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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 16, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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10 family members to covid-19. >> over the last months we've learned a lot about covid-19 including how to stop it. yet the virus is rearing up again in dangerous ways as vaccinations lag and disinformation spreads. it's a dangerous combination that we'll discuss this morning with the u.s. surgeon general, who you just heard there. plus we'll go to mississippi where health officials are warning of a surge in the delta variant, it's landed several children in the icu, some on life support. also an exclusive excerpt from the bombshell book by a pair of renowned washington post reporters how bill barr apparently stunned donald trump into silence, think about that, with his warning about the 2020 election. we'll get to that just ahead. plus angela merkel pays her final visit to the white house as germany's chancellor. we'll talk about her meeting
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with president biden which unlike a summit with bush 43 did not have any spontaneous shoulder rubs. all that and more on this friday, july 16th. that bush/merkel shoulder rub never gets old. >> a little shoulder rub diplomacy from the 43rd. we do begin with the growing fears of a new covid wave as cases climb, nations plateau. now los angeles is turning back the pandemic clock, issuing a new mask mandate. >> reporter: los angeles, the nation's largest county taking a step back requiring masks indoors even for the vaccinated starting sunday. breaking with cdc guidance, it's a clear signal concern is growing over the highly contagious delta variant.
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meantime, for some of the 48 million children under 12 and their parents who were hoping to get them vaccinated this fall, a longer wait. the fda will now review several additional months of safety data. meaning a vaccine for kids won't likely be available until early next year. >> it makes it a very stressful time to be a parent, educator and a child that all schools should have strong contingency plans. what are the methods we go back to virtual learning, what do we do to keep parents and staff safe. >> reporter: only a small fraction of children have died. but now our nation is bracing for a tidal wave of new infections. >> we've exceeded last year's peak. >> reporter: while outbreaks were expected in unvaccinated pockets of the nation, 98
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million are still not inoculated. 40 states are seeing a rise in infections. at yankee stadium, positive covid tests forced the game against the red sox to be postponed. the delta variant a serious risk. >> it's going to find those pockets in each community that people aren't vaccinated and do a lot of damage. >> reporter: that damage being done and for the unvaccinated, including the youngest americans, the worst may still be to come. miguel almaguer. we should point out rochelle walinsky said the cdc is not saying people who are vaccinated should wear masks. let's bring in dr. battelle. this is gut wrenching, frustrating given all the work that's gone in to get us to this
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place. how do we change this trajectory we appear to be on right now? >> one word, willie, vaccination. i think it's incredibly clear the vaccines we have are effective. what we're trying to do, i won't call it herd immunity, it's con fuzzing to say that. we're trying to reach a goal where a majority of people, not 100%, but where the majority of people are vaccinated and it protects the unvaccinated. this is a simple epidemiology, public health 101. short of that we'll continue to see these rolling waves throughout the country in various pockets. larger numbers in some areas. but don't think just because you live in a part of connecticut, vermont or another area of the country, southern california where if you have an area that's highly vaccinated that people vaccinated are not susceptible.
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everyone is vulnerable at one point. i will take a difference with the cdc director, she's much more in the data than i am, but there's no harm in talking about high risk settings like indoors where multiple people who are unvaccinated might gather with vaccinated people and just having everyone follow the same rules. because what we're seeing right now, willie is people aren't doing it. we're kind of trusting everyone, and i don't see a reason to do that. >> do you think, dr. patel, that los angeles county is a leading indicator of where places across the country is headed? we know about states with low vaccination rates. you mentioned states that have done well, connecticut, the northeast, new york, massachusetts, maine, up through the new england area. are those places susceptibility now to roll backs in terms of the restrictions we might see? >> they are.
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more than los angeles, i do praise the public health officials there, they're sticking their necks out on the lines, they're not popular people these days but look to israel, parts of what the uk have had to do, ignore what boris johnson has said but look at local ministry health officials are doing on the ground there. australia, other parts of the eu, they are what we would call canaries in the coal mine, they have put back in indoor masks. vaccines do protect us. they protect us from hospitalization and death, unvaccinated people with a variant that is novel, that we don't understand, that is highly transmissible, infectious, what is the harm when you're with strangers to wear a mask indoors, special in close contact settings. why are we taking a risk we don't need to take when we have a preventative measure for now until we get people vaccinated
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and that's really the bottom line. >> dr. patel, given what you just said and the simplicity of it, because science is about facts, but health is about communication and is about helping a population understand what's best for them to live long, healthy lives. what is happening here? what is the predominant reason that people are not getting vaccinated? what are you hearing? >> i'm a primary care physician so i'm hearing a lot of different things, including large sources of misinformation. i think that's why you're talking to the surgeon general. number one, the amount of misinformation has outweighed the facts and science. i may be the only person in a 15 minute visit telling people what the facts and data in the journal tell us but i have people's whose lives are
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dominated by facebook and what's up and twitter, that this is going to affect your dna, pregnancies, that the government rushed this, i've heard it all. i don't think there's one piece of misinformation i haven't heard. including this causes you to become magnetic. what i've learned over months, you can't shame them, you cannot blame them. you have to start empathize and say i too thought this might be fast, and here's what i learned and here's why i learned my 28-year-old latina patient did want the vaccine because she saw her sister get hospitalized and become oxygen dependent at her young age. it's what we had to do 10 years ago to fight misinformation about the affordable care act. it's just different forms exploited.
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>> absolutely important not to shame or blame the people who have been misinformed. that would be wrong. but the leaders, especially the republicans and those who follow donald trump and donald trump himself choosing to be negligent. choosing to misinform people, maybe even media organizations choosing to have hosts that misinform people, that is choosing to be negligent, that is malpractice and that is on them. and that will be what happens to this country on them. this is the warning. the warning that the u.s. surgeon general dr. vivek murthy had about covid-19. he issued an advisory declaring the rise of misinformation online an urgent threat calling on social media companies to take action. >> today we live in a world where misinformation poses an i
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imminent and insidious threat to our health. modern technology companies have enabled people to poison our environment with little accountability to our users. they allow people to spread disinformation and have extraordinary reach. they designed product features such as like buttons that reward us for sharing emotionally charged content not accurate content and their algorithms give us more of what we click on, pulling us deeper into the well. >> as we played at the top, nearly every death from covid-19 could have been prevented. think about that. at that same briefing, jen psaki said a large amount of misinformation is being spread by a relatively small number of people. >> there's about 12 people who are producing 65% of
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anti-vaccine misinformation on social media platforms. all of them remain active on facebook despite some being banned on other platforms, including facebook -- once that facebook owns. >> following those remarks facebook put out a statement reading we've partnered with government experts, health authorities and researchers to take aggressive action against misinformation about covid-19 and vaccines and protect public health. so far we've removed more than 18 million pieces of covid information, removed accounts that repeatedly break these rules and connected more than 2 billion people to reliable information -- are you really taking credit, facebook? are you taking credit? you think you saved lives? because the bottom line is, as long as you are carrying, channelling, and pushing out misinformation, that's taking lives. not saving lives. the surgeon general will be our guest later in the morning.
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it's just so frustrating that these companies that are really fire hoses of bad information and people who are following trump and the leaders in washington who refuse to bow to trump who are really delivering misinformation and using facebook and social media and anywhere that will listen to spread disinformation, there are a million words i can think for it, but at this point, it's fatal. it's killing people. >> yeah. no, you're absolutely right. it's deadly what's happening right now. and, of course, the seeds of all this disinformation, this bad information were planted a long time ago, long before the last year and a half around coronavirus but now we're seeing the rotten fruit and it's costing lives. dr. patel it does feel like we've had the trusted partners and people like you and others have worked so hard to get the message out to communities that have not been vaccinated. it feels like we hit a ceiling
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and if that's true, and we don't get the numbers up where they need to be. what happens the next few months, the next year with coronavirus in this country? what does it look like to you? >> willie, i think you're asking the critical question that all health officials are. i'll say number one, i hope there will be an up tick in vaccinations, especially if schools open. the news we're not going to have children vaccine option in the near future should give many adults at least some pause and i'm hoping officials encourage adults to get vaccinated. number two, i think employers, you heard many at large employers say they want to bring employees back in by labor day, more fully and enforced, they are going to have a heavier hand for having their workforce vaccinated, whether that's
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through requirements or mandates or if you're not vaccinated we are going to ask you to do the following precautions. we do it in health care, it's easier to get vaccinated. approval for the vaccines will help that. i think the third thing is getting the world vaccinated. you look at other countries, indonesia, it's spiraling out of control. south america. and peru responsible for about 93% of the infections. perhaps the best thing we can say, all the vaccines we're not going to use we're going to help to be part of a global vaccine push. the president expressed this but we can't do it soon enough. so the next year is going to look like -- just like heat waves, rolling heat waves across the country back and forth until people are either vaccinated or infected. >> dr. patel, thank you so much.
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coming up we'll have more on this, we'll take you inside a mississippi hospital where there are children on life support. going into a hospital in arkansas, bottom line, this thing is real, it's coming back in these united states of america we have a pandemic among the unvaccinated and we have more coming up. turning to politics we have more this morning from the book entitled "i alone can fix it". this latest excerpt recounts former president donald trump's reactions to the january 6th capitol attack. reading from the book, quote, early on january 6th, trump called pence who was spending the morning at his naval observatory residence before heading to the capital. pence again explained the legal limits on his authority as vice president and said hoe planned to perform his ceremonial duty as prescribed by the
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constitution. but trump showed him no mercy. you don't have the courage to make a hard decision, he told pence at 2:10 p.m. the first rioter entered the capitol by breaking a window and climbing inside, a stream of trump warriors followed him. at the white house, trump was back in his private dining room watching everything unfold on television. aides, including dan scavino and kayleigh mcenany popped in and out. the president was riveted. his supporters had heeded his call to march on the capitol with pride and boldness. for trump there was no more beautiful sight than thousands of energetic people waving trump flags wearing red maga caps and fighting to keep him in power.
