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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 8, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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you and i talked about the fact that he did interviews for 17 books. so months ahead, lots of trump. >> lots of trump. axios' mike allen, thank you very much this morning. >> thank you, kasie. private companies, not the government limiting free speech. thank you all for getting up "way too early" with us on this thursday morning. don't go anywhere. "morning joe" starts now. good morning, and welcome to "morning joe." it is thursday, july 8th. we're following a number of developing stories this morning, including two weeks after the collapse of the surfside condo came the difficult decision to transition from rescue to recovery. and the deepening crisis in haiti after the assassination of the country's president, immensely poor, unstable, and increasingly violent. what's next for that already
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troubled nation? we're following the latest with rudy giuliani. his law license suspended in the district of columbia just as it was in new york for making, quote, demonstrably false and misleading statements. and we will continue to cover that story. we've got a lot to dive into this morning, and we'll start with some politics. president biden, in illinois yesterday, to make the case for his two track american families plan. the president, pitching the infrastructure package as a new era in america. and during that trip, president biden called out senate minority leader, mitch mcconnell, for touting the american rescue plan during a recent trip to kentucky. the $1.9 trillion covid relief bill passed earlier this year without a single republican vote. here is what the president said, along with mcconnell's comments on the bill earlier this week.
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>> mitch mcconnell loves our programs. you see what mitch mcconnell said? >> so you're going to get a lot more money. i didn't vote for it. but you're going to get a lot more money. >> he told me he wasn't going to get a single vote in order to allow me to get, with the help of everybody here, that $1.9 trillion tax cut -- excuse me, program-to-for economic growth. look it up, man. he's bragging about it in kentucky. >> kentucky will get close to 7 or $800 million. >> it's a great thing for kentucky, getting $4 billion to help poor. it's amazing. >> if you add up the total amount that will come into our state, $4 billion, my advice and members of the legislature and others, local officials, spend it wisely. >> white house correspondent for nbc news, monica alba was with the president in illinois
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yesterday, and she joins us now. i take it the president is selling the plan to the american people, what was the response? >> reporter: this was part two of this major pitch on the road. last week we saw the president traveling to michigan and wisconsin to tout the bipartisan framework which does enjoy some republican support which the president said he's quite proud of. yesterday the focus was more on the so-called human infrastructure. so the plans that they would have liked to see in the original, traditional infrastructure framework, things including child care and education but later stripped out because republicans didn't want to support those, now those are lumped in with something called the americans family plan that's something the president wanted to go and be the explainer in chief and detail why he believes that not just democrats should be on board with some of these programs but republicans as well. he went to a county, in fact, that former president trump won
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in 2020, and that is all part of this strategy to try to pitch both of these things on a two-track plan. and, of course, the president misstepped a couple of weeks ago when he linked the two saying he wouldn't sign one without the other, he since clarified that. but the attempts to talk about senator con nell's comments saying look what the republicans are doing, if it passes and benefits their constituents, like it does with the social programs, they go back and tout them in their district. so this is something the president is predicting could happen. so there are still questions about democratic unity and whether all the senators will be on board since the larger reconciliation package doesn't have a price tag yet and they can't agree on going too big or too small on that. >> the president, of course, working on multiple tracks this week as always. he has another speech today on
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afghanistan. what can we expect? >> reporter: this game under some pressure. remember last week headed into the fourth of july holiday weekend, the president was asked to detail more of his draw down strategy and he said, i want to talk about happy things i don't want to talk about that headed into this fourth of july. i want to focus on independence day, vaccinations and talk about it later. later has arrived. that's today after a meeting with his national security team. he's going to be briefed, of course, on the latest developments there. at this point the withdrawal is almost around 90% complete. today the president is going to update the american people and talk about this date. remember, it was going to be by the 20th anniversary of the september 11th attacks. now it seems all of this is going to be complete by the end of august. he's going to detail the time line and defend this position that many critics have said there's a concern about the taliban gaining more control and about the u.s.-backed afghan
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government really collapsing potentially here with the u.s. leaving. and there's still this question of what's going to happen to thousands of afghan drivers, interpreters, engineers who helped the u.s., who may be located to other countries, some coming to the united states under special immigrant visas, but all the details are being finalized. >> monica alba, thank you very much. now the president's comments on afghanistan will come days after the u.s. pulled all troops out of its main military base there, bagram airfield after 20 years. richard engel got access inside and filed this report. >> reporter: the only sign of the afghan army now in charge of bagram air base is at the entrance. inside, there are miles of unguarded roads and barracks. and the relics of the u.s.
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troops who just left. a chillout area, christmas ornaments, care packages, and hundreds of very usable vehicles, nearly all white. some fire trucks, too. and the heart of the base, the runways. i borrowed a bike soldiers left behind and pedaled down what was one of the most active runways for strikes against the taliban and al qaeda. >> it feels post apocalyptic. >> no tumble week, a can of energy drink bobbed along. not long ago. it was the epicenter of the war, up to 100,000 troops planned and executed counterterrorism missions here. this was the command center. when u.s. troops left, they cut the power. the afghans, a soldier told me, can't get it working. >> how do you feel about the way
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the americans left this base? i don't want to talk about it, he said. everywhere on bagram we visited was dark. >> reporter: you hand over a base, can't turn on the power, it's not too useful. the main battle planning room is offline. here are the racks that had the computers and servers, the brain behind this operation center, that's all been stripped out. the americans say they handed over this base to the afghans in an orderly way to continue the fight against extremists. they left them a base that the americans, it looks like they looted themselves. but the hospital on base is still well stocked. plenty of drugs and valuable equipment. so this is good? this is very useful for you. >> it's ready for patient. >> reporter: many afghan soldiers are angry at how american troops left but they don't seem to make the most of what they have. you'd hardly know there's a war outside and the taliban are
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making rapid advances now that the americans have left here. bagram feels vulnerable. there are also thousands of taliban prisoners inside and now that the americans are gone, power is cut, and base defenses are disrupted, if the taliban were able to break them out, it would amass a huge fighting force on the doorstep of kabul. >> richard engel reporting. to new york city now as cheers erupted as new york city held its first parade in two years yesterday, honoring the essential workers who guided the one-time covid-19 epicenter through the pandemic. wnbc reporter ida segal from wnbc has more. >> reporter: the canyon of heroes, full of perhaps the truest heroes this city has ever known. they are the essential workers who made us proud and kept us
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safe, showered with love. >> this is new york strong. this is new york strong. we came together in a pandemic. >> it's an honor. it's an honor, a privilege, we love new york. >> reporter: they are the nurses and doctors, the ups workers and bus drivers. the police officers and firefighters. all the people who left their homes and risked their lives every day during the pandemic. they were celebrities. >> not just the sports people that wins the super bowl but for regular workers to be recognized by the city as important, essential is amazing. >> reporter: sandra lindsey, critical care nurse from queens and the first person to be vaccinated was the grand marshall. >> what does it mean to be here? >> so much. so many lost, so few recovered. it's like everybody gets the vaccine and we made it. >> reporter: it was emotional for jenna, an icu nurse who left
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her family to save lives. and for this grandmother. >> so grateful. just grateful. >> she's thinking about my dad. >> reporter: her 5-year-old grandson explained how his dad had covid and survived. this parade was for people who never imagined they would be on the front lines of a dangerous infectious war but stepped up anyway. >> they took care of all of us. >> this is a ticker tape parade, people went to the moon we honor them, world series, we honor them. essential workers did everything. >> i love it. >> you know, it really is unbelievable, mika. again, you look at the fact that there are many people that have been vaccinated now that don't really want to come back out yet. there are still uncomfortable 15 months later. here we're heroes, new york heroes, but it happened all
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across america. heroes that went out at the height of the crisis when they didn't know what danger they were facing -- >> many of them got very sick. >> they just news their colleagues had gotten sick and died, they left their young children, spouses, families, parents, at home. they went into work and i'll draw another 9/11 parallel, which was one day, of course. but we saluted those firemen and first responders that ran into buildings without knowing what they were going into. it's the same thing that happened here, except it didn't just happen on one day, it happened every day. we can't forget that. we can't forget how brave these people were and how proud they were to do their job and to help other new yorkers and save whatever lives they could save. >> thanks to wnbc's ida segal for that report. one day after new results
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showed former police captain eric adams maintaining his lead in the new york city democratic primary for mayor. his top opponents yesterday conceded. former city sanitation commissioner kathryn garcia and former council to bill de blasio, maya wiley, both accepted defeat. bringing an end to the high profile primary. >> this campaign has come closer than any other moment in history to breaking that glass ceiling and selecting new york city's first female mayor. we cracked the hell out of it and it's ready to be broken. >> and for every woman and girl of every race and every community, that saw so many powerful, smart, connected, grounded women who had the courage to stand up and say, we count and we lead, i
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congratulate every last one of them. >> you know, mika, obviously we know maya, and she ran such an extraordinary campaign. she started out with nobody expecting her to do as well as she did. she ended up in second, of course, in first balloting, then down to third. but this race was so close. the top three positions so close. and they ran great races. it could have gone any direction. but what a close victory. what a close race and what a big victory for eric adams. >> what you saw there, just to sort of -- speaking especially to younger women. that -- that was leadership. grace in loss and especially in an election, is a form of leadership and it's incred -- it's as important as winning. >> and what a contrast because obviously they're dealing with a board of elections that didn't know what they were doing.
