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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 1, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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saying that person is going to retire in 2022, that's the only way they would do it again. it's a stark warning from mccarthy. >> thank you very much for being here today. we really appreciate it. this january 6th commission is our last chance to get answers, and it sounds increasingly like republicans are not going to participate at all. says a lot. thanks for getting up way too early with us this morning. don't go anywhere, "morning joe" starts right now. 6:00 on the east coast, good morning, and welcome to "morning joe." it is thursday, july 1st, joe will be back tomorrow. along with willie and me we have former aid to the george w. bush white house and state departments and msnbc political analyst elise jordan with us. we have a lot going on this morning, including indictments
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expected today against the trump family business and its chief financial officer. we'll have the latest from south florida as crews recover more bodies from the rubble of that collapsed condo. and president biden visits the disaster site today. we're also following bill cosby's release from prison. the assault conviction against him overturned on a technicality. the house votes to establish a committee to investigate the capitol insurrection with only two republicans voting yes. we'll tell you who they are. and also we'll show you some incredible "the new york times" investigation footage that stitched together all the video from the insurrection into a must see compilation of exactly what happened that day from every angle. and how many entrances were breached. and how the cops were desperately outnumbered for hours.
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we'll dig into that, it's incredible. everybody should take a moment. it's 40 minutes long, to watch it. this morning, where things stand with the new york city mayor race after the board of election scrapped the results of an earlier count. willie? let's start right here, mika, with nbc news learning the manhattan district attorney and the new york state attorney general have obtained indictments against the trump organization and allen weissleberg. the specific charges will not be known until about 2:00 this afternoon when the indictments are unsealed. "the washington post" is reporting weisselberg is expected to surrender this morning and be arraigned today.
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the trump organization will also be arraigned by one of its attorneys. the company denied wrong doing and attorneys for both defendants declined comment. let's bring in david farnhold, who joins us from outside the courthouse. good morning, thanks for being with us. help us understand exactly what we expect to see when these indictments are unsealed this afternoon. allen weissleberg is front and center. many have said he's the guy who knows where the bodies are buried, if you will, been with donald trump for 50 years since the beginning of the organization. >> i think we'll get a sense of what prosecutors have. we've been hearing about the elephant for months but we haven't seen it so we'll see the beginning of the evidence they have. we heard these charges relate to unpaid taxes but how much, one apartment, one car, was this a
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pattern of tax evasion for many people over many years. when we see that, we'll see the legal pressure on weisselberg, because weisselberg flipping to reduce his liability will be one of the important things to happen. >> this could be the tip of the iceberg as the da looks into the trump organization. what happens from here do you expect that mr. weisselberg will flip on donald trump and leading to charges on the former president? >> reporter: it's hard to expect until we see how much jail time, if any, allen weisselberg is facing. if you remember, michael cohen, was saying i'll take a bullet for donald trump, then he sees more than 10 years in of jail time and he became a witness against trump. so until we see what weisselberg is facing, that could change the
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course. but we'll see the district attorney coming out and saying how they view the indictments, just the end or the beginning? >> also the michael cohen example is a very good one because like allen weisselberg he had extreme closeness to president trump and testified on capitol hill as to how the president communicated often saying nothing but enough to get them to do something that might have been inappropriate. what makes allen weisselberg different? >> the difference here is that allen weisselberg basically has been in operational control of the trump organization for decades. he was the cfo but in practice was a little bit more than that. he controls every dollar that comes in and out of the country, makes questions about who's hired and fired. in one deposition he said he made sure the right subsidiaries were buying the right pens to save money on office supplies.
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so somebody with that level of interaction with trump prosecutors are hoping he'll be able to tell them, this is why we did this, this is what trump told me to do. so that is going to be, if he's charged with breaking crimes, he understood what he was doing. >> david has been covering this story for years. we'll let you get inside the courthouse. thank you so much. let's bring in danny a vallow. we don't know what's in the indictments we may learn later this afternoon when they're unsealed. what are you expecting to see? >> based on reporting, if this was a case this was taxable fringe benefits that went unreported and gave rise to criminal liability to the cfo and cooperation. two things to be gleaned, one that would be clumsy for the chief financial officer to not
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realize his apartment and car could be taxable. you would need a car if it was free with the advertisement on the side it's only used for business and occasionally for personal use and then it might be a fringe benefit. if it's a late model cadillac that you drive whenever you want, that's definitely taxable fringe benefit. looking at tax prosecution, looking at the statistics of the many thousands of cases brought, a tiny fraction of those are tax fraud cases. within that, i'm not sure there were any taxable fringe benefit cases brought in federal court last year, still looking, the data just came out recently, but i don't know if there were any. this is not something taxable fringe benefits that becomes a criminal tax fraud case very often. >> thank you very much. we're going to be following this
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story and covering it all day here on msnbc as we learn more about exactly what the indictments are going to reveal. so the house is going to move forward with establishing a select committee to investigate the january 6th capital attack. yesterday's final vote was 222-190. all democrats voting yes while only two republicans, adam kinzinger and liz cheney, voting in favor of the panel. liz cheney released a statement saying in p part, quote, i believe this select committee is our only remaining option. the american people need and deserve a full accounting. we must ensure that what happened on january 6th, 2021 never happens again. and after spending several months analyzing thousands of videos from the capitol attack this every angle from people in the crowd, from organizers, from the beginning "the new york times" is out with an in depth
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look at the insurrection, digging into the details of what happened on january 6th and why. the paper's visual investigations unit filed motions to unseal police body camera footage, scoured law enforcement radio communications, synchronized and mapped out the video evidence and poured over footage filmed by the rioters themselves leading to a 40-minute panoramic take to what the times calls the most complete visual depiction of the capitol riots to date. it is. i watched it last night. here's a bit of what the times found. >> proud boys start fighting the police and with others in the mob, they push through the line.