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this is cool. he was happy recalled one aid who was with trump that afternoon. then when it turned violent, he thought, oh crap. as rioters ma radded through the capitol, it was clear whom they were looking for some of them shouted hang mike pence. trump didn't exactly throw them off the hunt. at 2:24 the president tweeted, mike pence didn't have the courage to do what was needed. is mike okay the president asked an aide. the secretary service has him under control, kellogg told trump. karen is there with the daughter. oh, trump asked. they're going to stay there until this gets sorted out kellogg said. trump said nothing more. he didn't express any hope that pence was okay. he didn't try to call the vice
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president to check on him. he just stayed in the dining room watching television. we should note this account has not been independently confirmed by nbc news. let's bring in host and executive producer of showtime's "the circus" john heileman. new york times reporter michael schmidt. and kasie hunt joins us as well. kasie we heard your announcement this morning. i've known about it, i'm practicing some radical acceptance right now and it is not working. i've been with you on this journey. so it's dialectal. i can't accept it but i'm really proud of you. john heileman i'll go to you first. the quotes from the book and the lack of any care for his vice
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president, it starts right there. what are your reactions? >> well, hey, good morning, mika. and, you know, it's been a really -- this has been a -- this period of the last week or two when we started to see these inside accounts. the one that we're focussing on this morning is -- just in the last couple of days has provided an incredible amount of fodder. almost all of it in some sense confirming and making vivid and making real a lot of things that we all kind of felt in our guts or we knew through some reporting. but these guys have gone so deep now into really kind of putting flesh on the bones to just how -- not just what a perilous moment it was for the country and how dangerous donald trump was. those are the headlines it seems to me, whether you talk about the reporting from the same book
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yesterday, the chairman of the joint chiefs and his concerns about a reichstag moment and the excerpt this morning, it almost is staggering, mika, as trump's total lack of care for mike pence. again we sort of knew, he was tweeting, attacking pence at the moment when pence was in physical mortal danger. we talked about this on the show in real time or shortly thereafter. but almost as stunning as that in this excerpt is another fact that we basically knew but comes through blaringly. which is where is donald trump commander in chief? where is donald trump in the residence talking to military leaders, the national guard, talking to anyone where he could be of assistance and try to quell this violence as it was unfolding. instead, he's passive and both -- on some levels we see enjoying the sight of his
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minions acting what he would consider strength acting with total human disregard for his completely loyal vice president for four years. but so completely disengaged from the most fundamental constitutional obligation he had for another 16 days, to protect the united states against enemies foreign or domestic. here the capitol was under siege by enemies domestic and donald trump is doing nothing, nothing, if anything, making the situation worse. >> john mentioned part of the book we told you about yesterday of chairman mark milley's concerns about a possible coup by president trump and his allies after the 2020 election. yesterday trump put out a statement in response to those revelations writing quote, i never threatened or spoke about to anyone, a coup of our government. so ridiculous. sorry to inform you, but an
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election is my form of coup. and if i was going to do a coup, one of the last people i would want to do it with is general mark milley. michael schmidt here we go again, at the same time this is a really, really dangerous moment for our country that there isn't a uniform just absolute agreement that there was a man in charge who incited a riot against our u.s. capitol, our constitution, our democracy in process. how much does this match a lot of the reporting that you've been doing? >> that was like a classic trump response there as a way of taking a shot at milley and also sort of, you know, throwing himself into this discussion about the coup and the way that he did. you know, it flashed pack to
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sort of the trump tweets. look, all of these accounts are really stark and really scary, because we saw all of us, how close we came to the edge. and what that insurrection was and how that was such a manifestation of everything that donald trump had done over four years. what i keep on finding that i think we sometimes forget or miss is that a lot of these people who, you know, found themselves in dangerous places like mike pence or, you know, others were people that for four years had been around donald trump and knew about his possibilities. they were enablers of donald trump. mike pence helped donald trump get out of the mueller investigation. mike pence stood around silently many times over the four years that donald trump was president and didn't say much and didn't do much to hold the president accountable.
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you know, there's accounts of bill barr that have come out about different things that bill barr did or said. there was no greater enabler of donald trump than bill barr. so i understand the importance that these individuals played in the historic moments after the election and how the country was on its edge, but these were folks that were still there after four years of donald trump being president. these were people that had seen the president act upclose. i guess some of them thought they needed to be there to stop trump from hurting himself and hurting the country. and i understand the unusualness of that phenomenon. but at the same time, i don't think many of us were surprised by donald trump's behavior after the election. >> and kasie right in the middle of this week when we're getting these breathtaking excerpts from the book about what happened leading up to january 6th, what
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happened on that day, and what happened afterward, you would think it might give some republicans pause and yet the house republican leader kevin mccarthy was at bed minister yesterday, kissing the ring even after we're seeing these stories. and what trump said at cpac, these were patriots and loving people. and the leadership of the party going to make sure they still have donald trump in their pocket. >> it continues to be stunning, willie for sure. and, of course, while the official accounts of the meeting yesterday between mccarthy and trump said they didn't talk about selections for the january 6th committee looking into this, we know that mccarthy has been
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involved in the decision-making process there, and the sense on the hill that under no circumstances is he going to select those people without making sure that the former president is on board with what he does here. i would just underscore a couple things. first of all we've learned so much from these accounts but there's also a lot we don't know because we have reporting -- contemporaneous reporting from that day about, for example, the call that we know occurred between the president and kevin mccarthy. there are a lot of questions about what was said there. who else was calling the president? i know democrats are interested in getting copies of the president's phone records, whether that's going to be possible is a different question. democrats are going to meet with the department of justice which has been investing the riot itself to see what evidence they can get their hands on. that will tell us a lot about that day. and just to circle back to mike pence and as he's in in the capitol and there is an angry phone call from pence to the
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white house, he's huddled in this room and the only person that can call off these people is the former president, donald trump. and one of the most evocative pieces of evidence we have for this is, i did an interview with a capitol police officer who was in one of those doorways, who was injured by the mob, had to take several weeks off of work, and he said as he was confronting these rioters who were trying to push past him and get into the capitol. he said, come on, you have to listen to me. and they said back to him, we're here because president trump told us to be here. he's the only one we listen to. we don't listen to the police, we don't listen to lawmakers, we listen to president trump that's why we're here. that shows you the importance of what trump himself was going to say and do on that day. that's why the tweet he sent out seemed so half hearted and people were so disappointed by it because he was the only one that had the power to say i'm
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going to keep mike pence and all these other people safe. that's what the stakes were. >> this really shows what kasie's analysis shows us is the need for robust hearings looking into every aspect of this. i want to focus on what kasie said, trump being the only person who could have called this off, john heileman, it's like so many people who were there and so many people across america, trump is the only person who could inspire them to get the vaccine, and yet he doesn't. and therein lies the cult likeness of the trump following that is such a danger to our democracy. it's not an exaggeration, this is how cult leaders act. >> yes. and i will go back to something willie said a second ago, mika to answer that question and then i want to ask mike schmidt a question.
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willie said the republican party and donald trump were in full denial of what happened on january 6th but cited something much worse, what trump is now doing is something much more insidious and dangerous than being in denial. it was bad enough when trump and others were saying these were all happy rev ellers and it was the atmosphere of a picnic, like trying to memory hole what happened on january 6th even though we all saw it with our eyes or we can watch the reconstruction on video. they're all out there. but they're not trying to whitewash it anymore, trump is trying to turn this into a glorious moment of patriotism. the whole thing of now trying to turn ashley babbit into a martyr
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is much more than that. the memory holder is dangerous to the country when you have tens of millions of republicans who believe the election was illegitimate. but to try to characterize this as a glorious moment is ten times worse and leads me to this question because it connects up to this other, which is at this moment after the election from november 7th through to january 6th, if on this program and other places when people would express the view that we were worried about, what donald trump might be doing at the pentagon with his personnel changes is he going to try to deploy the military for a political purpose, if you said the word coup on "morning joe," the entire republican party would come down on your head and say you are a maniac, who's fantasizing, pair enjoyed, all
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of that, now we have learned that the chairman of the joint chiefs was not just thinking of the possibility of a coup or donald trump trying to seize the military for his personal ends to try to extend his time in office, he was not just thinking those things he was taking action on a daily basis on the presumption that that was where trump was headed. the question i have to ask, it's crazy to even ask now whether republicans have any shame but it is amazing to me that in this moment as mark milley is revealed as having thought these things, done the things he did, along with mike pompeo and others in real time that there is no collective institutional grappling with that reality by republicans. is there not ever going to be a moment where someone on the republican side looks up and says, yeah, you know what, we were wrong and all of you who were most alarmed were, in fact,
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right? >>. >> i don't think so, especially as you pointed out the republican party has continued to follow trump in this direction. there has not been any interspeks and those people who have wanted to look back, the liz cheneys of the world, have been ridiculed and exiled and shunned by the party and the party has continued to move in that direction even as trump has seen his own approval ratings and popularity begin to wain and there's been a disconnect there in terms of why is it that the republican party is continuing to follow him, even if trump's popularity is falling off. and i don't know if there will ever be anything that changes the minds of this part of the bedrock part of the republican party led by leader mccarthy about how they view trump. obviously mccarthy still sees
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him as the gate keeper. they have followed what he wants in regards to this panel, the special committee that has been appointed to look at the events. it seems like they obviously don't want to go along with it and may want to put people on the panel who are going to be obstructionists through the entire thing. i think when you step back from all of it, whether it was the president plotting coups or the president's attempts to undermine the election or the president's attempts to throw sand in the gears of investigations, is that the president was very ham handed in in a lot of what he did. the president knew how to get out the megaphone and yell and say things, but when it came to being a tactician and actually getting down and plotting the coup or truly obstructing justice, he was only so skilled and that prevented him from doing even more damage.
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>> michael schmidt, thank you so much for your reporting this morning. and coming up on "morning joe" -- >> quote our dear friend, former senator and current president joe biden, this is a big effing deal, one of the biggest effing deals that's been passed in decades and decades. >> majority leader, chuck schumer celebrates the expanded tax credit and sets up a new deadline for an infrastructure deal. also ahead. >> they're storing wheelchairs and other equipment in the hallways because there's no place else to put them. every single room in this hospital is full. every one, except for this one. they plan on bringing in someone here from the er any minute now. nope, that's not from months and months ago, that's from yesterday. as we mentioned coronavirus cases are on the rise. gabe gutierrez has a look at one
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hospital in arkansas where doctors are struggling to keep up with the surge in patients. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. atching "mo" we'll be right back. this is cynthia suarez, cfo of go-go foodco., an online food delivery service. business was steady, until... gogo-foodco. go check it out. whaatt?! overnight, users tripled. which meant hiring 20 new employees and buying 20 new laptops. so she used her american express business card, which gives her more membership rewards points on her business purchases. somebody ordered some laptops? cynthia suarez. cfo. mvp. get the card built for business. by american express. usaa is made for the safe pilots. for mac. who can come to a stop with barely a bobble. lucia. who announces her intentions even if no one's there.
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the #1 fastest-growing testosterone brand in america. as we've been discussing this morning, covid cases are rising across the country, hospitals are filling up, including one at little rock, arkansas, gabe gutierrez has the story. >> reporter: in little rock, arkansas, you not only hear but see the surge. >> you hit the floor running and most all of us are working extra hours. >> reporter: this is one of four covid units at the university of arkansas for medical sciences, nurse mary ellen is exhausted.
