wanted to ask you, finally, zeke, about numbers we've been showing all morning. talking about 40% of health care workers working with seniors in nursing homes are not getting vaccinated. i think it's insanity. we've all looked back and seen what cuomo has done, what cuomo did when he sent patients that had covid back into nursing homes and the devastating impact that had. well, here we are, what, a year later, and we're sitting back while we're finding that 40% of staff in nursing homes have not gotten vaccinated. they're taking covid into those nursing homes and putting the lives of every senior citizen at
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risk. what do we do? how do we get a requirement that if you're going to work around senior citizens who are the most susceptible to getting covid and dying, you've got to be vaccinated or leave the building? >> i think there are two points, joe, let me emphasize, about 150 people associated with nursing homes and long term care facilities die each week. it's a problem despite the fact that 80% of residents are vaccinated. i agree we have to mandate all workers, hospitals, physician offices, pharmacies, and long term care facilities, nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities all be vaccinated. it has to be a nationwide mandate. i agree with what they're doing in france. i've been calling for it for three months. you're right, we cannot have
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this profusion of covid in health care facilities. no resident of a long term care facility or patient should have to wonder is that person coming near me in my room vaccinated or not. everyone should be vaccinated. and we have to expand it to other parts of our society. >> yeah, and -- >> i just want to underline it again. there are people out there saying this is fascist. this is what we have been doing as a country for over half a century. if you have a child and they were in public schools or if you went to public schools or even private schools, then you had five vaccine passports, or whatever you want to call them. your parents had to show proof that you had been vaccinated for measles, mumps, polio, for a lot
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of other diseases. or else you could not get a public education. think about that. people saying my rights are being taken away if i can't get a hamburger and a shake. if i have to be a quote vaccine passport to go into that hamburger shop. really? you're saying that would take your constitutional rights away. but actually not giving you an education if you didn't get five or six vaccines would be fine. it makes no sense. you know why it makes no sense? because it's stupid as hell. and the argument, it holds no water. which is why the president of the united states and members of congress need to get serious, need to get serious, and they need to get all of america vaccinated. if we do it for our school children and we've been doing it for our school children for 50, 60 years and it's been keeping
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them safe, then we need to do it for our seniors. we need to do it for school children who are going back to school. and yes, going back to school. i don't want to hear any teachers union leader talk about us not being ready to go back to school this fall. not even suggesting it. because people are starting, well, i'm not sure -- no. no. no. we're going back to school this fall. >> you know, joe, the science has proven itself. >> we're going back to school this fall. all right. we're getting our kids back into school. and if we require vaccines for our children to protect them and protect society, don't we owe the same to our senior citizens? don't we owe the same to the rest of america? mika, of course, the answer is yes, we do. >> but also americans now, especially the vaccine hesitant, you don't have to be zeke emmanuel to understand the science. you have seen this play out before your eyes over the past
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year. you've seen just hundreds of thousands, millions of americans get vaccinated and they're staying alive. and now you're seeing the unvaccinated dying. it's simple science. >> yeah. >> which side of it do you want to be on? dr. zeke emmanuel thank you. author of the book "which country has the world's best health care?" we appreciate you being on this morning. turning to the economy now and a stock market that seems to be brushing off the concerns over the delta variant, the dow jumped more than 200 points on friday. finishing above 35,000 for the first time ever and bringing its gain for 2021 to more than 14%. joining us now former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve ratner. >> steve, thank you so much for being with us. i think we may get into a place where we were about a year
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ago -- >> was it a year ago? in. >> i guess about a year ago where the market would go up one day, come down. go up, come down. we had that last week thursday and friday, where the market on friday seemed to at least shrug off the concerns about the rising delta variant. what are you expecting this coming week and what's really been the driving force for the markets? >> joe, as you say, the market has been a bit more volatile recently and that does reflect the market with the virus. at the moment, as you said, they are brushing it off. let me try to put that in a bit of longer term context going back about a year and a half and talking about what the market has been doing since then, which is essentially going straight up. what i'm -- i'm showing here three different market indexes because people talk about the dow but it's only one of three, and not the most useful or accurate of the three.
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the dow itself as you can see going back to the beginning of 2020 is up 21%. that gray area is the brief recession we had, the shortest recession on record. the do you and other indexes went down and since then have been on a straight up claim. but the dow, which represents old economy companies like chevron and boeing, the nasdaq, which is the blue line at the top, which is mostly the tech and growth companies is up 63%. and the s&p is up 35%. also outperforming the dow the yellow line at the bottom. why is that happening? we owe a lot to washington, actually. a lot done in washington has helped the stock market substantially. first and foremost as you can see on the next chart. the amount of stimulus we put into the economy has caused the recession to be unbelievably short. you can see the turquoise line, the profits of all the s&p
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companies put together, did full during the initial stages of the pandemic and the recession, but then they jumped right back up. and you can see in the first quarter of this year, the turquoise line, corporate profits actually hit an all-time record and they're projected to continue to go up. so that's -- >> steve, can i ask you -- >> yes, of course. >> why are corporate profits reaching a record level right now? >> that's a good question, joe. they're reaching a record level because of all the money -- in part because of all the money we have poured in this economy has caused consumers to go out and spend. so when we get a gdp number on thursday, which is strong, consumer spending numbers are strong and what it also meant is that corporations have pricing power, they've been able to raise prices that's why we're talking about inflation.
