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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 5, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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starts now. today we see the results of the unity of purpose. for together we're beating the virus. together we're breathing life into our economy. together we will rescue our people from division and despair. but together we must do it. over the past year, we've lived through some of our darkest days. now i truly believe, i give my word as a biden, i truly believe we're about to see our brightest future. >> president biden leads the nation in a fourth of july celebration. touting it as a day where we are nearing independence from the deadly pandemic but as the delta variant spreads across the country is vaccine hesitancy creating two americas. plus the latest from florida as part of the surfside condo that was left standing after the collapse has been demolished
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ahead of the tropical storm. what it means for families still looking for answers. and former president trump appears to acknowledge some of the tax schemes alleged by new york prosecutors in the case against the trump organization. good morning and welcome to "morning joe," it is monday july 5th, we hope everybody had a great fourth of july. we'll start with president biden marking the celebration on the lawn at the white house. part of what he called the summer of freedom, giving new meaning to the independence day holiday as he spoke about the nation's progress against covid-19. >> this year, the fourth of july is a day of special celebration for we are emerging from the darkness of years -- a year of pandemic and isolation, a year of pain, fear and heartbreaking loss, just think back to where
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this nation was a year ago. think back to where you were a year ago. and think about how far we've come from silent streets -- [ cheers and applause ] >> from silent streets to crowded streets. from empty arenas to fans back in their seats cheers together again. from families pressing a hand against a window to grandparents seeing their grandchildren again. businesses are open and hiring again. we're seeing record job creation and economic growth. the best in four decades, and i might add, the best in the world. >> let's bring in author and nbc
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news presidential historian, michael beschloss. you listen to the president's speech yesterday and you line up the facts, which is in some ways the hottest economy since reagan's morning in america economy in 1984 as joe biden said yesterday. we have record job openings, we actually have more jobs than we have people to fill them right now. covid, the pandemic, we're on the backside of the pandemic, america has beaten the world in getting, you know, most of its people vaccinated. yet as alex burns writes in "the new york times" we're still a 53/47 nation. do you suspect we're going to be divided this way for quite some time? >> i think we are joe and mika. here's the situation. you look back at history, we
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were divided in 1861, at the time of the impending civil war and slavery. but when before had we had a situation where at a time of medical emergency there was this kind of partisan division between those who wanted to get vaccinated and those who did not. polio vaccine began in 1955 you didn't see that. in the influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1920, there were a few fringe groups that were like anti-mask leagues but this was not a political thing. so we are living in a country where p even something like public health, which in normal times is almost above partisan division, becomes one more casualty to civil war. >> i do wonder whether a leader comes along, either in the republican party or democratic party that by force of will
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moves beyond that, i'm talking political will, of course, like in 1980, reagan changed everything. like barack obama did in 2008. that was supposed to be the beginning of a new era. trump 2016. isn't that for the most part, isn't that how american history is moved along out of these stubborn sort of retrenchments? >> you are absolutely right. a leader of the opposition party, you know, essentially said this is getting crazy and this is getting dangerous lets change it. arthur vapidenberg in 1947, for instance. he said this is a threat from the soviets in europe, we have to be more internationalists, we ahead to other republicans we have to make deals with others
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so we can have nato and deal with the spread of the soviet army, possibly through western europe which we want to stop. that's something that we usually have. the other thing is, in a time like this with this pandemic seeming to ebb, almost up to 70%, hasn't quite gotten there yet, americans do have a habit through history when we've been through a terrible experience we want to forget quickly. for instance, one of the reasons why the roaring "20s were roaring was because people wanted to forget the death toll of world war i, 105,000 people. the death toll of the influenza pandemic, 675,000. they wanted to forget it as soon as possible. it would have been a hard time for a president to say let's have a vaccine and we're going to have to restore things like mask. after the korean war, which
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people judge largely a failure, a frustration, people forget it happened. you talk to a korean veteran and that person will say that, same thing for the vietnam war. for president biden, he has to say let's keep getting vaccinated, the threat is still here, there might be a variant that might be very dangerous, particularly after labor day, but at the same time we have this terrific economy and america is certainly back and better than it was a year ago for all sorts of reasons. >> give us all your thoughts on the president's speech yesterday. and what the first six months of the biden presidency suggests for what's ahead? >> well, i think we have been very lucky to have a pro with a half century experience in national politics. because there have been very few mistakes over the last six months, especially in the thing that you were talking about just
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a moment ago, which is, you know, he would be very tempted to say, yes, the economy is wonderful, as he said yesterday, the pandemic is better, which he did say. but another less seasoned political leader might say everything is great. everyone relax. the tough thing for a leader is to do both of those things, because he knows if there is a downturn in the economy and that can always happen, terrible inflation might happen. you might have a variant that makes this vista look a little less bright than it does on the fifth of july 2021. then next year he has to run a midterm election which every republican commercial will put those words up saying he was too optimistic, let down our guard, almost like george w. bush with mission accomplished. >> michael beschloss, thank you
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always for being with us. and happy fourth of july weekend. >> fourth and fifth. >> yes. happy fourth of july observed. to michael's point last night, president biden also warned that the covid variants are still powerful and urged americans to get vaccinated. >> don't get me wrong, covid-19 has not been vanquished. we all know powerful variants have emerged, like the delta variant, but the best defense against these variants is to get vaccinated. my fellow americans, it's the most patriotic thing you can do. so, please, if you haven't gotten vaccinated, do it, do it now. for yourself. for your loved ones. for your community. and for your country. >> all right. the nation fell just short of the president's goal of getting 70% of american adults
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vaccinated by the fourth of july. more than 172 million adults have been vaccinated, that's about 67%. meanwhile, polling shows president biden earning high marks for his handling of the pandemic. in a new washington post abc news poll, 62% of americans said they approve of the president's performance. but while the majority of democrats and independents gave president biden good grades. 60% of republicans said they disapproved of his pandemic response. and while 69% of all respondents said they have been vaccinated or plan to get vaccinated, 47% of republicans said they probably or definitely will not get vaccinated. on "meet the press" yesterday, dr. anthony fauci was asked about the highly contagious delta variant of coronavirus and issued a warning about regional disparities in vaccination
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rates. >> we're going to see, and i have said, almost two types of america. you know, those regions of america which are highly vaccinated and we have a low level of dynamics of infection and in some places, some states, some cities, some areas where the level of vaccination is low and the level of view rus dissemination is high, that's where you're going to see the spikes. >> some republican governors are expressing concern with vaccine hesitancy in their states. arkansas' asa hutchinson, west virginia jim justice and utah's spencer cox all implored residents to get vaccinated yesterday. those are among the three states where the vaccination rate is lagging and the delta variant is spreading. joe, talk about the governors and what they're doing. these are states where folks
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don't want to give in on their vaccine hesitancy. >> well, they're states that are stronger republican states. you can actually see how america is divided. if there are lower vaccine rates, chances are good they're more likely to vote for republicans. they're more likely to be skeptical. they're more likely to be trump supporters. that's why these republican governors are going out in some of these states. we saw senator tommy tubberville in alabama do the same thing where vaccination rates are low. they're doing it for a good reason. first of all, they want their people to be healthy. but also, they want their states to be open for business. >> that's right. >> this is soon going to be an economic -- going to cause economic disparity. you're a business and you have a chance to move into a low tax state where vaccination rates are higher or a state where
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vaccination rates are lower, you're going to move your company where vaccination rates are higher, because it's going to be harder to get the best and brighter workers to get to a state with vaccination rates that are lower. it's just an economic reality. that's what we've been saying for some time on this show where even if you don't care about people's health, even if if you're so selfish that you don't care, just be selfish economically and do the things you need to do to keep yourself safe, your family safe, your community safe so businesses can open up and work there. >> so the governors are doing their best, but there is this vaccine hesitancy that we'll be talking a lot more of with experts here that could really set the country back.
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is this one area or tell me if i'm wrong, where donald trump could make a big difference if he really got out there and told people that he got the vaccine, melania got the vaccine, it is okay to get the vaccine, in fact, it is good for you and for the country to get the vaccine? if he came out and gave a full-throated endorsement of the vaccine and his own benefitting of it, would it make a difference with the vaccine hesitant population? >> you got to believe it would. he's come out and he told people to get the vaccine. >> you know what i'm saying. he sort of said it. >> yeah. i was going to get to that. he's come out and said people should get the vaccine. but if he was aggressive about it, if he talked about it a lot in his speeches. if he bragged about the fact that his administration helped develop the vaccine and it was the greatest vaccine on the planet like he says about his
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golf courses and his chocolate cakes that he gifts leaders of china. if he went all in, you got to believe he's one of the few people that could move the number that we saw at the beginning of the show down. almost one in two republicans are refusing to get vaccines. again, that's not only going to hurt them and their families and loved ones and friends. it's going to hurt their communities, states, because in the long run people are going to make business decisions based on what communities are not just friendly to low tax and regulations and a government that wants to be a partner with small businesses instead of an enemy. they're going to look at numbers on how many people are vaccinated. if i'm a ceo and i can go into, i don't know, austin, texas, i don't know what the vaccination rate is there. but say austin, texas' vaccination rates are higher
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than montgomery, alabama, i'm going to texas. that's the decision that leaders and states need to make. you're right, the one person getting out there aggressively telling that 50% of the republican party to go out and get vaccinations to make a difference, it would be donald trump. but again, i -- the numbers are really baffling because every one of those republicans, or 99% of those republicans, they gave all their kids vaccines before they went to school or else their kids didn't go to school. it's that simple. >> yes. let's bring in white house reporter for the associated press, jonathan lemire and president of the national action network, reverend al sharpton. and founding director of the boston university center for emerging infectious diseases,
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dr. nahid bhadelia, she's an msnbc contributor. good morning to you all. dr. bhadelia, i want to ask you about the scientific side of the delta variant. how -- i guess explain where the united states stands with the delta variant and how possible is it that it could set the country back in its progress against the coronavirus? >> mika, happy fourth weekend by the way. what we know about the delta variant is, it's a lot more transmissible. because of that, the exposure to it, it makes it a lot more dangerous for you if you're not vaccinated now compared to even last summer. the poll that you showed, what i found interesting about that, three out of ten people are saying they're not -- probably are definitely not going to get the vaccine. 80% of those people say they
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won't because they don't think this virus is going to impact them. the truth of the matter is, the way this distribution has occurred where you're seeing cases go up, hospitalizations go up, missouri, mississippi, arkansas, those are all states that low 30s -- vaccination rates in the low 30s. the idea, people look at that, 70% of people almost getting their first dose. they'll say, the inclination is to say aren't we close, won't we get over the hurdle with kids now getting vaccinated? sure some places that might be enough. in fall with kids going to school, the vaccines getting emergency use authorization for kids under 12, the problem is the way the distribution of unvaccinated, as you talked about, set up is that most of them are in the same community.