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>> these patients are sicker. >> reporter: and younger ones, 20 to 40 years old, as well as pregnant women. overall arkansas has seen a 130% jump in cases over the last two weeks. they're storing wheelchairs and other equipment in the hallways because there's no place to put them. every single room in the hospital is full, every single one, except this one, they plan on bringing someone here from the er. >> i'm worried about back to school. >> how much does it frustrate you that the vaccination issue has become politicized. >> it's disheartening. >> reporter: at a vaccine clinic nearby 600 doses are available. only 16 people made appointments. the vaccination rate is about 35%. >> were you skeptical of getting the vaccine? >> yes. >> why is that? >> it was not proven yet. >> tate and his wife did not get
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the shot. in may they all tested positive for covid, tate was hospitalized, so was his wife. >> it turned our world upside down. >> reporter: they were placed in if separate rooms until she was put on a ventilator, all the more terrifying because she was pregnant. >> we lost the baby. her oxygen got too low. >> reporter: his wife survived and now she's in covid. for his wife, the fight is far from over. >> i want people to hear my story so maybe they'll think twice about not getting vaccinated. >> we move east to mississippi the state with the lowest vaccination rate in the country. doctors say vaccines are available but they too are struggling with misinformation. >> sometimes i feel like the voices of science and medicine are drowned out by the, you know, facebook experts.
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but there are many voices out there saying, this is the right thing to do. this is what we need to do. the vaccine is safe. but sometimes i feel like we're outnumbered. >> there's been a sharp increase in children hospitalized with cases, more than half a dozen children are in the icu because of the virus in the state of mississippi two of them had to be put on a ventilator. vaccinations, the lowest rates tied are mississippi and arkansas, the two states we just talked about hovering around 33 to 35%, alabama also in that range. dr. patel said it, if people get vaccinated we avoid scenes like the ones we showed. >> it's a resurgence among the unvaccinated and the patients are younger, sicker and virtually all unvaccinated.
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joining us now is correspondent elson barber, live at the state's only children's hospital in jackson, mississippi. what can you tell us about children who have gotten severely ill from covid? >> when we're talking about children here. when you're looking at numbers in general in this state on the surface they might not seem high. there were 557 new confirmed cases of covid-19 in mississippi yesterday. but it is the rate that theorizing that is really concerning when you look further at the numbers, hospitalizations in this state because of covid-19 have steadily increased since the beginning of this month and in the last week and a half alone, covid patients in icus, that number has nearly doubled. when you look specifically at children, mississippi's top health official had talked about and put out these numbers earlier in the week warning people that the delta variant,
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which makes up about 80% of their cases here, is really serious and impacting children right now and the reason why they're putting out that number is because when you look at the amount of people hospitalized because of covid-19 children are making up a staggering percentage of it compared to last year, that number, seven children in icus because of covid-19 statewide. that means that children currently make up 7% of the covid patients hospitalized in intensive care units because of covid-19. when i spoke to doctors at this hospital, they have five children here right now. they told me that percent increase is what's really troubling because that is not as high of a -- it is higher, rather, a percentage right now of children hospitalized because of covid-19 than they saw at their peak in the summer last year. guys? >> i recognize that people don't like being told what to do, but we also, as a society are told
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what to do for a lot of things. we pay taxes we have to get vaccines before we go to school. we have to get car tags. so there are a lot of things that we're used to doing because we know we have to do. and this to me is more about responsibility for society. >> we've certainly seen complications of covid-19 and very critical children with covid-19 and very critical young adults and late teens with covid-19 and people who have died who would have been, you know, well if they had not gotten it. it's a very preventable disease with this vaccine. >> and elson, these are great interviews and framing the point that a lot of people, public health experts, are trying to make at this point. we've been doing vaccines for 70 years. and i just wonder, what are you hearing about what's behind this severe hesitancy? hesitancy that's leading to a
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pandemic among the unvaccinated in this country? >> i have spoken in the last couple of weeks to people who are unvaccinated in mississippi and also in alabama. i actually went in alabama to the county that is the least vaccinated in the state and the range of answers we heard for why people weren't getting vaccinated ranged from conspiracy theories to skepticism. here what i hear from doctors, particularly in this state is that they really do feel like, you heard dr. woodward say it in the beginning of the segment, that they are competing against facebook posts and they can't match that rate as much as they try of misinformation and a lot of people, for whatever reason, are choosing to rely on that they see on facebook instead of the doctors here. one of the doctors told me it's so frustrating because people trust them to give advice for their children, to get vaccines,
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treat cancer, whatever, but on this cher choosing to trust facebook posts instead of the doctors who are saying we need you to get vaccinated in order to save lives to keep our hospitals at a capacity level that we can treat anything that people might need cared for. and they keep running into a wall again and again. the i ask them, is there anything you need from the federal government? they said the issue is vaccines are widely available, they can get them, but people are not doing it. they are begging people to do something and do something now. because with the delta variant, we're in a position where the vaccines actually deal with the variant but the more it spreads, the more variant we get and the vaccines we have now may not work down the road. mika? >> thank you so much. and we will speak with the u.s. surgeon general just ahead. "morning joe" is coming right
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back. these are mississippians we live here, love the state. our families are here and they are saying please get vaccinated and it is like we are yelling into a void. they trust us for so many things, but there is just this big disconnect and blind spot around the vaccine that, to me, i cannot reconcile rational thought with that. subway has so much new, i couldn't fit it all in the last ad... refresh yep, so let me finish this. there's new hickory-smoked bacon, fresh mozzarella, smashed avocado... you know what, there's a lot! but it all makes a better footlong. can i get a word, in? sure, take the tagline. because you gotta... ...you gotta refresh to be fresh. it's the eat fresh refresh at subway. and they're refreshing everything from how they make it, to how they bake it, to how they bring it to you.
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welcome back to "morning joe," millions of parents are receiving their first monthly check from the government. president biden hailing the one year expanded child tax credit as a major step toward ending
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child poverty in america. here's peter alexander. >> reporter: badly needed relief for sasha, the single mother of three, was laid off while she was hospitalized with covid this spring. >> what does that money mean to you and your family? >> it means a lot. i've always lived paycheck to paycheck, so it will continue to be helpful and keep us going. >> reporter: the payments begin showing up in checking accounts today, up to $300 a month for each child 5 and under, $250 each month for children 6 to 17. it applies to single parents earning as much as $112,000 a year and couples making $150,000. families that doesn't make enough to file taxes can register to receive the check. >> it's the right thing to do. >> reporter: it expands on the existing child tax credit.
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some republicans have criticized the program as welfare because it removes work requirements to receive the money. sasha said she hopes they make the one year program permanent. >> we have billionaires going to space but we have people down here trying to make ends meet. >> all right. kasie hunt, i want to ask you about these payments, a tax credit as it's called. compared to everything else that the democrats are trying to push through at this point. how is it working with the bipartisan efforts that are under way and our democrats and republicans able to agree to disagree on some of these measures? >> what's different about this is, it's a credit, yes. but it's sent in advance. instead of being another line item on your tax return it's showing up as money in people's bank accounts right now. that's a really important difference because people are going to see it and understand something about these complicated policy questions
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that we're always talking about. this has been something that republicans and democrats have in the past been willing to agree on. a lot of republicans support an expanded child tax credit. but, of course, actually making this something that happens again and again is going to be tricky. reporter for "the washington post" eugene scott joins us now. this is going to be a key part of what the democrats are going to try to do in their major reconciliation plan, they want to extend the child tax credit and make it work in this different way. it is really hard to see any way in which this is not just a pure political win, especially for a white house that campaigned on this kind of policy change and is now going to likely see potentially benefits from the independent swing voters they're going to need to hang on to. and that is focussing on the politics, not even the policy that is going to help so many families.