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>> very frustrating process. >> they're dealing with a system that is outdated and old and needs to be replaced. and yet, you know, they weren't whiners. they accepted defeat with grace, because unlike -- well, my god, unlike tens of millions of people, these two women, these two leaders actually -- well, you know, they believe in democracy, they believe in the constitution. they believe in free and fair elections, whether they win or whether they lose. it's not situational. it's not a constitution that is applied only in certain situations. they show, you apply the constitution, you apply the rule of law in all situations. >> so eric adams will now go on to face the winner of the republican primary, that's guardian angels founder curtis
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slaywa in november's general election and eric adams will join us at the top of the next hour of "morning joe." the next mayor of new york will have to face crime as a top issue, a top priority. across the country, it was a deadly holiday weekend. with gun violence taking the lives of more than 200 people, according to the gun violence archive. calls for action are coming from all major cities across the country. from philadelphia, where a state senator had a relative shot dead over the weekend, to los angeles where homicides have jumped 25% over this time last year and shootings are up 50%. new york governor, andrew cuomo declared a state of emergency over gun violence on tuesday saying it's costing more lives than covid and is a threat to the broader economic recovery. let's bring in the former head of new york city, boston and los
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angeles police departments, bill bratton. he's the author of the new book "the profession, a memoir of community, race and the ark of policing in america" also with us the host of "msnbc's politics nation" reverend al sharpton. good to have you both on this morning. >> thank you both for being on with us. mr. commissioner, what is going on out there from oakland, chicago, new york to philadelphia, violence is spiking in ways that reminds us of like the 1970s. what's going on? >> a number of things going on. the criminal justice system of the united states collapsed during the coronavirus epidemic. courts were closed, we were releasing a lot of people out of prison much too early. the proliferation of guns is
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phenomenal in this country, 400 million guns, many in the hands of young people, gangs. many, many causes of what's going on. resolution of the problem is going to be extraordinarily difficult moving forward. courts are just starting to reopen in many states, we haven't effectively dealt with the gun issue. and the issue of all these young people that simulate out of control, it's going to be a heavy lift, nationally, state level and for eric adams, at the local level in new york city. >> let's talk about things people aren't going to want to talk about -- >> that's what we do. >> -- if they want violence to come down, perhaps these are things we have to look at. there have been a series of reforms over the last couple years when crime was at a 50 year low, no cash bail, some other criminal justice reform measures that have shortened
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sentences that have allowed a rotating door going in and out of prisons. reverend al and i talked about it a couple weeks ago. you have people committing a crime, a violent crime and they're back on the street 15 minutes later. let's talk about some of the things that are going to make so-called reformers uncomfortable if we want safe streets, what are some of the things we're going to need to do to keep perpetrators of these violent crimes in jail? >> well, one of the things is to recognize unfortunately in our society there are violent people that need to be in jail and keep them away from the rest of us. so we have to address that, 5,000 people walking the streets of new york right now arrested on gun crime charges, including serious violent crimes because of the court system not being opened. i predict many people will have their cases dismissed by
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district attorneys in new york that are all reform minded but too much, too fast. we have to address the issue of understanding some people need to be separated from society. we have a lot of well intended efforts, bail reform one of them, but too much too fast. if you look at new york city's situation in particular, everything was going well until 2018, state prison population down 40%, homicides down 90%, overall crime down 80%, then the legislature in albany and the city council, well intended criminal justice reform, 20 19d it all blew up. a year before the coronavirus and its influence, new york began to experience increased shootings, violence and crime of all categories. this was a direct result of well-intended efforts that went too far, too fast. >> reverend al, you and i have talked about it, we spoke about
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it also with eric adams, about the fact that you talk about in many neighborhoods you have heard and you have seen people who have committed crimes with guns in jail and, you know, an hour or two later back out on the streets. we just hurt commissioner bratton say right now in new york city, there are 5,000 people walking around the streets of new york city that have been arrested for gun crimes and let back out onto the streets. what do we do about it? >> i think we have to deal with the fact, first of all, where are the guns coming from? i think what governor cuomo brought about yesterday, we have to deal with the manufacturers to those running gun rings to those having guns in the street that continue like a revolving door keep getting back out without any kind of punishment
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or redemption or programs that would recycle how they think or readdress how they think and how they behave. i think first and foremost, probably the incoming mayor, eric adams, who i know well, will be able to deal with. you have to emphasize these people are committing crimes against us. we're not talking about us against them. we're talking about people in our community that are the victims of this. so we've got to stop it at the root, i'm not seeing people raiding gun manufacturers or rings that have a deal with the manufacturers to get the guns. and i'm not seeing people that are reformers stand up and say, wait a minute, we cannot in the name of reform allow our communities to live under siege. that is deform, not reform. we need to have the
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responsibility of saying if you commit a crime against your own in your own community, you have got to pay for it and reform yourself but at the other end you have to stop the proliferation of guns. it's not an or, it's an and. >> we were all talking a headline flashed on the screen that talked about record number of police officers quitting the job. and so many -- those that i talked to personally, those that have talked to people, on -- whether it's on television or in the newspaper, they have said they're quitting in droves because they don't feel like the city has their back, they don't feel like officials have their backs if they go out and do their jobs, then they can be arrested, thrown in jail. and some of these people will say in the same breath, yes, they want police reform, yes,
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they want bad cops taken off the force. but there's this growing belief that nobody has their backs when they're going out at 2:00, 3:00 in the morning putting their lives in danger. what does the next mayor of new york city have to do to reverse that trend? >> joe, it's not a belief, it's a fact that the legislature in albany, city council in new york, political leadership of this state, speaking to new york, has spent the last several years attacking the police, putting laws into effect that basically focus more on police misbehavior. reverend sharpton's comment about who's being hurt, 96% of people being shot and killed in new york city are minorities, that's the base that selected eric adams. the attention to who are the victims of crime. we need to stop basically trying
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to penalize the police while reforming them. we've gone a bridge too far. and for eric coming in as mayor, he's going to have a smaller police force. why? with the deep funding, a lot of cops leaving, they're down several thousand already, they're going to have a couple of issues in the door. fortunately he has the background, the community support, the community most effected by crime. so it's going to be a challenging time. the issue for him is six months, there's a lame duck mayor that hasn't been effective in dealing with these issues the last few years. eric adams doesn't take office until january 1st of 2022. we have eric adams coming up later this morning. reverend al i want to underline something that commissioner bratton said. 96% of those murders, of those
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crimes, are committed against people of color. and you said something, in their neighborhoods. you said something a couple of days ago on this show that basically said, okay. yes, we want you to focus on our communities when there is police misconduct, when there is killing of a new yorker or an american by a police officer that may not have been by the book, that may not have been necessary. but you can't ignore us when all these other murders are happening in our communities of people of color by people of color. explain what you were trying to say and why do you think it is that the media just doesn't focus -- you know, just doesn't
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focus on the people killed in chicago this weekend, the people killed in oakland, the people that were killed across the nation as much as they do when those killings happen in suburbs. >> i have fought for years to say that when police abuse us it cannot be ignored and it cannot be normalized and the media should focus on it and the media began focussing on it with the work of a lot of people including me. but it is just as bias to act like it is normal to see 100 people shot in chicago over the weekend. and it's like, okay, that's them, that's how they act. that is racist in its nature to act like this kind of behavior is what people expect out of us, which means they don't see us as human beings to have children that are going to grow up and be productive, to have grandmothers that should not have to worry about is a bullet going to fly
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through the window. so i think the media must be just as concerned, just as dealing with the sensationalism that we can attribute to something when we're dealing with this kind of thug mentality that is being excused because that is not the norm in our community and we must be able to work with those that want to work with us to get rid of that element unapologetically. i do not apologize for standing up for george floyd or eric gardner, because i think that is right. i think those police broke the law. but i don't apologize for standing up for grandma not living under siege or a 1-year-old killed with a stray bullet from a gang fight, and whoever made the gun, got the gun there and the kid that used the gun need to be held accountable just like a
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policeman that breaks the law. you can't have it one way or another, you have to have one standing for all. either you want to save and preserve our lives or you don't. >> reverend. and former new york city police commissioner bill bratton, thank you for being on this morning. we appreciate it. and still ahead, the latest from surfside, florida where crews at the site of the collapsed condominium are switching from rescue efforts to recovery mode. plus a grim new milestone in the fight against coronavirus. the global death toll has hit 4 million amid growing concerns over the delta variant. and england will face italy for the 2020 european championship. advancing to the final with harry kane's extra time goal. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. k.
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welcome back to "morning joe." it's 33 past the hour. a live look at capitol hill in washington d.c. a city where rudy giuliani can no longer practice law. at least for now. a d.c. appellate court suspended his license yesterday after the new york appellate court did the same thing last month for making, quote, demonstrably false and misleading statements about the 2020 election while representing then president donald trump. under the rules of the d.c. bar, license suspension is required when a member is facing disciplinary action in another state. the former new york mayor may
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appeal to have his license reinstated. good luck with that. and let's bring in the co-founder of axios, mike allen, who joins us this morning. mike, i guess first on rudy giuliani, any chance he'll get his law license back but any more chance he'll be held accountable in any way for the statements he's made not only about the 2020 election but on stage on january 6th? >> mika, with these suspensions we're seeing a rare consequence, right. like so many of these statements have had zero consequences, it's not going to stop rudy from being rudy, but the system at least is working. >> yeah. really, mike allen, it's great to see you, it's really surprising to me that people that earlier on this with the extraordinarily damaging and false claims that he made about
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a legal process, but that's what's happened. do you expect other states to follow and go after rudy giuliani? >> as a country lawyer, yourself, joe, you know better than anyone how political these can be. i think we'll see a real blue/red split on this. but the action on the license shows that you can't just say anything. we're coming out of a period where alas a lot of people thought, with good reason, they could say anything. >> speaking of saying anything, yesterday we showed one tweet after another that jd vance wrote over the past five years, especially in 2016, telling christians that the world is looking at us, god help us, talking about how he couldn't support donald trump, that his
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policies were idiotic. you read all the tweets. this wasn't a tweet that jd vance just shot off in the middle of the night. this was over a year's time -- >> this was how he felt. >> -- before donald trump was in power. he let christians know that supporting donald trump would actually damage the faith. he let conservatives, republicans know that this guy was not fit to be president of the united states. he voted for a third party candidate. he did everything he could do and bragged about it trying to stop donald trump. now he wants to pretend that never happened. will that help him in ohio win the nomination? >> joe, yes, jd vance has a new religion and he has this unbelievable quote he gave to molly ball of time magazine when asked about trump. he said, well, he's the leader
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of these people, if i want to lead these people of ohio, talking about the trump crowd, he says i have to suck it up and support him. so twitter, of course, calls that, saying the quiet part out loud. but this is a fascinating race, joe. at the top of axios today we call this the one race to watch to see what some of the themes are going to be in the midterm races and beyond. i did an interview yesterday with jd vance and what was he talking about? he was talking about culture wars, big tech and censorship and economic populism which takes in inflation, gas prices, which takes in jobs to china. and so, we see a real preview there of how races are going to unfold and folded into that, we'll see just how close do these republican candidates have to be to trump. because as you guys know, the republican race in ohio to
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replace rob portman very crowded but if jd vance were to win that, that's no sure thing, he would be the favorite to win the senate race and then he'd be suddenly talked about as a national candidate in a post-trump world. >> it's surprising to me, and mika and i talked about this yesterday, but mike i'd love to get your thoughts. what's so surprising to me is that jd vance is a guy who really had a stellar brand, a bipartisan brand, he had a book that just continued selling, republicans, democrats, independents, everybody read the book, they were moved by it, inspired by the story. this is a guy that really could have been a uniting candidate, a candidate that united people from across party lines. when you spoke to him yesterday, did you get any insight as to why he would throw away that brand, and yes, this sounds like a leading question, it's
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actually just the reality, why he would throw away that powerfully unifying brand and burrow down and start engaging in this narrow casting of -- to try to get the support of trumpists? which, you know, maybe that's right now the hard core that require this. maybe that's one out of three americans overall. why would he do that? >> you know, i think you're right. the old jd vance brand would have been perfect for whenever the trump wave passes, what is that, 2024? we can debate that. but i can tell you we see this, the show covers it better than anyone. these republican candidates they think it's a math problem. they think to succeed in today's republican party you have to, as jd vance might put it, suck it up and support him.