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when you put it together, it's strong corporate profits. >> steve, let me ask you another question just a little off track here. i've been traveling around the northeast this summer, been traveling around new england, around the deep south, and it's the same story everywhere i go. there are people who are looking desperately for employees, i've seen mcdonald's, i've seen mcdonald's saying, you know, that they were -- that have signs all over the place when i went in to, of course, buy my daily big mac value meal because it is a value meal, mika, so i'm saving money. but there's signs all over the place, talking about bonuses, burger king talking about bonuses. i went past a lobster restaurant last night, talked about a big signing bonus. i've seen small mom and pop operations saying they can only work four or five hours a day because they have family members
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working for them and nobody else. gas station in rural part of new england that actually had on their sign $20 an hour, desperately need workers. what's going on with that? i know a lot of people are saying that's happening because of the $300 extra in unemployment benefits. and when that washes out of the system people will start coming back to work. of course, we've seen again, and this is all over the place. the "the new york times," boston globe writing stories about how summer camps have been cancelled halfway through because they've had camp counselors just get up and leave because they didn't want to work. what's going on? is that affecting the macro economy right now? and how much longer until that sort of washes out and we get back to a situation where, actually, small family
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restaurants will be able to employ workers again? >> your basic take on the situation is absolutely correct. we have a record number of job openings in this country, over 9 million jobs are available in this country yet we have a relatively high unemployment rate and as you say, many people not wachbting to go back to work. why are they not wanting to go back to work? there was a poll a couple weeks ago that i think basically was pretty accurate. there are a variety of reasons, in no particular order, the fact there are extra checks for unemployment out there, $300 a week that expire in september, except half the states have already stopped it. so you do have the effects of unemployment insurance. you have the effects that households are actually in pretty good financial shape because of all the money we poured into the economy because they couldn't spend last year as much as they usually do, there's an estimated $2 trillion in household bank accounts waiting
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to be spent so they don't feel an urge to go back. and then you get into the issues about child care, health care fears just like you've been talking about this morning. and you also have this kind of even softer feeling around that a lot of people are saying i don't want to go back to those jobs, back to working in the kitchen of a burger king and i'm going to step back and wait as long as i can, and figure out if there's something better for me out there than being in the kitchen of a burger king. presumably this fall those factors disappear, schools reopen, extra unemployment disappear, people will feel like they need to earn a living. i can't tell you when. so far it has not had a massive impact on the economy but we'll see how it evolves going forward. >> steve ratner, thank you very much. mika, it would be dangerous for me to be in the kitchen of a burger king. i can easily down, 12, 13
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whoppers in a day. >> oh my god. to capitol hill where the first select committee hearing on the january 6th insurrection will take place tomorrow and speaker nancy pelosi is bringing another republican voice to the table. nbc news white house correspondent monica alba has the details. >> reporter: the congressional committee investigating the january 6th attack on the capitol has another republican member. house speaker nancy pelosi adding illinois congressman adam kinzinger today, writing he brings great patriotism to the committee's mission to find the facts and protect our democracy. >> we will find the truth, it will have the confidence of the american people because it will be done patriot cli. >> the congressman explaining i'm a republican dedicated to conservative values but i swore an oath to uphold and defend the
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constitution. when duty calls i will always answer. he joins liz cheney on the nine member panel, the only other gop voice since kevin mccarthy pulled other republicans from the group after the speaker pulled two that repeated the lie about the rigged campaign. >> we have to fight. >> reporter: the first committee hearing is set for tuesday where capitol police officers will testify about their personal experiences. some of which even motivated their newly named chief to come out of retirement. >> if you asked me on january 5th, do you want to be a police chief again? no, i'm fine i'm enjoying retirement. but the events of january 6th changed that. let's bring in peter baker and washington post reporter
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mariana soto mayor. what is the latest on putting together this commission and the way they will approach this given that republicans are -- who want to deny what happened on january 6th or even, you know, threatening their own investigation, how could this play out and how can democrats keep the truth at the forefront? >> what it looks like right now you'll see two separate inquiries in in effect and they're going to be seen as bipartisan. the democratic-led one that nancy pelosi has put together with adam kinzinger and liz cheney and something that looks like kevin mccarthy might try to do on his own. they'll be looking at it from the pro-trump point of view. and voters are going to end up with rather than a consensus view of what happened or consensus report cut through the
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partisanship. they'll have your pick your own version of the news we get. so different from what we saw after 9/11. after 9/11 we saw the commitment to the idea it's important to find out what happened so it doesn't happen again. obviously politics involved then too but with a five/five commission led by one republican, one democrat, you ended up with a consensus view that stands the test of time. to this day we hear people on both sides of the aisle referring to the /9/11 report as the gold standard. in the end both agreed it was important to get to the facts, to figure out what happened so we can find out and not have it happen again. that's not going to happen here. you'll see republicans, pro-trump, reject whatever it is
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the pelosi select committee comes up with, even though there are republicans on it. and the republicans pro-trump find their own version of reality which might not bear any relationship to what we saw on television or the images that were captured by protesters and the police officers. >> but, peter, it seems to me, and some would say this is wishful thinking, it's not wishful thinking p. it seems to me if republicans are talking about january the 6th, and they're teetering along a high political tight rope, trying to make excuses for trump, trying to make excuses for these insurrectionists, trying to down play these mob -- these thugs, it's as difficult as preaching against the vaccine. it seems that two of the top issues right now are issues
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where kevin mccarthy and other republicans, most republicans that aren't back benchers are really uncomfortable walking that fine line. and the few who you go out and blurt stupid things like they're just tourists are usually shunned by the rest of the conference and respectable society and "the washington journal" editorial page. >> i think a lot of main stream republicans are uncomfortable with the thing. they understand what happened on january 6th, a tragedy in american life and there needs to be some sort of, you know, understanding of what happened and how to prevent it again. yet they're held hostage, in effect, to loyalty to their former president, which is now, you know, come to dominate this party in a way we haven't seen in modern times. it's -- you know, there was, in fact, going to be an independent