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>> and there is going to be popular because there are going to be people receiving the tax credits on both sides of the aisle. the reality is poff erty and eliminating it for children is something that is winsome to voters regardless of their political persuasion. i was interviewing educating yesterdays about the biden administration making a correlation about child hunger and students performing academically and so adjusting to the mental health challenges, the poverty challenges, child hunger are all of these things that the biden administration say they're trying to pay attention to with the hope of winning support from people across the political spectrum. >> john heileman, as we talk about this massive legislation, we're just casually throwing around trillion dollar figures and with we talk about infrastructure, 3.5 trillion,
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the bipartisan bill you get over $4 trillion, and you have voting rights and joe manchin is at the center of it and talk about whether or not the filibuster is going to stay in place he's been clear along with senator kyrsten sinema, they don't want to remove the filibuster which leaves democrats wondering how they get all this stuff through. >> it's a big sprawling thing, willy and there's been some indication on manchin's part, he's not going to get rid of the filibuster, but is there an openness to a filibuster reform, bring back the talking filibuster. but i think the macro picture here is the sweeping ambition of joe biden, democrats who see a lot of need in the country, also see an opportunity to have unified control, however narrow the 50/50 senate, the small majority in the house and a very
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limited amount of time to have it, you're going to be headed into midterm campaigning just a few months from now, you're looking down the path here, you have a few months between now and the end of this year and early next year to try to do all the things you just talked about and the appetite for it on the democratic side are very high but the days are limited and the hurdles are high. so we're going to see, it's really going to be crunch time. the fact that they're working this much of the summer tells you about it, we're going to see a high degree of difficulty and a lot of pressure and intensity on capitol hill over the course of the months to come. once you turn the corner into 2022, it's going to quickly become all politics all the time. >> another story we've been following all week is the democratic lawmakers that left the state of texas in order not to have a vote on voting rights
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laws that tend to be extreme. and eugene scott, i'm wondering, some of those democrats met with joe manchin yesterday. where does he stand on this? what is his role? and what's next for these democratic lawmakers who literally left the state so there is no quorum. >> as you know these lawmakers were hoping the senator would support federal voting legislation that could make what republicans in the state of texas are trying to do obsolete. manchin made it clear he wanted to hear them out but given no suggestion he's going to change what he believes his constituents want him to do when it comes to voting rights. and that is not, you know, protest the filibuster. and i'm not surprised to hear that given what he has written in "the washington post," and said repeatedly in interviews up until this point. he is very aware that, you know, many of the people who support him are conservatives and do not
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support what he believes to be an extreme and too liberal approach to voting rights. so regardless of what those in texas say and those outside of his state say, his priority is going to continue to be those people that elected him. >> all right. eugene scott from "the washington post," thank you very much. john heileman, thank you as well. it is just approaching the top of the hour right here on "morning joe," and we want to turn back to the revelations that we're learning from the upcoming book and carol lenning and phillip rucker. the book is entitled "i alone can fix it" which is a quote from trump. and we'll be speaking with vivek murthy about the vaccination and the disinformation being spread out there, a lot through trump followers, trump supporters who believe the former president in
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the big lie and also somehow their vaccine hesitancy is tied to trump, even though trump got the vaccine. we'll be talking about all of that, also some stunning new revelations from the book, the excerpt that we're going to be talking about coming up is exclusive to "morning joe" and they describe former new jersey governor chris christie's relationship with rudy giuliani. on november 22nd, chris christie said on television what many in trump world had been saying privately appearing that sunday on abc's "this week," the long time trump confidant sized up the president's representation. if you've got the evidence of fraud, present it. and what's happened here is quite frankly, the president's legal team has been a national embarrassment. christy calling trump's lawyers
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an embarrassment. giuliani had been close with chris christie for decades, feeling missed off, if he'd been stabbed in in the back he called him, what are you doing? you need to stop. giuliani admonished christie and said he would be embarrassed once he saw all the evidence the trump team had compiled. well if you want us to fight with you, arm us with the facts. let me tell you something, when i was a u.s. attorney and you were u.s. attorney, if an assistant u.s. attorney came to us with this crock of you know what we would have kicked them out of our offices. so act like you're a u.s. attorney again not like you're a lawyer for donald trump. the two men ended the call on
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bitter terms. it was a casualty of trump's quest to remain power. a giuliani spokesperson said this conversation never happened. let's bring in claire mccaskill and eugene robinson and donny deutsch. and kasie hunt is still with us as well. for like 1 hour and 45 minutes, i can't even believe it. we'll talk about that coming up. it's just unspeakable. claire, your reaction to the revelations in the book about the rift that developed between chris christie and rudy giuliani. >> if this special committee does anything, it should take the american people inside of that small dining room and -- to
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orient people as to where this is, you basically walk in the oval office and there's a hallway to your right, you go down a very short hallway and at the end of that hallway is a small dining room. donald trump tricked out that dining room with a bunch of tvs. this was his little cave where he would watch, mostly on an endless loop, cable news that was good for him. the propaganda stations pushing his stuff. i want the american people to get inside that room and realize what was going on in this guy's head. and this is what this book begins to lay out for us. that is, that he was in that room and he was tickled pink. he thought this was terrific. that these people were mobbing our nation's capitol and he refused, for a long time, to exercise the power that he alone had and that was to stop the
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violence against law enforcement in our nation's capitol and the threats against his own vice president. that was the most stunning fact that we all have to circle back to over and over and over again. >> and gene, he sat there and watched, didn't call his vice president, as the crowds went through the capitol saying hang mike pence. as we get these excerpts out from phil and carol's book, it puts flesh on the bones of a lot of things we already knew. donald trump tweeted about mike pence at 2:24 in the afternoon on january 6th saying he didn't have the courage to stand up and do what was right. this takes us inside the room, puts in vivid detail some of the things we knew. when you think about what we knew about chairman milley, it's worth thinking that the chairman of the joint chief of staff thought a coup was in question and gathered leaders of the
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military, law enforcement, said we are the guys with the guns, we're the military, fbi, cia, we have to put a ring of steel around this city and stop what he called the nazi's from coming in. these are the details that maybe you would think would give a republican or two even pause about what happened that day. >> you would think so. first of all, yes it's worth stopping to look at that, right. it's worth stopping to look at the fact that the chairman of the joint chiefs wanted to put a ring of steel around washington so the nazi's went get in. but he went for the nazi analogy in the middle of this, which you never do. that's a break glass in emergency sort of formulation that he was using. clearly, he was frightened and exercised and determined about this moment and saw the importance and the danger of
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this moment that the president was creating. the excerpts of this book that have been published in the post and that you've had on "morning joe" are just stunning. yes, we kind of knew it, but to get inside the room and to read this detail of how close we came, how close we came to a rob porter -- how close we came to a rupture of our democracy and how completely -- not -- callous isn't the word. how the president was not just cheering this on, but leading this on in order to cling to power. this is the sort of thing that happens -- used to happen in banana republic. this is the sort of thing that
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that doesn't happen in the world's greatest democracy, yet it happened on january 6th. so yeah, we should stop and we should look at this and we should keep looking at it and make sure that nothing like this ever, ever happens again. >> so donny deutsch on the question of general milley and what was going through his mind. you're our resident branding expert, and the reports have said that the turning point for general milley was really that photo op where he was sort of swept up, according to his account, into the president crossing lafayette square after protesters had been cleared, he's wearing a military uniform and that he recognized just how problematic that image was in terms of protecting the military standing and sending a message that, you know, the country was being governed appropriately and
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what is the appropriate role of the military there. explain the impact of an image like that and how it connects with all of the rest of what we're learning now, because milley is clearly talking to all of these authors because he wants to set the record straight. >> yeah. it took milley a day or two then he realized and came out and apologized. look, what's frightening as these books come out is how close we were, and had there been somebody else different in milley's seat or somebody else different in brad raffensperger's seat -- obviously i'm going to a different place now, but how with four or five individuals in places of power influence how this coup would have and could have taken place. that's the frightening thing we were a few people away from going over the edge. the other thing is with all these books coming out, is this changing one voter's opinion of these people cpac still giving
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trump 70% in the straw poll, the trump devotees. is any of this swaying one person? my cynical gut tells me no. i'm going to go to one thing i read yesterday in a poll, seems unrelated but one of the most stunning things i read. in a poll they asked 66% of southern republicans given the choice was succeed from the union, if you could be a bunch of states in the south and not part of the country, would you agree? two out of three said yeah. that's kind of the underpinning here as we sit aghast of all of this, that there's a chunk of this country that wants to take our democracy apart that doesn't believe the basic tenants of things going on. so as we sit here, bow our heads, make references back to
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nazi germany. there's a chunk of the country going this sounds about right to me. >> to your point there's a chunk of this country that won't get the vaccine because of donald trump. >> same thing. >> that are choosing to risk their lives and there are people dying now because they're unvaccinated because they refuse to take the vaccine. it's there, it's available, it's five minutes of most americans. there are maces sitting there waiting to use the vaccine and they're going bad because people won't get them. and there's a chunk of this country that denies science and flouts public health in the name of donald trump. that's a cult. another excerpt from the book exclusive to us this morning, this one details former attorney general bill barr's realization that president trump would probably lose the 2020 election, quote, as spring of 20 2020 wore on, barr came to believe that president trump was squandering
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his hopes for re-election. it felt all too familiar. he had experienced this same premonition of an election slipping away when he had been attorney general in the final year of george h.w. bush's presidency. barr scheduled a meeting with trump in the oval office just two of them alone. he wanted a truly private conversation. i feel you are going to lose the election barr said. i feel you are actually losing touch with your own base. barr explained that in his travels around the country he talked to a lot of people in law enforcement and other solid trump supporters who were uncomfortable with the president's focus on skewing his conceived enemies rather than plans to navigate through the pandemic. >> the quote goes on, the only reason you won them last time mr. president is because of the grab them by the p comment.
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barr said. it actually scared you enough to listen to kellyanne, you behaved yourself and won by a hair. this time it's different. you can't wait until the end. i feel a sense of deja vu, i think you're going to lose this election. if you wanted to, you could walk into a second term, covid and all. you can be an amazing second term president but it's up to you. the book reports trump was oddly silent not interrupting or trying to regain the floor as he usually did. he did not ask any questions, he did not push back. now as barr's spiel came to an end, trump nodded and said he appreciated the advice. barr left hopeful the president had taken his message to heart but he could not be sure. claire there is undoubtedly some reputation laundering going on here on the part of former attorney general bill barr with
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this book and other comments he made that he wanted to get out there he thought the claims of election fraud were untrue and he made that known at the time, but what do you make about this push and pull? the one thing that stands out to me is you're losing your base, that's untrue, donald trump still got 74 million votes in that election. >> here's what i have to say about bill barr. i'm glad he talked to the authors of this book. but this is not going to work for him. he was a hack attorney general. he was an attorney general that gave a short shift to the rule of law and to the norms that this country expects when it comes to celebration of politics and the department of justice. he did this president's bidding in unspeakable ways. and if you don't believe me, you ask the prosecutors in the department of justice.
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you ask the people who were undercut by bill barr when he did ridiculous things like trying to undo a guilty plea of one of trump's henchmen. so i really have little patience for bill barr. if he wants to do the country a favor, he needs to come out of the shadows, he needs to do a full-blown interview and take some of the questions why in the world he would reverse a guilty plea of a criminal and do this president's bidding. he walked away at the end, i'm sorry it doesn't do any good for me. i could careless he walked away at the end. what a jerk. >> you really crystallized it there. thank you. still ahead on "morning joe," u.s. surgeon general, dr. vivek murthy is standing by. he joins us on the heels of his new warning about the spread of false information when it comes
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to the coronavirus. speaking of misinformation, florida governor ron desantis has a new fund-raising effort after mocking dr. fauci. plus a new treatment for alzheimer's hits a major roadblock. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. watching "" we'll be right back. that's why td ameritrade designed a first-of-its-kind, personalized education center. oh. their award-winning content is tailored to fit your investing goals and interests. and it learns with you, so as you become smarter, so do its recommendations. so it's like my streaming service. well except now you're binge learning. see how you can become a smarter investor with a personalized education from td ameritrade. visit tdameritrade.com/learn ♪
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the opening ceremony for the summer olympic games in tokyo is one week from today. but one member of team usa will not be competing because of covid and cases across japan continue to rise. tom yamas has the latest from tokyo. >> three to shoot, bradley beal. >> reporter: he was hoping to help team usa win a fourth gold medal but u.s. basketball announcing bradley beal will miss the olympics after being placed in covid protocols.
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>> he was playing very well. there's no next bradley beal. >> his teammate jeremy grant now in the protocols as well. over the last week they played teams from three different countries in las vegas. while here in tokyo covid cases are at a six-month high. organizers saying another olympian has tested positive. the ioc president telling me safety is their number one priority. >> we want to organize the olympic games but we want to organize it in a safe and secure way for everybody. >> reporter: athletes are flying in from around the world. simone biles and the women's ja gymnastics team the latest to arrive. >> i've never competed without a crowd, my family there but i know they'll be there in spirit. nfl network host rich eisen
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has contracted covid even after he was vaccinated. he posted about his situation writing every health care professional i've come across in the last few days tell me the two shots i got of pfizer in february is what's keeping a 52-year-old like me from a far worse experience than the one i'm having. he urged those vaccinate to be careful and those who aren't, quote, don't wait another second to be vaccinated. rich eisen one of the most prominent sports anchors in the country. a great guy. issuing a warning, he's been vaccinated, he got it. but the reason he's not worse is because of that vaccine. >> we're at the point of begging people to get vaccinated. it's for all of our health. florida governor ron desantis is fund-raising off of a wave of criticism he has received for selling t-shirts and hats that
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mock white house chief medical adviser dr. anthony fauci. in an email to supporters, desantis said the media attacked him for having the backbone to call fauci out. adding he refused to follow an unelected career bureaucrat like fauci. desantis is selling merchandise like this tv, don't fauci my florida, even as the state sees one of the highest coronavirus spikes in the country. eugene robinson, this is again government officials, elected officials, banking on, fund-raising off of misinformation. trying to undermine dr. anthony fauci. >> yeah, i mean, i know probably can't be because of the constitution but it ought to be criminal. he is endangering people's lives. he will cost people their lives.