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so if you're not vaccinated you're hurting your own neighbors, communities, families, is true. and i fear the politics in the fall is going to get worse as we start talking about vaccinating school kids as they go back to school. >> jonathan lemire, president biden wanted to get to 70% by the fourth of july, he's close, 67% i think the number is, but you look at the number of where we are as a country, then you look at that poll, and you've got about 30% of americans saying they haven't gotten it, they're not going to get it. what's the next step for the white house to try to encourage more americans to get those vaccines? >> in your conversation with michael beschloss a few minutes ago, he mentioned the george w. bush mission accomplished banner, and that is the forefront of this white house's mind, they wanted to make sure they are not perceived as doing that. as getting out ahead of it,
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claiming the pandemic is behind the nation when it clearly is not. they wanted to use fourth of july as a moment of celebration to mark look how far we've come. and no doubt there's remarkable success and the vaccine distribution largely had been a triumphed for this administration but there are dark clouds on the horizon, covid cases are up 10% or so as the delta variant takes hold, particularly in states with low vaccination rates they know that is the great challenge, it'll take three to four weeks before they hit the 70% vaccination mark they are close but deserve credit. now it's a targeted approach to those communities that have been so hesitant. there's not been a formal ask of donald trump to do this and if the white house were to ask, that would be a good way to get him not to do it. but he is more about the
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vaccine but mostly he hasn't gotten enough credit. we've talked, my colleagues and i, who have been out in the states across the country some of them say at this point, republicans who are refusing to get the vaccine said they wouldn't get it if trump did say you need to do this, that he wouldn't mean it. it's become another battle hardened divide, us versus them, a cultural decision to not take the vaccine, which is dangerous economically yes, but also their health and the health of their loved ones, do they rely on local leaders to get out there with ad campaigns, but this is a stubborn problem and they admit they don't have all the answers right now. >> it's a stubborn problem and we've been talking about republican vaccine hesitancy. obviously, reverend al, people of color have been vaccine
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hesitant. in 2020 well over a third of people of color saying they were unlikely to get the vaccine. that vaccine hesitancy is still there, down just a little bit. but what do leaders do to get to members of the black community, the hispanic, latino community, to get the vaccines, because let's face it at the end of the day if they get sick, they're the ones most likely to suffer the most. >> the hesitancy is still there, it's down somewhat, but not nearly where it should be. that took a lot of effort from those of us in community positions of leadership and visibility. but i think we have got to keep pounding at the fact that this is not, first of all, exposing you to something that some conspiracy theorist as weaved even though the history is clearly there that gives people
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cause for pause. this is not in any way like we've seen in the past and we have to make them understand, don't do this just for you, do this for your children, grandchildren, and the business in your community. everyone wants to see the businesses and the jobs and a sense of stability come back to the community, you can't stand in the way. and you have to have those direct kind of messages to them to almost say to them, you're the one standing in the way of the community rising back to some level of trying to be stable. >> all right. we're going to come right back to this conversation but we want to go to florida now where, in preparation of an impending tropical storm, the remaining portion of the condo building in surfside was demolished overnight.
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>> it happened last night around 10:30 eastern time, with controlled explosives. there was concern that the rest of champlain towers south could come crashing down as well. demolishing the rest of the condo was sped up due to a tropical storm that could hit surfside as early as this afternoon. the governor of florida has issued a state of emergency as tropical storm elsa closes in, 121 people remain missing 12 days after the building collapsed. 24 people are confirmed dead. joining us now from surfside is nbc news correspondent von hillyard. what's the latest? >> reporter: good morning. this was a major operational hurdle for the rescue operation. a striking decision made this weekend to take down the remaining part of that building.
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this decision was a reversal from the mayor and other officials' initial stance that they were not going to risk this building coming down, potentially making this rescue operation even harder on top of the rubble. but the reality is there is a expected and rain and the last thing these rescue teams wanted was that building going down in a direction, whether it's in the streets or the building next door or onto that pile of rubble because there are still 121 individuals unaccounted for, you saw from the images of the video overnight. this was a success. the mayor calling the collapse a success. this was 11 days after that initial collapse here. you can see the video shot in the streets last night. within minutes there, the rescue crews were headed right back to the scene. essentially going back into that debris, that dust, to begin this rescue mission again.
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this is still a rescue mission at this time. folks, families are still holding out hope that families, loved ones are beneath the rubble. i was talking to one man whose mother and grandmother are both missing. he questioned the decision to take this down. he said he wants closure, a proper burial. but officials saying they put a tarp over the existing rubble so this morning it made it easier to eliminate the new material so they could get to that initial pile of rubble and begin to recover bodies at a speedier rate and one in which there is not a looming danger that that condo complex could collapse on top of the rescue crews. mika? >> vaughn hillyard thank you for your coverage. we want to turn back to our coverage of the concern. the president announcing he
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almost made his goal, 67% of people vaccinated. but this vaccine hesitancy is a concern. dr. bhadelia, what's the concern that people who did get vaccinated will need booster shots. >> the science is still out. it's good news showing those who had both the vaccines or a prior infection and one dose that likely they're going to hold out some level of immune response to the variants out there or over time, at least for a year, maybe a couple years have that protection. however we don't know what's on the horizon. we covered the idea of a booster because of how long the vaccine coverage will last but also because we're worried in the virus continues to transmit and right now worldwide you're seeing increase in transmissions in southern africa, asia, you're
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seeing cases going up. so there might be a new variant that poses a new risk that then introduces the need for a booster. the answer is we don't know. only 10% of the world is vaccinated and the other 90% you're seeing the virus pose a risk, currently. >> dr. nahid bhadelia, thank you for being on this morning. we appreciate it. still ahead, former president trump uses a rally in florida to rail against the prosecution of the trump organization. he appeared to acknowledge the tax schemes behind the charges. >> well, i don't know he did that. it was like, what, taxes? you have to pay taxes on cars and buildings? >> he sort of denied they are crimes. >> well, he acted like he didn't know what he was doing. which i guess would work if you weren't keeping two sets of books to hide the taxes you
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weren't paying. plus, experts say it may be the single biggest global ransomware attack on record and russian hackers could be responsible. also, as they prepare to celebrate 75 years of marriage. former president, jimmy carter and his wife, roselyn reflect on their relationship and offer some advice. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. atching "mo" we'll be right back. l my employ something different. oh, we can help with that. okay, imagine this... your mover, rob, he's on the scene and needs a plan with a mobile hotspot. we cut to downtown, your sales rep lisa has to send some files, asap! so basically i can pick the right plan for each employee... yeah i should've just led with that... with at&t business... you can pick the best plan for each employee and only pay for the features they need. discover card i just got my cashback match is this for real? yup!
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well, joe, he's done it again. >> simply the best. sort of the beethoven. joey chestnut broke his own record, setting -- he set that record last year and now he broke it. this is news. by eating 76 hot dogs in if just
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ten minutes at nathan's annual fourth of july contest, marking his 14th, fourth of july win. chestnut celebrated to cheers of several thousand attendees watching from the stands of a minor league baseball stadium at coney island. >> i want to see lee greenwood right now. >> the runner up managed down 50 hot dogs while third place ate 44. what are we doing here? can we stop? >> jonathan lemire, and i proudly stand up next to you and defend her still today. gorging like a g. o.a.t. joey chestnut sets record with 76 hot dogs in no minutes, a true american great. i want to bring up willie geist trying to get in our head suggesting that the red sox have won the east. we know that's not true,
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jonathan lemire. we're about to collapse. you could see it a couple nights ago in oakland. true we've won nine out of ten games, we're ahead of the new york yankees by ten just before the all-star break, true our relief pitching for the most part has been excellent but you dig into that one loss in ten games a couple nights ago in oak oakland you can see the beginning of the end from this franchise. i suspect we're moving down to triple a. they're lulling us into this false sense of security and when it's time to go around the home stretch, going to go right past you. >> they got us where they want us joe. it's interesting that you suggest relegation, which is a staple of english soccer leagues would now come to major league baseball. does seem like it's the red sox's fate and sad future.
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i will say on joey chestnut, america is backs. that's what that is. >> yes, yes, we are. >> i can't even watch those. >> so gross. >> i can't do it. i know he's the tom brady of that sport, except he's not like tom brady in any way. >> that's not a sport. >> that's hard for me to stomach, but i will say, joe, fourth of july, no better time perhaps to mark the fall of an empire. i did take my boys yesterday to the subway series and saw the mets come back against the yankees, but then the yankees did win the night cap, their comeback starts right now. >> we're in trouble. >> we're in trouble. >> rev, it's hard to look at the tabloids in new york city. they're just trashing the yankees the fans are turning on this team, booing them. thank god we have joey chestnut to gather around the flag.
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america is back. >> i think that, as one who has been particularly careful with my diet the last several years -- >> you look fantastic. >> -- chestnut is not exactly a heroic figure to me. and i sit there and what is more interesting to me than anything is why thousands of people would go and watch this. i mean, on a sunday, it really is not something that a minister wants to hear people are doing on a sunday rather than go to church. >> he needs to be folded into some sort of religious celebration, i don't know. >> it is a religious celebration in itself, mika, but go ahead. here's something nice. former president jimmy carter and his wife, rosalyn, will celebrate their 75th wedding anniversary, wednesday july 7th. they're the lopgest married presidential couple in history.