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and when you look in the states, they're not wrong. like the continuing hold of trump on the republican electorate, on conservative media, on republican fund-raising. you see what they're thinking. >> but i'm probably -- it's just a different way of asking the same question. i'm curious when he said i had to suck it up and support him, did you ask him, what does that mean? supporting racism? supporting insurrections? supporting anti-democratic behavior? supporting cult-like following? does he understand -- he does understand what he's sucking up and supporting, because he wrote a book about the very people who have been taken in and misled, and he knows this. when you pressed him on this, what was his explanation for sucking up and supporting this? >> when he made that comment to molly ball, he was saying that he recognizes what you have to
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do to win a republican party in a state like ohio right now. and you were talking about like today's tweets, he's gotten very -- he's pushing the culture wars, a big part of what you're going to see in his campaign and a lot of republican campaigns ahead. he told me when he was going to fourth of july parades this weekend, that the number one thing that voters would say to him is they're worried about cancel culture, they're worried they could say something on social media that could get them fired from their job. as far as what he's talking about, as far as policy solutions, he wants to be activists against companies. he wants to take action against companies that act against workers, including taking away tax benefits and taking away legal liability protection, very similar to what trump is trying to do with the lawsuit on social media. trying to argue that social media companies are state
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actors. of course the first amendment does not protect you from private businesses, it protects you from the government. and we have a story up on axios right now saying that -- scholars telling us that these trump lawsuits against the social media platforms and their ceos are doomed. and we have a quote in there that says, yes, social media companies are powerful but they ain't the government. >> no. >> mike allen of axios, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> it's always great seeing you, talking to you. hope to see you again soon. mika, mike is so right. it's been humorous. i say humorous. it's been funny to watch these phony populist, the harvard, stanford, yale boys, and you name it, these ivy league schoolboys that are supposed to be so smart talking about facebook and twitter like they
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are state actors. and like they're violating people's first amendment rights. i mean, they -- i don't know if they just play foosball now in -- i don't know. i'm just a dumb country lawyer. but even i know if you want to remedy the situation, you break facebook up and you use anti-trust laws to break facebook up and to break twitter up and to break these other monopolies up. but this argument that they're state actors and they're violating people's first amentments is just asinine. no court is going to support that. again they're either playing ping-pong and foosball during law school. if that's the case i should have tried harder to get into ivy league law schools because i had
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to actually study and read case law when i was in florida case law. or they're lying to their voters. wonder which one it is? stay tuned. >> we'll follow it. although i got a glimpse of trump's press conference announcing the lawsuits, and the whole thing is just more of a grab for attention. >> it's farce. let's not give him attention, it's farce. >> no, we're not showing that. joining us democratic congresswoman lauren underwood who represents the illinois district visited by president biden yesterday. she is also a registered nurse. which would probably give you insight into some of the things the president would like to do, especially on the families plan that would really help folks. but how was he received yesterday and were they buying what he was selling? >> we were so honored to welcome president biden to crystal lake,
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illinois yesterday. i think he got a good idea of how competitive our community is. the particular community he visited is at the intersection of suburban and rural communities here in northern illinois so he got a glimpse of the conversations we have every day in the midwest, where are we going as a country, what is this economic recovery going to look like and will it benefit me and my family. i was heartened to hear him speak about the child tax credit, affordable child care for working families, affording community college by offering a couple years of free community college to every resident in the country. i think these are ideas that people support and we were all excited to see him in our community yesterday. >> congresswoman, reverend al sharpton. >> hi. >> you have been, i think, one
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of the unsung national treasures being you've been very young, i think like 34 when you went in. >> i'm 34 now. >> you're 34 now. >> my lord. >> and you went in a district that was not democratic and you were able to win and won a tough re-election. and you have gotten four pieces of legislation through, including what you've done around this issue of black women and the challenges that they faced in terms of pregnancy and maternity. will you share with us how you got these bills through? how you've been so productive? that's why the president gave you three or four shoutouts yesterday and what your bill will in effect do for a community that's been neglected in that area. >> so in my first term i had four pieces of legislation signed by president trump, this year two by president trump, and one by president biden. i've been focused on writing bills that get things done for
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my community. the number one issue i hear walking around my district is that health care costs are too high. there are many ways we can tackle this problem. but i am so proud that in the american rescue plan, we were able to expand tax credits that lower out of pocket costs saying no american would pay more than 8.5% of their income through the marketplace. since this policy went into effect over 1.5 million americans have signed up, we're working to make that permanent president but also in the american families plan is our black maternal bus mommy bill. black women are three times more likely to die than their white counter parts. these are preventable deaths we know what to do we have to take action. >> we've been talking about
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crime this morning, been talking about what happened over the weekend not just in oakland and new york, philadelphia, but also chicago. the number of deaths just continue to go up. the acts of violence, gun crimes, i think 100 this past weekend. it's just unthinkable. how do we stem that tide of violence that's been gripping chicago for a long time? what can we do to support law enforcement? do we need more police officers on the street as we move to reform policing? what do we do to let police officers know in chicago that members of congress, the mayor, other oshave their back when they're doing their job? >> as i shared with reverend al. i'm 34 years old. i grew up in the school shooting generation. since i was in high school, we have not seen this country take
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decisive action to prevent gun violence. it's something that now, not only are millennials grappling with, we have gen z and today's students asking us to do something. i was disappointed to see the vote in the senate and the posturing that we've seen among senators around this idea of even universal background checks which then prevents us getting to solutions like the assault weapons ban. and wildly popular policy solutions that we know would save lives in the country. at the end of the day, we need a congress that is willing to have the tough conversations around how to save lives. willing to call gun violence by every different form that it expresses itself as unacceptable. whether we're talking about partner gun violence, school based violence, random acts of violence in communities all across this country. this is not just an urban issue, not just a people of color issue, this is an issue
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affecting my suburban and rural community every day. and i hope that this congress will find the courage to do the right thing to keep all of us safe in our communities. >> you're so right on those background checks we've been talking about it on this show now for a decade. support, almost nine out of ten americans support expanded background checks. and so many other gun safety laws. but on the policing side of the ledger, what do we do -- we've been reading articles for some time. i know you've seen it too. police officers leaving the force in droves because they don't feel like public officials have their back. as we, rightly, pursue police reform, what do we do to let good cops know, to let good police officers know on the streets that we have their back. when they kiss their family good night and they get in the car and put on the badge at 10:00 at
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night and drive through chicago or oakland or new york, or your district or my district, what do we do to let them know we have their back? >> in my job i interact with a lot of police officers. whether it's in washington, these heroes on the u.s. capitol police force, it was my republican colleagues that would not step forward to fund the enhancements they need to be able to have officer retention, to offer these folks mental health benefits, in the face of january 6th. just two days ago we were all reflecting as a country about where we've come in the last six months and the relative inaction that's happened as a result of republicans digging in trying to normalize the big lie and say it was, you know, just outlandish things they said about january 6th. what about in chicago? >> what about in chicago. >> what about new york, across america?
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>> we have to be very clear that our police officers do need support in their jobs, okay. they need to be able to have the full benefits and pay and all of that stuff. right, these are challenging jobs that they have. however, we also have to be very clear that it is unacceptable that folks continue to die at the hand of law enforcement in this country. that's what police reform is about. we're muddling the issue here. what we have seen in the spike in crime is not because the united states congress is taking action to reform policing in this country to make it more equitable, to make it fair and safe in all of our communities. what we are seeing is a set of laws in this country that continue to allow, as reverend al said, guns that shouldn't be on the street to be on the street. that continue to allow people to purchase weapons of war and use them freely and we continue to
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see that, you know, people are fantasizing about committing acts of violence and it has been normalized. violence of any kind is unacceptable. >> you said we're muddling the issue here. what issue are we muddling? what issue am i muddling? >> i believe the issue of policing reform, these very specific issues like banning choke holds, holding bad police officers accountable, shining a light on transparency, figuring out a way to make sure that those who are committing crimes while on the job are held responsible, that we are separating that and being clear and concrete about how that is a separate issue than people dying on the streets every day across this country. those are completely different things. >> i certainly support everything that you're talking about there. but people do keep dying on the
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streets, and we had commissioner bratton on earlier today, talking about how police officers are leaving in droves because they don't feel like public officials have their back. we've read story after story, i know you have too, of police officers saying -- good police officers saying i feel like we are under siege all the time. do you think those police officers are muddling the issue or do you think that they are unfairly attacking politicians? >> it's not about politicians being attacked. we get feedback from all corners of our constituencies. all i'm trying to share with you, joe, is solving the problem of a lack of police accountability is not going to then enable more and more spikes in crimes in this country.
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these are different issues. and the issue around policing morale, around their inability to recruit good officers around this challenge of their image around the country is one that it will take some deep reflection within the leadership of these law enforcement agencies to try to figure out how they can help recast this image of law enforcement. this is not somehow the united states congress has been disparaging or, you know, something like that. that is -- i reject that. >> all right. congresswoman, lauren underwood, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> reverend al, so the question is, what do we do? we've talked about it, you and i have talked about it, commissioner bratton was talking about it this morning. police officers are leaving the force and not -- we're not just talking about white police
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officers. look at new york city, police officers of every demographic group is leaving -- are leaving the force right now. and the question is, what do we do about it? and again, i mean, my god it's like the discussion we have about critical race theory, you can actually hold two competing thoughts in your mind at the same time. two things can be true at one time, you talked about it all time we have to be aggressive on reforming policing in america, at the same time we have to let good police officers know, whether they're white, whether they're hispanic, whether they're black, whether they're asian-american, whatever they are, we have to let them know we have your back. you go out at night, you're risking your life, saying good
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night to your children, to your spouse, you may not come back again alive, but we have your back. in chicago, three cops shot yesterday in front of a police station. so how do we do these two things at once. we have to do two things at once and apparently politicians don't want to talk about both things at once, it's like let's pick a side and debate that one thing. >> i think it's not one or the other. it's both and. we have the responsibility to stand up to bad cops and stand up for good cops at the same time and not see this as some, am i choosing sides? it's the same side. when you have policemen in our communities that are standing up, fighting crime, fighting for us, we ought to have their back, we ought to stand with them,
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salute them. i said when policemen are shot, that is wrong. i've taken police brutality victims to vigils for them and when we see the morale of police that are good police, that are brought down because of bad police or because of community isolation or community saying that they have a bad picture of what policing is, we must deal with that, step in, and bridge that gap. because policemen are necessary to restore and keep law in our community. when they break the law we need to have them held accountable. but when there are those in the community breaking the law, we need to support police in making sure that order is established to protect our lives. >> again, just to put things in perspective with what reverend sharpton and i are saying, former police officer eric adams
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won four of the five boroughs in his race to be mayor of new york city. the only borough he didn't win was manhattan. he won brooklyn, queens, staten island. he won every borough. also as commissioner bratton said this morning, when we're talking about stemming violence. when we're talking about saving lives here on this show, and across america, we're talking about the overwhelming number of victims being people of color, 96% of the victims, commissioner bratton said, of gun violence in new york city are people of color. that's what this policy debate is about. improving the lives of all americans but overwhelmingly
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right now improving the lives of people of color who are on the front lines in this gun violence. >> we'll talk to eric adams about this issue later on the show. he's going to be our guest coming up on "morning joe." we turn to headlines in in the sports world. roger federer will not win a ninth wimbledon title this year and may never will. playing in his first grand slam tournament since a pair of knee injuries the champion fell in straight sets to 14th seeded hubert hercozk. he said he was unsure if he'll be back. >> is this the last time you'll play at wimbledon? >> i don't know. i have to regroup. of course, i would like to play it again. but at my age you just never
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sure what's around the corner. >> is retirement an active possibility for the immediate future. >> no. it's about perspective. i have to take my time and make a decision where i feel comfortable. no, i hope not that that's going to happen. the goal is to play, of course. >> but the game that england was really focused on, england will face italy for the 2020 european championship. >> unbelievable. >> joining us nbc sports soccer analyst roger bennett. his book, "reborn in the usa, an englishman's love letter to his chosen home," which is, by the way, now number one on the new york times best-seller list. >> no way! >> number one.