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commission. not a select committee appointed by the speaker but independent commission not involving current members of congress that were agreed to by many republicans that was then shot down by kevin mccarthy saying that's not loyal enough to trump. so that effort by main stream republicans who themselves were targeted and felt threatened on january 6th and would like to see something done about it, you're right, they're keeping quiet because they're afraid of the political consequences that liz cheney and adam kinzinger have seen in terms of being targeted by the pro-trump part of the party. >> i just want to jump in and say one of the historical elements here is there was a commission that was envisioned, that was modelled after the 9/11 commission. it was the first proposed one concocted with republicans and democrats in the house but it was filibustered in the senate. that's why we end up here now is that the republicans
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filibustered the independent, bipartisan commission. so pelosi felt she had to go this route. but what are we looking at in terms of the scope and time line here? that was the big hold up for republicans in the senate, this is going to go into election year, you'll use it politically so therefore we have to filibuster this. but now that it's a select committee, what are we looking at? is this thing going to drag into 2022, do they have limits on what they can be? could you make, arguably, the case that this would end up worse politically for republicans instead of those concerns about scope and timelines because now it's under pelosi's control really. >> one could argue this is not the best outcome for republicans. of course, what they want is to fire up their base. and they're going to be able to do that by pointing to this as a witch hunt, this is another kind
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of impeachment of former president donald trump. but when you talk about timeline, when pelosi tapped those democrats and liz cheney last month, chairman benny thompson we asked him initially and continue to ask, how long is this going to take? and his answer continues to be the same. this could go on for as long as we want it to. we're going to follow the facts, see where it leads. and that's what these democrats and now liz cheney and adam kin kinzinger are going to be discussing. they're thinking about when we can start issuing for subpoenas or asking people to come in behind closed doors. those are the conversations happening now and that excludes republicans from that
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conversation, besides those two that have been tapped by pelosi. but again, it's not a good scenario for mccarthy and more of the rank and file. and they are getting upset that there are two members of their conference that are sitting here. and they do want to see punishment for those two. it's unclear right now if leadership is going to try to get involved in that. it's already messing up the feelings around the conference. >> and, you know, peter baker, sometimes we try to -- we look at inside baseball and think everybody is looking at that. those of us who follow this every day are thinking is what people that aren't as connected in politics are thinking. i would guess that independents seeing liz cheney and adam kinzinger on this committee, two republicans on this committee, asking tough questions and also i'm sure at times trying to push back against what they consider to be democratic excesses. i think that's going to have an
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impact on independents and swing voters that are watching the 14 swing voters left in america that are watching this. i think it really does under cut somebody like kevin mccarthy who, of course, was screaming at donald trump on january the 6th. i think it undercuts their ability to say it's a partisan witch hunt because liz cheney with a 95% conservative union voting record through her lifetime. and kinzinger also a conservative, you have both of them on the committee. it's hard to argue around that. >> i think that's right, but the problem for, you know, kinzinger and cheney is that they have been basically brushed off by their party. the party has decided they no longer consider them to be sufficiently loyal conservatives even though their records are
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staunchly conservative, staunchly republican. the problem in america today is we are looking for information that confirms what we believe. so in that tribal moment we're in, in the moment we seek out preconceived ideas rather than looking for new ideas it could be hard to break through. we'll see what happens. they have subpoena power, the ability to bring people before the committee. it is possible that these hearings become particularly dramatic or revelatory, or we learn new information or they keep the horror of that day in front of the public in a way that has impact. broadly speaking, people's minds in this country are locked into where they are. it's hard to change people's opinions once they sort of cement into place. and within a few weeks after january 6th we thought maybe january 6th would change the minds about things. basically within a few weeks people migrated back to their starts points, most people did
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and have been stuck there or staunchly there ever since. and the question is whether they'll look at the process and say, i'm willing to consider new ideas. >> of course you are right. so many of the republicans are locked in, their feet are in cement. their support for donald trump and probably that won't change by anything that happens on this committee but in a country that's a 50/48 country right now or maybe a 49/49 country, those 2%, 4% that could be influenced certainly could have a big impact on how things move going forward. and speaking of swing votes and people that are willing to sort of go both way, tell me, what in the world is happening with the infrastructure bill? we're still talking about it. we're supposed to be coming up on a deadline. what are you expecting this
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week? >> it is still infrastructure week, sorry to break it to you guys. last week a lot of -- many senators were saying give us a week, we don't want the vote in the senate. on wednesday, give us more time. let us have the weekend. well, yesterday on the sunday shows you heard give us a couple more days. they're definitely getting closer but a lot of those sticky issues are still in question. we're going to continue to see exactly where this goes. but they really, at least when it comes to goal setting they are really trying to get something done in the next couple days because august recess is right around the corner, the house right now is still expected to leave for over a month starting on friday. and you'll need that chamber once the senate tries to pass a number of pieces of legislation to wrap up infrastructure week once and for all. >> thank you both for your
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reporting this morning. coming up on "morning joe," the u.s. men's basketball team lost its tokyo opener to france. richard haass calls that defeat a metaphor for what's going on in the world. he joins us to describe that. plus wildfires continue to rage across the west coast and they are causing big problems, even thousands of miles away. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ing "morning joe. we'll be right back. ♪ born to be wild ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ born to be wild ♪ see disney's jungle cruise. applebee's and a movie, now that's eatin' good in the neighborhood. [sfx: radio being tuned] welcome to allstate. ♪ [band plays] ♪ a place where everyone lives life well-protected.