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>> storm the capitol building. look at this. >> over several minutes it's a brutal fight on the steps. at one point the rioters are held back. but they make a final push up the flight of stairs. at the top they scuffle again with a small group of officers. who give in after barely a minute. the mob now has direct entrance to capitol entrances. >> i can't believe this is reality. we established this [bleep]. >> hundreds more protesters below surge forward. >> we're going to have a lot
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more from that "the new york times" investigation. it's gripping to watch. it is the most disturbing thing you will see so far on this. and really, it traces the depth of the sort of cult-like commitment to trump and why they ran on the capitol that day. a close up look, really, at the craven massive assault on not just the heart of our country, the united states capitol, but also the democracy in process. and you see in blips and images and faces, the heartbreak for capitol cops, for d.c. cops as they were left exposed and incapable of defending themselves and our country for hours. i don't know how you can't look at this and not be moved. >> mika, it's just -- it's medieval hand-to-hand combat. you look at that and it's like a
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modern day version of "brave heart" almost in the worst possible way. i was looking at the footage just then of what the cops endured and the restraint and just having batons to protect themselves and not escalating and finally they had to give in and let this insurrectionist mob storm the capitol. it's chilling. and the times did such a public service by putting this together and documenting in such detail what went down, because we need to remember, we need to have this select committee because we need to know the truth behind what happened and we need to know if anyone from the trump administration played a role in orchestrating the rally that led to this horrible day in american history. >> the president of the council on foreign relations, richard haus also with us this morning. this is a document for history. it's 40 minutes, every american
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should watch. i submit all the republicans that said we don't need to look further into this should watch it together. the three words that came to mind was normal tourist visit, which one republican said these were people walking through the walls taking photographs. sit down, watch those 40 minutes and you can't whitewash what happened on january 6th. >> no. it's an important document in our civics, i'm struck by the scale and violence of those storming the capitol, one. and second of all, how unprepared and outnumbered the law enforcement was. and thirdly what it did you want show, how did we get to this point? we said it makes a powerful case for why we need a commission. because this only is the surface. this is the result of decisions of conversations of something that built over time. and just like after 9/11 we
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needed a commission to connect the dots, to explain what happened before, and its consequences. and to suggest reforms. so too we desperately need that now because this -- it's awful this happened once, what would be tragic and unforgivable if anything like this happened a second time. >> yesterday on the day this video was released only two republicans, adam kinzinger and liz cheney voted to establish a select committee in the house to investigate with subpoena power the events of that day laid out graphically and in devastating form in this piece. we'll show more of this video coming up in a few minutes. we want to turn to bill cosby released from a pennsylvania prison yesterday now a free man after the state supreme court reversed cosby's indecent assault conviction. the court threw out the conviction saying prosecutors violated a deal meant to shield him from prosecution.
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stephanie gosk has details. >> reporter: bill cosby is a free man, his conviction tossed out, his record wiped clean, he cannot be retried. he appeared briefly before reporters outside of his home. the pennsylvania supreme court ruled that the decision to charge cosby with sexual assault in 2015 was an affront to fundamental fairness and the prosecution violated cosby's due process. cosby calling into a radio show. >> this is for all the people who have been imprisoned wrongfully, regardless of race, color or creed. because i met them in there. >> reporter: the 83-year-old was serving a 3 to 10 year sentence in maximum security prison after a jury found him guilty in 2018 of sexually assaulting andrea constand. at the time, cosby's other accusers celebrated the attack outside the court. >> i feel like i'm dreaming.
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can you pinch me. >> reporter: constand said cosby drugged and sexually assaulted her in his pennsylvania home in 2004, cosby said the interaction was consensual. in 2005 the district attorney at the time, bruce caster, who later would go on to be one of president trump's impeachment attorneys did not bring charges. he testified there was not enough evidence but instead he made a verbal agreement not to prosecute cosby if he would give a deposition in constand's civil case. that same deposition became the basis for a new da to charge him ten years later, days before the statute of limitations expired. a spokesman for cosby said this is justice and justice for black america. one of the prosecutors from the trial, firing back. >> i'm disturbed, i'm distressed that they are exploiting our thirst for justice in his name. >> stephanie gosk reporting
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there. the district attorney who brought the case, kevin steel, said cosby was found guilty by a jury and was released by a procedural issue. joining us is the attorney you saw in that case, a prosecutor in the first case against cosby and danny cevallos is still with us as well. take me back to 2005 and bruce caster striking this deal with mr. cosby, a verbal agreement he would not prosecute him if he testified in the civil case. is that out of the ordinary? is that something you've seen before and should it have been grounds for the supreme court to overturn cosby's conviction? >> i have to say that i do respect our supreme court, and i respect their findings. but not only is it unseen and unheard of, but i would assert and allege that it actually didn't happen. you know, i think one of the
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things that is really important is when nonprosecutorial agreements are made, they are in writing, approved by the court, and bruce caster, who had been the da for a number of years knew that. had actually implemented that in prior cases. so it's not like this was something he did not know. so, a verbal agreement like that not only doesn't happen, but i think the other thing to emphasize is that if it were to have happened, it would have been in writing, it would have been approved by the court. and there are other indicia that i'm happy to go through that kind of firm up for me at least the fact that i don't believe that it happened. >> so, you say you respect the supreme court and i respect your stance on that, but how can we respect the supreme court if you're saying it acted on something that maybe didn't even happen number one and if it did happen, a verbal agreement it should not have been grounds to overturn the conviction?
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>> my belief they accepted the testimony of bruce caster. when i look at the facts, keep in mind i was there during the day and a half hearing where we had bruce caster on the stand where he testified as to this alleged promise. the things that he stated were contrary to what a lot of the other evidence. for example, he testified that he had informed cosby's attorney as well as ms. constand's attorneys that he was making this promise. ms. constand's attorneys took the stand and said these promises were never made, in fact, they had no knowledge of it. number two he released a press release moments after declining charges stating that he would revisit the decision to decline charges should the need arise. an individual that makes a promise that he's not going to prosecute someone does not make that kind of press release. i understand the press release was seen as something different
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but i think the plain language of what he stated is clear. i think in addition to that, the fact that bruce caster was only the -- the da of montgomery county speaks volumes to whether or not he could really bind cosby for other types of self-incriminating crimes. what i mean by that is that bill cosby didn't make any statements regarding any crime he committed in montgomery county. his incriminating statements were crimes he committed against women in other jurisdictions which bruce caster would have had no authority to give him immunity. so with all those things said i don't believe there was a promise and i don't believe there was detrimental alliance. >> mr. cosby and his supporters are touting this as an exoneration, that justice has been caried out for him.