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>> roger bennett, that's just really huge. what do people do when they find out that you never really became an american. this was all just like donald trump's first election, this was just a marketing -- >> stop it. it's a great book. >> -- scam gone wrong. it's always true as hans solo said, all of it. we're all so moved by it. you know, people in britain, they're moved by the fact that the bennett curse has now been completely lifted. you stopped being an englishman and here for the first time since 1966, probably the year you were born, the first year since 1966 england makes it to a final. the albatross has been shot. roger bennett is no longer an englishman, take us through it. >> that's all it took was for me to write a book about my love of america. a massive day in english
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history, 10 million pints of beer were sold, most of which flung into the air in celebration. england attempting to qualify for their first tournament final after 55 years of agony and hurt. didn't start well. denmark struck first, 35 yards, the danes invaded england at 10:13. and that was the first goal england conceded all tournament. they responded in the most un-english way possible, which is tenacity driven and fighting their way back into the game. 1-1. the game went into extra time. nerves over time when english icon, raheem sterling, a pair of
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danish redwoods tumbling to the ground, sterling, more than mere mortal. harry kane, the real prince harry. his penalty. oh. on the rebound, what's the story, morning glory? enland win. 55 years of agony, self-sabotage, failure, exercise yesterday. you have 1066, the norman invasion. 1966 england win the world cup, 2021, the year england qualified. they face italy on sunday. and the english nation has suffered the past 17 months lockdown after brexit. i can't tell you what it means, the nation deserved it. >> it's unbelievable, especially as you look at some of the early matches. one of the most inspiring matches i've seen them play
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early on against scotland. it was just absolutely pathetic. hard to believe this is the same team. i want to ask you just your opinion of the penalty. technically it was a -- i suppose it was a penalty, technically. but you have to wonder, should a game have been decided by such a soft penalty. no doubt you can look at the replay 1,000 times, sterling did feel gravity's pull and it fling him to the ground. seems like a soft penalty to me, what do you think? >> i think the term for it is slightly match fixy. this team has transformed the image of modern footballer to lovable national heroes. this squad campaigns on social issues, mental health, take stands against racism in
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britain. it gives me great joy even though i ride with team america now, for this team to triumph on the field as they have off it. >> roger bennett, thank you so much. number one, "reborn in the usa". heart-to-heart, finally after all these years getting its due in "reborn in the usa". >> that escalated quickly. with about two weeks to go until the summer olympics, japan's prime minister has announced a covid-related state of merge for the tokyo region. new restrictions will be put in place starting on monday, and lasting through the games until august 22nd. "the new york times" reports the decision could force officials to abandon plans announced last month to allow domestic spectators at events. a move met with public
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opposition over concerns that the games would become a petri dish for new strains of the virus. tokyo reported 920 new cases yesterday up from 714 a wreak ago. the global death toll from covid-19 eclipsed 4 million yesterday as the crisis becomes a race between the vaccine and the highly contagious delta variant. the ap reports the tally of lives lost over the past year and a half has -- as compiled from official sources from johns hopkins university is about equal to the number of people killed in the battle in all the world's wars since 1982, according to estimate from the peace research institute. here in the u.s. the cdc is warning that the delta variant
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is now the dominant strain in the u.s., posing dangers for those who are still unvaccinated. miguel almaguer has more. >> reporter: the ticker tape parade in new york city honored front line heroes. >> it's amazing. we have worked so hard every day of the pandemic. >> thank you to all the essential workers. >> reporter: leading the parade, grand marshall sandra lindsey, the first nurse and american to get inoculated after fda authorization as many today still refuse vaccination. >> if you don't want to go to the hospital, get vaccinated. >> reporter: the delta variant is now fuelling community surges. already believed to be the nation's most dominant strain in kansas, missouri, iowa and nebraska delta accounts for 80% of new cases. russell taylor wasn't vaccinated
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and spent three weeks in the icu. >> i thought i was going to die. probably the closest i've ever been to dying. >> reporter: it's not just vaccines some americans are rejecting. after scenes like these, this week some high school graduates on an american airlines flight refused to wear masks, became disruptive and were forced to exit the plane before takeoff. the push back and the struggle to vaccinate, while at the same time honoring the heroes who save lives. >> all right. one day after being declared the winner of the new york city democratic primary for mayor, former police captain, eric adams is making good on a campaign promise. adams got his ear pierced yesterday at what seemed to be a
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claire's store in a brooklyn mall. he explained on the campaign trail he said he would get the piercing if he won to prove he is a man of his word. and eric adams joins us now. >> come on, man. reverend al is still with us as well. mike barnicle is here. here's the thing, eric adams. you could have promised to go ride a roller coaster at coney island, right? >> yes, i could. >> while eating cotton candy, wouldn't that have been easier. >> i think it looks good. >> difficult things you must make difficult decision. and actually, it was a group of young people who i made a commitment and my son said promises made, must be promises kept.
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eric, congratulations on a hard fought and really close primary victory. but we're going to start calling you landslide here on "morning joe." landslide adams. i want to bring up a couple of numbers that i think are -- actually line up with -- we've been talking about it all morning that line up with your victory. commissioner bill bratton, who's a fan of yours, brought up the stat that 96% of gun violence in new york city right now is committed against people of color. and i don't think it's a coincidence that a former cop who has tried to chart a center course on police reform as well as supporting police officers won every borough, except for manhattan. talk about those numbers, how do we save more lives of people of color? how do we -- yes, i want to talk about the guns. i want to talk about the guns.
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i support probably the same gun legislation you do. but let's talk about the people that are pulling the triggers on the guns too. how do we arrest them? how do we keep them in jail? how do we get the 5,000 people who have committed gun crimes walking around the streets of new york right now back in jail? >> well said, joe. i believe you had a great conversation this morning. first, let's look at this. we need to separate the two issues that it was pointed out. police reform and violence in -- that are -- that's taken place in the street. they're two different issues. if we keep muddying the waters we're not going to get to the heart of it. let's separate the issues. let's go to the crime problem. we must have an intervention plan and prevention plan. prevention, those are the long term things people talk about, such as dyslexia screening in our schools, 30% of our prison population is apparently
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dislexic. if we can stop the pipeline of feed incline, learning disabilities, 55% of our inmates have learning disabilities, 48% have mental health illnesses. if we go upstream and prevent the feed of crime that's a great way to stop the flow. let's deal with intervention right now. this is where the discomfort comes from many of my colleagues refuse to deal with the intervention, they're bad people doing bad things to good people and i'm not going to sit back and continue to allow that to happen. you can't have someone arrested with a gun on monday and back doing another shooting because they're out of jail on tuesday. that's unacceptable. if we don't have an intervention problem going after gang violence, going after those who are known shooters in our city and country we're going to have a real issue with violence that is going to be irreversible if
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we don't get this under control. lastly, this is very important we've ignored this crisis because of the victims, black, brown, poor. we turned our backs on them. we know these babies have been dying for years. our crisis in america is not an assault weapons crisis. our crisis is a handgun crisis. federal movement and state movement has only focused on assault weapons because of the mass shooters, but the mass shooters are taking place every day in the south side of chicago, brownsville, compton, atlanta, but we ignoring the handgun crisis because of the victim. the victim is black, brown, immigrant and poor. >> it's something that needs to be said, reverend al every day. you look at the number of shootings and you look at people of color. the numbers that tally up every
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weekend, whether you're talking about chicago or across this country, they don't grab the headlines. and even mike bloomberg, when he was trying to make gun violence go down he said we all talk about the military-style weapons and it is terrible the crimes committed there, but if you look at the numbers, those aren't the weapons that are killing the most people, that are killing the most kids, that are killing, as you said, the grandmas in these communities. so i'm so glad to hear eric adams say that. again, two things can be true at once, you can reform policing and still back cops at the same time. >> i think you have to do two things at once. because the way to support police reform is to support good policemen. and i think one of the things i want to address this to eric
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adams he is the perfect person to say this. when i met him, he was thinking of becoming a policeman and then became a policeman. he formed a group called 100 blacks in policing, to reform from the inside. and he was one of the five people to sign incorporation papers, he's a founding member. he did both at the same time. he was a policeman and a police reformer part of action network. i think the waters and muddy and what we have to do is do both at the same time. so i don't think joe is muddying the waters or you're muddying the waters, eric. the water is muddy. we're getting killed by cops and robbers and we need to address that and stop that. having said that, eric -- mr. mayor-to-be, i can say, well, you have to win the general election, so let me do that.
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>> yes, you do. >> what kind of police commissioner would you be looking for that can deal with both police reform and deal with the question of policing at the same time with the morale problem, but with the problem that we still want to see policing deal with things like mental health and readjust these budgets to deal with that? what kind of commission are you looking for? >> great question. as a reverend you can appreciate, this is a 14 and 14 moment -- >> very important. >> arrested, beat by police officers, go into the police department but at the same time, when i was arrested and beat by police officers, i also lost a good friend during the crack wars. so i understood what abusive policing was like and i also understood what violence was like. and now those 22 years i know the characteristics we need of a person who's going to be responsible for taking life and liberty. when i hear police officers say i'm angry and going to leave the
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department because of i'm angry. then i say leave because you have two precious authorities that americans believe, life and liberty, if i'm going to give you that authority you have the highest standard and oversight. so my commissioner and new york city, if i'm mayor, number one it's going to be a woman, because it's time to break that glass ceiling. number two i want to know who are you as a person? leadership starts from the top. bill bratton is a good friend one of the best police administrators i know. i have leaned on him throughout the years to talk about how do we continue to reform policing? i'm going to make sure we have a commissioner that's going to send the right message to our officers that you can weed out your bad cops in our police agencies right now they don't feel they can do that because the inner mechanism of investigating bad police officers is flawed and no one trust that system.