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they shared advice in a new joint interview with the associated press. he said, my biggest secret is to mary the right person if you want to have a long-lasting marriage. every day there needs to be reconciliation and communication between the two spouses. we don't go to sleep with some remaining differences between us. rosalyn carter noted the importance of finding common interests. even now she said jimmy and i are always looking for things to do together. still she emphasized a caveat, each person should have space. that's important. isn't that nice. >> we have common interests, you love going out and running long distances. and i love. >> joey chestnut. >> the fact that you like to go out and run long distances. >> you want me to keep running. >> you know the carters,
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actually, and you saw them upclose. i heard you say such wornful things about them. especially you didn't -- you didn't spend as much time around the president as you did rosalyn, but you just -- you just -- and your father and mother, your entire family just absolutely loved rosalyn carter. >> they're a remarkable couple. and i believe that a lot of what they did in terms of how they conducted their marriage but their lives is focused on their religion and on their values, and he brought that to the white house. and my father has so many amazing stories about just the kindness, the generosity, the empathy and just the beauty that the carters brought to the table every day. >> you forgot one word, in your
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father's diary i read patience. jimmy brought a lot of patience towards your father. >> and many others. >> and a lot of love. >> yes. >> you're right. a wonderful couple. happy anniversary. >> coming up, china's president celebrated the 100th anniversary of the chinese communist party with a warning to rivals. plus, could we see former president trump testify before the new house committee investigating the january 6th insurrection. >> i doubt it. >> what house majority whip, jim clyburn is saying about that. "morning joe" will be right back. ♪♪ ♪ and i'm proud to be an american ♪ ♪ where at least i know i'm free ♪ ♪ and i won't forget the men who died ♪ ♪ who gave that right to me ♪ ♪ and i gladly stand up next to you and defend her still today ♪
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we lead by the power of our example. not the example of our power. and we're part of something so much bigger than ourselves. we stand as a beacon to the world. it's a code. it's a code. uniquely american code. it's who we are. all the service members in your families who are here tonight, today, all of you serving around the world, it's the greatest honor to serve as your commander in chief. jill and i -- jill and i and our entire family thank you for your service and sacrifice. like so many military families, thinking of your loved ones who served, we think of our son beau
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today. you're all part of a long chain of patriots who pledged their lives and their sacred honor in defense of this nation. president biden at the white house yesterday in contrast the top republican on the house foreign affairs committee, congressman michael mccall is slamming president biden for his decision to withdraw all troops from afghanistan saying the president will be responsible for the actions of taliban. >> we're going dark in afghanistan and there will be consequences because of this. at the end of the day, when we fully withdraw, the devastation, and the killings in women, humanitarian crisis, president biden is going to own these ugly images. >> i wonder if the chairman said the same thing when donald trump
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kept pushing to get us out of afghanistan, maybe he said the same thing when the donald trump decided he was going to abandon our kurdish allies by taking 3,000, 3,500 troops -- when he yanked them out of syria. when we actually had american troops that were pushing back on isis. american troops bushing back on the iranians, the syrians, the russians, and we had american troops that were pushing back on the turks. and yet donald trump yanked them out. i think that was a mistake. said so. i think getting everybody out of afghanistan is a mistake. i wonder if the chairman was that aggressive when donald trump were making what i believe were those terrible tactical decisions. >> that's the frustration here, these are important debates but the hypocrisy is ridiculous. the top u.s. general in
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afghanistan, general scott miller is warning of a civil war in the region. >> you look at the security situation, it's not good. the taliban are on the move. we're starting to create conditions here that won't look good for afghanistan in the future if there's a push for a military takeover. let's bring in richard haas, and ed luce. richard you and i have both expressed our concerns with this afghanistan withdrawal. people may be tired of afghanistan, and yet people were tired of being in iraq and we had to send troops back to iraq after isis created havoc. would it be the same in afghanistan? >> i'd be surprised if we sent
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any troops to afghanistan for any duration. i think the lesson here is we are just -- just because we overreached in afghanistan doesn't now make the argument for underreaching. and to leave will create vacuums, things are going badly faster than i thought. the fact the taliban are making enroads in the north, not the normal base in the country, is a bad development. and i think this is a rare example of bipartisan for both the trump administration, now the biden administration, i think both of us would argue have gotten it wrong. we've reached a point where a small level of american troops seem to be keeping the lid on. we haven't had a combat fatality there in something like 16 months. we've driven the cost way down in terms of human as well as financial and i think this is -- this is simply a strategic-owned goal. >> you know, richard, the question is always asked what in
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the world did we learn from 20 years of war? what we learned, the united states military showed in syria, that you can have a small number of troops place them strategically get the right troops there and you can push back on isis, on russia, on the syrians, the iranians. and it was a sustainable force, 2,500 to 4,000 troops there. the same thing with afghanistan and yet it seems this all or nothing mentality again, it's -- it is so short sided. i will say, strategically inept for not just democrats, republicans like donald trump and a lot of people who just want to bring troops home and live in fortress america. it's not how a great power behaves. >> it's also not how a smart power behaves. again, in our rush to get out we
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will create situations which i think, as we learned on 9/11 we're about to mark the 20th anniversary, can hurt us. we're not immune from these things. one of the phrases, joe, i would argue should be banned from the conversation is forever wars. we don't call what we have in korea or germany wars we call them open interests. and again afghanistan we have arrived at a point where for modest investment we really got good results and i think it's unfortunate that the mentality is somehow let's bring all the troops back which in the short run is welcome but in the medium and long run i fear we may regret it. >> the all or nothing approach where if you have 2,500 people there it's the same as having 100,000 troops there, it's just
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ridiculous. ban forever war and also world's policemen. if we're sending 2,500 troops to push back on isis or russian aggression, to stand up and help the kurds, stop the refugee crisis in syria, where tens of thousands of syrians are being starved to death because we aren't there. that's not us being global policeman, that's us looking after our own best interests. and ed luce american politicians love to say the united states is going it alone, why should we go it alone in afghanistan? we aren't going it alone in afghanistan. and we weren't going it alone in afghanistan. we had a lot of allies, they're helping us. >> yeah. that's right. and i'm sitting here in rural england visiting my parents for the first time in a couple of
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years, so forgive the eccentric backdrop. it was something the british, the dutch, the germans, italians, other nato partners in afghanistan were not extensively consulted on before the biden announcement of withdrawal and they weren't consulted on the 9/11, 20th anniversary withdrawal date. i think overall the europeans are happy with biden they do believe the americans, to some extent, are back. but this is one decision on the negative side of the ledger. because america's nato partners can only exist in afghanistan and continue their operations with the united states. so they're all withdrawing i think pretty much fully withdrawn now with the full knowledge that pakistan hasn't changed, still run by a deep
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state by its intelligence services and seedy military. and the taliban, as mika's dad used to say, we might have the watchers but the taliban have the time. and they've got the time and they're using it really much quicker than we might have feared as richard pointed out. they are gaining districts at an alarming pace. >> so now moving to china. china's president, xi jingping, recently marked the 100th anniversary of the communist party of china with a warning to his rivals. in a speech last week before a crowd of 70,000, xi praised the party's successes saying china wanted to promote peace in the world but said the country would no longer listen to, quote, sangt moan yous preaching and
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the time they could bullied by others is gone forever. he praised the ruling party for living china out of poverty and vowed to expand the military and influence. >> there was a belief that china was inward looking, wanted to protect the kingdom, it was not going to be like the soviets post 1917. any reason to reassess that beyond the south china seas. do you see china as a country that has military designs on other parts of the world? >> i wouldn't say they have military designs on quote/unquote other parts of the world. i think the real question is not just the south china see but the areas in close, the border with india, the islands they dispute with japan, the question of whether they might be willing at some point to use military force and take taiwan and quote/unquote reunify china. i think in the rest of the world beyond that their tools are more
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economic, more diplomatic, the so-called belt and road infrastructure, but i think the real thing is what we call in the case of russia, they're near abroad. they don't consider to be abroad. so much of xi jingping's speech the other day was not simply about celebrating the party and all that they've accomplished over the last century but talking about the work that remains to be done. the good news i would say in a speech is when he did speak about taiwan, he didn't lay out a timetable, he talked about peaceful reunification. and talked about the main thing was that taiwan not declare independence and if that didn't happen there weren't specific threats. so as muscular as the speech was, a lot of red meat should we say, it didn't set new worrisome language out there on taiwan. >> ed luce, listening to the
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speech or reading accounts of the speech, it's the sort of speech that you would expect a politician to give on the 100th anniversary of their party. obviously china is a special case but i wasn't shocked by language that said china will never be preached to again, never be told what to do again. it's exactly -- tell me, maybe i'm wrong, i heard nothing there that sent alarm bells off only because he seemed to be speaking to a domestic crowd. >> yeah, there's that and also the fact that we got used to this more robust, more aggressive face of china to the world. so we've had several years of xi jingping and wolf warrior diplomacy being the norm with china. he didn't ratchet it up a notch with this speech and as richard
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pointed out, he didn't make any specific threats to taiwan, it was more boiler plate language directed to a domestic obvious. if you're in the tom cotton camp and looking for reasons to sort of escalate this cold war with china, this isn't a reason. >> now to this ransomware attack that has affected the networks of at least 200 u.s. companies on friday, and a russian criminal gang appears to be behind it. cyber security experts are pointing the blame at a major russian-speaking ransomware syndicate. the satisfactory ware company is believed to have been the target of the attack, and experts think it could be the same hackers who shutdown the jbs meat company over memorial day demanding an
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$11 million ransom. so jonathan lemire, what has been and is the white house reaction to these attacks and how do they counter them? >> this is sort of the first test of how president biden's summit with vladimir putin went a few weeks ago. part of that meeting was biden delivering a stern and not subtle messaging to putin suggesting we don't necessarily believe that the russian government are behind the cyber attacks that happened up to that point but you are giving safe harbor to organizations doing this. the pipeline that was shutdown that caused temporary fuel spikes just one of many examples of the ransomware attacks going more and more prevalent. the president was asked about this saturday he was at an event in michigan, and more or less he was asked about it by a report erthere. he said he hadn't been fully briefed yet, wasn't able to weigh in one way or another who
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was behind it. we are seeing others saying yes, it was a russian group. we don't expect to hear from him publicly today but this will be a major topic in in the days ahead, what sort of reaction will the white house have. in the past they've given russia cover if the government wasn't involved directly. we'll see in the days and weeks ahead if there will be a more aggressive response from the administration whether it's sanctions or nudge, wink a cyber attack the other way. >> how important is it for the biden administration to have a signal sent from the russians that things are different now and that actually the -- putin and the russian government will move aggressively against criminal operators in their own country? >> it's critical.