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but did the supreme court say anything about the guilty on his charges which he was convicted? in other words was there a statement that he was guilty of the things he was convicted of doing or was it a procedural motion? >> this was about the technicality, the jury of his peers of his peers stated that he was guilty. and while the guilty no longer stands, the factual finding behind what the jury said still does. they found, after all of the testimony, after andrea constand testified, they found he gave her a drug, rendered her incapable of consent and then sexually assaulted her. >> danny, what's your read about what we saw yesterday? >> a lot of things kristin said are spot on. but we've been calling this an
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agreement and i would say it doesn't rise to the level of an agreement. and that's what the court concluded because it used a principle from contract law that happens when you have parties that think there is a contract but the contract fails. in this case bruce caster didn't follow the rules for offering immunity, so if there was no underlying contract sometimes courts will say when one party makes a promise to another party and that second party relies, to his detriment, on that propromise and in this case cosby relied on the promise and gave up the fifth amendment right, sat down for a deposition and that led to his prosecution. the court struggled with the remedy. the court considered the possibility they could vacate the conviction and allow another prosecution. instead they did something rare. winning on appeal is exceedingly rare. winning on appeal and then a bar
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to reprosecutioner is rarer still. so this is something we're not likely to see in a high profile case, again maybe in our lifetime. but the court concluded where there is no other remedy or in their opinion there was no other remedy for this promise but to enforce it, and enforcing it means barring future prosecution. i understand kristin's frustration. these were decisions made long before she thought about or heard about the cosby criminal prosecution, before it was a glimmer in kevin steel's eye, the later da, so this was a decision made not to prosecute long ago and bound the prosecution years later. not surprised that the trial court refused to dismiss on these grounds, trial courts would rather the appeals court deal with it and this was always an issue on appeal. it was an issue at the trial court, it was preserved and made its way to appeal where you see
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this stunningly rare occurrence here. >> bill cosby convicted of three counts of aggravated assault this morning is a free man based on that oral agreement. thank you both so much we appreciate your insights this morning. mika? >> still ahead on "morning joe," the latest on the search for survivors after last week's deadly condo collapse as president biden prepares to see the damage firsthand today and former president trump is also planning to head to florida this weekend for a rally. even after governor ron desantis reportedly asked him to postpone it. plus a look at where the chaotic new york city mayoral race stands after the board scraps san earlier count. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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28 past the hour. a beautiful shot from the top of the rock in new york city as the sun comes up on this wednesday morning -- or are we already at thursday? the chaotic race -- it's thursday -- for new york city mayor took another turn yesterday. one day after the city's board of elections released and then rescinded new results in the democratic primary contest. new numbers show former city sanitation commission katherine gar see who was behind by 13 points now trailing former police captain eric adams by just two points. these numbers are largely in line with the faulty results
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released on tuesday, the b.o.e. later called the mishap an error. test votes meant to be cleared from the system were reported in the vote count. this prompted a lawsuit from the adams campaign. yesterday it announced it is petitioning the court to, quote, preserve our right to a fair election process. more than 120,000 absentee ballots still remain unaccounted for as the city uses a ranked choice voting system for the first time. what a mess. here now with more on that, city hall and politics reporter for wnyc, bridgett bergon. i can see how the candidates would be getting stressed out at this point wanting the numbers to be counted and counted right, and the people of new york as well. >> absolutely. i think one of the most important things when we look at the tallies, to remember is that
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these are just interim results. the results released this week were never intended to be the final results. and while the error made by the board of elections was egregious and is understandable that it would shake the confidence of voters and the candidates, the good thing is they identified it before it was part of any additional tallies or any certification process. the other part to remember is while the race has narrowed significantly with eric adams only having a two point lead over kathryn garcia, maya wiley the tally said eliminated, she was only behind by about 120 votes but there are 120,000 outstanding ballots in that tally. so it's fair to say this race is wide open and still alive. and even the lawsuits, while it's something that procedurally
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candidates do rather routinely, it's a product of new york state election law, they have to file these orders in order to protect their right to challenge any ballots within ten days of the primary, that would be friday. so these are pre-emptive actions so they don't necessarily speak to anything that has happened so far. it just guarantees these candidates have a right when they are canvassing these absentee ballots to race -- raise objections. >> as you said, maya wiley is not going to drop out of the race why would she if you have garcia trailing by two percent and maya trailing by 240 votes. how could maya wiley be declared eliminated? >> they were giving us our first look at what the ranked tallies
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looked like. on primary night we saw a snapshot of how voters identified their first choice votes. this was the first time we saw when they took into accounts the second through fifth choice votes and showed us the tallies using this ranked choice algorithm. it's a snapshot we have additional votes we need to factor in, one of the things looking at is where these absentee ballots are coming from. if you were to try to do a little bit of game analysis, a lot of these absentee ballots are from manhattan where kathryn garcia won the largest share of the votes however there are votes coming in from all five boroughs, as we see the next tally, expected next tuesday, july 6th, how much do these numbers change? because the one thing that is certain is these numbers will change. . >> richard haas, the company who
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manages the software used in the election tells nbc news that the board of election repeatedly denied its offers of assistance. the boe refused to accept training, education, a blind review and an offer to run parallel tabulation for the company. the company said it continued to reach out via emails, phone calls and an in-person visit but the efforts were ignored. a b.o.e. spokesperson -- that's board of election -- said the software was not an issue, the problem was human error. i don't know which makes me feel better, richard, what do you make of this? >> nothing should make you feel better about this. this is incompetence on steroids. this is corruption on steroids. the people on the board of elections should not be there. these are political hacks who are totally unqualified to
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oversee anything. they shouldn't be overseeing their breakfasts. then you have the situation why in the world is the board of elections releasing these results which are meaningless until you've counted the absentee ballots, how can you possibly release votes or numbers about ranked choice voting? they have no meaning, no standing. this is a deeply flawed system, unfortunately it's going to be hard to fix. it's not in the purview of the next mayor or governor. michael kinsley once said what's scandalous is what's legal. this is a scandal for the people of new york and it's not going to make life easy for the next mayor who quite possible is going to begin under a cloud. >> this is not the first time the b.o.a. has displayed its competence. can you go back through the last several elections and find problems there.