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>> you said you're going to have a woman, just point of information not available -- >> yes. >> -- but let me ask you this. this afternoon several of our civil rights leaders are meeting with president biden on voting rights and other issues. what do you need the federal government to do and then the state? because governor cuomo announced something yesterday you said it's about time. what are you going to do to make sure that federal and state government helps you in your quest? >> great question. when i said about time, it's not a criticism of governor cuomo, it's our country. we had this national emergency going on. it's time for the federal, state and city to align itself. if we were having the shootings you see in the south side of chicago take place in affluent communities we would have a national emergency. how are we ignoring this?
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what we need from the president is number one, let's identify the feeder of crime. let's look at our prison population and say what are the common denominators? how come we have 30% dislex you can dislexic. the crime is not just what's on the streets, it's what's taking place in our schools across the country. we are abandoning and creating systemic poverty that is feeding crime across america and we comfortable with it because of the demographics that's impacted. 95% of the shooters in new york are black and brown, 90% of the victims are black and brown, no one cares. i care. >> mike barnicle is with us and has a question. mike? >> eric my frame of reference for the new york city police department, which i regard as the finest police department in
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america, are two people. my old friend bill bratton who was on air earlier, and my late friend john timny, number two in the police department under bill bratton. and john used to say that the job of a superintendent of police or commissioner of police is to protect police from themselves. in other words, leadership. so the leadership to come of the new york city police department is going to have to deal with many issues. but one of the issues and i'm sure you can identify with this given your police background, the phrase gang units, somehow is found to be offensive among some editorial writers. but gang units out on the streets of any city, specifically new york city here. they know many times who the shooters are, and yet they are precluded for a number of
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reasons from going after this, lack of witnesses, lack of corporation on the street, what ever. what's your plan to restore the confidence of specific units like gang units who are out every night fighting crime in neighborhoods that very few editorial writers have ever walked the sidewalk of. >> you missed the third in the that trio, jack maple. an amazing law enforcement person to really transform police in america. there's a disjointedness to how we are going after the bad guys. the bad guys are organized. are streets are going to be controlled by the good guys or the bad guys. right now the bad guys are winning. number one i believe there should be a special prosecutor for guns and gangs. we need to really put resources into the gang units, resources
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into the gun suppression units. and we need to use precision policing. we're not going back to the days where you stop, frisk, search every person based on their ethnicity, the community they're in. you can have precision policing without heavy handed abusive policing. and you must have an anti-crime -- a plain clothes unit that's gun focused. not the unit i fought against as a police officer, i testified in federal court to get removed. but policing must have an element of uncertainty. right now if you have blue and white cars out there, the bad guy is going to carry that gun with a level of comfort and that's a big mistake we're making here in new york and we're probably duplicating that across america. >> new york city candidate for mayor, eric adams.
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thank you very much for being on this morning. >> keeps his word. >> yeah. has got the pierced ear. >> got the earring. still ahead on "morning joe," after months of talks we may finally see a senate vote on infrastructure within two weeks. we'll have the latest on those capitol developments when kasie hunt joins the conversation. in the wake of donald trump's 2020 election loss, qanon followers have launched a new plan, run for school board. we'll be right back. you're watching "morning joe." r" dry eye symptoms driving you crazy? inflammation might be to blame. inflammation: time for ache and burn! over the counter eye drops typically work by lubricating your eyes and may provide temporary relief. inflammation: those'll probably pass by me! xiidra works differently, targeting inflammation that can cause dry eye disease.
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the largest investment in infrastructure in decades. fixing roads and bridges,
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replacing led pipes to deliver clean water and expanding high speed internet access across america. without raising taxes on anyone making under 400,000 a year. a plan all parties support, big, bold, now let's get it done. >> a first look at the new ad out today, part of a $10 million campaign by the nonprofit progressive group building back together. looking to bolster support for the bipartisan infrastructure bill. president biden was in illinois yesterday pushing the bill and democrats in the senate may bring something up for a vote as early as two weeks from now. let's bring in host of "way too early" kasie hunt and correspondent for "the new york times" peter baker. kasie, do you think it'll be taken up in two weeks?
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>> we'll see. i'll be surprised if they manage to get it together. there's a lot of speed bumps still ahead. they still don't have legislative text out there, which is they need to figure out how much it's going to cost and the ad wars are kicking up, part of why this group is out there is because there are republican groups on the airwaves pressuring some republicans, jerry moran in kansas, for example, who said he'd be willing to support the package. so there's a long way to go still and with the restive progressives who are insisting they also get together a massive reconciliation package at the same time, the white house is going to have to be very careful about keeping everybody happy and it's not going to be awe easy to do that, especially under a time deadline like that. >> kasie, obviously republicans are needed if they're going to get 60 votes for the hard infrastructure part of this bill. we asked jen psaki yesterday
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about mitch mcconnell and he was saying nice things about joe biden over the past week or so. do you have any insight on that? is it -- is he trolling progressives or does mitch mcconnell want to get this hard infrastructure package through as well? >> first of all, joe, mitch mcconnell knows that he is firmly in control of whether or not it actually does pass. he's been clear about that in recent interviews and comments. because if he were to say to some of those republicans in his conference, he doesn't want it to happen. it's very unlikely that it would then happen, that there would be 60 votes for it. that said, mcconnell is careful and he is going to think about this i think in the moment when it arrives. he's going to see how long it takes how the process plays out. he's going to take every opportunity he has to basically, i think, criticize the administration. you've seen him do that already. but at the end of the day, what
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he cares most about is regaining the majority. if he decides when actually it is time to make a final decision on this, that letting it go forward is going to let his vulnerable republicans go home and say, look at what i've built for you, look at these bridges, these roads and that's going to matter more for them and his potential majority and standing in the way then i think he's going to go ahead and do that. that may stand away a little bit of republicans in the house. democrats are hoping to be able to go home and say they accomplished something at all. the administration's bar is we have got to be seen getting something done. in private conversations it doesn't matter what it is. they need to take it home and say look at what we did. it could be kevin mccarthy and mitch mcconnell have different interests here we'll have to see but i think that's the dynamic to determine whether this package gets through.
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>> peter baker, what's your latest on the packages, it seems before the fourth people were talking about the infrastructure deal, getting towards that 60 vote margin, things have seemed to slow down a bit. what's the latest? do you think it's still moving towards passage? >> if you talk to the people at the white house they tell you, have patience. this is a president that understands the process, understands that things don't happen as quickly as you like but times is of the essence. there are things that ebb over time. particularly for any new president coming in. you have a handful of months to get big things done before things start to pull apart. the centrifugal forces that will pull apart any kind of agreement like this are powerful. not only do you have republicans weighing in whether it's more advantageous weighing whether it's better to be against or for
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something, but you also have the progressives on the other side not getting what they want, and the longer the package takes the greater the chances are it frays. and president biden understands that better than most presidents at this stage. and he knows he has narrow majorities, anything can happen when you have a 50/50 senate. you have to act when you have the advantage to act. at the same time, of course, heading into a summer where people are going to be headed home to their districts and taking the measure of where things stand. that first summer of president obama's presidency was kind of a disaster for the obama/biden administration -- >> it was rough. >> right. because they want to change the dynamics and get things done before anything can change in a similar way. >> peter, you're so right about 2009, that summer, my god. it really was a turning point in the obama administration in a lot of ways. mike barnicle is with us and has
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a question. mike? >> joe, that summer of 2009, the same -- part of the same cast of characters were involved then as are involved now. barack obama is not around, but joe biden is around and mitch mcconnell is around. and peter baker, there's been a lot of talk and a lot written about the supposed friendship, the long-term friendship between biden and mcconnell. it's a relationship, but is it a friendship? that's one question. and the other aspect of it is, within the white house west wing, where they talk about this thing all the time, all day long, the relationship and moving the legislation through the senate, what are the odds that at the end of the day, mitch mcconnell reverts to form and says, basically, he's against governing, he's against passing anything to accrue some benefit to president biden? >> it's a great question. washington, the definition of friendship is somewhat elastic.
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right. it obviously extends to people -- >> elastic. >> yes, it is. >> it extends to people who might have bagels together at breakfast in the morning and slit each other's throats by lunch and then call each other friends at night still. i think in the current day, polarized washington that's what amounts to a friendship. they can sit down in a room and not hate each other, that doesn't mean they're going to agree on things, they don't have separate and competing priorities and dynamics pushing them in opposite directions. i think what you should look at at a biden/mcconnell friendship or relationship is one that avoids some of the most toxic versions of this that we've seen in washington over the years. mcconnell is not going to want to raise jihad against biden. but that doesn't mean he's going to help his agenda if he doesn't see it's in his interest.
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the real question in washington today is are you rewarded politically more for getting something done or for having an issue to debate the other side on, something to criticize the other side on. and in recent years the calculations on both parties, but particularly mitch mcconnell's party, it's better to have the argument, than the record because people don't vote on what you did in the past, the theory goes, they vote on what they're angry about at the moment. and the conversation is should we have an issue to run against biden and the democrats in 2022, or is there an advantage to say, hey, we can bring you home this bridge to our district, bring you more broadband, fix the pipes that need to be fixed. >> they can claim they can erase the past. word is the republicans are
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going to appoint someone from the commission? >> word is he is going to tap republicans and participate. there are a few, including rodney davis, who voted to support a bipartisan commission earlier. he said i'm interested in participanting in this. he's in a swing district. but the others are expected to at least be loyal to former president trump, people like i would say jim jordan may be someone that's certainly under consideration. he may have too much else on his plate. but he's known as an attack dog for the former president. the big question is whether any fire brands like matt gaetz or marjorie taylor greene will be tapped. and it's important to remember that nancy pelosi has veto power
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over this. but it tells you that mccarthy is interested in at least having some people in the room to know what's going on and shape the narrative coming out of the select committee. and remember how much mccarthy has on the line here because he was on the phone with former president trump, then president trump, on that day and we -- many reporters heard about it on background from various sources afterward talking about how angry he was. how he saw these were trump supporters, they were not antifa, not the fbi, not any of these things the conspiracy theorists are now saying. mccarthy knows what he said to the president, they're the only two people that know what was said in those conversations. finding out what was said may be something that's really significant, he seems concerned about it getting out in public. so that may be playing a role here as well. >> all right, kasie stay with us. peter baker thank you so much for your reporting this morning. a few other stories we're following this morning. if a british court permits the
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extradition of wikileaks founder julian assange to face criminal charges in the u.s., the biden administration has pledged it will not hold him under the most severe conditions reserved for high security prisoners. the white house also said if he was convicted, it will let him serve his sentence in his native australia. assange spent seven years holed up inside ecuador's london embassy where he fled. a well known dutch crime reporter is fighting for his life after being shot. peter devries was shot in the head tuesday night while leaving a television studio in amsterdam. dutch police arrested three people, one of whom they said could be the possible gunman. his reporting regularly drew
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death threats. police did not comment on a motive. coming up, 36 states and the district of columbia filed suit yesterday against google. we'll tell you what they allege against the tech giant. plus how bill barr broke the prosecutor's code and corrupted the justice department. a look at the lasting impact of the former attorney general. "morning joe" is coming right back. orney general. "morning joe" is coming right back so then i said to him,
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welcome back to "morning joe." 36 states and the district of columbia filed suit yesterday against google in an anti-trust challenge to the company's control over its android app store. the suit is the latest challenge to the search giant's plan to force all app developers who use
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its google play store to pay a 30% commission on all sales or digital goods or services. >> that's a lot. >> yeah, it is. politico writes that the case mirrors a barrage of anti-trust class actions filed by those who allege google's policies have led to higher prices. google said it's not about helping the little guy, it's about boosting a handful of major app developers who want the benefits of google play without paying for it. google is also facing a justice department lawsuit over its efforts to dominate the bumble search market. we'll follow the developments in this story. let's bring in former federal and state prosecutors elly -- elie honig.