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we began the conversation this morning talking about afghanistan and after 9/11 we declared to the world that we nould not only hold terrorist groups responsible but we would hold responsible any government, country that harbored them or supported them. and we've moved to the same place with these cyber criminals. so the message is to the russian government, if you allow groups like this to operate freely out of your territory you are just as responsible, as guilty as they are. so i think we reached that point. unless you believe a group of this scale could be operating under mr. putin's nose without his knowledge and approval, and i don't, it's time to follow-up geneva and say you're accountable. whether the response is sanctioned or i would prefer something in the cyber domain to say to putin, we put you on notice, this has happened, you have to respond. >> ed luce, you are in rural england, i must ask you, how is
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the household? how is the neighborhood, the community? how is the nation preparing for wednesday as england moves forward and takes on denmark, possibly moving all the way to the finals to have an opportunity to break the hearts of every englishmen in the final next week? >> well, there are plenty of prince hamlet jokes being cracked already before the denmark semifinal. rural england is obviously obsessed with the soccer. but i went on a walk -- this is very much country side around here yesterday, and i came across two isolated cottages, picturesque scenes flying the american flag and i've never seen that before. it was july the 4th, they knew
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it was july the 4th. normally they have the saint union flags. but to have the american flag flying in rural england on july the 4th, was to me something unusual. i've never seen that before. and i doubt i will have seen it this time last year. trump is not a popular figure. biden is quite highly liked in england. but the obsession, as you suggest, joe, and you must forgive the spotty wi-fi, this is my parents' house. that the football on wednesday will -- it's like a religious event. it's going to have the entire nation watching. >> yes. the wi-fi is fine. >> better than eating hot dogs. >> the backdrop is wonderful. i don't know if you saw the movie "yesterday," but it looks like a set scene out of the movie. we love it.
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thank you for being with us ed luce. and richard haass, i'm going to be carol merle here, you have two doors you can talk about the new york yankees, that's behind door one or door two -- >> what's door two? >> we can wish you a happy fourth of july -- are you going to go golfing today, richard? >> i will go golfing today. and i do want to remind you and the guy in the box next to you that the season is not even 50% over. it's too soon to start setting aside nights in many october for playoffs or world series. you're not quite there yet. on the other hand, we are even farther not quite there yet. it's not looking good. i think we ought to get the hot dog guy, we ought to get him on. we need him. >> richard we fully expect the red sox will collapse and the jane keys will storm past us again. but for now we're just the little engine that could. i think i can.
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>> richard haass, ed luce, thank you both. we are just a few minutes past the top of the hour, of course, late. in preparation of an impending tropical storm, the remaining portion of the condo building in surfside, florida was demolished overnight. it happened last night around 10:30 eastern time with controlled explosives. there was very real concerns that the rest of champlain towers south could come crashing down as well. >> bringing the building down in a controlled manner is critical to expanding our scope of search, as you know, in the pile, and allowing us to search in the area closest to the building which has currently not been accessible to the teams given the great risk to our first responders due to the instability of the building.
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>> demolishing the rest of the condo was sped up due to a tropical storm that could hit surfside as early as this afternoon. the governor of florida has issued a state of emergency as tropical storm elsa closes in. 121 people remain missing. 12 days after the building collapsed. 24 people are confirmed dead. now to president biden marking the fourth of july holiday last night with a celebration on the south lawn of the white house. it was part of what he called the summer of freedom, giving new meaning to the independence day holiday, as he spoke about the nation's progress against covid-19. >> this year, the fourth of july is a day of special celebration. for we are emerging from the darkness of years -- a year of
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pandemic and isolation, a year of pain, fear, and heart breaking loss. just think back to where this nation was a year ago. think back to where you were a year ago. and think about how far we've come from silent streets to crowded parade routes lined with people waving american flags. from empty stadiums and arenas to fans back in their seats cheering together again. from families pressing hands against a window to grandparents hugging their grandchildren once again. we're back traveling again. we're back seeing one another again. businesses are opening and hiring again. we're seeing record job creation and record economic growth. the best in four decades, and i
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might add, the best in the world. [ cheers and applause ] >> meanwhile, with an estimated 350,000 attendees at nashville's let freedom sing fourth of july celebration, headliner brad paisley's independence day convert marked the official reopening of nashville and america's live music scene breaking historic records for its attendance and fireworks display. the "morning joe" field team was there last night with the musicians and attendees as they cheered on the music and a return to normalcy.
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>> happy fourth of july! >> nashville is back. >> this is the greatest country in the world. greatest city in the world. >> covid is basically over for most of us. it's nice to see all these smiles. >> i think it's the fact that it's the largest show in the country is a testament to the growth that's happened here. >> i'm a music lover and country fan, coming here to nashville getting to see brad paisley. >> we love america and nashville. >> nashville is back, baby. it's back. >> to show you have a global super star that's going to take the stage inviting everybody to come out to experience music once again, it's back, live music, let's do this. >> this is what we lost that time, that feeling that you're looking at a stranger in the eyes, singing along. that's what i miss, singing that with someone i never met before at the top of my lungs. >> bringing live music back is
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so exciting. being in front of a crowd is why we do it. we want to reach people. so this is really reaching people and a lot of people. >> this is what it's all about to me playing music, in music city. to me this is the greatest music city in the world. and just playing a venue this big, dream come true. >> i could not be more excited to see brad paisley in concert, it's like old times again. live events, i don't see masks, hopefully everyone is vaccinated. i'm a big believer in the vaccination. >> i think brad speaks for a lot of people in the united states. i think he brings people together. as far as politics goes. i feel like people on all sides of the aisle love brad, he's the definition of coming together and showing that we're all going to get through this. >> after 15 months of being locked up and doing everything digitally and remotely, having the opportunity to come together and experience this live, the reopening of america, country
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music is all about community, energy and connectivity, and nobody embodies that more than brad paisley, who someone like brad paisley, encouraging people to get the shot, the vaccine, so we can have nights like this. >> this really feels like they've done an incredible job in nashville. we're talking about more fireworks than anywhere else in the country. and this is really the home of this type of music and the idea of getting back out there, we're back, it's great. basically singing city of music on broadway, which is mentioned in the song, it's the type of thing where when i saw what all we went through, a bombing, a flood, a tornado, a pandemic, music business shutdown, to be able to celebrate what we are as a city and what we stand for musically, i can't wait to look at the very people i'm talking
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about when i sing it. i think this means everything for the country. we need to experience music in an open airplane setting together, shoulder to shoulder, collective experience of things like this as well as the idea of economically what it means to my industry. these people were devastated by this. and the fact that we're all going back on the road, this is the first of, i hope, many of these that are going to happen all around the country all summer long and be able to celebrate that we've really -- we're at a good place. it's great. >> i love this city! i love y'all! god bless you! we're back! thanks for being here! >> what a great city. >> so cool. >> what a great event and what a great guy brad paisley is. one of the guys you saw in that piece, curt bardella, now an
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adviser for the d triple c. and also with us capitol correspondent kasie hunt. also alexi mchammond joins us, she's rejoined the axios political team covering the 2022 midterm elections and jonathan lemire and reverend al sharpton are still with us. curt, looked like an extraordinary night we heard joe biden say america is back but last night it looked like nashville is back and open for business. >> joe, it sure felt like it. i can't even do justice to what it felt like to look out and see 350,000 plus people just in the celebratory euphoric, joyous mood. you know this being a musician
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that music is a universal language. i think all of us have been waiting so long for something positive to experience together as a community and being in nashville, you know, music city, brad paisley, a tremendous ambassador both for country music but as well as just the american people and someone who embodies the spirit of being unified, of coming together, as he's talking about, nothing more patriotic you can do than get the shot so we can experience moments like this. and it's everything we could have hoped and imagined for and really the powerful energy amongst that crowd and this was a situation where it wasn't republicans, democrats, we were all americans, all singing along and it was just such a joyous feeling. >> reverend al, you obviously travel around the country, i'm
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curious, do you get the sense that we are finally, at last, reopen for business, reopen the churches, whether we're talking about churches, concert halls, baseball stadiums, does it seem like we've gotten to the point with this fourth of july where we can say america is open for business? >> i think that we are approaching that very rapidly. and i -- what i sense even more is a hunger for people who want to open for business. they want to be back together. when we saw what brad was able to pull off in nashville, i think he is right when he says he wants to do it in new york in front of live people. to really see people really want to come out and they want to the come out together. i'm sensing that kind of hunger across political lines, people that did not normally talk to each other, that were strangers or talking to each other now. i think that's one of the good
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things that comes out of quarantine is that you sort of appreciate trying to learn and build and bond with certain situations that you may not have done before. i really sense that everywhere i travel around. to politics now. republicans nationwide have unified around one issue as they gear up for a midterm fight that will determine control of congress. crime. gop operatives are centering their midterm message on rising crime rates and defunding the police. a strategy that saw them gain seats in the house in 2020 nbc news reports in retrospectives by democrats, the lack of clarity on where they stand on policing was cited for a cause of their disappointing results in several congressional races. this as a recent poll show 60%
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of americans see crime as an extremely or serious problem in the united states. >> and president biden is talking obviously about spending more money on policing, spending more money on crime prevention. i'm wondering, is that being picked up on the hill by democrats and is that a message that moderate and progressive democrats can move forward with as they go toward the 2022 elections? >> joe, i think it's going to be tricky actually. i think you're right that the president has handled this in a careful way. remember jim clyburn, the number three democrat in the house at the time, said why are we using this slogan, it doesn't make any sense. and i think that perspective has settled with most of the members of congress but there are still progressives who are focused on this. there was a bill to literally secure the capitol building that nancy pelosi the house speaker
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had to scramble and make sure she had enough votes for it because there were members of the squad that said this bill gives money to police and we are not ready to vote for that. this is still an emotional and divisive issue inside the democratic party, i think this is going to put much more pressure on that group to -- i mean, they did not necessarily publicize that this is what they were doing in advance but that is actually what happened. it's clear how quickly this issue has changed and, you know, we've cited the new york may mayor race that suddenly this has rocketed to the top of the list of things important to people and i think president biden gets that. he was around when crime was an issue in a durcht way than it has been in the last decade and i don't think that lesson has been lost. >> over the last six to nine months we've had democratic leaders on, i asked each one whether they supported the, quote, defunding of the police,
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whether it was a good idea, every one said it was a bad idea, a bad slogan. jim clyburn has been saying it since that about. and then you the new york mayoral race where the excop rocketed to first place. let me ask you the same question, is there going to be a disconnect between biden, jim clyburn and the more progressive members of the caucus when it comes to crime, or funding police or defunding police? >> as kasie mentioned this issue is changing. i spoke with nina turner last week by phone, she's running in ohio's 11th district, and when jim clyburn got involved in that primary and endorsed her democratic opponent he cited
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defund the police in what he calls sloganing as the reason he was endorsing chantel brown and not nina turner. nina is a progressive icon to folks on the left, one of bernie sanders' senior most advisers, she said to me, look, i don't run on defund the police. i have family members who served in law enforcement throughout my life. i have a more nuanced take on police reform and yet folks like clyburn are taking the range out on the progressive movement against those trying to get a seat in congress. so we're seeing the dynamics unfold for the folks that are progressive icons and vocal progressives but having to walk this weird tight rope, balance as democrats are trying, and some say failing, to figure out their message on police reform.