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wildfires continue to rage across the west, destroying homes and forcing community evacuations over the weekend. nbc news correspondent has the latest. >> reporter: homes and vehicles
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destroyed as the dixie fly fire tore this california community. it's the largest in the state, expected to reach 200,000 acre, the size of new york city, with 5,000 firefighters battling the flames and thousands of residents evacuated. >> people are losing their home. >> reporter: the golden state also fighting the tamarac fire, both now contained 20% with four counties under state of emergencies. >> there's spotting over a mile long. >> reporter: 85 large fires are burning across 11 states in the west with extreme drought conditions extending through the region. >> this is super dry, you can't find moisture under there. >> reporter: in oregon the bootleg fire is the nation's largest, torching more than 400,000 acres and destroying at least 67 homes.
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gauge clark's among them. >> i came back thinking i had something to come home to, when i came here i was gut shot, nothing left. >> reporter: all eyes on montana where more than a dozen large fires are burning and five firefighters remain hospitalized. crews from california and hospitalized. a united front against mother nature. >> let's bring in the president on foreign relations, richard haas who is tieing climate change and covid-19 saying globalization strikes back. the summer of 2021 has come to be largely defined by the ongoing covid-19 pandemic and accelerating climate change. both are manifestations of globalization and the reality of a world increasingly defined by the vast and fast cross border flows of just about everything.
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these two crisis demonstrate the woeful inadequacy of efforts to address the problematic aspects of globalization. if the collective failure to deal with covid-19 is any indication, we better be prepared to consider them sooner rather than later. there is no escape from global vags. the only question is whether and how we choose to manage it. >> i was reading josh rogan's book on china. and i think every foreign policy person should read it. you could be defined as being very hawkish, but we're not going to get anything done on climate change. we're not going to get anything done on health care crisis like covid unless we figure out how
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to confront china where we diver and work with china when we have to. on issues, again, like climate change. if you look at the numbers, there is nothing that we can do to stop the rise of global temperatures if china is not working with us. because right now, their contributing so much more to the problem over all than any country in the world. >> that is partially right. china is involved and it is necessary, but not sufficient. the foreign policy change will be how do we compete? how do we deal with the reality that on monday, wednesday, and fridays china is a geo-political adversary, but also a necessary partner to deal with pandemics, climate change, and things like
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north korea and iran missile programs. that is a foreign policy challenge of our time. it's not clear that we're up for it. it's not clear that china is prepared to play a constructive role, and then it has to go beyond china. there is no international community. we also have to bring in india and africa. one part of the world where the population is growing really quickly. at the moment if you're dealing with covid or climate, again, i'm struck by the gap between the scale of the problem and the scale of the response. >> what does this administration need to do that the last three administrations did not, the bush administration because the war started very unpopular. you heard a lot of grumbling about the obama administration internationally about an america in retreat.
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i know jeffrey sacks talks about going from one area to another. and talking about salve anning our closest partnerships. reconnecting with the g p, with the eu, our closest allies. and what is the next important step that we need to stake to rebuild this international community? >> we have to reestablish the confidence on covid that will require mandates, but we also have to ramp up dramatically on export. we have to walk the walk and we have to become a bigger provider there. we have more supply than demand when it comes to the vaccine and
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the rest of the world is just the opposite. on covid, on climate, it is more difficult. there again we have to show the way. we have to make certain technologies available. we have to set our own behavior. this administration, neither one had a trade policy. you cannot produce your goods. but this administration needs a trade policy for economic and strategic reasons and climate reasons and it is simply opting out. >> i'm dieing to hear about the metaphor about france's
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basketball team. a couple decades ago, they would say we have strength in international institutions. we have to beach up nato and the u.n. now we're dealing with the issue of sovereignty. and countries are saying no no, we need to protect our own. can you talk about the balance here? that's right, it might be formal institutions, it might be coalitions of the willing. we talk about sovereignty and rights. we never have a conversation about the obligations in our own self interest.
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climate as we're seeing, we have an obligation out of our own self interest to get to the rest of the world to work with us. so we really need to rethink our relationship with the world. it is an absolute conversation about rights, what is in our own self interest and are we prepared to meet others halfway. >> how soccer explains the world. it's a great book. richard, you think basketball explains the world in relation to the united states losing to france. my god, my god. how does this explain where the u.s. is right now? >> because after world war ii and the end of the cold war,
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they enjoyed a degree of privacy and advantage that we don't enjoy any more. we can't do it alone, we just impose our will on others. if we can't beat the french in basketball, how will be beat anyone else and force them on what we want to do for covid or climate change. >> and we have to work with ourselves. my guess is if that basketball team learned to work together better, learned to use their talents together collectively, nobody would beat them in the world. you can say the same about the united states. finally, we have to go but any thoughts on the yankees and red sox. >> i want to reaction first and say foreign policy begins at home. and if you were a real fan you would not raise that poison. >> i'm sad that you only want to
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talk about your reality that you read on facebook and all of your yankee fan pages. >> this is getting crazy. >> our prayer wills be for you tonight and forever. >> what's coming up? >> still ahead, if asking, coaxing, and bribing isn't working, what about forcing? what needs to happen now? we're back in just one minute. w we're back in just one minute. (customer) hi? (burke) happy anniversary. (customer) for what? (burke) every year you're with us, you get fifty dollars toward your home deductible. it's a policy perk for being a farmers customer. (customer) do i have to do anything? (burke) nothing. (customer) nothing? (burke) nothing. (customer) nothing? (burke) nothing. (customer) hmm, that is really something. (burke) you get a whole lot of something with farmers policy perks. see ya. (kid) may i have a balloon, too? (burke) sure. your parents have maintained a farmers home policy for twelve consecutive months, right? ♪ we are farmers. bum-pa-dum, bum-bum-bum-bum ♪ (burke) start with a quote at 1-800-farmers. vo: the climate crisis is here.