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great to have you on the show. let's start by asking you what is the prosecutor's code. >> it's the lessons that you learn from being a real prosecutor like i was here in the southern district of new york. one of the arguments i make in the book was bill barr was never a really prosecutor, he never tried a case. so in the book i tell behind the scenes stories of things i learned and draw up the lessons and show how bill barr violated them. the first thing i was taught as an ausa is all you have is your credibility, every time you stand up and say representing the united states of america, the judge will tend to believe you, the jury will tend to believe you, the american public will tend to believe you, not because you're you because you're part of the doj. and bill barr came in and lied to us for two years everything from the mueller report to the election lie. i call him a liar in the book.
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he lied to us over and over again, i pull no punches. >> so you blame the lack of experience instead of the lack of character for what bill barr did over the past several years? >> both, joe. i think the lack of experience made him ill equipped to be attorney general because he doesn't understand what's it's about, the stakes, what it means to be in the courtroom but yes, there's a lack of character. lying shows a lack of character. and beyond that, bill barr weaponized doj, i served equal time under the bush administration and the obama administration. it made no difference to me on the line. bill barr came in and he used doj to protect donald trump in a dishonest way, to protect michael flynn, roger stone. and to pump the president's -- whatever his political narratives of the moments were whether trying to pump up the threat of protests in cities or the threat of election fraud,
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bill barr was right there enhancing whatever donald trump's political talking point was. >> what was the motivation -- there was a lot of establishment republicans that didn't like donald trump but said, hey, this is a bush guy, we can trust barr, he's a -- he's a pro, he's not going to let let donald trump politicize the justice department. we should be glad to have him in there. quite a few people who, of course, regretted what they said within a month or so but what was the motivation for a guy that had a good reputation in washington, d.c. wrapping himself around donald trump? >> joe, count me in that group. i publicly praised bill barr. i gave him the benefit of the doubt. same reasons you laid out. what were his motives? that's a great why r question. why? why did he do this? i argue two reasons, bill barr has an extreme view of the law, the technical form is the idea that the president is the
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executive branch and the executive branch sort of stands above the other branches. the problem is bill barr took it to a ridiculous extreme, the president is completely above the law, completely unaccountable. the second thing, this one surprised me in the research for this book, joe, is that bill bar senior a true sort of old school culture warrior. we found some things that he wrote and said back in the '90s that really were shocking. he talked about the need for and i quote god's you a to guide us in everything we do in our government. he railed against secularism, meaning non-religious forms of government. he blamed and i quote the homosexual movement for many of the ills in our society. so bill barr has an extreme view of relidgeiosity needs to govern our affairs. by the way, he went on an execution spree on his way out
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of office. he had more people federally than the prior six decades. he went into the supreme court, his doj and argued against equal protections for lbgtq people. those plus a lack in character i think created this perfect storm. >> mike barnicle is with us and has a question. mike. >> mr. honig, the former southern district rudy guiliani, the semi famous rudy guiliani has recently been suspended from the practice of law in both manhattan and the district of colombia for basically saying crazy things out loud. with regard to bill barr, he is on record of distorting and lying about facts of laws during his course at ten years as attorney general. where has the american bar association been on bill barr? where is it now? >> i think the american bar association and the states where bill barr licenses have to deal
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with this. he lied to the american public, not a crime a. basis to lose your license. he lied in front of congress. i think the bar association licensing associations have an important job. i'm glad you raised rudy guiliani. i talked about this in the book. if you ever been inside the bishlgd we have a wall of portraits of anyone serving as u.s. attorney. rudy is up on that law. in the '80s, he was a u.s. attorney. i confessed when i started in the of the, we used to admire rudy, i used to brag, this is the office rudy used to run. boy, what an utter disgrace and embarrassment he has become, a man who lost his moral compass and forgot the things i call the prosecutor's code in the book. >> so what do you make of bill barr's last-minute switch around the certification of the election that interview he did where he was essentially sending a message to the president that he wasn't going to go along with the president's lies about the 2020 election?
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>> i completely reject this revisionist history that has taken hold among not just donald trump, he's the king of revisionist history, i'll deny it and make it so. but people around donald trump are trying to do the same image rehabilitation act. bill barr among them. he came forward way too late in december of 2020. so three weeks after the election and say, we found no evidence of election frad. great, wonderful. the problem is absent from his rehabilitation tour is any mention. i cover this in depth in the book is the fact for six months leading up to the election when the big lies of election fraud was spread and catching fire, he was one of the main people fanning the flames and did it as attorney general. so that credibility i talked about that doj seal was behind him. he went on national tv, he went in front of congress and said there is this enormous election fraud. he had no facts to back it. he is to blame. i'm not going to let him revise
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history after the fact now. >> the new book is hatchet man, how bill barr broke the prosecutors code and corrupted the justice delaware allen honig, thank you very much for coming on the show, congratulations on the book. >> thanks for having me. we have a notable passing from the film world. filmmaker robert downie, sr. downey, sr., father of robert downey, jr. he was in 1969 the western jesus greaseer's palace in 1972. he was only made about $2.7 million at the time. but in 2016 was selected for the
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national film registry by the library of congress, highlighting its cultural significance. many of downey, sr.'s films gained depreciation decades after they were released. martin scorcese called him an essential part of the moment when a truly independent american cinema was born. he was 85. and still ahead, a lot of exercise regimens say people should take at least 10,000 steps each day. it turns out taking fewer steps may actually have some photoable benefits. >> fantastic. >> listen up. >> i knew that all along. plus, new developments in the high profile divorce of bill and melinda gates. "morning joe" is coming right back. gates. "morning joe" is comg inright back
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. good morning.
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and welcome as to "morning joe." it is thursday, july 8th. we are following a number of developing stories this morning, including two weeks after the collapse of the surfside condo came the difficult decision to transition from rescue to recovery. and the deepening crisis in haiti, after the assassination of the country's president immensely poor, unstable and increasingly violent. what's next for that already troubled nation? we're also following the latest with rudy guiliani. his law license suspended in the district of colombia, just as it was in new york for making quote demonstrably false statements about the 2020 election while representing then president trump. we will start with the very latest and the interesting dynamic playing out between
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president biden and senate majority leader mcconnell. biden called out mcconnell for touting the american rescue plan during a recent trip to kentucky. the $1.9 trillion covid relief passed earlier this year without a single republican vote. here's what the president said along with mcconnell's comments on the bill earlier this week. >> mitch mcconnell loves our program. did you see what he said? >> so you will get a lot more money, i didn't vote for it, but you are going to get a lot more money. >> he told me he wasn't going to get a single vote in order for me to get with the help of everybody here $1.9 trillion traction cut, excuse me, program for economic growth. look it up, man, he's bragging about it in kentucky. >> kentucky will get close to $7 or $800 million.
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>> it's a great thing for couple, it's getting 4 billion. it's amazing. >> if you add up the total amount that will come into our state $4 million. my advice to members of the legislature and others, local officials, spend it wildly. >> white house correspondent jessica alba was with the president in illinois yesterday. she joins us now. so i take at this time president is selling the plan to the american people. twhoofs response? >> reporter: and this was really part 2 of this major pitch on the road. last week we saw the president traveling to michigan and wisconsin to tout the bipartisan frame, which does enjoy republican support, which the president was quite proud of. yesterday it was on the quote so-called human sister. they would have liked to have seen in the original traditional
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physical infrastructure frame. that included child care and were later stripped out. republicans didn't want to supportment that now they're lumped in with the american families plan. that is something the president wanted to go to crystal lake, illinois to be the explainer in chief and detail why he believes not just democrats should be on board but republicans as well. he went to a county, in fact, that former president trump won in 2020. that is all a part of this strategy to try to pitch both of these things on a two-track plan. of course, the president misstepped a couple weeks ago when he linked the two saying he wouldn't sign one without the other. he since clarified that the attempt to talk about senator mcconnell's comments, was to say, look at what republicans are doing even when they don't vote for this legislation. if it passes and benefits their constituents, which it could in terms of the social programs, they go back an tout them in
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their district. so this is something the president is sort of predicting what could happench there are a lot of questions about democratic unity and whether all the senators will be on board since this package doesn't have a price tag yet and they can't agree on going too big or too small on that. that remains to be seen in terms of capitol hill. >> the president, of course, working on multiple track this is week as always. he has another speech today on afghanistan. what can we expect? >> reporter: and this came under some pressure. remember last week headed that the fourth of july holiday weekend, the president was asked to detail more about his draw-down strategy. he said, i want to talk about happy things. i don't want to talk about that heading into the fourth of july. i want to focus on independence day and vaccinations. i'll talk about that later. so later has arrived. that will be today after a meeting with his national security team. he will be briefed, of course, on the latest developments there.
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because at this point the withdrawal is around 90% complete. so today the president is going to update the american people and talk about this date. remember it was going to be by the 20th i was in of the september 11th attacks. now it seems all of this is going to be complete by the end of august. so he's going to detail the time line and defend the position that many critics say there ask a concern about the taliban gaining more control and the u.s.-backed afghanistan government collapsing potentially with the u.s. leading. there is still this open question of what's going to happen to these thousands of afghan interpreters, drivers, eng fierce, people who helped the u.s. search-and-rescue mission over the last two decades, who may be relocated to other countries. some may be coming to the united states under special immigrant visas as well. all of those details are being finalized. >> monicaal barks thank you very much. now, the president's comments on afghanistan will come just days after the u.s.
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pulled all troops out of its main military base there, bagram after 20 years. nbc news' richard engel filed this report. >> reporter: the only site of the afghan army now in charge of backram airbase is at the entrance. inside, there are miles of unguarded roads and barracks. and the relic of the u.s. troops who just left, a chillout area, christmas ornaments, care packages, and hundreds of very usable vehicles, nearly all white. some fire trucks, too, and the heart of the base, the runways. i borrowed a bike soldiers left behind and ped amounted down what was one of the most active runways for strikes against the taliban and al qaeda. it doesn't just feel like a ghost town. it almost feels post-apocalypticic.