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ranked choice voting has its proponents, is this the end of it in new york on how it rolled out and how long it's going to take, under the best of circumstances, to determine a mayor? >> again, i think it is not going to be the end of ranked choice voting because this is a voter approved ballot referendum, so to end it would require voters approving an initiative to repeal it, there is proposed legislation to do that but we're a long way from that point. there will be a critical review from lawmakers at the local and state level about how the election was run and to what degree rules need to change to account for ranked choice voting. in terms of the timing, it is important to remember that the timing here, in terms of getting the full and complete results is a product of law, when they're
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allowed to count absentee ballots. there is a push for legislation to allow absentee ballots to be counted sooner. that would speed up the process but it's not the ranked choice tally that's slowing things down, it's the rules around how we conduct elections when we mail out ballots, count them, that's really slowing up the process. >> thank you very much. coming up, a lot going on. what "the new york times" learned about the capitol riot after analyzing thousands of videos of the attack. and a ranking of presidents by their leadership ability. "morning joe" is coming right back. ability. "morning joe" is coming right back
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more now from the that incredible in depth look at the events of the capitol attack painstakingly put together by "the new york times" visual investigations unit. the paper pinpointed at least eight locations, eight, around the capitol where rioters breached and entered the capitol building more than were previously known. the police were outnumbered and responded differently at various breach points allowing rioters to break through doors using weapons like crow bars or in some cases to walk through as police stepped aside knowing they were outnumbered. the multiple breaches revealed the capitol's vulnerability, despite locked doors and thick windows, rioters without specialized equipment were able to break in instantly in some
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places after analyzing thousands of videos from the capitol attack their in depth look looks at the insurrection and digs further into the details of what exactly happened on january 6th and even in the days before. and why these things happened. here now is more of what the times put together. >> inside the capitol, nancy pelosi and mike pence have begun certifying the 2020 election results. certification will happen on both sides of the building in the house and the senate. and this is what the rioters want to stop. an hour into the assault, the mob is battling a police line here along the west face of the capitol but that violence is now going to spread to multiple points of attack as west side rioters stream around the capitol and incite on the east. here's what the crowd looks like on the east. >> stop the steal! stop the steal!
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>> they're aware of the siege happening on the west side and some are emboldened by it. >> let's go. >> but up until now they've been kept behind the barricades then the group from the west pushes around the building and storms through the barriers. the police here barely put up a fight. and it's now that protesters along the east barricades surge forward. the capitol is now surrounded. rioters haven't made it inside yet but around the time that the mob on the east pushed forward, rioters on the west were making a pivotal move. this scaffolding was erected for the inauguration of joe biden it covers a staircase that gives direct access to an upper level and dozens of doors and windows.
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three police lines guard the route. the proud boys see the weakness. >> stay over right there. the stairs! take the stairs! >> proud boys start fighting the police and with others in the mob, they push through the line. >> take the stairs! >> storm the capitol building. look at this. >> over several minutes it's a brutal fight on these steps. >> at one point the rioters are held back. but they make a final push up the flight of stairs.
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at the top they scuffle again with a small group of officers. who give in after barely a minute. >> stop! >> the mob now has direct access to capitol entrances. >> this is our building. >> i can't believe this is reality. we accomplished this [bleep]. >> and hundreds more protesters below surge forward. >> let's go! >> it's utter mayhem and it's about to get worse. the scene is being filmed from countless angles allowing us to piece together moment by moment what comes next. proud boy dominic pazola uses a police shield he stole to bash in a window. and at 2:13 p.m. the capitol is breached.
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throughout the capitol, staffers have barricaded doors to keep the mob out. in nancy pelosi's chambers staffers rush into a conference room and lock two doors behind them. just 12 minutes later, rioters outside head straight for her office. and pile in. >> here we are, nancy. are you in there? [bleep]. >> huddled together under a stable, the staff record what's happening. one rioter tries to break into that same room. inside, staffers are silent as they record him pounding. he gets through the first door but the second door keeps him out. it's the arrival of more police and other agencies that finally turns the tide.
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when those officers enter the rotunda, they clear it in just 20 minutes. as the mob is pushed back through the east doors, their rage turns to mike pence, who trump attacked earlier. >> hang mike pence! >> metro officers stop other rioters from entering on the west side where the mob first broke in. but here too we see a crowd empowered by the belief that they're carrying out some patriotic duty. >> i was invited here by the president! >> over the course of the day, 150 police officers are injured. all right. this is incredibly chilling to watch and it's worth watching
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and knowing it is 40 minutes long, but it covers six hours. and the fact that it took four hours for the national guard to get there. four hours. and for two hours these cops were completely outnumbered. so set aside the fact that you see sort of the craven behavior of people doing whatever it takes to get inside the capitol and wreak havoc and cause damage in the name of trump, carrying his flag, saying his name, demanding entry and feeling entitled to be there to cause damage and chaos and pain in his name, set that all aside and i found what was so gripping in this is the cops that were trying to hold the line. the cops that were trying to do everything they can to keep our senators and our members of congress safe, that were trying to trick the group into chasing them, facing them head on
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completely unmatched, without even an eighth of what they needed to try to push back this tide of violence, streaming into the capitol from eight different entrances, there are so many questions, kasie hunt, nbc news capitol hill correspondent and host of "way too early". i know this day was extremely traumatic for you, members of the press but my heart goes out to the cops. the capitol cops who were there and they were left hanging. they were left alone to try and figure out how to secure the entire building. and also, figure out the logistics of moving the nuclear football. the vice president and the bags that carry the country's nuclear information into a safe space.
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moving 435 members of congress, 100 senators, and they did it. they somehow kept the sanctity and the lives of the leaders elect safe, but the job was done. the process was interrupted. they invaded their capitol, they wreaked havoc in the name of trump and stopped the process. i don't know if you've seen the video yet. i urge all of our viewers to take a moment and watch it and to please try and get others to do the same. to help understand what happened that day. your thoughts? >> i'll be completely honest, mika. i started to try to watch this video a couple of times and i had a real hard time getting through it because of all the people that -- frankly i look at that and i see people i know. so watching it sitting here with you, it really underscores how -- just how close we came to
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utter catastrophe. it's obviously awful but when you look at it that way pieced together and see them walking down the hallways, staffers cowering, the boxes on the floor of the house of representatives. i think you were right to point out that those police officers who, you know, took on these rioters who were injured, who were hurt, at the end of the day, they kept our democracy intact by keeping members of congress alive and some of these quick thinking members of congress took those boxes and you saw that in the video, those are the boxes that hold the electoral college votes. it's a bit of an arcane process because it was written back when we had to bring everything by horse, basically to washington from across the country but those ballots represent something significant and important if they hadn't thought to grab them and take them with them out the door who knows what
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the rioters would have done with them. they were there to disrupt the process, the peaceful and orderly transfer of power. despite my inability to get through all 40 minutes of this in a row, this was incredible work by "the new york times." because the chaos of that day, we've seen the video footage time and time again but i know where all these places are when i see these individual videos, most americans do not. even i didn't have a complete understanding of how this actually happened and where on the building they invaded. so i think we should all be grateful to them for creating this historic record. what you see in the entrances from people's personal cell phones, thousands of cell phone videos, is the faces of rage, desire to do harm in a way that really captures that way.