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and, you know, we -- the frustrating thing, the crazy thing is that these vaccines, of course, were developed under operation warp speed which was the trump administration's initiative, they developed and bougt out the vaccines. you would think that trump world would embrace this and think that perhaps the former president would actually give a boost to the vaccines by telling his people, no, please take the vaccines, stay healthy. but he won't do it. and as a result we can slip back, los angeles just -- los angeles county just reimposed an indoor mask mandate because of the rising number of cases. this is not necessarily a one-way road out of this.
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and we can go back in the other direction if -- the crazy thing is that if people get vaccinated we won't. we will get out of it. it's inexplicable and tragic because people are dying now. >> medical officials are telling us this is a pandemic among the unvaccinated part of our population. the u.s. surgeon general joins us next. general joins us next.
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today we liv in a world where misinformation poses an imminent and insidious threat to our nation's health. modern technology companies have enabled people to poison our environment with little accountability to our users. they allowed users who spread misinformation to have
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extraordinary reach. they've designed product features such as like buttons that reward us for sharing emotionally charged content not accurate content and their algorithms give us more of what we click on pulling us deeper and deeper into a well of misinformation. on a personal note it's painful to know that every death we see now from covid-19 could have been presented. i say that as a person who lost 10 family members from covid and wishes each and every day they had the opportunity to get vaccinated. >> that's chilling, every death we're seeing from covid-19 could have been prevented. that's the surgeon general dr. vivek murthy yesterday declaring the rise of misinformation online an urgent threat. i want to show you a sound bite of luann woodward of the university of mississippi
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medical center. mississippi has children in icu. some on life support from covid. and the patients are reportedly younger and they're sicker and they're dying, and the u.s. surgeon general says these are all preventable deaths. think about that's where we are right now. but here she is, luann woodward, talking about science and her word as a medical professional being drowned out by facebook. >> sometimes i feel like the voices of science and medicine are drowned out by the, you know, facebook experts. but there are many voices out there saying this is the right thing to do. this is what we need to do. the vaccine is safe. but sometimes i feel like we're outnumbered. these are mississippians we are
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here, we love the state, our families are here, they're saying please get vaccinated and it's like we are yelling into a void. they trust us for so many things but there is just this big disconnect and blind spot around the vaccine that to me i cannot reconcile rational thought with that. >> this is a frightening moment in our country's history and the u.s. surgeon general dr. vivek murthy joins us now. i heard you loud and clear trying to get the word out and i know that as the u.s. surgeon general you don't want to get involved in politics. politics aside, it's about facts and it's about public health and about getting the word, the right information to the american people, but i do have to ask you this, if donald trump held a press conference and it was covered wildly across all -- widely across all networks and
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all media platforms and he begged the american people, all of the american people to get the vaccine, he showed a picture of himself getting the vaccine, and he said, don't believe what you hear on facebook, could he turn this resurgence among the unvaccinated around, do you think? what are you hearing? >> well, mika, i'm very concerned about the misinformation that's out there. i think it's preventing people from getting vaccinated right now, certainly prevented people from wearing masks. i think what all of us have an obligation to do regardless of the size of our platform whether we have millions of people who follow us or a few people, we have a responsibility now to help people access accurate information. we know there are two thirds of people unvaccinated right now who are saying they believe common myths about covid-19 or think they might be true. we have to reach out to the people who trust us, family
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friends, or followings if we had larger number of folks to follow us we have to let them know that vaccines are safe and effective, they save many people's lives, right now with covid we are seeing the surges of infections take place among those taking place in those who are unvaccinated. this is a tragedy, really. because every one of these deaths is one that may have been avoided if people would have been vaccinated. a year ago we didn't have a vaccine, we were seeing people die and we didn't know how to stop that. now we do know how to stop it. and it breaks my heart that we can't get accurate information to people so they can get the vaccine. >> but beyond it breaking your heart and i -- and mine, too, actually, it's just painful to see so many people so misled to the point where this pandemic can rip through their families and take people away from them, but you mentioned reaching out
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to people who trust us. the problem is, they don't trust you. the problem is, they believe what you say is fake news and they read facebook or listen to someone who listened to donald trump once and they don't believe you. what is the administration doing to stop disinformation and save the health of the american people? >> well, there are a number of steps that we've been taking and more that we'll continue to take. but i'll tell you a few. one is, we recognize that we're a big country, not everyone trusts the same people or same news sources. what we have to do is work in supporting a number of trusted messengers and communities, we have to get messages out. that's one of the reasons we're working closely with faith leaders, local doctors and nurses. 80% say they want to talk to their local doctor or nurse before they make a decision
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about the vaccine. sometimes it a not what i say as surgeon general it's what i can do to support people in local communities. the other thing we're doing, we've been in conversation with technology companies, we're going to ratchet up those engagements more but we believe technology companies have a responsibility to reduce the spread of misinformation on their platforms. it's not enough to say this might get better in a few years. right now the misinformation is harming people's health. if you run a platform, have a technology company that is somehow inadvertently or contributing to the spread of misinformation you have a responsibility to take action to stop it. the tech companies have taken some steps forward and i appreciate that, but there's so much more they have to do and they have to do it with greater urgency because we are seeing people. we are seeing people lose their lives because of misinformation. >> i can hear the frustration in your voice, doctor, and i
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understand it because what we had in this country is a medical miracle, the combination of government, pharmaceutical companies, doctors and scientists getting together to bring us this miracle vaccine that can stop covid-19 in its tracks and now here you are bumping up against facebook posts that are stopping people from getting it. as you talk about trusted partners i'm thinking alabama where you had nick saban, the head coach of the university of alabama, more important than the governor of that state. senator tommy tubberville has spoken out. charles barkley, a huge figure in that state they've all done psas to say get vaccinated and yet the rate hovers in the low 30s. how do you break through that? are you in a position to break through that and let people know just how important this is and just how deadly their action or
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inaction is? >> well, willie, i think that this is a very complicated and challenging problem. we are at the hard part of the vaccination campaign and unfortunately misinformation has been circulating for a long time and it's now deeply embedded in many people's minds. here's what we do know, vaccine confidence in our country is at its highest point in the last year and a half and certainly since we got the vaccine available in december. we also know when people make decisions about getting the vaccine it's based on people they know and trust in their lives. yes, people have heard of celebrities, they see folks on tv all the time. the people they trust are often their doctors, people who provide them health care, family and friends and that method of getting information out to people, relying on family, friends, local doctors and nurses, it takes time but thags the effort we are engaged in right now. my hope is people see that covid
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is not over as they see ininfection rates rising. and i hope they'll take a second look at the vaccine and realize this is still our best pathway out of this pandemic. >> doctor, it's kasie hunt. my question for you is whether the administration waited too long to start getting these shots to local doctors' offices. you were pursuing for a while a max vaccination strategy which made sense when our supplies were short but it's recently suddenly you could get it at our your doctor's office instead of a public area or cvs and there's resistance to allow people to get the vaccine in private. do you think you should have under taken that earlier to make it more available to people in their primary physician's offices sooner?
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>> it's a good question. because a lot of people do want to get the vaccine from their doctor. from the beginning we knew this was going to be an important channel. we knew that primary care doctors were going to be critical. in the beginning there was a limited supply and the most efficient way to get the vaccine out to the most number of people was to set up these large vaccination sites in collaboration with local and state government and community organizations. but as the supply increased we began urging states to get the vaccine into doctors' offices. we've already had thousands and thousands of doctors' offices which have gotten the vaccine which are administering the vaccine each and every day to their patient and that will only increase. we'll keep working hard to make sure the doctors' offices have access to the vaccine. it has been a priority since day one, unfortunately supply limited the ability to distribute to as many offices as
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we wanted. u.s. surgeon general dr. vivek murthy thank you very much for being on the show this morning. donny deutsch i would like to ask you the same question i asked the surgeon general. is it too late, or if donald trump held a press conference, a big event, it'll be huge, and urged the american people to get the vaccine, implored them passionately, showed a picture of himself getting it and supported vaccination across the country, could he alone fix this? >> he certainly could but that's not going to happen. i'll tell you something that should happen and the doctor just touched on this a little bit when he talked about social media and facebook. half the people in this country get their news from facebook. i'm going to say it again, half the people. facebook, market capitalization is in the trillions. how dare mark zuckerberg and cheryl sandberg allow this to continue to happen on their platform. take a billion bucks, a tiny fraction, and say we are going
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to do an immediate task force and clean up our platform. they have blood on their hands. i'm going to say it again. we have a very isolated situation where half of all of this problem is getting their news from one place and we still allow this place to put out misinformation. we can stop it. that is a tactical thing that can happen. and the government should be all over them. how dare they still allow this to happen. you want one -- i don't care. you're putting up their response, i don't care what their response is. they can do more. they're in the trillions. and shame on them. they have blood on their hands. specifically, call out two people, mark zuckerberg, cheryl sandberg you run the company. if i'm mark zuckerberg and i'm worth $100 billion, i don't know i might go into my pocket a little bit if i can save lives. shame on you. >> i stand with you on that, donny. mark zuckerberg and cheryl sandberg, they have been saying
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for a decade we're going to get better. we're going to fix this. they call us and do behind the scenes phone calls saying don't worry we're going to get better. it's going to be okay. no. it's not okay. look at our country and look at the disinformation spewing through facebook and what it has done. it has warped the minds of americans who eat this stuff up as news. and you're not news. you're facebook. with blood on your hands. coming up, as the debate over the election laws heats up on capitol hill, we'll hear from members of the martin luther king family on the push to pass federal protections for voting rights. plus, president biden hosts german chancellor angela merkel at the white house. but the visit came amid catastrophic flooding in germany. we'll be right back. flooding in germany. we'll be right back.