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berardelli: these temperatures are almost unbelievable even for a meteorologist. vo: and the solution is here too: clean energy. like wind turbines and solar panels. now, congress has to invest in it and the millions of workers ready to install it across the country. because in america, we don't hide from problems like climate change. we take them on. we innovate. we lead. because if we invest in these workers, and their future at this moment, that's how we build back better. i know folks are watching the number of cases rise again and wondering what it means for them. here is the truth, if you're fully vaccinated you're safer with a higher degree of protection. and now, what we have now, is a pandemic of the unvaccinated.
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and by the way, you know that old expression that a lotserati call. they have seen the lord. on fox news and the most conservative commentators. >> more republicans and conservative commentators have seen the lord, as president biden put it. we'll tell you about one conservative radio host in tennessee who originally didn't think he needed to be vaccinated. until his own struggle with the virus. what he is telling his listeners now. we're also following the first house committee, the hearing on the january 6th capitol riot. it is set for tomorrow. speaker nancy pelosi is bringing another republican voice to the table, we'll tell you who it is and we'll talk about what is at stake. we're going to begin this morning with what we have been
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talking about as it gets worse and worse. coronavirus infections continuing to rise among the unvaccinated americans and the nation's top infectious disease expert says the u.s. is headed in the wrong direction. megan fitzgerald has the latest. >> the worst case scenario among the unvaccinated. >> we feel like we're going back into battle again and it is definitely another wave. >> the highly contagious delta variant fuelling a surge of new cases across the country. dire warnings from the nation's top doctor. >> we could have a serious problem with a considerable surge of infections. >> the variant sweeping through the south. texas, arkansas, and florida accounting for 40% of new cases in the country. but in miami, thousands packing the stadium for a live concert.
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the cdc says they could recommend masks for fully vaccinated indoors. but in arkansas, a new law banning mask mandates goes into effect this week. >> it's important not to have a current debate about mask wearing, but to have the emphasis on getting a vaccine. >> only 49% of the country is fully vaccinated. frontline workers once again with urgent pleas to the public. >> we're seeing younger patients, all unvaccinated, that are sicker. >> he is seeing more covid patients now than ever before. >> what would it mean if more people got vaccinated. >> pain and suffering. calling loved up withes to tell
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them their family didn't make it. >> that is linda mercer's greatest fear. >> i was being selfish by not getting vaccinated. it changes your outlook on life when you feel like i may be called home. >> our thanks to megan for that report. she mentioned florida that is the new covid-19 epicenter in the united states. no state is coming close to the explosive surge. according to the cdc, florida accounts for one in five infections. since the start of the month, the total number of weekly cases jumped more than four fold reaching it's highestpoint since
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mid january. >> and you know mika, it has gotten so bad in florida that you're hearing ron de santis talking about the need for vaccinations. there is several republicans that thought it was politically perilous to suggest getting the vaccine. you see in florida and other states that have not encouraged that in the past, just an explosion, an absolute explosion in hospitalizations. 99.5% of everybody who is going to the hospital and dieing have not been vaccinated and we're still having this debate.
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it is surreal and it is tragic. i don't think it is just the information from facebook primarily. some people say fox news, but even the cop shows get two or three million viewers out of 325 million americans. it is facebook that's everywhere. you talk to public health care officials and you ask them what is their biggest challenge and they will say facebook. the lies spread, the misinformation spread, the doctor in florida making money going viral and spreading misinformation and lies about what is happening with covid and the vaccines. that is what is causing this. there is a few under lying issues that we also have to address as a country but we have
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to get the word out and facebook until they are broken up by anti-trust laws, the way they should, they need to do more. megan fitzgerald mentioned in arkansas, in her report, that one of the state's candidates for governor, someone you have heard of, sarah huckabee sanders is making the case for getting vaccinated. she and her family got what they call the trump vaccine. the former press secretary for the trump white house says "based on the advice of my doctor, and please get your advice from your doctor, not your idiot cousin on facebook or an idiot co-worker on facebook that is trying to kill you.