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and a rioter was trampled and killed because people didn't even care to stop and think about the people around them. they wanted to get in there, no matter what happened to themselves or anybody else, and do unbelievable damage not just to our process but to our leaders. >> yeah, and one of the takeaways as you watch those 40 minutes which is very painful to watch, is they were driven there by donald trump, they heard his message not just on that day but for the weeks that led up to that day and also a lie that was perpetuated by many of the members of congress inside that building. i want to refresh the memory of our viewers on a quote from senator ron johnson, the republican from wisconsin made on a radio show in march, quote, i knew those were people that love this country that truly respect law enforcement and
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would never do anything to break the law, so i was not concerned. he went on to say he would have been more concerned if they were black lives matter activists or antifa coming into the building but they were not concerned because he knew they loved law enforcement, think about that as you watch the pictures, and would never do anything to break the law. that's one of many quotes, normal tourist visits, republicans who would not shake the hand of d.c. metro officer michael fanone when he was on capitol, he was beaten to an inch of his life. some republicans said these were the real victims, the trump supporters and the woman shot and killed as she tried to break into the house chamber is a martyr. we know they've been outvoted
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for the select committee. is there any other step along the way? they're not going to watch the video. is there any moment where any republican will confront what clearly happened on joe arpaio -- clearly happened on january 6th? >> i don't know. watching this makes me angry, this is a place i've been going to nearly every day for 15 years and i know many of the faces of the cops in this video. and to see what they did for every member of congress, republican, democrat, independent, they protected all of them. they owe their lives, in many cases, to these police officers, mike pence very much knows he owes his life to these police officers and we heard him talk a little bit about it actually the other day that he was proud of the actions that he took in making sure that he played the proper role in all of this, and then, of course, after he did that, these people came to the capitol looking for him, hung up
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a noose for him. so the speed with which this has become political and the speed with which disinformation about who these people really were has spread to the point where, you know, we had adam kinzinger on the other day talking about how some people believe the fbi orchestrated this because that's what they read on the internet is just really very, very troubling for the future of our country. >> so richard haas what does this mean for democracy? these images specifically. >> two thoughts come to mind, mika. one is one of the hallmarks of a democracy is peaceful transfer of power, that would differentiate us from china, russia or other authoritarian system. and we saw how it didn't happen. kasie said it made her angry, i
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get that. it should make us all worry, a reminder democracy is fragile, hangs by something of a thread, people are what sustain it, we don't teach it in our schools. the dna of democracy isn't somehow automatically transmitted and what i think americans should take from this is among all the other deficits in our country, from financial to what have you, we have a civics deficit. there is not an appreciation of what it takes to make a democracy work and survive and why it's valuable. and to me, that's the biggest lesson from this, that if we don't do something here, then it really is a question more like when and not if we have other real challenges to the rule of law. we're about two and a half centuries old. nobody said we're automatically permanent. this ought to be a wakeup call. >> it's precious and it's fragile. richard haas and kasie hunt, thank you both very much. and still ahead, a live report
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from surfside, florida where search efforts after a devastating condo collapse are entering week two. president biden leaves momentarily to visit the disaster site and meet with families. plus we learned that top trump organization executive allen weisselberg has now surrendered to the manhattan district attorney's office and is expected to face charges. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. watching "" we'll be right back.
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it is the top of the hour, live look at times square on this thursday morning. welcome back to "morning joe," it is thursday, july 1st. elise is still with us. we're going to dive in. we have news right now that allen weisselberg, the chief financial officer of the trump organization surrendered to the manhattan district attorney's office about 6:20 this morning as he and the company prepare to face charges on tax evasion brought in concert with the new york state attorney general. the specific charges won't be known until about 2:00 this afternoon when the indictments are expected to be unsealed. but people familiar with the case say they're related to unpaid taxes on gifts and benefits to weisselberg and potentially other executives.
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weisselberg will be arraigned in state court later today, along with the trump organization represented in court by one of its attorneys. the company has repeatedly denied wrong doing. attorneys for both defendants declined comment yesterday. joining us now, tom winter, and former u.s. attorney and an msnbc contributor barbara mcquad. i'll start with you tom just to give a blanket overview of exactly what we know at this point and then barbara can analyze. what do we know so far? >> as you said, allen weisselberg has surrendered himself to the manhattan district attorney's office, happened at 6:20 this morning confirmed by nbc news. it's a sequence of events that's going to happen today. the trump organization will be in court later on, when you indict a corporation it's tough
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to figure out who to arraign or arrest so the attorneys will be in court to address those charges at that time. we expect the charges will be read, the specific counts. the big question, mika, i think is that typically -- we've talked about federal indictments countless times on this program where there's big speaking indictments what do i mean by that? a lot of detail, narrative, text emails, communications, sometimes wiretap communications are in that indictment in the state of new york it's typically not the case you would see that. it's a basic document that details what are the specific violations of law and not a lot else. however, since a company is being indicted here, it could be possible that we would get more information. i think that would be helpful to understand the size and scope of what's being charged here and the real threat that allen weisselberg personally faces and, of course, that will then perhaps determine whether or not at some point he makes the
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decision to plead guilty and cooperate. what could he offer, we don't know. and, of course, there's a whole other side of this version involving allegations of potential bank fraud and potential insurance fraud being looked at by the manhattan's district attorney's office. it was four months and seven days ago they were able to get trump's tax returns and several hundred thousand pages of documents. so do they have more to come? is today to the put pressure on the corporation and weisselberg, a lot of things we'll have clarity about sometime after 2:00. >> you led me to my next question, most people don't know the name allen weisselberg. what is the significance of these indictments and his possible testimony here? because president trump has said, and many people might think as well, the cfo got a free car, didn't pay taxes on the car, his grand kid got to go to private school, that tuition was paid for by the organization, why is that significant in the larger scope of this investigation?