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welcome back to "morning joe." president biden bid farewell in person to german chancellor angela merkel yet before she steps down in september. >> chancellor merkel has been here frequently over the past 16 years. she knows the oval office as well as i do. madame chancellor, i know that the partnership between germany and the united states will continue to grow stronger on the foundation that you have helped to build. on a personal note, i must tell you, i'll miss seeing you at our summits. i truly will. >> the relationship between president biden and chancellor merkel a stark contrast from her relationship with former president donald trump. merkel famously was photographed standing over trump who had his arms crossed at the g 7 summit
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in 2018 and this moment in 2017 when the former president appeared to snub the german chancellor after reporters asked about a hand shake between the two leaders. when asked yesterday to compare her relationship with the two presidents, chancellor smiled and said, quote, today was a very friendly exchange. mika? at least 110 people have died in devastating floods across germany and belgium. the search is under way for those still unaccounted for. local authorities in this belgium this morning, the flash floods followed days of heavy rainfall which turned streams and streets into raging torrents that swept away cars and caused houses to collapse. willie? violent protests continue in south africa following the arrest of former president,
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jacobzuma. allegations of corruption were investigated after he left office and he refused to testify. he faced 15 months in prison for contempt of court. south africa's army began deploying 25,000 troops thursday to assist police. g 25,000 troopy to assist police more than 2,000 people have been arrested. supreme court justice steven breyer is in no rush to retire. when asked directly in an interview with cnn whether to step down. he said, no it was his first comments amid speculation whether he'd retire while democrats cold the nom nags
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process. he wouldn't ask questions about the timing to leave the court. he said the primary factor would be his health. he then spoke openly about his satisfaction in leading the court's left wing since the death of justice ruth bader ginsberg saying his new seniority in the justices private discussions has made a difference to me. it is fought a fight. ness not sarcasm. it is deliberation. justice brier was appointed in 1994 by president bill clinton and will be 83 next month. claire miscass sell, your take? >> reporter: well, the supreme court is an insular place and this is not an institution that has a lot of circulation of different kind of opinions or political takes. you know, it is most of their clerks come from a handful of schools.
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most of the justices come from a handful of schools. it's not healthy that justice brier probably doesn't understand that this is bigger thans him. i think if sandra day o'connor had an honest and open discussion, she would regret when she retired in lew of citizens united and what happened. on the other hand, what we've seen with supreme court nominations is that the republican party will do whatever it has to do, including, you know, really just ignoring the constitution if they have to, to stack the court. so it's disappointing in a way that it appears that justice briar is looking at this decision that's personal to him instead of for the country. >> a maricopa judge rejected an attempt by state senators to
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keep documents relating to the 2020 audit private. the state senate was ordered yesterday to release the records of the private companies conducting the controversial review. the firm hired to supervisors the audit cyber ninjas is run by a pro-trump executive that tweeted arizona voting machines were rigged. after yesterday's ruling, the company now has two weeks to turn over almost all documents related to the audit. that ruling came one day after an investigation was photoed into theas recount. casey, your take on this and sixes similar across the country. >> reporter: well, as we have talked aboutwe at length here. i think first of all put audit if quotes. thisif is aimed at continuing t undermine american's faith in their elections results. and that is an insidious
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problematic reality that is going to lead us to more events akin to january 6th. too is the big picture here is that there are more and more people quebec our elections and the results are legitimates. if wee don't have that buy-in from people our democracy on incredibly shaky grounds, whether it's the state lawmakers or officials are playing a role and are a part of that. this is the thing that i just struggled to get my head around in terms of what we do about it. i talked to someone like atam kinzinger, leaders have to leave, talk to their constituents, say what's true, insist, on it. he also says that it's hard to get people to believe him. obviously, there are very few republicans willing to stands up and says to people who vote republican that, in fact, donald trump lost the election. i mean, that's why when you run
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down the w hallways, sometimes u can't get them to say it. it's remarkable. i think it's incredibly important to cover the gravity of what's going on here e. we can't make fune of it. there are people that mocked it. i understand edwhy. at the end of the day, this is critical and important and a very disturbing trend. >>ve you know, donny, as a branding expert, i am curious, we saw a massive change in sort of donald trump's ecochamber becoming smaller, much smaller, when he was kicked off twitter. i mean he does these press releases. they just gone get turned over as much and seen, nobody sees. they don't really hear him. so,ll it's just much smaller. so my question to you is if facebook was shut down today and did not consist, was taken off,
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wiped off the face of the earth, how much impact would it have on situations like what we areit seeing if arizona and the spreading of the big lie and the leaders in washington who can't bow to a corrupt politician? >> reporter: it's the same tipping as the vaccine. we got in a room, let's solve this problem.t' okay. we have p this misinformation about the vaccine. misinformation about the election.ut 50% of it is coming from one place. it's not brain surgery kids, i'm going to say zuckerberg and sandberg haul them every day into congress.l this is d a targeted, unique situation. it's not like there's millions of people on the streets, how do we contain a million people? it's one voice selling half of this scrowd. voice that o a happens to be one of the richest companies in the e world. let's doie that math again. richest company in the world, responsible for half of the
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misinformation out there. i don't know. o something's got to be done there. once again, screw to you guys, shame un. i wisham every day every newscaster kept calls those two individual names out, each worth billions, responsible for spreading not 5%, not 10%, 50% of the misinformation. the solution is clear. period. >> amen. still ahead, new excerpts from the bombshell book by two renowned washington post reporters detailing the final days of theth trump administration. plus, the nation's largest county, los angeles is issuing a new indoor mask mandate as cases rise again across the country. and congresswoman mikey sherrill will join us as democrats set an ambitious new timeline for getting infrastructure passed. "morning joe" isfr coming right back.
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. it's painful for me to know that nearly every death we are seeing now from covid-19 could have been prevented. i say that as someone who has lost ten family members to covid-19 and who wishes each and every day that they had had the opportunity to get advantages
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vaccinated. >> over the last many months, we have learned a lot about covid-19, including how to stop it. yet the virus is rearing up again in dangerous ways as vaccinations lag and disinformation spreads. plus, health officials are warning of a surge in the delta variant. it's landed several children in the icu, some on life support. als, an exclusive excerpt from that bombshell book by a pair of renowned washington post reporters, how bill barr reportedly stunned donald trump into silence. think about that. with his warning about the 2020 election. willie, let's begin on the latest on the coronavirus. >> reporter: yeah, there are growing fears of a few covid wave as cases climb and vaccination rates plateau. now the nation's largest county, los angeles, is turning down the pandemic clock issuing a new indoor macmandate. miguel almaguer as the latest.
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>> reporter: los angeles, the nation's largest county taking a step back, requiring masks indoors even for the vaccinated affected sunday, impacting 10 million people here, breaking with cdc guidance, it's a clear signal concern is growing over the highly contagious delta variant. meantime for some of the 48 million children under 12 ander that their parents, a longer wait. the fda will review several additional months of safety data, meaning the vaccine for kids won't likely be available until early next year. >> it makes it a very stressful time to be a parent, an educator and a child. all schools really should have very strong contingency plans. one of the metrics by which we go back to verytual learning? what will we do to keep parents and staff safe. >> reporter: less than 2% have been hospitalized.
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only a small fraction have died. now our nation is bracing for a tidal wave of if you infection option as experts fear new flooded covid cases is beginning to grip the country. >> we've exceeded last year's peak. >> reporter: while outbreaks were expected in unvaccinated pockets of the nation, 98 million are still fought inoculated. 40 states are seeing a rise if infections. at yankee stadium, positive covid tests forced the game against the red sox to be postponed. the delta variant a serious risk. >> it will find those pockets in each community where people aren't vaccinated and will do a lot of damage. >> reporter: that damage, for including the youngest americans, the worst may still be the calm. miguel almaguer, nbc news. >> we should point out cdc
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director dr. alinski. let's bring in dr. patel, a former obama white house policy director and msnbc medical contributor. it's good to see you. it's gut wrenching, obviously, everything we have gone through the work to get under the circumstances to this place. how do we change this trajectory we appear to be on right now? >> yeah, willie, one word, vaccination. i think it's incredibly clear the vaccines we have are effective. what we are trying to do, i won't call it herd immunity. we are trying to reach a goal where the majority of pooem people, fought 100%. we will have kids that can't get them for different reasons, where the majority gets vaccinated. they protect the unvaccinateed.n we will continue to see these rolling waves throughout the country in various pockets,
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larger footballs in some areas, but don't think just because you live in a part of connecticut, vermont, or another area of the country, southern california, where you have an area that's highly vaccinated that people who are fought vaccinated are still not susceptible. let me say it another way. everybody is vulnerable at some point. i will just take a difference with the cdc director. obviously, she is much more ahead in the data than i am. but will is no harm talking about he-risk settings, where indoors, multiple people not vaccinated might gather with vaccinated people and having everyone follow the same rules. because what we are seeing right now, willie, is that people aren't doing it. we're kind of trusting everyone and i don't see a reason to do that. do you think, dr. patel, that los angeles county is the leading indicator of where places across the country may be
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headed? we know about the states with low vaccination race. many across the south. you mentioned the ones that have done well, connecticut, northeast, new york, massachusetts, maine, up through the new england area. are those places susceptible now to rollbacks in terms of the kinds of restrictions we might see? >> they r. let me just say, even more than los angeles county, by the way, i do praise the public health official there is for sticking their knicks out on the lines. they're not popular people these days. we can look to other countries, israel, parts of what the uk had to do ignore what boris johnson said, look apt what officials are doing on the ground, australia, parts of the eu they are what we call canaries in the coal mine. they have put back indoor masks. it's simply for this reason. vaccines protect us. they protect us from hospitalization and death as we have said. unvaccinated people with a variant, willie, that is no, that we don't understand, it's
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highly transmissible, highly infections, minutes to give it to each other. what is the harm to wear masks indoors? why are we taking a risk we don't need to take. we have a simple preventative measure for now until we get more people vaccinated. that's really the bottom line. >> so dr. patel, given what you just said and the simplicity of it. science is about facts. but health about communication. and is about helping a population understand what's best for them to live long, healthy lives. what is happening here? what is the predominant reason people are not getting vaccinated? what are you hearing? >> yeah. i'm a primary care physician. i hear many thing. people have the amount of misinformation has outweighed the facts and the science.
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i pay be the only person if a 15-minute visit telling people the facts in the data as journals tell us. i've had 99.97 people's lived dominated by facebook, what'sup groups, now the myths seem like facts. this interferes with your dfa him it affects your fertility and future pregnancies. the government rushed this, this is a conspiracy to help pharmaceutical companies. i've heard it all. i don't think there is one piece of misinformation i haven't heard including this causes you to become magnetic. what i have learned over months, you can't shame them. you can not blame them. you to start and empathize and say, yeah, i too thought this might be kind of fast and here's what my 28-year-old latino did want this vaccine, because she saw her sister get hospitalized and get dependent on oxygen at her age.