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>> jl jonathan lemire it's nas fascinating. leaders have been saying on this show they oppose defunding the police, joe biden came out talking about additional funding for the police. obviously they understand this is going to be a top issue as crime rates go up across the country according to one headline after another. i'm wondering, jonathan, any future plans from the white house to show americans that president biden is tough on crime? >> joe, the white house feels like they are pretty well protected against the defund the police attack, biden personally, they point to his long career, associations with law enforcement, support for the crime bill -- obviously from the '90s some of that he has withdrawn saying we should have done this better, but they feel he personally is okay on this issue. they're watching the stats too. this is why they had the event at the white house a few weeks
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ago. they recognize this is becoming a top issue for many americans as crimes, shootings go up in a number of places across the country. there is concern, though, that the split on this issue, reverendocts in the midterms, their margins are so slim for democrats to keep control of the house. they feel even if president biden is okay on this other democrats may not be. you care about both sides of the issue, police reform, which is what progressives are mostly focused on, but you see the impact of high crime in the communities. so how do you think the white house and democratic party at large -- have they been able to enact this balancing act? >> i think they have began to navigate it. i think a lot of people have lost the critical core problem and that is who defines what is a progressive in what community. you must remember that it was in south carolina that joe biden,
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with jim clyburn's support, defeated bernie sanders and so many other. so in so many communities they depend on black and brown communities, depended on the vote to save them in congress and 50/50 in the senate. the deaf in addition of what is progressive is not the same. so it is not progressive for people dealing with an up tick on gun violence to say we want to take all the money away from police or from programs in those cities. i think there's been a hijacking by some that have identified themselves as progressive from those that have had a long record of trying to deal with issues like police reform and voting reform. you have to remember, everyone brought up the new york primaries that just was over. we had two or three at most so-called progressive candidates. 70% of the democrats voted for
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who were considered the moderates in liberal new york. so i think that people are reading their own tweets rather than reading the community. >> all right. we're now getting a closer look at the evidence new york prosecutors allegedly have against the trump organization. in documents filed in the new york supreme court last week, the state claimed that the trump organization has spent years paying its cfo, allen weisselberg, off the books. payments allegedly included cars, an apartment, cash, and even tuition payments all hidden from income tax authorities. the indictment alleges the trump organization was keeping internal spread sheets that tallied the payments that were being hidden. prosecutors treated the spread sheets as the accounting equivalent of a confession.
quote
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prosecutors estimate weisselberg alone avoided paying more than $900,000 in taxes and have been pushing him to operate with the investigation. at his rally in sarasota, florida over the weekend. the former president railed against the indictment and some say may have incriminated his company in the process. >> they go after good, hardworking people for not paying taxes on a company car. company car. you didn't pay taxes on the car, or a company apartment. you used an apartment because you need an apartment and didn't pay tax or education for your grandchildren. i don't even know, do you have to -- does anybody know the answer to that stuff? okay. but they indict people for that. think of how unfair it is. never before has new york city and their prosecutors, or perhaps any prosecutors,
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criminally charged a company or person for fringe benefits. murder is okay. human trafficking no problem. but fringe benefits you can't do that. >> you can't, actually say it's one of the dumber things you've ever heard him say but i can bring in dave aaronburg. dave, this guy who claims to be a business genius, you have to pay taxes on apartments? whoever knew you had to pay taxes on cars and apartments? you know who did? they did because they had two spread sheets. they were keeping two sets of books according to the charges and the information. it seems they knew all too well the ramifications of not paying almost $1 million in taxes on those benefits. >> good morning, joe. you got it.
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that sound you hear is the sound of the trump bus rolling over allen weisselberg at that rally. i do take it as admissions they're going to hurt allen weisselberg, the trump organization and could come back to be used against trump himself if he's ever charged in this matter. what you saw was a preview of his future defense, if he's ever charged, which is what i call the sergeant schultz defense, you remember the character, i know nothing he used to say. we see that defense all the time here when it comes to white collar broad cases. the defense could help trump but allen weisselberg can't use it, he has a level of sophistication, experience, knowledge, that makes that defense inapplicable. plus there's evidence of criminal intent here like the allegation of two separate sets of books one for the irs and one internally that kept account of the hidden benefits that
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weisselberg got so when he said he never received a raise between 2011, 2018, it was done under the table according to prosecutors and subsidized by taxpayers. >> they kept meticulous books according to the prosecutors. so i'm wondering what charges or what -- what liability does allen weisselberg face? how serious could this be for him and what's the likelihood that he'll flip so he spares himself prison time? >> joe, i think he's in the range of five years in prison. remember, leona helmsly had something like this. when trump said no one has been prosecuted like this, new york prosecuted leona helmsly and then the feds took its over, and she got four years. for weisselberg now he's facing prison time here, as to the
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question of whether he will flip, i think it's kill or be killed time here. if you're wondering whether he'll flip before or after trump points the finger at him, it's happening. the longer weisselberg waits to flip on trump, the worse deal he'll get, and he has to watch and wonder if barry, his son, who may also be implicated in the scheme, allegedly received free housing and didn't pay taxes on it, whether he'll be indicted next so prosecutors have other arrows in their quiver. i think flipping is inevitable for allen weisselberg. i think it comes on the day that he fears prosecutors and prison more than he fears donald trump. let's move quickly to surfside we've been all following that tragedy closely. based on what you learned the past week, the design defect, based on other things that are
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being revealed a week after that tragedy, what's your view on the liability of those who ran the condo, who built the condo? >> i think there will be a lot more civil lawsuits that have been filed and they'll be certified into a class action. the standard for negligence is to prove preponderance of the evidence that there was a duty of care here and it's not a high duty to reach. compare that to criminal prosecution, which requires proof beyond any reasonable doubt. and to get higher to culpable negligence, it's higher than gross negligence, you have to act so recklessly, it's the guy who shoots into the air at a new year's eve party and kills someone, that's the recklessness you need. but there's a grand jury that
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will be empanelled, they can subpoena records, testimony, we'll know if this civil liability rises to the level of criminal liability. we're just not there yet. >> dave aaronburg, thank you so much. kasie hunt i want to turn back to something we talked about earlier this morning with michael beschloss that was as sy despite the fact that the economy is growing in some areas faster than in a generation, you have covid receding, america reopening for business, moving up on a significant bipartisan deal, and yet we're still divided. we're not seeing movement right now, joe biden 50% approval
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rating, 42% disapproval rating. how are republicans and democrats looking at this reality as they move towards possible closure on this bipartisan deal? is the deal going to happen? how do they think it's going to impact the election next year? >> joe i think it shows and underscores that there are fewer and fewer people open to persuasion or convincing in our politics and that does drive a lot of what happens on capitol , it's going to help us to demonstrate that we're able to do something to convince people to get out to the polls, shows you we have some basic things in common still and we all still need some of the same things, but i think the biggest risk to the deal is exactly what you outlined here, which is that at the end of the day, people no
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longer necessarily view or at least a lot of the most partisan people no longer view bipartisan cooperation as a plus. that used to be something almost every candidate ran on. i think joe biden showed everyone at the middle of the electorate, t are looking for something like that. but in an area where people are concerned about primaries, and where energizing your base to get out the door to vote is a criminal part of the game that's a disincentive to work with people and why they embraced the former president so aggressively. i think the democratic party is different. they're in a different scenario and joe biden has clearly demonstrated that he understands that. there was another times piece that looked back at why he won in 2020, it was gains with married men and veterans, more conservative households. i think he gets that and a lot of the house races are going to
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depend on those things. that's one of the ways where democrats i think have to be more careful if they want to try to hold onto the house. >> by the way, that times piece i tweeted early this morning, times piece on why joe biden won, it was a deep dive from i think earlier this week or last week, deep dive, a research poll, and showed as kasie said that biden didn't do as well as hillary on a lot of traditional democratic groups, progressive groups, but did very well, made big gains among men and among veterans and homes of veterans. and that really made the difference in him winning the election. alexi, i'm curious, what are you hearing from the progressive side as we talk about the infrastructure deal, how far are they going to be willing to move in joe manchin's direction to
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get a deal? >> not far in joe manchin's direction, that's for sure. but we have seen progressives staging climate rallies outside of the white house and refocussing the infrastructure discussion to include climate change and ways in p which the infrastructure package or their complimentary package could address the issues that the progressives are fighting for. they were holding this kind of rally, protest, demonstration outside of the white house last week. this is an issue they've been pushing president biden on. one they don't think he's been moving as far to the left in their direction as they would want. so that's where we should watch progressives moving this infrastructure discussion around climate change, policies, not so much bridges, roads, things like that. >> so, curt bardella with the information that democrats have gotten from the 2020 election