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>> i think if you're going to try to figure out what exactly was going on within the trump organization, particularly with respect to intent, particularly with respect to who was saying what to whom and when and what was actually being guided and directed, the cfo is going to be the person you want to talk to. the cfo is going to be the person that knows those answers. so from a cooperation standpoint in the investigation as it continues forward, it's important, willie, but it's also important to understand, and i think today, we'll see, obviously ron f fishetti has put out where they want us to believe this case is going. when we see the charging documents it'll provide clarity as to what the manhattan district attorney's office said they found. that's a key thing to watch this afternoon. >> barbara mcquad from
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everything we know so far what does this tell you about any of this getting close to donald trump, the former president himself, or i think of michael cohen, and how he ended up going to jail, but nothing really ended up touching donald trump. >> yeah, i think i would add to your sentence there, yet. i think the inclusion of allen weisselberg in this indictment signals that prosecutors are interested in flipping him in hopes of finding liability for others up to and including donald trump. allen weisselberg, as the cfo, as tom said, is someone in a key position. when you have an organization as small as the trump organization it's harder to defuse responsibility. in a small corporation like this we know that donald trump was hands on in decision making. so someone like allen weisselberg, now that he is staring down criminal charges and the possibility of prison
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may change his tune about whether he wants to cooperate and provide what he knows about donald trump and his involvement in some of these decisions that have now been labeled as crimes. >> barbara, elise here, this may be a difficult question to quantify. we're talking about tax fraud right now and danny cevallos was on earlier and mentioned you look at these cases and normally nothing happens and there's not really any boom boom punishment, so to speak. if this escalates to insurance fraud and bank fraud is it potentially more threatening to donald trump's empire? >> i think it is. some of those other crimes, if an intent to defraud can be proved, are typically sentenced on the basis of the amount of the loss to victims. so if those victims are banks or insurance companies who were defrauded those dollar values can trigger higher sentences.
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i think one of the things we see in our country is that white collar crimes are punished less severely than other street crimes, it's one of the disparities i think in the criminal justice system and one of the drivers of racial disparity in the criminal justice system. so i don't know that we'll see the eye popping numbers we see when someone is charged with, for example, a drug crime. but as danny said those fraud cases are likely to bring longer sentences than a tax charge. >> barbara, it's impossible for you or anyone to see inside the investigation what they've been working on for all of these months but based on the information we have, we know the indictments will be unsealed around 2:00 this afternoon. what do you expect they're leading up to if this is the just tip of the iceberg, what's below the surface? >> based on the things we heard from michael cohen and even the statements that cy vance himself made when he was seeking
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president trump's tax returns, it seems like this is this possibility of insurance fraud or bank fraud. michael cohen said that it was donald trump's practice to change the value of assets depending on what most suited his immediate need to lower his numbers when it came to reporting taxes and to inflate his assets when it came to seeking loans. so michael cohen said everything from his attempted purchase of the buffalo bills to purchases of art involved this process. and so we saw with paul manafort, some of these same kinds of things, bank fraud when he was playing around with assets seeking bank loans and we know his sentencing guidelines were in the neighborhood of 8 to 10 years. if donald trump followed that same pattern of practice we might expect to see similar kinds of numbers. >> tom, donald trump over the years has inspired loyalty but only to a point as we saw in the
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case of michael cohen. allen weisselberg has been his financial right hand for almost half a century. do you suspect he would be willing based upon what he hears about his own case today, to turn on his long-time boss? >> that's the ultimate question. in a story we broke on this program with jennifer weisselberg, she said the sun rises and sets for the weisselbergs with the trumps, so will that carry forward? i think that's the ultimate question. you never know until somebody is actually in a courtroom, sees the weight and the gravity of the law and the potential consequences they face whether or not they're going to make a decision to plead guilty and eventually cooperate. so i think today is going to be a new feeling for allen weisselberg you're out of the bubble, the confines of the trump tower now you're before a court and before a lot of reporters, i think it's a very different scene. so how that looks and goes
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forwards and what the specific charges are are going to be very important. i think barbara mcquade mentioned paul manafort there and it was a smart mention. this feels analogous in some ways to the mueller investigation, you go after the financial crimes, you go after people that might have been close to whoever your key person might be, again it's donald trump. so interesting to see going forward whether or not they are able to get guilty pleas and full cooperation. not something that paul manafort provided. how important will allen weisselberg be? he is somebody who did previously receive use immunity from the southern district of new york in the investigation of michael cohen and the payments to stormy daniels, he was not cooperative then and not helpful when he received that very limited use immunity to testify to very specific things. so allen weisselberg has been down this road before so we're going to have to see going
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forward where we end up and where things end up with him in this investigation. >> thanks to barbara mcquade and tom winter. thanks to you both for being on this morning. bill cosby was released from a pennsylvania prison yesterday. a free man. after the state's supreme court reversed his indecent assault conviction. the court threw out his conviction saying prosecutors violated a deal meant to shield cosby from criminal prosecution. nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk has details. >> we love you, mr. cosby. >> reporter: bill cosby is a free man, his conviction toss out, his record wiped clean, he cannot be retried. he a you peered before reporters outside his home. >> today innocence came to mr. cosby. >> reporter: pennsylvania's supreme court ruled the decision to charge him in 2015 was an affront to fundamental fairness and the prosecution violated
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cosby's due process. cosby calling into a radio show. >> this is for all the people who have been imprisoned wrongfully regardless of race, color or creed. because i met them in there. >> reporter: the 83-year-old was serving a 3 to 10 year sentence in maximum security prison after a jury found him guilty in 2018 of sexually assaulting andrea constand. at the same time his other accusers celebrated the verdict outside the court. >> i feel like i'm dreaming. >> reporter: constand a former temple university employee said cosby drugged and sexually assaulted her in 2004, cosby said the interaction was consensual. in 2005 the district attorney at the time, bruce caster, did not bring charges. caster testified that there was not enough evidence but instead he made a verbal agreement not to prosecute cosby if he would
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give a deposition in constand's civil case. that same deposition became the basis for a new da to charge him ten years later. the pennsylvania supreme court said prosecutors broke the promise. a spokesman for cosby said this is justice and justice for black america. one of the prosecutors from the trial firing back. >> i'm disturbed, distressed that they are again exploiting our thirst for justice in his name. >> stephanie gosk reporting there. joining us now charles coleman. great to see you this morning. so kristin, who we just saw in the piece, the prosecutor in the cosby case was with us in our last hour she said not only is this oral agreement from 2005 not grounds for the supreme court to over turn the
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conviction she doesn't have any evidence that it happened. what's your take? >> i think the first thing people need to understand this is not a commentary on cosby's built or innocence. he was not exonerated. this is a furngs of what happens when you have political motivations mixed with the criminal justice system. so cosby and his attorneys make a deal with a former prosecutor if they cooperate with a civil trial they will not be charged in this court. when you have these agreements about immunity, the question becomes are future prosecutors liable or responsible for upholding them in the future after the prosecutors who made those deals are gone and left office, and the supreme court in pennsylvania ultimately ruled yes, they are. part of what happened here, is if the reasoning was, the information and evidence used to convict bill cosby at trial would not have been available
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but for his participation and testimony at the deposition. so when the supreme court decided to throw that out what it said was you would not have had the case you had in addition to additional witnesses which they deemed unnecessary and they deemed highly prejudicial against mr. cosby being able to testify at trial. >> we have a hand shake deal here that the supreme court used to overturn the conviction. how unusual are those in your experience, and wouldn't they be memorialized somehow? would there be a signature that the supreme court could say here's why we're doing it. we understand there's a hand shake deal and we're setting him free. >> as a former prosecutor i can tell you these sorts of informal agreements don't happen to the degree we're seeing in the cosby case. one thing his attorneys held their hats on in the court of
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appeals was there was a memo from the former prosecutor to the current prosecutor and following successors, basically outlining the contours of the deal saying this happened and that was official. and that memo, although it was secret and private was something presented and included in evidence as part of their appeal. but to answer your question it is unusual that you would have this back room conversation that wasn't memorialized in any way formally between the parts in a way that would have allowed them to present this earlier. >> is this the end of the story? it's gone to the pennsylvania supreme court, they said he can walk a free man. we heard from many of the victims devastating by those images of bill cosby walking free is he free for the rest of his life? >> he is. and this is an unfortunate and tragic end to the story. on one hand huh the political motivations of a prosecutor in montgomery county who ran on a platform of getting bill cosby and making sure that he was
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brought to justice. and then caught in the middle of this saga are the unfortunate stories of these sexual assault victims who all they wanted was their day in court and justice and rightfully so many feel denied by that with the turn of events we've seen. >> you can understand why. charles coleman great to have your insights this morning. thanks for being with us. still ahead on "morning joe," president biden is headed to surfside, florida to meet with the families of the victims of the deadly condomin yum collapse. you're watching "morning joe" we'll be right back. you're watching "morning joe" we'll be right back. you already pay for car insurance, why not take your home along for the ride? allstate. here, better protection costs a whole lot less.