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so i think it's a very different, honestly, it's what we had to do ten years ago to fight this information about the affordable care act, access to healthcare. it's different misinformation in different forms, exploited by multiple media channels and opportunities. >> well, absolutely important not to shame or blame the people who have been magazine informed. that would be wrong. but the leaders, especially the republicans and those who funnel donald trump and donald trump, himself, choosing to be neglect, choosing to misinform people. maybe even media organizations choosing to have hosts that misinform people. that is choosing to be negligent. that is malpractice and that is on them and it will be what happens to this country. here's a warning. this is just so chilling. the warning that the u.s. surgeon general issued about misinformation when it comes to
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covid-19. he relates the certain generals advisory yesterday declaring the rise of misinformation online an urgent threat, calling on social media companies to take action. >> today we live in a world where misinformation poses an imminent and insidious threat to our nation's health. modern technology companies have enabled our environment with little accountability toer that users. they've allowed people to intentionally spread information what we call disinformation, to have extraordinary reach. they design product faetures such as life buttons that reward us for sharing emotionally-charged content, not accurate content and their algorithms tend to give u.s. more of what we click on, pushing us deeper and deeper into a well of misinformation. >> as we played at the very top, it's worth repeating from the surgeon general.
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nearly every death from covid-19 could have been prevented. think about that jen psaki said a large amount of misinformation is being spread by a relatively small number of people. >> there's about 12 people who are producing 65% of anti-vaccine misinformation on social media platforms. all of them remain active on facebook despite some band on other platforms, including facebook, one that facebook owns. >> following those remarks, facebook put out a state of mind reading, we've partnered with government experts, health authorities and researchers to take aggressive action against misinformation about covid-19 and vaccines to protect public health. so far, we've removed more than 18 million pieces of covid-19 information, removed accounts that repeatedly break these rules and connect 2 billion people to reliable information about covid. are you really taking credit
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facebook? you think you've saved lives? because the bottom line is as long as you can carrying, channeling and pushing out misinformation, that's taking lives. not saving lives. still ahead, donald trump's reported one-word reaction upon hearing that his vice president mike pence and the pence family were inside the capitol as trump supporters attacked the building. that's ahead on "morning joe." building that's ahead on "morning joe." (realtor) the previous owners left in a hurry, so the house comes with everything you see. follow me. ♪ (realtor) so, any questions? (wife) we'll take it! (realtor) great. (vo) it will haunt your senses. the heart-pounding audi suv family. get exceptional offers
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i love it. turning now to politics, we have more by washington post reporters carol lennick and
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philip rutger, this latest excerpt recounts former president donald trump's reactions to the january 6th capitol attack. reading from the book, quote, early on january 6th, trump call pence, who was spending the morning at his naval observatory residence before heading to the capitol. pence again explained the legal limits on his authority as vice president and planned to perform his ceremonial duty as prescribed by the constitution. but trump showed him no mercy. you don't have the courage to make a hard decision, he told pence. at 2:10, p.m., the first rioter entered the capitol by breaking a window and climbing inside. stream of trump warriors followed him. trump was back in his praft dining room watching everything on television. aides popped if and out.
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the president was riveted. his supported heed his call to march on the capital with pride and boldness. for trump, there was no more beautiful site tan thousands wearing red maga caps and fighting to keep him in power. he thought, this is cool. he was happy, recalled one aide who was with trump that afternoon. then when it turned violent, he thought, oh, c as rioters marauded through the capitol, it was clear whom they were look for, some of them shouted, happening mike pence. trump didn't throw them off the hunt. keith kellogg was worried about
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pence's safety and went to find trump s. mike okay, the president asked him? the secret service has him under control, karen is there with the daughter. oh, trump asked? they're going to stay there until this thing gets sorted out, kellogg said. trump said nothing more. he didn't express any hope that pence was okay. he didn't try to call the vice president to check on him. he just stayed in the dining room watching television. we should mention this account has not been independently confirmed by nbc news. let's bring in nbc news and national affairs analyst host and executive producer of showtime's the host and hell and high watt recount, john heilemann. and the lack of any care for his vice president, it starts right
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there. what are the reactions? >> well, hey, mika, it's been a really, this has been, this period over the last week when we started to see these inside accounts. this is the rutger and carol lennick these last couple days provided an incredible amount of fodder. almost all of it in some sense confirming and making vivid and making real a lot of things that were -- that we all kind of felt in our guts, we saw some contemporaneous reporting. but these guys have gone so deep now into putting flesh on the bones to just how, not just how -- what a perilous moment it was for the country and how dangerous donald trump was. those are the headlines, it seems to me. you talk about yesterday the joint chiefs and his concerns
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about the right stag moment. now the excerpt this morning. s the staggering for his lack of care for mike pence, we knew he was attacking pence at the moment pence was if physical mortal danger. we talked about this on the show in real time or shortly thereafter. this excerpt is another fact we few and it comes due blaringly, where is donald trump commandner chief in the residence on the phone talking to military leaders? talking to the national guard, talking to anyone who, where he could be of assistance and try to quell this violence as it was unfolding. instead, he is passive and both, on some levels, we see enjoying the sight of his mignons acting with what he would consider
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strength. on the other side with human disregard for the loyal vice president for four years. so completely disengaged from the post-fundamental constitutional obligation he had, still at that point, which was to protect the occupation of america against enemies foreign and domestic. here the country, the capitol is under siege by enemies who are domestic. donald trump is doing nothing, nothing, if anything, making the situation worse. >> coming up, we'll talk to navy veteran and member of the house congresswoman mikie sherrill of new jersey. her reaction over the infrastructure. morning joe is back in omoment. e morning joe is back in omoment
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now, that's making a difference. show me the olympics. ♪ "bugler's dream" begins playing ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ . as we have been discussing this morning, covid cases are rising across the country. hospitals are filling up, including up in arkansas. gabe gutierrez has this story.
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>> reporter: in little rock, arkansas, you not only hear but see the surge. >> we have the floor running and all of us are working extra hours. >> reporter: this is one of four covid-19 units at the university of arkansas for medical sciences. this nurse is exhausted. >> like we see really, really sick patients. >> reporter: younger ones, 20 to 40-years-old, as well as pregnant women. overall, they have seen a 130% jump in the last few weeks. there are equipment in the hallways. there is no place to put them. every single room in this hospital is full. every single one, except for this one. they plan on bringing in someone from the er any minute now. >> i'm very concerned about continuing strain on our healthcare system. >> how much does it frustrate you the vaccination issue has
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become stressed? >> it's disheartening. >> reporter: vaccine clinics phish, 600 dose are available each day. just 19 people made appointments. the overall vaccination rate is at 16. were you skeptical? >> yes. >> reporter: they did not get the shot. in may four of their five kids tested positive. he was hospitalized. so was his wife. >> this kind of turned our world upsidedown. >> reporter: they texted each other until separate rooms him until she was placed on a ventilator. all the more terrifying because she was pregnant. >> we lost the baby. at some point her oxygen dropped too low. >> reporter: his wife survived and is in rehab. for him, covid is far from over. >> i want other people to hearpy story so maybe they will think twice about fought getting vaccinated. >> gabe gutierrez reporting
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there. from arc sauce, we move east to mississippi, the state with one of the lowest vaccination rates in the country, doctors say vaccines are available but they, too, are struggling with misinformation. >> seams i feel like the sounds are drowned out by the facebook experts e. but there are many voices out there saying the is the right thing to do. this is what we feed to do. the vaccine is safe. but sometimes i feel we are outnumbered. >> there has been a sharp increase in children hospitalized with severe cases, more than half a dozen are in the icu because of the virus. in the state of mississippi, two had to be put on a ventilator. there is no mystery. vaccinations, the lowest states tied, hovering around 33-to-35%.
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alabama also in that range. dr. patel just said it, can't be more clear about it, if people continue getting vaccinated, we continue to avoid what we showed. >> the patients are younger, sick irand virtually all unvaccinated. coming up, an update on voting rights from a family who has been leading the cause for generations. martin luther king, iii, joins us, alongside andrea king, just ahead on "morning joe." [ music playing ] d on "morning . [ music playing
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colorado to kentucky. states of play spent the year on the road with candidates across the america. >> 240,000 miles. a new set of tires. the biebe is going to get me over the finish line. >> reporter: democrats work hard to distance themselves from an unpopular president. >> i speak for myself and don't need any other surrogate to do that. >> you know you and scott brown keep wanting to make this race about the president. >> reporter: do you think the president is a good model as an executive? >> you know, i probably look to other models. whether it's abraham lincoln or whether it's george washington. >> reporter: some republicans struggled to prove there is no place like home. >> reporter: will you and your family commit to staying here? >> of course. my mom is five miles away.
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>> reporter: democrats labeled you east coast dan. so where are you? >> i'm from alaska. i'm an alaskan. >> not everybody was eager to answer questions. >> reporter: hi, i'm kasie hunt. >> good morning, i don't want to talk to you. >> oh, wow, that is from to have of 2014 as kasie hunt wrapped up her states of play series, where she criss-crossed the country for morning joe, since then, she has become a fixture on this show and a close member of the morning joe family, not to mention her day job, leading nbc capitol hill coverage, following reports for "the today" show, "nightly news" and work all over msnbc. in 2017, she launched, "kasiedc" for political junkies, last september, she took over the reigns way that early franchise
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started by our willie geist, now you are flying the coup. i'm heart broken and really proud of you. are you going to miss us? >> it's going to make me cry. yes, this show has been a family for me at nbc and the way you and joe and willie have helped me and learn and grow and get better every day for all of the years that we have been working together has just meant the absolute world to me. it was such an honor willie was willing to share the show title with me as well. mika, let me see, the know you value effort that you lead from my perspective, you have lived that out with me every single day that we have known each other and you have encouraged me and supported me in a way. i can't even say how much it's meant to have a woman as a mentor the way you have been willing to mentor me. i am so sad to be leaving this
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family, but i'm also really excited about what's coming next. you, like i said, have taught me to know my value and so now is just the rate time for me to take a leap and embark on a new big adventure which i'm sure we'll have more to stay about soon. but it's going to be, i am just, i'm so sad this is my last day on "morning joe." i can't even tell you. >> as a family, it is a family on "morning joe." there is nobody closer than you r. you are a little sister to me and somebody i look up to professionally. people ask, how do we prepare for this show? it's constant, but our day starts preparing listening to you from 5:00 to 6:00. you set the table. are you a role model for a lot people in our news division for how hard you work and the kind of reporting you do and what you bring from 5:00 in the morning to 11:00 at fight. we will miss you dearly. but as a little sister, you are
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also proud to watch her go on and take the next step and to watch her get a new job that she is excited about. we will miss you desperately. we are heart broken, have you stitt sitting if these box, sharing your reporting and expertise. we are really proud. >> a slow cap for casey, we love. >> you thank you all so much. let's turn to some business before the bell, treasury secretary janet yellin says she expects the united states economy will see several more months of rapid innation in her domenic chu, what can you tell us? >> reporter: she has fans here as well. we are sad to see her go. we wish her the luck. she's a bright star that we're going to be sad.