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and the growing realization in most of these studies that defund the police, that phrase and also socialism, especially in hispanic communities but also in many other communities, really moved people towards republicans on the house, senate, and presidential level. knowing that's what they did in 2020, knowing that it had an impact with large chunk of the electorate and knowing that's the one-two punch coming in 2022. you're advising the d triple c, what would you suggest they do to push back on those two arguments? >> well, i think first of all we need to stop allowing republicans to kind of set the premises for some of these things. the idea that the republican party is in any position to talk about law and order given their position on january 6th, given their position in votes they
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have taken that have actually defunded the police. given their position in not supporting the men and women who wear uniform who defended our capitol during a domestic terrorist attack, given the position they want everybody to have guns which results in more crimes, they're in no position to have any moral high ground when it comes to rising crime, violence and mayhem in our society and democrats need to do a better job communicating that and not giving republicans the rhetorical edge and claiming to be they're something they're not. and assuming we get infrastructure done we discuss how what we're fighting for affect people on a day-to-day level. climate change, how it affects your healthcare, your air, water quality. extreme climate events that we're having now, they're ulconnected. we need better infrastructure,
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tools at our disposal so when events happen in real time there's something there people could rebuild their lives on and help mitigate the risks and consequences of these eventuallies. a lot of things aren't going to go away. they're going to get worse as inaction continues to washington. more than anything people want their political parties, elected representatives, to show they're fighting for them every day. one thing donald trump did well in the 2016 campaign was create this perception, it is a perception, it's not real, this idea he's fighting for the work man, people who feel like they're left behind in washington. that's very real. for a long time we've seen the american people feel like washington isn't for them. trump and the republicans have done a good job of tapping into that, weapon nuysing that. democrats need to show those are not people's friends, those
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policies that the republicans champion hurt people, the very real things that affect people on a real level, the republican party stands against. democrats have to hammer that message home to connect the dots from what's going on in washington to people's real day-to-day lives. >> curt and alexi, thank you both for being on this morning. and for more on this let's bring in democratic congresswoman chrissy houlahan of pennsylvania. >> i thought mr. bardella's comments are spot on. as democrats we need to reject the republican narrative that democrats aren't for law and order and aren't strong on these issues. the very agenda, the very advocacies that we're putting on
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things like education, things like infrastructure, gun safety, climate safety, mental health, the american rescue plan all of those kinds of things are absolutely demonstrating to the american people who is for them. i also agree that the republican agenda demonstrates that the republican agenda is not for them. the question about infrastructure, i'm hopeful we'll have an opportunity certainly to pass the bipartisan infrastructure package. i'm a member of the problem sol vers caucus in the house making that a reality. but i'm equally hopeful about a second package to address the issues we're talking about, the other part of infrastructure. if you have a road or bus and have work you still need a baby sitter. and those kinds of things are also infrastructure.
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>> kasie? >> congresswoman, it's kasie hunt. it's lovely to see you this morning. we were just talking a little bit about a piece in "the new york times" this morning that says even though we're in this period of incredible change, the coronavirus going behind us, the former president's companies just indicted, all of these things, nothing is changing about the fundamentals of where people stand that we're still a closely divided country and even the big headlines don't sway people one way or the other. what is your experience on the ground when you go home to pennsylvania voters, historically the philadelphia suburbs have been a swingy area but the state does represent this divide we have. why do you think it is that people are still so divided and what are democrats going to try to do to break through as we head towards the midterm elections? >> it's nice to see you, too.
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i will say this worries me too. it's one of the reasons why i think the biden nomination and candidacy, resonated with people, just like people in pennsylvania is that we're looking for our government to represent us. we're looking for our representatives to have civility and decency as one of their agenda items. i think the biden administration brings that to us. i think when i'm home in my community one of the things we talk about all the time is the importance of civility and unifying people. i have been advocating for a national service program for that reason. i think it's important we find each other and see each other and recognize we have so much more in common than we do differently. i get frustrated as a relatively new member of congress with a die visty. the american people want their government to get along and function and work for them.
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>> good morning, it's jonathan lemire. we were talking today about the idea of crime and how republicans were using this as a dee divisive issues. they're saying crime is up in places like big cities and painting that imagery of crime moving to the suburbs that you represent. is this something you're hearing about? is this a major concern for the people you represent? how front of mind is crime right now as we move into the summer months where a lot of experts, including the white house, fear there may be the traditional surge in violence? >> we should all take crime seriously and our rising crime seriously and we should all be thinking about what we can be doing to address that crime. as you mentioned earlier in your conversation, in the last four or five months i voted to help and support the police, and
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republicans as was mentioned earlier have not. i think that's significant but also as significant is the approach to democratic crime in general. it's the whole of crime approach. it's not just the actual crime itself it's what's underlying those crimes and those are issues we should be addressing with our agenda as well. whether it's safety nets and whether we can provide the same education to all of our children and providing mental health support because many times that's a cause of crime as well. gun safety is another agenda item of ours. so i believe the democratic response is a more holistic response and something that resonates with my community. >> thank you very much for being on this morning. chrissy has a new op-ed for usa "today" entitled people are watching. attacks on milley and the u.s. military play right into enemy
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hands. can you read that online. >> we thank general milley, again, we thank him for his leadership, the fact that he served this country proudly over four decades in iraq, in afghanistan, and when he made a mistake on june the 1st, he went before all of the troops and apologized. i thought showed real leadership because this is -- when somebody makes a mistake, we all make mistakes, that's what a leader does and that's what he did. my gosh, decades and decades of leadership and experience, and i certainly hope that all americans can rally behind that type of that type of man or woman who's given their entire life in uniform to defending this country. still ahead on "morning joe," what american track star
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. my god, a look at england fans reacting to the goal that put them up 2-0 against ukraine in the quarter finals. joining us now, co-host of "men in blazers" roger bennett.
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he is also author of the new book "reborn in the usa." >> such a moving book. we heard so many people reach out and talk about how moving the segment was last week having roger on here. and roger, i have to say also, many people from britain saying thank god you moved to america. the bennett curse coming to an end. and half a century of heartbreak, maybe at their back like a cold brisk north wind coming off of the north sea. >> it can't be a coincidence now that i've left. the quarterquarterfinals this w.
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england the new york knicks of football. the fourth minute, a goal for the real prince harry. it should be forged in bronze, and just before halftime this national feed the dream got even bet tore another harry. we're going to see it again. look at this little tumble, juke, we were invaded by the normans. that is another harry. harry mcguire. known across england for his enormous slap. that man is to goals what joey chestnut is to hot dogs.
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55 years of never stopping dreaming and the beauty of the success on the field is the unity it is creating after it. i have to say, england, after this 15 or 16 months of lock down, they really needed this joy. >> yes, of course, many call mcguire very courageous. you said he has a slap for a forehead. but i have to ask you you're all red, white, and blue and you turned your back on eng lapd. you had to have been excited watching the game. >> i roll with team america now, but becoming world betters, it
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put home's address into the gps. in the other semi-final let's look at a glorious story. denmark took on the czech republic. christian ericson had a cardiac arrest in game. they survived the worst that live could throw at them. here they played the check republic and they won. from devastation to glory. near death to life. defeat to semifinal. it's why sports is the greatest human theaters. they will face london on wednesday. >> and the other side, let's talk about the floppers extraordinary, italy is back. one of their players acted as if he had been shot in the back of
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the head and then fell and was not moving and then suddenly italy scores and he jumps up and races to celebrate. >> they believe in the resurrection. they didn't make the cup in 2018. they got that goal straight out of spaisx. more fans like to be declothed by their fans and left in their under pants. >> who do you like? >> the tiny bit of englishman left in me says not england, but everybody has left lockdown ready to party and have a party. nobody is more drunk than euro 2020. >> thank you, roger. >> his new book is "reborn in
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the usa." a englishman's love letter to his chosen home. >> anthony fauci is worried that the disparities could lead to two americas. o two americas replace old pipes? i can do that. install energy-efficient windows?
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i can do that. build an electric car? i can do that. weld the tower of a wind turbine? modernize the grid? install 10,000 solar panels? do what i've been doing my whole life? rebuild the country and protect america against climate change? we can do that. my name is douglas. i'm a writer/director and i'm still working. in the kind of work that i do, you are surrounded by people who are all younger than you. i had to get help somewhere along the line to stay competitive. i discovered prevagen. i started taking it and after a period of time, my memory improved. it was a game-changer for me. prevagen. healthier brain. better life. it's the lowest prices of the season on the sleep number 360 smart bed. it's the most comfortable, dually-adjustable, foot-warming,
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you hope the more you give the less they'll miss. but even if your teen was vaccinated against meningitis in the past they may be missing vaccination for meningitis b. although uncommon, up to 1 in 5 survivors of meningitis will have long term consequences. now as you're thinking about all the vaccines your teen might need make sure you ask your doctor if your teen is missing meningitis b vaccination.