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yes, they're trying to kill you with bad information, get your information from your doctor that you have known your entire life. so sarah huckabee sanders says based on the advice from my doctor, i determined that the benefits of the vaccination outweighed any potential risks. i was also reassured after president trump and his family were vaccinated. if it was safe enough for them, i felt it was safe enough for me. i believe in freedom and personal responsibility. arkansas should not be told they can't work because they're businesses or jobs are not essential. there should not be mandates to get vaccinated or wear masks. kahn servetive radio host is also his also urging his
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listeners to get the shot. phil would like for his listeners to know that while he has never been an anti-vaxer, he regrets to the being more pro-vaccine. meanwhile his wife gave a update on his increasingly grave condition on saturday saying he is still not getting well. please pray for me. i am at a breaking point. we hear his situation keeps going up and down, up and downs. our prayers are with him and all others right now fighting covid. >> despite the kinds of testimonials, the majority of unvaccinated americans are unlikely to be moved in their
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thinking. according to a new center poll, 81% of americans said they would definitely not get the shot. just like 19% said they would likely not get vaccinated. vaccine diplomacy in a time of antiscience. also with us u.s. national editor of the financial times ed loose. and i'll start with peter ohio tez. listen, it might be, there is no kind way to say it. there is a political divide in this country that is now one side of this being isolated by a
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deadly virus. and with numbers that we have seen, 80% of people still not changing their mind of the vaccine, your research on how to stop a pandemic, or the next one, i wounder what it would take at this point to try to turn this around. >> mika, you're exactly right. it is no coincidence where this epidemic is raging right now. if you look at the states with the lowest vaccinate rates, those are the state that's have an norm amount of covid. florida, louisiana is on fire, alabama is on fire. missouri, arkansas, they're all conservative strongholds. and it's not fun for people like myself to talk about democrats and republicans, and liberals, but that is the reality in is
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months and months of antiscience coming out. they say this is nothing more than an effort for power and control and they're going to use -- first they're going to force vaccines on us and then take away our bibles and our guns, and all of that disinformation, meaning deliberate misinformation came from cpac. so when we talk about facebook as a disseminator. we have to look at the sources of who is driving this, and right now is our conservative groups. now they're trying to make amends after they're seeing the monster they unleashed. but this was not a one-off thing. this went on nor months and months and months. this was all a deliberate,
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coordinated, war of aggression against science and scientists. >> it is so tragic that these times made obvious public health moves. you hear people talking about vaccine mandates as if, again, we had the nazi analogies and every other crazy analogy. of the 300 million americans or so that get five or six vaccines before they went into kindergarten, did they have to trade in their bibles to get the vaccines. when they were required, if they wanted to get a public education, to get vaccine for the mumps, for polio, i can name five, six, seven.
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you could have called them vaccine mandates. whatever you want to require it, it was a different requirement. if you don't get it you don't get an education in the united states of america except in extraordinary circumstances. why can't we say if you want to teach this fall you to get a vaccine? why not tell the health care workers that are working with senior citizens right now. why don't we say you have to get a vaccination or you can't work. why don't we tell our public safety officers the same thing? this would be no more radical than what we have been doing for 60 years. whoever, you know, we want to
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blame for this, they are tacting like it is something new. >> yeah, eisenhower launched nasa, bush lawned the emergency aides aids relief. there was a new health and medical treatment movement. the vaccine movement to reenergize, because a lot of us thought we found links between
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vaccines and autism, and it was particularly down here in texas. and it just really accelerated after covid. they started becoming defiant and now is extended to vaccines. i'm not politicizing this. my job is to call it out and say look this antiscience aggression benefits nobody if is self-defeating for the country and all of the deep red states. and i'm really worried because as bad as things are, it will get worse. schools are starting down here. 30% to 40% of the young adults.
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we have a delta variant accelerating. we have a number of red state governors saying no mask mandates. what makes you think any of this will go well? we will see now lots of young people get hospitalized in the coming weeks. >> still ahead, we'll talk about the new law in france that requires vaccines for health workers. and limits access to restaurants and movie theaters for anyone else who refuses the shot. could that happen here? you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ht back. welcome to allstate.
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here we are we're moving into a new school year. we all know our children have to be in school they have to be. so why can't joe biden have a reagan moment? like he did with air traffic controllers and tell public school teachers, public university professors, health care workers working with seep your citizens. tell them get vaccinated or you will be fired. we have reopened this country and we're on the verge of having to shut down again because of the reckless 30% that will not
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get their vaccines. >> i think until this point president biden has taken the perfectly reasonable approach of catching more flies with honey than vinegar. you look at the curve of vaccinations and it was pretty steep. and the numbers you're showing. those antivaxers for the most part pretty strongly decided against getting a vaccine. so i think at this point leadership, political risk taking, it will be required by biden and others. if that means imposing a ban on
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unvaccinated people, and federal profit including interstate travel, including flying, sadding medical workers. i don't know. it will produce, it would produce an enormous backlash. it would also get the job done. you see in countries like france where they have done that. they have imposed essentially a permanent quarantine on the unvaccinated. you have seen a massive up take in vaccinations since president macron made that announcement. it would escalate the culture wars and it would improve the situation in america. it requires richk taking and
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leadership and i hope that biden is beginning to confront that possibility. >> coming up, president biden won the white house in part because of the way it was handled. officials are said to be getting nervous. "morning joe" back in a moment. t ray loves vacations. but his diabetes never seemed to take one. everything felt like a 'no.' everything. but then ray went from no to know.
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it's time to rock the boat, america. imagine if information came . then you'd know if what you're consuming has the right mix of verified facts credible sources and relevant context. but news and information don't come with a label.
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it's on us to develop a healthy news diet ourselves. let's all resolve to strengthen our news literacy so we can make healthier choice about what news and information to consume, share and act on test your news literacy fitness with our quiz at newslit-dot-og the rapidly spreading delta variant is causing a new set of concerns for the biden administration. inside of the white house top officials are growing increasingly anxious about the state of the pandemic. they're gravely concerned about the situation spiraling out of control in some areas of the country. that is according to two people that work with the administration. officials are now working at
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models that predict from a few thousand new covid cases to more than 200,000 every day in the fall. one new forecast estimates the u.s. could see three times the number of daily deaths from opt to now. >> and it seems to me there are not a lot of serious nations that would allow facebook and allow political extremists to get in the way from getting every public school teacher vaccinated or getting every health care worker that works with senior accounts that works with nursing homing vaccinated, or getting every public safety officer in america vaccinated.