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anyway, i will try to fight through this and get through these headlines for you guys. you guys, you mentioned, willie, secretary janet yellin said you should be prepared for higher prices. she added, though, the expectation is for those prices to fall back down to more normal levels over the medium turn and they come as multiple measures throw up consumers have rinz at the fastest pace in over a decade. she expressed worries over the red hot housing market and the negative impact of the housing affordability and prices for lower-income families and first-time buyers as j. powell told members of congress, he believes those measures are transitory. the colonial pipeline have been resolved. gas stakes owners are suing
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because of the sales they lost when it was shut down. the plaintiffs are led by a north carolina station on behalf of 11,000 other businesses. they allege they had no plan in place for ransomware attack option. colonial says it is a ware of the suit and cannot comment on pending litiationgation. but it worked around the clock and finally, technology pilot square is starting crypt to -- crypto currency. those transactions have been a key for them. they will make this a goal of this to make it open source so that a lot of people can kind of develop around that system. so, those are the big business headlines, guys. i'll send things back over to you. >> all right. cnbc's domenic chu.
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thank you so much. an alabama army base is the first to ask for proof of service members not wear ac mask a. if you rule applies only to uniform personnel of which there are about 5 thuchlt assigned to the base. theativiation branch is home to thousands of civilian employees. democratic congresswoman mikie sherrill of new jersey joins us. she's a navy veteran and a member of the house armed services committee and contributor mike barnicle joins as well. i will begin with you on the question of coronavirus. how the state of new jersey, how your district is doing. we have been talking to public health experts this morning, sounding the alarms they're not just for the states where they're not vaccinated even in places in the south, even in states they've done well, like the state of new jersey, for example.
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what are you hearing about this surge from the delta variant? >> well, willie, i was watching your reporting earlier on msnbc. it's really heart breaking to hear those stories from the south. it brought me back when we were facing things here in new jersey. the vaccines tha have helped tremendously here. the reason you are not hearing from new jersey as much, the most densely populated state in the nation is because we've had a huge vaccine effort. but we are still fighting misinformation. it's almost one for one, you can track the hospital cases and deaths and areas president the areas are vaccine resistant. it's critical we get people vaccinated. we need to keep an eye on the new variants. we are very concerned about those. we are seeing concerning numbers in some young people some we have to keep up the vaccine rates and then if the cdc determines we need to have masks in certain places, especially in the fall as we move back
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indoors, we know in the northeast, the fall presents real challenges for for us as we move inside. then we will need to do so. >> as schools open up, too, as you know well as a mother. so let me ask you, congresswoman, yesterday you hosted energy secretary jennifer granholm in new jersey to talk about infracture and this massive package that's being debated in the congress right now. what are some of the needs in your district and are you confident that this big piece of legislation will move through not joao the senate but your body as well? >> willie, as you know, this is a really, really tricky legislative dance we have going on here with the bipartisan structure billion and reconciliation bit. both some critical things for my state, new england with the infrastructure, we got to get the gate-based tunnel fund. that's a huge investment that's poverty.
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we also need grid resilience, fought just to withstand the superstorms and hurricanes we've seen recently in the northeast with more and more frequency, al also getting our grid power into wind and solar for our bower grid. in the reconciliation bill, we have child care, for example. we know before the pandemic, for every one space in our child care centers, there were two in new jersey that needed it. now projections are five for each state and already hearing from employers saying they can't find enough and part of that is related to child care. we want to make sure we are investing in clean power and energy. i have jennifer granholm in my district. it was exciting to talk to her about all of the jobs. we have in new jersey the largest investment in solar panels. they will start to look like regular roof tiles. so for all of you holding out,
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we have great news coming up. but we got to make shows investments. however, we got to address the state deduction pack. that has been such a wait on my district and districts across the nation, that we will need to see some of that in the upcoming reconciliation bill. >> mike barnicle has a question. mike. >> reporter: according to experts, at least every expert we speak to, the delta variant that is out there now is not going to be the only variant. this is not going to go away. so what is your view at some point public schools, state colleges, there will be mandatory investigations in force. >> from everything you hear, you are exactly right. part of the reason you are seeing these variants is because we have too large of an
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unvaccinated population. and that just allows the virus to mutate and grow. that is the reason i am a proponent of getting everyone vaccinated to keep people protected and stop these new strains from growing. with that said, we are already seeing some moves such as in our hospital and healthcare areas of moving to mandatory vaccine. we're going to have to see what other areas that makes sense for such as we were talking about the base. and if not mandatory vaccination, then having to show that you were vaccinated in order maybe not to wear a mask in certain critical spaces to stop the spread. because it is so damaging. i have four children. they have got to go back to in-person school in the fall. it is so damaging. i heard from so many parents, that say, i heard a heart
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breaking story, he was far from home, his roommate decided not to go to college and he shared mental health in the after math. they have to be back into activities. we have to create a safe environment. >> congresswoman, let me ask you to put on your national security hat for a second as a veteran. as you watched how the withdrawal from afghanistan has gone as sort of how abrupt it's been and how quickly the taliban has taken some of the territory there, do you have any concerns about the biden administration's policies in this regard? >> well, casey, it's an honor to get asked a question by you on your last day here. i am so sorry you are leaving. i look forward to your next step. >> thanks. >> i have a lot of concerns of pulling out of afghanistan. we knew it would be a very difficult process. but we have been there for 20 years. this is our nation's core and we have accomplished militarily
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what we can accomplish and namely that is protecting this naths from violent extremist attacks. we've combat violent extremists in afghanistan. that's been so important. we owe a huge debt of gratitude to our service men that have kept us safe here at home. now we are pulling out. as we do so we have now got to protect all of those people who have been so instrument am in protecting us in afghanistan. so, these translators, the drivers, national security, i'm sorry, the security contractors with our men and women in the field protecting them, keeping them safe. i have so many veteran friends, anyone that's served any length of time in afghanistan has a story how either their translator or driver saved their life, really, by giving them information some now it's up to us to get them safely out of
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afghanistan along with their families. >> congresswoman mikey sherrill, thank you so much for being on this morning. good to see you. now to the issue of voting rights, richard parker, author of how texas will transform america was out with an opinions piece in the "new york times" yesterday, titled, texas should be a warning to democrats everywhere. in it he says he sees a future where democrats can't stop voter suppression legislation because they are powerless without money. he writes in quote, if democrats have any hope of avoiding this future, their donors will have to take big risks in long shot races in states like texas and be ready to lose money. democratic politicians will have to buck up. in washington, that means running roughshod over the filibuster. forget bipartisanship, remember texas. and joining us now, civil rights leaders, martin luther king iii and his wife, andrea king.
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they are cofounders of #forjohn! campaign, raising small dollar donors online for local organizers who are fighting voter suppression laws. and tomorrow marks the one year since the death of congressman john lewis. it is really good to have you both. and in light of the one-year mark to the death of this great man, andrea, i would like to start with you. tell us about your efforts and how john lewis continues to inspire them. >> well, thank you for having us on this morning. we are so honored to take on the challenge, if you will, or to take the mantle, to help groups, black and brown groups that are on the -- in the trenches every day, in our courts, in our communities to help protect and
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restore voting rights all around our country. so we're launching a campaign where we're asking everyday americans to donate anywhere from 50 cents to $2 every day, of which the money will go to groups that are on the ground to help protect the most sacred right of voting. >> martin iii, the money that goes to these groups, explain to our viewers how it will be used and what it will be doing in the fight for equal rights, equal voting rights. >> the fact that you're talking about small donations that add up to significant amounts of money. there are people on the ground who are doing work every day. one of the goals is to register over 2 million people, at a minimum between now and election day. we are having a march on august 28th. that is the number of organizations that have come together in five states, excuse me, wells sister cities. and those marches are certainly to honor the legacy of my dad,
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the "i have a dream" speech, but most importantly, the focus on getting or regaining the right to vote. it's sad that voting is being suppressed. we know this all over america. we should be having a discussion about expanding. we are the greatest democracy in the world, but yet we're reducing the right to vote. that just makes no sense. >> mr. and mrs. king, it's willie geist. it's great to have you both on the show this morning. you started to answer my question, mr. king, about the stakes right now. you know, we heard from the president of the united states the other day, who believes this is a return or at least a 21st century version of jim crow. that rhetoric struck some people as extreme, given the horrors of jim crow. but in your eyes, and you as well, mrs. king, if you don't mind, what do you think is at stake here? >> i certainly think, you know, it's interesting we're talking about democracy. we go all over the world talking about democracy. and all we've really done is proven that when we expand
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opportunities, more people participate. when we make it harder to vote, less people participate. we should want everybody in our nation to vote. and so, that really is what is at stake with these laws in over 20 states now that are being and that's why it feels like jim crow 2.1. the reality is, my father and so many others would be fighting against this. this campaign we'll launch in ft. john, let's get the act passed. these are things that expand the opportunity. why would anybody be against it? it's very sad we're at this point. but guess what, we'll continue to mobilize, to organize, to strategize, and ultimately, we can have success. >> and it's important to
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estimate that one of the cornerstones of jim crow was the restriction of the right to vote. and that was one of the cornerstones of that whole foundation. and there are many people who have sacrificed and lost their lives and devoted their lives to this. and now it is on us. and a lot of times, people ask themselves if they would have marched with martin luther king jr. what i would ask all of you is, are you marching now? because it's just that critical, and we have very real, viable solutions. you talked about an op-ed that talked about misunderstand that could help. we, sometimes, i think, we don't know where to start or what we can do. but each of us can donate a little bit every day to make sure that our sacred rights to voting, people that are on the ground, in the trenches, getting arrested, that they are funded and that their work can continue. you can also join us on august 20th. we're marching, as martin said, in five flagship cities and we're adding sister marches, as we speak, in a broad coalition to stand up and demand that our
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voting rights are not only protected, but restored. >> mike barnicle has a question for you. mike? >> so, mrs. king, off of what you just said, the donations and, you know, people working and being jailed and things like that, working for the for john campaign, what happens to the money? who gets it, what's it for? >> the money goes directly to groups that are on the ground, mainly black and brown groups, because, frankly, those communities, our communities are the ones that are being targeted, if you will in a lot of these voting restrictive laws and legislations that are being proposed on the books. so there are many groups that a lot of us may not know their names. some people know their names that are on the ground, in communities that are working to restore, to organize. and so what we would hope to do is use our platform to continue
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the work that they're doing. critical and credible organizations. >> and one example is the most recently election in georgia back in january of this year, when senator warnock and senator ossoff won, it was many, many organizations. stacey abrams was obviously, extremely significant, but there were 20 or so organizations, and we did a thing called win both seats along with andrew yang and others and we raised about $3 million that went to those groups to help support getting the vote out. this is the same thing that we believe will happen nationally, as it relates to many of these states. >> martin luther king iii and andrea king, thanks to you both and we appreciate your efforts. that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage after a final short break. e picks up the coverage after a final short break.
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