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no tumbleweed, a can of energy drink bobbed along. not long ago, it was the epicenter of america's longest wars. so this was the command center. so there is no light? when u.s. troops left, they cut the power. the afghans, the soldiers told me, can't get it working. >> reporter: how do you feel the way the americans lest this base? "i don't want to talk about it," he said. everywhere was dark. you can't turn on the power, not too useful. the main battle room is offline. here are the racks that had all the computers, servers, the brain behind this operations center. that's all been stripped out. the americans say they handed over this base to the after goons in an orderly way so they can continue the fight against
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extremists. they left them a base that the americans, it looks like they looted themselves. but the hospital on base is still well stocked. plenty of drugs and valuable equipment. so this is good? this is very use. for you? >> maybe for patients. >> reporter: many afghan soldiers are angry how american soldiers left. but they don't seem to be making the most of what they v. you hardly know there is a war ou outside and the taliban are making rapid advances now the americans have left here. backram feels vulnerable. there are thousands of prisoners inside, now the base is disrupted, if the taliban were able to break them out, it would amass a huge fighting force right on the doorstep of kabul. >> great piece. to new york city now where cheers erupt fareed downtown hasn't mat tan as new york city held its first ticker tape
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parade in two years yesterday, honoring the essential work, who guided the epicenter through the pandemic. ida siegl has more. >> reporter: the canyon of heroes, number of perhaps the truest heroes this city has ever known. they are the essential workers who made us proud and kept us safe, showered with love. >> this is new york strong. we came together in a pandemic. >> oh my god, it's an honor and a privilege. we love new york. >> reporter: they are the nurses and doctors, the ups workers and bus drivers, the police officers and firefighters, all the people who left their homes and risked their lives every day during the pandemic. they were celebrities. >> not just the sports people that have been to the super bowl. but for regular workers recognized by the city as important, essential, it's
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amazing. >> reporter: sandra lindsay, a critical care worker from queens and the first person in the u.s. to be vaccinated was the grand marshall. what does it mean? >> so much, so many laws, everyone recovered. >> reporter: it was an emotional moment for jenna morgan, an icu nurse who left her family to save lives. and for this grandmother. >> so grateful. so grateful. >> she's thinking about my dad. >> reporter: her 5-year-old grandson explains how his granddad had covid and survived. they never thought they would be on the front lines of this dangerous war and stepped up anyways. >> it's a ticker tape parade, right? world series, we honor them. essential workers did
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everything. >> you know, it really is unbelievable, and again, you look at the fact there are many people that have been vaccinated now that don't really want to come back out yet, that are still uncomfortable 15 months later. here, we're heroes, new york heroes. but it happened all across america. still ahead, addressing the crime crisis and calls for police reform. brill bratton and the reverend al sharpton. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. harpton. you are watching "morning joe. we'll be right back. i'm morgan, and there's more to me than hiv.
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. across the country, it was a deadly holiday weekend with gun violence taking the lives of more than 200 people, according to gun violence archive.
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calls for action are coming from all major cities across the country, from philadelphia where a state senator had a family member die and homicides are up 25% and shootings up 50%. new york governor andrew cuomo declared a state of emergency over gun violence on tuesday saying it is costing more lives than covid and is a threat to the broader economic recovery. let's bring in the former head of new york city, boston and los angeles police departments, bill bratton. he is the author of the new book "the profession," a memoir of communities race and ar kiefg of policing in america and host of msnbc's host of the nation and action network reverend al
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sharpton. >> commissioner and reverend al, thank you so much for being with us. what is going on out there from oakland to chicago to new york, philadelphia, across america? violence is spiking in ways that reminds us of like the 1970s. what's going on? >> yeah, a number of things are going on, for all intents and purposes, the criminal justice in the occupation collapsed in the coronavirus epidemic. courts were closed. we were releasing a lot of people out of prison much too early. the proliferation of guns is phenomenal. many in the hands of young people and gangs. there are many, many causes of what's going on, the resolution of the problem is going to be extraordinarily difficult moving forward. the courts are now just starting to reopen in many states. we have still not effectively dealt with the gun issue. again this issue of all these
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young people that seemingly are out of control. it's going to be a heavy lift nationally, at the st. level and eric adams at the local level in new york city. >> right. let's talk about some things people won't want to talk about. but if they want violence come down, perhaps these are some of the things we have to look at. there have been a series of reforms over the past couple of years that were undertaken when crime was at a 50-year low, no cash bell, for instance. some other criminal justice reform measures that have shortened sentences and have allowed a rotating door going in and out of prisons. reverend al and i talked about it weeks ago. you have people committing a crime, a violent crime, they're back out in the street 15 minutes later, let's talk about the things that will make so-called reformers uncomfortable. if we want safe streets, what are some of the things we are going to need to do to keep
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perpetrators of these violent crimes in jail. >> well, one of the things, just to recognize, unfortunately, there are violent people that need to be in jail, keep them away from the rest of us. so we will have to address that. are 5,000 people walking the streets right now committing violent crimes. many of them have their cases dismissed by district attorneys in new york, well intended, but too much too fast and we're going to have to address that issue understanding that some people need to be separated from society. >> and reverend al, you and i have talked about it. we spoke also with eric adams about the fact that you talked about in many neighborhoods, you have heard and you have seen
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people who have committed crimes with guns if jail and you know an hour or two later back out on the streets. we just heard commissioner bratton say now in new york city $5,000 people walking around the streets arrested for gun crimes and let back out onto the streets. what do we do about it? >> i think we have to deal with the fact first of all, where are the guns coming from? i think what governor cuomo brought up yesterday, we have to deal with the manufactures to those running gun rings, to those that have the guns in the street that continue to almost like a revolving door keep getting back out without any kind of punishment or redemption or programs that would recycle how they think or readdress how they think and how they behave. and i think that we must first
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and foremost and i think that the incoming probably incoming mayor eric adams, who i know well, will be able to deal with this. >> coming up, there are 34 senate seats up for grabs next year. mike allen joins us to explain why the ohio race is the one to watch. "morning joe" is back in a moment. watch. "morning joe" is back in a moment
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♪♪ a live look at capitol hill in washington, d.c. a city where rudy guiliani can no longer practice law. at least for now a. d.c. appellate court suspended his license yesterday after the new york appellate court did the same thing last month for making quote demonstrably false and misleading staples about the 2020 election while representing then president donald trump. under the rules of the d.c. bar, license suspension is required when a member is facing disciplinary action in another
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state. the former new york mayor may appeal to have his license reinstated. let's bring in mike axios, who joins us, i guess first on rudy guiliani, any chance he whether get his law license back for the statements not only about the 2020 election but on stage on january 6th? >> well, with these suspensions we're seeing a rare consequence, so many have had zero consequences, it's not going to stop rudy from being rudy, but the system, at least, is working. >> yeah. >> really, mike allen, it's great to see you. it was surprising people that move earlier on this with the extraordinarily damaging and
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false claims that he made about illegal process but that's what's happened do you expect other states to follow and go after guiliani? >> well, as a country lawyer, yourself, joe, you know better how political these could be. i think we could see a blue/red split on this. but action on the license shows that you can't just say anything and we're coming out of a period where alas, people thought with good reason they could say anything. >> speaking of saying anything, yesterday we showed one tweet after another that j.d. vance wrote over the past five years, especially 2016, telling the christians the world is looking at us. god help us, talking act how he
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couldn't support donald trump, that his policies were idiotic and i mean you've read all the tweets saying, this wasn't a tweet that j.d. vaps shot off in the middle of the night. this was over a year's time. >> this was never felt. >> before he was in producer. he let christians know that supporting donald trump would damage the faith. he let conservative republicans know this guy was not fit to be president of the united states. he voted for a third party candidate. he did everything he could do and bragged about it trying to stop donald trump. now he wants to pretend that never happened will that help him in ohio win the nomination? >> yes, he has an unbelievable quote he gave to "time" magazine
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when asked about trump, he said, well, he's the leader if i want to talk about the trump crowd, i have a have to suck it up and support him. twitter, of course, calls that saying the quiet part aloud. this is a fascinating race we call this the one race to watch to see what some of the themes are going to be in the mid-term races and beyond. i did an interview yesterday with j.d. vance. what was he talking about? culture wars and big tech and populism, which takes in inflation and gas prices and jobs to coin so it's a preview of how races will unfold and folded into that we will see how close do these republican
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candidates have to be to trump? it's very crowded. if j.d. vance were to win that, that's no sure thing, he would be the definite favorite to win the senate race and he would suddenly be talked about if a post-trump world. >> coming up, the evolution of qanon as its followers tried to expand hiding in plain sight. nbc news' pat collins has been following the fringe movement. he joins us next with his new reporting. joins us next with h reporting.
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surfside. >> reporter: this morning in surfside, two weeks worth of tears spilling over after a search and rescue search-and-rescue mission unlike anything seen in florida history, a painful and emotional admission from officials. >> we decided based on everything given to us that there are no live victims. >> reporter: a rescue search-and-rescue mission shifting to recovery as the death toll only rises, crews finding 18 more bodies wednesday, 54 people now confirmed dead. more than 80 others still missing. >> our first responders have truly searched that pile every single day since the collapse as if they're searching for their own loved ones. >> reporter: the chances of finding anyone else alive, officials say forly nearly impossible. >> but we can and will do everything in our power possible to identify all of the victims and to offer closure to the families.