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let me say it again for idiots that suggest that suggest this is radical. this is what we have been doing with kids going into kindergarten. they all had to get five or six vaccination shots before they can get into school. and i think every state has about the same vaccination requirements. they are your "passports" if that makes it sound ominous enough for the idiots pushing back on this. how are we as a serious nation not requiring this of our school teachers, of our cops, of our transportation officials, of our health care workers. we're not a serious nation if we don't demand that of them if they a job in the middle of the pandemic. >> there is a model for this in
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trans. we saw a rapid spike. they said you have these restrictions for those that chose not to get the vaccine. we just had someone on and we asked what would it take you you to get vaccinated, but the thing that tended to work was if there was a requirement. they breustled, they thought it would be onerous, but they haultly said yeah, i would do it if i had to travel, for instance. a more sticks rather than carrots might work here. but the problem is the political backlash that might happen here. they are a cultural emblem.
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they were not pushing back against covid, they were pushing back against vaccination for all vaccines. you're not just fighting people resistance to getting the pfizer shot, you're trying to convince them that vaccinations at large are important. when you talk to people in the biden orbit, they tell you that more often than not people are not going to take direction from the government. they will not be pushed but they will get prodded. they need people like pastors or family member members to tell them it is important. full disclosure, my wife works for facebook, but if you're following a certain universe of people that are antivaccine, and that's the universe that you get
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your eco system will encourage you not to get the vaccine and it is very hard for someone to ill filtrate that ico system. and that is where it becomes very problematic. we have closed off information circuits that don't let us get outside information. >> police officers and bystanders rescue a baby trabed under a car after an out of control vehicle slams into a building. cle slams into a building
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blocked cdc restrictions on cruiseships operating out of florida. the decision that applies only to florida came after lawyers for the state asked the u.s. supreme court in an emergency appeal to block the restrictions. it argued they were costing florida tens of millions in tax and port revenue. the cdc allowed passengers to board if they set up testing labs, maintain test voyaging, maintain social distancing and have on-shore housing for quarantining passengers. the state argued that it gave them power to enact traditional measures does not permit the agency to remake the entire cruiseship industry. and the district court agreed. they left the restrictions in
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place and reversed itself on friday without explanation. the state will likely withdraw the case from the supreme court. for more business headlines we turn to frank holland. what do we expect after friday's record close. >> markets are on track to start this day slightly lower. looking at the future. they are set to open about 35 years lower. really a major turn around for what we saw monday, a week ago, the worst day of the markets some of them are buying the dip. whether or not that was stock picking or machine trading, but in general analysts and investors have been encouraged by profits comes in.
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we're also looking at bitcoin. >> go ahead, frank. tell us about bit coin. we're watching it really closely here. it is a big milestone for people who are crypto investors. the moves don't always make sense, but the point today that amazon may start accepting them, elon musk and others talking about it in a positive way, another catalyst there. >> that is amazing. let me ask you about the stock rates. everyone talks about thedown going on. nasdaq in the past six months
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have exploded. i take it we're seeing record numbers with the tech stocks really driving this rally, right? >> last week we saw twitter and snap really beat expectations and this week we have huge tech names, amazon reporting it's reporting on thursday. tesla, facebook, alphabet, and also some company that's are a bellweather, visa and mastercard. a two-day fed policy, and on thursday the report on second quarter gdp. a lot going on in the markets. tech earnings will be a real focus. >> all right. thank you, frank. great to have you on "morning joe." and after a possible senate run in georgia, the ap is digging into the life of one of college
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football's greatest players. looking into hundreds of public documents and found the 58-year-old repeatedly threatened his ex-wife and exaggerated his financial and business success. when the book was released, his ex-wife details his alleged violent behavior toward her. it is reported that he filed a protective order in 2005 after threatening her life. police were concerned enough that they took a gun that he had. the ap also found issues with his chicken business. in interviews he said he employs hundreds and makes tens of millions of dollars. however, he has just eight
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employees and averages $1.5 million in profit a year. he was contacted multiple times for comment and he did not respond. we're going to follow that senate race and it is fascinating because normally you would think that this ap story, and if someone was calling the ap or providing the ap it would come from democrats but there is a lot of republicans on capitol hill that don't want him to run. they don't think he will be the strongest candidate. but trump loves him. he pushed him out there so right now when you see more and more negative things out there, that will be coming most likely from republicans who are leaking or talking to news sources. right now the republicans in
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washington dc think walker would be a very weak general election candidate and they're trying to stop donald trump's candidate. >> we want to show you now an astonishing rescue that was caught on camera after a woman and baby were pinned under an out of control car. vaughn hilliard has the story. >> startling footage of a frantic effort. the driver swerving out of control on friday through a new york intersection toward a mom and her infant daughter. the car slamming into the parent and barrelling through the barbershop. >> there is a baby under the car. within moments these two near by officers enter. >> there is a baby under the
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vehicle. >> one officer radioing for back up, the other shouting for support. a body camera shows the seriously injured mom laying next to the car as he tries to move the vehicle. the bean seen wriggling beneath it. others step in to assist. >> come on, kid, come on. seconds pass as the officer lifts. they reach in and grasp for and finally pull out the child. authorities charged this man for driving while intoxicated. he broke the mother's leg and fractured part of her daughter's skull. they will both be okay as they remain in the hospital. >> my god. thanks to vaughn hilliard for that report and to the i don't think -- yonkers comics.
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he was best known for his routines on the differences between jews and non-jews. >> do you see when they come on the plane, they have to pass the first class section. you see how they look at you then they start hitting you with the luggage. you're ten times better off in coach. gentiles think they have to seat at the sea they were assigned. they are all sitting in their assigned seats and the jews are saying look what i found, come here, come here, the stewardess
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are chasing the jews, look at this, grab this seat. they could sit here or there. what happened to my upgrade. i was supposed to have a upgrade. they all walk around asking everybody how much have you paid? >> he also appeared in a number of films and he was the voice of crusty the clown's father on "the simpsons. he was 93 years old. up next, a look at the role that technology plays in the pandemic. and one of our next guest calls the most influential spreader of coronavirus misinformation online. we're back in two minutes. we're back in two minutes.