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today we see the results of the unity and purpose. today we're beating the progress. together we will rescue our people from division in despair, but together we must do it. over the past year we lived through some of our darkest days. now i truly believe, i give you
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my word, i truly believe we're about to see our brightest future. >> president biden leads the nation in a 4th of july celebration. touting it as a day when we're nearing independence pandemic. as the delta variant spreads across the country is vaccine hesitancy creating two americas? plus the latest from florida has the part of the surfside condo that was left standing has been demolished ahead of a tropical storm. what it means for the families still looking for answers. good morning and welcome to morning joe. it is monday, july 5th. we hope you all had a great 4th of july. well start with president biden marking the celebration on the south lawn of the white house. he spoke about the nation's
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progress against covid-19. >> this year the 4th of july is a day of special celebration. for we're emerging from the darkness of years -- the year of pandemic and isolation. the year of pain, fear, and heartbreaking loss. just think back to where this nation was a year ago. think back to where you were a year ago. and think about how far we have come from silent streets, silent streets, to crowded parade routes lined with people waving american flags. fans in the seats of stadiums cheering together. families with hands against a window to grandparents hugging
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grandchildren once again. we're back to seeing one another again. we're traveling again, businesses are hiring again. we're seeing record job creation and record economic growth. the best in four decades and i might add the best in the world. michael beshlov, you listen to the president's speech and you line up the facts in is in some ways the hottest economies since the morning in america in 1984. we have record job openings. we have more jobs than we have people to fill them right now. we're on the backside of the
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pandemic. america has beaten the world in getting most of it's people vaccinated, and we're still a 50/50 nation, or as alex said a 53/47 nation. do you suspect that we will divided this way for quite some time? >> i think we will. you look back in history and we sure were divided. but when before have we had a situation where at a time of medical emergency there was this kind of a partisan division between those that wanted to get vaccinated and those that did not. polio started in 1955 and you didn't see that. in the influenza pandemic there was a few fringe groups, but this was not a political thing. and so we're living in a country
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where even something like public health, which is normal times is almost above partisan division becomes one more casualty to civil war. >> i wonder when a leader comes along in the republican or the democratic party that by force of will moves us beyond this. i'm talking political will like reagan did in 1980. he changed everything. like barack obama did in 2008. that was supposed to be the beginning of a new era. trump 2016. it's a bad -- for the most part isn't that how american history is moved along out of these stubborn sort of retrenchments? >> you're right, they
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essentially said this is getting crazy and dangerous, let's change it. the republicans were a largely isolationists party. he said this is a real threat from the soviets in europe. he began to say to other republicans we have to make deals with harry true man so we have things like nato so we can deal with these threats of the soviet army. possibly over western europe, which we want to stop. that is something we usually have. the other problem is that in a time like this with this pandemic seeming to have almost up to 70% has not quite gotten there yet, americans also have a habit through history when we have been through a terrible experience we want to forget really quickly. for instance, one of the reasons why the roaring 20s were roaring is because people wanted to
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forget the enormous death toll of world war i. 105,000 people. the death toll of the influenza pandemic, 126,000. they want today forget. it would have been hard for a president to say things like we need a vaccine and masks. after the korean war, people almost forgot it happened. the same with the vietnam war. so for biden it's a real problem for leadership, you have to say let's keep getting vaccinated. the threat is still here. there might be a variant that might be very dangerous, particularly after labor day, but at the same time we have a terrific economy and america is certainly back and better than it was a year ago for all sorts of reasons.
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give us your thoughts on what president's speech was yesterday and what the first six months of the biden presidency suggests for what's ahead. >> i think we have been very lucky to have this. he would be very tempted to say yes, the economy is wonderful like he said yes. the pandemic is better which he did say, but another less seasoned political leader might say everything is great, everyone relax. the tough thing for a lead is to do both of those things. he knows if there is a downturn of the economy that can always happy. terrible inflation might happen. you might have a variant that makes it look less bright than
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it does in july of 2021. next year he has to run a mid-term election. every republican commercial will put those words up saying he was too optimistic. we let down our guard. >> thank you so much for being with us and happy 4th of july weekend. >> 4th and 5th. >> exactly. happy 4th of july observed. >> to michael's point, last night president biden warned that the covid variants are still dangerous and urged americans to get vaccinated. >> don't get me wrong, covid has not been vanquished. but the best defense is to get
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vaccinated. it's the most patriotic thing we can do, so please if you have not gotten vaccinated, do it, do it now. for yourself, for your loved ones, for your community, and for your country. >> all right, the nation fell just short of the president's goal of getting 70% of american adults vaccinated by the 4th of july. more than 172 million adults have been vaccinated. that is about 67%. meanwhile, polling shows that president biden is earning high marks for his handling of the pandemic. in a new poll, 62% of americans said they approve of the president's performance, but while the majority of democrats and independents gave him good grades. 60% of republicans say they disapproved of his pandemic
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response. 69% of all respondants said they had been vaccinated. on "meet the press" dr. anthony fauci was asked about the highly contagious delta variant and issued a warning about regional disparities in vaccination rates. >> those areas of america that are highly vaccinated and a low level of dynamics in infection. and in some areas a level of fax nation is low and the level of dissemination is high. >> some are expressing concern with vaccine hesitancy in their
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states. west virginia's jim justice, and spencer cox all implored residents to get vaccinated yesterday. joe, explain what these governors, talk about what they're doing. these are states where folks just don't want to give in on their vaccine hesitancy. >> they are states that are stronger republican states. you can actually see how america is divided. if there are lower vaccine rates, chances are good that they are more likely to vet for republicans and to be skeptical.
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the vaccination rates were low there, and they're doing it there. they want their people to be healthy. but also they want their states to be open for business. >> that's right. >> this is soon going to be an economic -- going to cause economic disparity. you're a business, and you have a chance to move into a low-tax state. where vaccination rates are higher. or a state where vaccination rates are lower. you're going to move your company where rates are higher. it will be harder to get the best and the brightest workers to come to a state that is lagging way behind in vaccination rates. the workers are not going to want to come, spouses will not want to come, they will not want to bring their children there. that's what we have been saying for some time on the show. even if you're so selfish that
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we want to go to florida now where the preparation for an impending tropical storm, the remaining portion of the condo building in surfside was demolished overnight. it happened last night with
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controlled explosives. there was concern that the rest of the tower could crash down so demolishing was sped up due to a tropical storm that could hit surfside has early as this afternoon. 24 people are confirmed dead. joining us now from surfside is nbc news correspondent vaughn hilliard. what's the latest? >> this is a major operational hurdle for this rescue operation. a striking decision made this weekend to take down the remaining part of that partially standing building. this was a reversal from the mayor and other officials stance that they would not risk this building coming down potentially
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making this rescue operation even harder on top of the rubble. but the reality is that there is a major tropical storm arriving as early as this morning. raingusts and rain. and the last thing they wanted was that building going down in a direction in the streets or in a building next door or on to that pile of rubble. there are still 121 individuals unaccounted for. you saw from the images of that video overnight this was a success. this was a success. this was 11 days after the collapse. in that video, within minutes the rescue crews were going right back to the scene, essentially going back into that debris and that dust to begin this rescue mission again. this is still a rescue mission at this time. folks and families are holding out hope there is a chance that the loved ones that are missing
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will stillfi. one family member said he felt like there was going to be a tarp put down so they could easily eliminate the new rubble to get to the initial pile to recover bodies at a speedier rate and one that there is not a looming danger that the rest of the condo could collapse on those crews. >> thank you, vaughn, for your coverage. coming up the president of china using strong language to warn against foreign forces like the u.s. richard haas weighs in, next. e . richard haas weighs in, next
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♪ me and you singing in the park ♪ ♪ me and you, we're waiting for the dark ♪ top republican on the house affairs committee is slammed president biden for his decision to withdrawal all u.s. troops from afghanistan saying the president will be responsible for the actions of the taliban.
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>> we're going dark in afghanistan and there will be consequences long term to this. when we fully withdrawal, the devastation and the killing, the humanitarian crisis, president biden is going to own these ugly images. >> i wonder if the chairman said the same thing when donald trump kept pushing to get us out of afghanistan. maybe he did, maybe he said the same thing when donald trump decided he would booked our kurd ish alleys by taking troops and yanked them out of syria. when we actually had american troops that were pushing back on isis. we had american troops pushing back on the iranians. we had american troops pushing back on the russians, and we had
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american troops pushing back on the turks. donald trump yanked them out. i think that was a mistake. i think getting everyone out of afghanistan is a mistake. i'm wondering if the chairman was that aggressive when donald trump was making, what i believe, those terrible tactical decisions. >> these are important debates, but the hypocrisy is ridiculous. meanwhile the top u.s. general in afghanistan is warning of a possibility of a civil war in the region. >> you look at the security situation and it's not good. the afghans recognize that it is not good. >> let's bring in richard haas.
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people may be tired of afghanistan. and yet, people were tired of americans being in iraq and we had to send troops back to iraq after isis created havoc and the humanitarian crisis they created there. do you fear the same thing may happen in afghanistan? >> i would be surprised, joe, if we send any significant amount of troops back. i can imagine us sending them in for a specific counter terrorism mission, but i think the lesson here, is, just because we overreached in afghanistan doesn't make the argument for under reaching. things are going badly faster than i thought. the fact that the taliban are making in-roads in the north at a not normal pace is a bad development. i think that this is a rare example of bipartisanship.
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i think both of us have gotten it wrong. a small level of american troops seem to be keeping the lid on. we have not had a combat. i think this is a strategic goal. >> now moving to china. china's president xi jinping recently marked the 100th anniversary of the communist party in china with a warning. in a speech in front of 70,000, xi praised the party's successes saying china wanted to promote peace in the world but he quickly warned that the country would no longer listen to
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"preaching" he pledged to expand china's military and influence. joe? >> you know, richard, there has been a belief for a long time that china was inward looking. it wanted to protect the middle kingdom. it was not going to be like the soviets in 1917. any reason to reassess that beyond the south china seas. do you see china as a country that has designs on other parts of the world. >> i would not say they have military designs. i think the real question is not just the south china sea, but the areas in close. they're border with india. the islands they dispute with japan. the question of whether or not they may be willing to use military force to take taiwan and reunify china. i think their tools are more
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economic, more diplomatic. belt and road initiatives, building infrastructure and the like. but the real thing is what we call in the case of russia, they're a fraud. they don't consider themselves a fraud. they are talking about what the work is that remains to be done. the good news i would say in the speech is that he did not lay out a time table, and he talked about, in aas that taiwan not declare independence. so as must collar as what a lot of the speech was, it didn't set new worry some language out there on taiwan. >> coming up, is there a bias against fathers when it comes to the par of the legal system that
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deals with families and children after divorce? our next guest is a hollywood actor using his own personal story to call for reform. that discussion is straight ahead on "morning joe." straigh ahead on "morning joe. [♪♪] if you have diabetes, it's important to have confidence in the nutritional drink you choose. try boost glucose control. it's clinically shown to help manage blood sugar levels and contains high quality protein to help manage hunger and support muscle health. try boost today.