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i love it. all right. we're looking at live pictures right now, marine one at joint base andrews. president biden and dr. jill biden will be heading off shortly. their destination is surfside, florida where they are going to be visiting the disaster zone of
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the condo collapse there. there's still over 100 people missing and unaccounted for. and president biden will be not just visiting the site to see the wreckage, to see it firsthand, but also to meet with the families of those who have died and those who are still missing and at this point presumed dead, although there is still a rescue mission under way. very, very, very difficult day ahead for those family members as they enter the second week of this catastrophe. president biden, dr. jill biden offering their condolences face-to-face. something you didn't see a lot of in the past four years, but something that this president takes very seriously and that is connecting with people who have suffered from loss and empathizing with them and sharing with them their pain. joining us now from surfside,
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florida, nbc news correspondent allison barber. what more can you tell us, allison? >> reporter: mika, yeah, this visit is primarily going to be a comfort visit. you can imagine what these families have been going through. it is not just the uncertainty. it is the waiting. it is a wave of emotions every single day hearing first that more victims have been found, more bodies pulled from the rubble and the lag in having to wait to find out who they are. at least 18 lives have been lost in this building collapse, grandparents, mothers, fathers, children, an entire family lost their lives here. marcus, anna and their two daughters lucie ya and emma, they were 10 and 4 years old, they lived on the eighth floor, just two doors down from them there was a newly wed couple. i met their family just a couple of days ago, they had gotten married in january and were
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planning to have a bigger ceremony after the pandemic. they are among the 140 plus people still unaccounted for. as far as we know, search and rescue efforts continue this morning and are under way. when we spoke to a rescuer, a member of the miami-dade urban search and rescue team, known as florida task force one, they talked about how this is not only a physically logistically, tactically challenging endeavor, but it is also emotionally grueling for the rescuers because this is not just any disaster. these are teams that have responded to catastrophes all across the world but this is unique because some of them know these families. i want you to listen to what that rescuer told us, her name is maggie castro. >> the guys and gals working on that pile, there are times they're breaking down.
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they break down sometimes on the pile itself because it is hard. it is hard when you're going through that pile and you suddenly find a toy. and you suddenly find a picture of a family. all of these -- it keeps reminding us that we are looking for people, we are looking for people's family members, their loved ones. >> reporter: there's a memorial not far from here, i imagine it's something that the president will likely visit today. there are photos all along it of the missing and now some of the confirmed victims. there are a lot of stuffed animals some of them teddy bears pulled from the rubble by rescuers and they took them and placed them at that sight. there are at least four lawsuits filed, most against the condo association, a grand jury is also expected to look at this and we know the national institute of standards and technology has launched a full
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technical investigation, similar to what they did after 9/11 to try and understand how this collapse happened, how this building was built, any modifications made, how it was maintained, they say that investigation could take years. but right now, mika, for the families here, when i talked to them, the main thing they are focused on is wanting to know how their loved one is, where their loved one is, and those rescuers say they're in this for the long haul, they will move every piece of debris out here until they're able to save maybe one life or at least bring closure to these families. there are over 140 people still unaccounted for this morning. mika? >> unspeakable. allison barber, thank you very much for that reporting. we have a chilling voice mail left by a surfside resident giving a glimpse into the moments surrounding the deadly
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collapse. larisa rodriguez called her brother after waking up to a loud noise. she described the building swaying, quote, like a sheet of paper as she began knocking on neighbors' doors before narrowly escaping. >> oh my god! what the hell! >> oh my god! yadi! the whole entire building is gone. >> rodriguez's two close friends and neighbors seen her have yet to be found and, willie, again, when you read about exactly what
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they do know so far about what happened first and then second and third with one part of the building going down and then another, there were a few seconds there for people at least to try to escape as this woman was. >> yeah, but it was the middle of the night, you know, it was 1:30 in the morning. >> i know. >> all asleep. >> she was awakened. nobody had time to react and responds. this is a week in, as hope fades they're going to find survivors, the reality washes over everyone down there. as you heard from the fire and rescue worker that it's going to be bad. the numbers of unaccounted for are high. and they fear the worst about what's happened to those who have been unaccounted for. we learned last night, mika, that a 21-year-old, a member of our vanderbilt university family, where i went to school, set to be a senior next year, a young man named andres he was there in the condominium tower
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visiting his god father and last night his mother was told they found his body, he had been killed and she said my son was the strongest person i knew and the best part of my day, we had plans for his future. 21 years old, visiting his god father, killed in surfside. we extend our condolences to his family and those getting this news in the days to m come. coming up from their moral authority to how they respond to crisis. historians are ranking presidents by leadership, one living president is in the top ten, another is in the bottom five. we'll have that list next on "morning joe." t list next on "morning joe."