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during the covid-19 pandemic, health misinformation has led people to resist wearing masks in high risk settings, it has led them to turn down proven treatments and to choose not to get vaccinated. this has led to avoidable illnesses and death. simply put, health information has cost us lives. >> as a new wave of the coronavirus emerges, health officials in louisiana are facing a formidable challenge, fighting for influence as they face deep mistrust that is stoked by conservative news outlets and lawmakers and by rampant misinformation online. the new york times reports that no where is the struggle as urgent as the northwest corner
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of louisiana where the immediate crisis is confounding and demoralizing health officials. we know the results, but what about the origins of it? the "new york times" recently looked in to one man who many say is the most influential spreader, joseph culler has become the spreader of misinformation. his official facebook page has over 1.7 million followers, while his spanish language page has 1 million followers. the "times" also found 17 other facebook pages that appeared to be run by him or were closely connected to his businesses. so twitter, he has nearly 300,000 followers.
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plus nearly 400,000 on youtube. >> joining us now is the reporter that wrote about dr. mercola and co-author of oig an ugly truth." and also with us, professor of information studies at ucla. and he is the author of "beyond the valley." thank you both for being on with us this morning. where do we begin? it all points back to facebook. >> i guess the question is, what does this doctor have to benefit from spreading these lies? >> he started off in natural medicine in the 1990s and he launched a website that sold
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natural health products. what we've seen is over the last 20 year, he has profited hugely off that website. in the last year he has pivoted toward selling vitamin supplements that he says will cure -- excuse me, vitamin d will cure and treat covid-19. but he is told that he cannot tell people that these products will help people with covid-19. >> and ramesh, when you actually have a doctor that is one of the largest purveyors of these lies about covid that is killing thousands of people. >> yeah, without question, joe. we have to interrogate and understand the engines by which misinformation and disinformation spread. and that is fundamentally about big technology, right?
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they prey on suspicions, on doubts and they radicalize those doubts with fueling people with content that are a rouse them, that will outrage them or con fir some of their biases and make them more hardcore. and this is a general issue with social media platforms. and so without our public investment, none of these companies would be worth anything and that is why these companies owe it to the public interests to bring this all together especially at a time when so many people are suffering and are distressed. >> so looking at the one person who has the biggest platform, you can blame the person, but ultimately it is social media platforms. they are acting like publishers.
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people are receiving their information as if they are publishers that have standards and a sense of moral responsibility about giving correct information. when they don't. when there are actually no standards. when anything can fly around on social media. and i guess what i'm confused about is why is it taking so long for lawmakers to figure this out and get to the point where they can hold them accountable and get to the point where people can sue when they receive misinformationmis characterized or defamed on these platforms. because as long as they exist, aren't people like the doctor that we're profiling here going to live forever spreading disinformation? >> i'm so glad you asked that. i've been on your show before talking about how the platforms really amplify this really emotive kept. the stuff that you see on facebook, on the top of your
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news feed, is placed there because it will inspire an emotion in you and maybe that is a doctor that is promising a cure or treatment for covid that sounds too good to be true. i'll note that the platforms have taken action against categorically false claims. for instance people can't go on to facebook and say that you should not get vaccinated, that vaccines don't work. that is a falsehood. you cannot say that on facebook. but what people like mercola does which is so effective, he just skirts the truth. he asks the question. don't you think that the vaccines might not be effective? and then he provides an argument. and facebook and platforms struggle with that because he is falling into that gray area between their rules where he makes it very hard for them to figure out what should be allowed and what shouldn't be allowed. >> facebook says it has labeled many of his posts false, that they violated policies. twitter has also taken down some
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of his posts and labeled others as misleading. what other social media platforms are you concerned about that have been real instigators of spreading lies? >> we've seen how youtube for example especially with his algorithmic recommendation systems has tended to recommend content [ inaudible ] which take people down a rabbit hole. so maybe you have skepticism about one vaccine or another and then you logon to youtube or twitter or to facebook and the algorithm -- the technology has been gathering so much intimate data about you, none of which we know as the american public and that data is being transacted to make behavioral predictions around content to provide to you that again will take you down the ran bet hole, will to
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exactly what she was saying which is fuel you with more content that raises suspicions. as fine for us to have different thoughts and perspectives about covid, but we need a technology that brings us all together to talk about those differences. rather than amplify and radicalize us. >> thank you both very much for being on the show this morning. >> and new reporting this morning from the "washington post" hit about 20 minutes ago that follows up what we've been talking about all morning, medical groups are taking an increasingly tough stance when it comes to mandatory vaccinations of all u.s. health workers against the coronavirus. in a joint statement today, dozens of leading medical groups including the american medical association, american nurses association, say the health and safety of families, communities and the nation depends on it.
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sam stein, there does seem to be a sense of a growing urgency from this statement from what we're hearing from the white house on teachers vaccines. i think that we're turning a page. >> yeah, a month ago it seemed like everything was trending optimistically, vaccination reallies were good, we thought that we'd hit the july 4th marker. that hasn't happened. and then there was annen aity vaccine push. and now another note where people are saying we need to do mandatory vaccinations like this group talked about. but also redoubling our efforts to reach the hard to reach populations. >> you have new york city asking teachers to get the vaccine or get tested every week, compelling them. and the big question that we'll be looking at in the days to come is vaccine mandates and whether or not the white house can come to terms with something like that as they try to get teachers vaccinated for the

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