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. welcome back. america's fastest woman was suspended days ago for marijuana use. she could find our way on to the olympic team, but it is causing everyone to look at elite athletes. >> people are judging me. i'm human. after an american sprinter was suspended for a month for using
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marijuana that she used to deal with the death of her buy logical mother. >> i was blinded by emotions, and that, and just hurting. crying and hurting. >> in an exclusive interview, richardson apologized for letting down fans and coaches. >> i still made that decision. >> president biden weighing in. >> i was really proud of her. >> her dream might not be over. her team says they're focusing, instead, on her mental health. her agent saying we have not focused on the relay. i don't want her hopes to be dashed. it sparked a conversation about the humanity of elite athletes. kansas city quarterback patrick
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mahomes tweeting "this is so trash." >> michael phelps struggling with mental health for years, and naomi osaka refusing to give a press conference because of anxiety. she paid a $15,000 price. >> we expect them to be super human in their athletic ability and extraordinary in other elements of their life, but the pressure and the toll can be extraordinary as well. >> a call to reform sports to make psychology a part of success. >> our thanks to matt bradley for that report. reverend al, i wanted your take
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on this. there are so many mixed messages and different laws. it's not a performance enhancing drug, and i don't know, i'm conflicted about it. i was curious to hear what you thought about this and what you think should be done. >> first, i think that we should give ms. richardson credit for coming forward saying i did it, and she apologized to her fans. i respect that. and i think even the president saying her response is good. i think it really opening up several conversations. clearly there needs to be a conversation about how we make athletes become something less than normal in dealing with the mental health questions. this young lady faced the news of her biological mother's death. there will be a reaction to that. are we supposed to assume
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they're not going to react to the death of their mother. the other is how do we decriminalize marijuana in society. and not expect that that is going to be looked upon in the world of athletics when it is not, as you said, a life enhancing drug. i think at least we ought to have a revisiting of what the rules are, and what are the rules based on. if it has nothing to do with performance why is the rule there. if it is no longer in society, why are we acting like athletes are no longer regular citizens that have the legal right to do something as long as it doesn't impact one way or another their ability to do the sport. now to our next guest who is an actor calling for a big part of the legal system to be reformed. he is talking about family law.
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greg ellis joins us now. he is author of "the respondent." exposing the cartel of family law. he reveals his own story. what he believe social security bias against fathers. greg, tell us what your goal was with this book. what's the message? >> well, thank you for having me. in "the respondent" my life changed in 2015 in the span of 24 hours. i was ushered from my home in handcuffs at the behest of my ex-wife. i became homeless, nearly destitute, and my professional reputation was ruined, and my
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without a father. we have an archaic and inhumane divorce system. thousand one in three children in their their country. the u.s. has the highest rate of children in single parent families and households. so what i found was this american divorce industry that is incentiized to keep the system the way it is. and one branch of our legal system that does afford you process. and i found that to be staggering. think about that, rrapists,
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murders, pedophiles, have the presumption of innocence, but that's not thousand is in the divorce system. >> if you talk about this cartel, as you described it, there are many good lawyers out there. it is a difficult framework in which to deal with such difficult personal problems that revolve around children. the outlook and the outcome for children and lawyers are often built to fight. >> yeah, look, attorneys and lawyers are trained to make arguments of when two people have a disagreement and can no longer get along. we, our system, brings in two representatives to argue on their behalf.
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and the system doesn't offer the presumption of innocent. that is one change. another is 50/50 shared parenting. arkansas passed a new law for 50/50 baseline resumption. so that means if there is accramony and back to the presumption of innocence in family law. if one parent feels they have deserve more custodial time, they have to prove that. right now the burden of proof is on the accused. but this is salem witch trials and spanish inquisitions. the other thing that i'm looking for as well, and i this in my book, and we want to protect the most vulnerable among us.
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our children, future generations, and how do we do that? we need a solutions oriented approach. we need better training of judges and people in the system. >> how important is it to also have a burden of presumption for mediation. state's passing laws saying don't even think about getting into a hostile back and forth. we're going to force you to go to mediation. we're going to force you to do alternative dispute resolution. and the first temperature is not getting an attorney that will immediately do everything they can to destroy the other side weather it is destroying the mother or the father because as you say, it is the child who is
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a loser in the end once they square off and start fighting. as an attorney i met a lot of humane attorneys that worry first about children, but the system is set up to spark the fight to build the file, to get as many billable hours as possible. how do we reverse that? >> that is a great question, joe. it is very difficult. to your point, some attorneys mean well and they're ethical in the system. and both sets of parents and partners can want to approach this more positive solutions based oriented approach. but the system is not set up for that. it is nearly a $60 billion a year industry. and they are needlessly adversarial. the unwitting participants from most of the time, family law
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justice is not neutral. and the powers are shielded by judicial immunity and no one is held accountable. and to your point about mediation, that is a really good point, that is a good first step to get into mediation before we get into a legal battle, if you will. the challenge with that, of course, is many of the mediators are working in the court system. are friendly with the attorneys or the judges. i did two days of mediation that it was $31,000. they were friends with the attorneys, they all went to aa meetings together. it was a debacle. so it is what i am moving to do is the children and parents united group. we have three cost effective
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solutions to that. up with of those is cpu law. which is to assist cpu mediation. the solutions oriented intervention experts that help resolve problems outside of the system, and the attorneys that work outside of the system with the mediators. to empower people to draw up their own divorce settlement agreements and keep out of the horrible system and keep families and by the fact of children out of our courtrooms. they have no place being in family flaw it doesn't provide the presumption of innocence to people. >> what i hear from your book it raises situations that are brought to me all of the time where you don't have the father in the home. nanny many ways, it's because of the legal proceedings and barriers that really prevent the father from being in the home, particularly in some
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communities, low income communities and communities of color. how would that also great that -- address that when you a father prevented from not being there or relating to his children if that's what he chose to do because of the barriers set up. in many cases men say it is stacked against them to have a relationship because of the way the structure is set up legally. >> yeah, you bring up a great point, reverend al. it comes down to dad-deprived children. particularly dad-deprived boys. we have a crisis of fatherlessness. u.s. is the world leader of children growing up in single parent families. i think the improvement of our family wills have an exponential
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improvement. our teenager youth getting into drugs, dropping out of education, and teen pregnancy. we don't really believe the statistics. and we encourage that we are more think if we are more encouraging of young fathers, old fathers, just men in general. we've had such a conversation recently, we've had this me too monologue, and i think we need a dialogue. it's okay to have a part of that organization, open it up and this will at the time people in impoverished areas that are really struggling, you know, our mothers need the support of fathers for particularly our children. and we should be encouraging the father to stay in the home and help. >> in your book, you also talk
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about a few other contentious divorces that others have been through. can you walk us through what is included in the book and what you learned from those stories as well? >> sure. the book is part med warrior, part manifestation, and a portrait. hopefully it's an indispensable read, but all and everyone interested in learning about the unrelenting brutality of family lea. law. this system is incentivized to break up a family, and i think the breakdown of family is the biggest threat we are facing in
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our system. it's incentivized for the attorneys to keep churning the acrimony. we need to be encouraging the family unit, not breaking it now. with more than a third of children living absent without their absent father children absent their biological father are more likely to uses drugs, experience drugs, twice as likely to drop out of hiss, and much more likely to live in poverty, and seven tiles more likely to become pregnant as teens. i'm encouraging a dialogue in the book through my story, what happened to me, what happens to thousands of fathers, and mothers. it happens to mothers too. recently i spoke to a nurse in pennsylvania, who, you know, she falsely accused of child abuse. she lost her children, all based
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on a false allegation. this isn't a left-right issue or a father-mother issue. this is an issue to protect our most vulnerable in our society. >> the new book is called "the respondent." thank you. up next, pope francis is said to be alert after an invasive surgery. we'll talk about that next on "morning joe." surgery we'll talk about that next on "morning joe." ♪ ♪are you down, d-d-down, d-d-down, d-d-down♪ where we're driving down the cost of insurance. ♪ ♪ are you down, down♪ ♪d-down, down? are you♪ drivers who switched saved over $700. ♪ allstate. here, better protection costs a whole lot less. you're in good hands.
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a few more headlines before we hand off coverage. the vatican said a short while ago that pope francis was in good general condition, a day after undergoing colon surgery, adding that he was expected to remain in the hospital for several days if no complications arise. he was alert and breathing on his own after the three-hour surgery. the procedure had been scheduled. pope francis suffers from diverticulitis. the oakland sood is now
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vaccinating several animals. none of the oakland animals have tested positive, zoo officials want to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. final thoughts now. we'll start with reverend al, final thoughts this morning? >> i hope that we continue this discussion on not dealing with police in terms of how we deal with gun violence, and as a way that is a wedge against our coming together. we continue to deal with police reform at the same time. i'm on my way to arkansas for a eulogy of an unarmed white young man who was killed. i'm joining attorney ben crump there. i think standing with police, but police reform as a
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contraction, i think it's not a black and white issue, but a right-and-wrong issue. >> kasie? >> just how much a threat it is to our country as we confront the rise of china, have to deal with so many other challenges, our adver sears are seeing that as something they can sxloint. >> jonathan? >> we talked about the new york city mayor's race, but we should learn more tomorrow. there's 125,000 absentee votes coming in, a far bigger number than the margin right now. we should get preliminary and a much clearer picture, and with the token republican opposition, likely the next mayor. >> mika, final thoughts?
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>> on this fourth of july, or fifth, i love this country. i think of my parents who cake from this country from poland and czechoslovakia under very different circumstances. i salute and thank them for coming here. >> on this fourth of july holiday observed, i align myself with jim clyburn who doesn't say america may be a great country one day, he says america is a great country. i believe america is a great country, and it is really should be the goal of all of us to expand the dream and the opportunity to all americans. >> that does it for us this morning. yasmin vossoughian picks up the coverage right now. good morning, everybody. i'

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