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>> reporter: the news devastating for the families of those lost and draining for the crews working their way through the rubble. captain ignacious carroll says every day passing without a rescue has taken a toll. >> there has not been a dry eye out on that search operation since we started. >> reporter: the massive undertaking more than a job. >> any time that we found a person, we would stop, you give them a moment of silence and there would be a line created by the search and rescue person fell as they bring that person off of that pile. >> reporter: and it was that tile crews lined wednesday, standing shoulder-to-shoulder in absolute silence, paying tribute to those lost and promising to make families whole one final time. >> all right. now to a story we first broke while we were on the air yesterday morning. the deepening crisis in haiti after the assassination of the
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country's president. nbc news correspondent gabe gutierrez has the new developments. >> reporter: overnight, the first arrest after videos emerged of assassins apparently outside a private residence of haiti's president. the footage appears to show vehicles and heavily-armed men moving down the street around the time he was murdered. >> dea operations, everybody back up, fan out. >> reporter: in separate audio, a group can be heard identifying the group as dea agents. >> do you believe they were paid by his political opponents? >> i believe there was some possibility being made. it's obvious it's a group of mercenaries. >> reporter: haiti's ambassador to the u.s. tells me they were clearly not dea agents but foreign mercenaries that gunned down president jovenel moise and critically injured his wife. overnight, haitian authorities announced four suspects were
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killed, two were arrested as the international manhunt continues. the country's prime minister is in charge and declared a state of siege. the airport in port-au-prince is shut down. the dominican republic closed its boarder with haiti. the u.s. embassy is saying to shelter in place. >> we will have more information. it's very worrisome about the state. >> reporter: the poorest country in the western hemisphere ravaged by that devastated earthquake a decade ago has grown increasingly violent. protesters accused president moise of authoritarianism as he tried to rewrite the constitution ahead of elections later this year. now to a looming humanitarian crisis in syria as the u.n. security council is set to vote today on a resolution to keep the country's border opened for aid. the 2014 resolution is set to
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expire on saturday, which allows u.n. to deliver aid across the turkish/syrian border. many dependent on the relief effort would be put at risk if it lapses. last year, the council closed three of the four authorized border entry points after vetos from russia and china. russia continues to promise to veto any resolution allowing aid across the border. >> you are making this, this is an issue that really americans should pay closer attention to. it's something we talked about be every the summit in geneva. the people of syria have experienced just unspeakable hor horse over the past decade. >> truly. >> those horrors continue now in large part because of russia's involvement in propping up assad, who has really been responsible for the death of half a million of his people and
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also the greatest humanitarian crisis since the end of world war ii. and russia keeps standing in the way of america and the world. the global community going in there and providing some relief, a modicum of aid to the people in syria continuing to suffer in that country. >> also -- >> it is just unspeakable. >> also involving russia, president biden is facing increasing pressure to respond to the recent cyber attack that has affected thousands of businesses. biden said over the weekend that the u.s. will respond if russia is, fact, behind it. but kevin after russian hackers claimed responsibility, biden has been vague about what the response will look like. >> mr. president, these cyber attacks are happening, at what point cuz the united states respond and take action?
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at what point does the united states respond? >> i would expect the united states to be vague on the response but i and lots of other millions of americans would expect a response if the russian aren't going to respond against these hackers and against these terrorists, then we have to respond and we have to defer future conduct. just like the president said he would. >> yeah, the line has been drawn. a new report obtained exclusively by nbc news shows the computer code behind the ransomware attack by the hacking gang are evil was written in a way so that the malware avoids systems that primarily use russian or related languages further highlighting that the attack originated in russia. the russian government still denies being responsible for the
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attack or another recent alleged hack of the republican national committee. they deny both. so turning now to a few development with the conspiracy group qanon. quick we fresher, it is the group founded on the belief donald trump would take down a fictitious group of child-eating cannibals that ran our government. it seems the group seems to have a new plan to gain influence. senior reporter for nbc news, ben collins joins with us that new reporting, in the wake of donald trump's 2020 election defeat and the disappearance of the anonymous online account q that once served as qanon's inspiration, many people who spout qanon's false claims hatched a new plan, running for school board or local office. spread the gospel of q but don't
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call it qanon. >> thank you so much for being with us, ben. before we get to this really interesting plan and strategy by supporters of qanon. just curious, you can give us a background in we heard the news that marjorie taylor green is now teletelling people that believe the qanon conspiracy theory that donald trump will be reinstated in august, is out, now telling people it's not true. it's not going to happen. i'm curious, in general, how much is the qafon movement in retreat right now? >> reporter: they're in retreat to the extent that they don't want anything to do with the name qanon. but they will continue kicking the can down the road about the president donald trump being reinstated as president. that's in part because of how it works. it's how cult-like movements
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work, they work on disinformation on continually having a dooms day that's coming somewhere down the line. so look they hate the branding qanon. all the attendants have stated network factions that built up over the years, these forms and influencers. they always look to for new guidance. they are shifting the plan down the road saying it's coming later on. be you the actual movement, itself, is not going away. >> so you can explain to us? i've read some of your explanations before. just explain to people who are watching who are curious like me, how is it that all of these scenarios are set forth, something's going to happen on february such-and-such. something will happen in march and they never happen and you move past that date and you think most people would be humiliated for going on social media and telling the world that an event was going to happen on a date.
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certainly it didn't happen. they move it forward a month. it doesn't happen on that day, they move it forward obviously, donald trump is not going to be reinstated if august. psychologically what is it? i know you have talked to a good number of members. what is it that keeps them moving forward even after they have been proven wrong and gullible time and time again? >> reporter: if you talk to cult psychology experts about this, back in the '60s there was a cult that had a hard dooms day, right, they were all going to be taken up into space and everything was going to be fine while earth got destroyed that dooms day came and went, people afterwards got more and more into the belief set that they had done something to push that date back. that they think, you know, hey, we must have been fighting the right war that whole time if we didn't wind up getting raptured here. that's what qanon people believe. they believe they are fighting a long war on the internet through
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digital soldiers is what michael flynn calls them. so they believe they've done something right if the dooms day is pushed down the road. it's an element of human nature. if you have gone all in on something deeply embarrassing, which is what qanon is. it doesn't happen over and over again. there are two options with your tail tucked between your legs, your family would be like, i guess i wasn't right. you can double and triple down, no, i'm right all a. along, it will come out soon. >> tell us about the plan to start running for local offices like school board? >> reporter: yeah, so look as q went away this omnicient believeer. he hasn't posted since december 8th. so we're over six, seven months of that now. so they've looked for different
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strategies. they still have these forms and influencers who are trying to decode all the q posts and decode was president trump is still saying. you know, from mar-a-lago or wherever it is. so instead of abandoning that, they have looked to people like michael flynn and michael flynn has said, run for school board, run for local office. he said, get involved in the education of our children. they've taken hand the affixed it to the top of their forms. this is our next plan, the real plan. we need to instead of waiting around for stuff to happen, we need to take the bull by the horns basically n. some cases, these are working, elections where 1200-something votes can win. they are winning at local officers throughout the country, california, pennsylvania, florida, michigan. they are telling people to run and they are doing it. >> ben, it's kasie hunt. what is the overlap between the qanon people or next ev lux of
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qanon and extreist white supremacist groups, the proud boys, i remember seeing pike flynn signs and from the tactical planning what is the connection between them, if any? >> reporter: true, there was a moment with proud boys and oath keepers they decided the bigger the tent the better, really anybody who is committed to the search-and-rescue mission of making donald trump the front and center, you know, of their lives, basically, driving that culture war. so qanon people came in a couple years ago and said, we'll be a part of this. it's the real life version of what we have been fighting for anyway. that's what we saw, q people next to proud boys. you've seen proud boys wearing q patches, in the past, oath keepers doing the same thing. sometimes they look down on qafon people. they think they're as pathetic as most people do. they will allow them n. it's
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numbers, sheer force. they have a lot of ideological agreements about culture war issues. that's where you see it. after the 6th, these groups started recruiting realizing these people might want to take their fight more public. that's what's happened as qanon has dissolved qanon has dissolv there have been places to voice their grievances. >> ben, the other kay, i came out of the super market on nantucket island. i was marked next to a car with a qanon bumper sticker on it. i'm sure there's not people walking around on nantucket island wearing q t-shirts.
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how much of the group is basically more interested in culture ideas like race, what's caught in school, critical race theory, things like that. how much of the group is composed of that philosophy? >> first of all, mike, you're right. this isn't a blue state/red state thing. qanon has he facebook groups, in real life, anywhere there -- anywhere you can get alternative medicine, they will find a way in. it's not a strict -- it doesn't go by ideological borders at all. the critical race theory has opened up a new public platform, to make youtube videos to get the crowd riled up, our story is foundationally, there's a guy in florida who talked about the hollywood pedophiles that are carrying away our children.
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a lot of people were there to talk about critical race theory. it adds to the grievances that people have with school boards. there's a podium at that for your school board, and you can then upload it to your youtube page. ben collins, that is you so much for your reporting. we greatly appreciate it, as always. we have an update on the high-profile divorce of bill and melinda gates. they will continue their roles as co-chairs, about you if after two years they cannot find an amicable way to work together, bill gates will take over in full. he would buy melinda out and provide her resources to do her
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own philanthropic work separate from the foundation. they have also agreed to increase the number of trustees. currently they and warren buffett are the only trustees. buffett announced in june his plans to step down. naomi osaka opens up about her mental health saying it's okay to not be okay. "morning joe" is back in a moment. to not be okay. "morning joe" is back in a moment (realtor) the previous owners left in a hurry, so the house comes with everything you see. follow me. ♪ (realtor) so, any questions? (wife) we'll take it! (realtor) great. (vo) it will haunt your senses. the heart-pounding audi suv family. get exceptional offers at your local audi dealer.
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♪♪ the tampa bay lightning finished a pandemic hockey season the way they did last, winning a stanley cup after defeating the canadiens last night. from skating to walking, it turns out we may not need to take 10,000 steps a day to be healthy. >> that's what i've been saying a long time. >> because you never made it to 10,000. >> never. an expert on step counts and health found that, for women in their 70s, the risks for early
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death dropped for those walking more than 5,000 steps a day, but benefits plateaued aabout 7500 daily steps. i guess you can walk too much. >> hmm. now to a young sports star back in the spotlight this morning. tennis phenom naomi osaka is on the cover of "time," as she opens up. here's stephanie gosk. >> reporter: dropping out shocked the tennis world, then she withdrew from wimbledon. now on her own terms and in her own words, she's explaining why, writing -- it's okay to not be okay, and it's okay to talk about it. she explains that i wanted to skip press conferences to exercise self-care and preservation of my mental health. i stand by that. athletes are humans.
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but tournament officials insisted she face the press, like every other player. osaka writing -- i felt under a great amount of pressure to sxloes my symptoms. i do not wish that on win she has a proposal for all professional sports, writing -- we can enact measures to protect athletes, especially the fragile ones. osaka says give athletes the right to take a mental break from media scrutiny, but a twist that is only grown brighter. >> people might think i'm quiet, different, but i don't fixed box of what anyone should be. >> overnight the international olympic committee launching the stronger together campaign. >> but i am proof that the
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definition is bigger than people think. >> osaka, who will play for sxwrapen in the olympic games, with a message for young female athletes. >> if we don't fit that expectation of what people think we're supposed to be, good. >> it's a message exoed in her netflix series launching next week. >> i always had this image, but now i don't care what anyone has to say. >> she thanks those who stood by her, including michelle obama, novak djokovic, and steph curry. she adds, michael phelps told me by stepping up, i may have save someone's live. >> such wid dom. it's okay to not be okay, and
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really the most important line, it's okay to talk about it. >> and do what you need to do to help yourself. the last thing you want is someone who is suffering to then not take the steps to help themselves, to validate what they need. i commend her. that does it for us. chris jansing picks up the coverage right now. >> hi there. i'm chris jansing in for stephanie ruhle. it's thursday, july 8th. there's a ton going on. today marks a huge day as texas republicans try again to restrict how ballots can be cast. president biden pledges to fight voting restrictions nationally. the also is also talking about afghanistan today, new questions about the drawdown that's left

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