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welcome back to "morning joe." ahead of july 4th, cspan has released its fourth ranking of past u.s. president and the results are not good for president trump. former president trump. in a survey of nearly 150 historians, former president trump ranked among the worst in history. he beat only one term president franklin pierce, the first president to be impeached. andrew johnson and james buchanan, best known for not stopping southern states from is seeding in the lead up to the civil war. the top ranking presidents have been consistent with abraham lincoln topping the list, former president barack obama ranked 10th. joining us now one of the
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organizers of the cspan list who was also surveyed, professor douglas frankly. and also professor walter tu lan and author annette gordon reed joins us. doug, i'll start with you. in terms of how this all was put together what the criteria was, everything that brought this list about so we understand what we're looking at. >> at cspan every four years we bring out a poll, do a wide cast of historians and biograpiers we had 143 respond and the voting goes down in different categories. donald trump did abysmally in administrative skills, did better in public persuasion. so it's broken down commander in
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chief, foreign policy, and we get them all together and tabulate them and this is the list. there's a lot of sustainability here. we have lincoln first, washington second, fdr third, theodore roosevelt fourth. eisenhower has been playing in the fifth zone where harry truman used to be. but truman is high. and john f kennedy and ronald reagan and barack oba all hold extremely high places. you don't want to be in this poll ranked below william henry harrison, he was president for one month. if you ranked below him like donald trump is, it means you did damage while you were in the white house. and the bottom basement presidents. >> and before we branch out here, talk about abraham lincoln and his topping the list. >> well, lincoln is everybody's favorite president, the cruisable of our country, the
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civil war, guided us through it. some of his speeches have become foundational texts, his inaugural addresses, the emancipation proclamation. and he's barack obama's favorite, george w. bush's favorite. so there's unity among the historians of the utter greatness of lincoln. what's more interesting is in this age of statues coming down, you see two slave owners, washington and thomas jefferson being able to still maintain quite high spots. >> so annette, what do you make, professor gordon-reed of these rankings, they've held steady right at the top, you do have for the first time, former president obama moving into the top ten. what's your assessment of the top of that list? >> well, it's not surprising to me that it remains relatively
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stable. the things that people did remain the things that they did. and people admire lincoln for saving the union and washington for being pivotal to the creation of the country. it's interesting to see obama at 10. we have had not many years pass since he was president and a lot of this reflects his great popularity as president. i wonder how it will hold up as the years go by. historians usually like to have some sort of distance between a presidency to make the assessment of it. >> it's walter isaacson, hey, doug and annette. one thing that struck me about the list was the fall of andrew jackson more so than any other, the slave owning president. since you both know about andrew jackson, i was wondering if you could speak to that. >> i would say about andrew jackson, the trail of tears have
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come to haunt him. people are looking at what it was, a genocide of native american people, the forced marches. there might be some anger at jackson because it seemed to be the president that donald trump gravitated to he visited the hermitage in nashville, so it may be that some scholars are associating this sort of populism in a more vicious or ugly racist way than they had before. it wasn't that long ago walter when you were writing the book "the wiseman" there were still jefferson dinners, alas you see a lot of slippage with jackson, but you see elevation of grant because of ron's book but grant because of the issues of race and equality do better than somebody like andrew jackson. >> i agree with doug on this
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point. obviously the trail of tears was a tragedy and people focus on that. but also jackson democracy people look at that and understand that that was the period in which even free blacks lost ground. so the populism of that moment was a populism designed to create a white man's government. so that's the reason i think his image has faltered in recent years. >> walter, we were having an interesting offset conversation where i was grilling you about history, but i like the rise of eisenhower bumping truman and joe is not here today to defend truman and why truman should still be in the top five, but what do you attribute this rise in eisenhower's legacy now versus at the time when he was seen as boring and not very dynamic and really has kind of seen a rebirth of his reputation. >> i think what we want now is
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somebody who's a bit boring. we've gone through too much exciting times. in some ways eisenhower, who i think was a great president, reminds me of joe biden, he's inarticulate or -- no. he had a good, moral compass, eisenhower, the only time he deploys american troops is little rock, the 101st airborne division to desegregate the schools. i think you're seeing not so much a fall of truman because he's staying at the top but you're looking at eisenhower and here's a small thing about eisenhower that's important now. i know you're going to be writing about him, is that he was a science president. he created darpa, he created nasa, he dinners with what he called my scientist. i know that joe biden has talked about his own desire to be a science president in the way that eisenhower was and you're writing about how eisenhower was enlightened about the role of
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women in the military. >> and eisenhower was an infrastructure president. we have our highway. >> i forgot. >> so hopefully president biden will update that a little bit, you know? >> um-hum. >> i'm curious who, doug, you think you see rising up on this list and any changes or trends that are happening, especially in light of the past four years? >> well, in light of the past four years, richard nixon and bill clinton have both slipped in the polls and i think it's because their names have become synonymous with impeachment. our country went through two impeachments with donald trump and there's a lot of comparison going on with watergate or the clinton affairs of the 1990s. so they're not rising stars at this moment. george w. bush has gone surprisingly up more, still middle to low but he's gone up quite a few notches and i think it's a testimony to how well
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he's conducted his ex-presidency, he's in dallas, doing those paintings of immigrants and wounded warriors and the like. kept a low profile but he's beloved in the state of texas. he criticizes trump from time to time. so he's an example of somebody who somehow has been able to become at least people are seeing virtues in him. everything in this poll is about donald trump, in my view. trump is so low, such a disruptive force it makes the other more recent presidents look better and i've been getting a lot of people saying why is jack kennedy so high? i think he deserves to be so high when you think about his handling of cuban missile crisis, berlin, the creating of the peace core, the army rangers, the green beret, he saved national seashores like cape cord and padre island.
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it is a record. and, of course, he was such an inspiring leader so there's this feeling of what we could have had if kennedy stayed alive. so kennedy and ronald reagan are holding firm on the polls, looking good. >> annette, i'm curious if we can imagine the potentials and the different options for joe biden as we look ahead and at some point see him on this list in retrospective, given the lows that the trump presidency hit, according to this list, what are the potentials for him being either a transitional president, for us bouncing back or bouncing forward, sort of in reaction to the trump presidency? >> well, i think if president biden does things, i mean, people want to see concrete accomplishments and if he's able to do the infrastructure plan and really change people's daily
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lives in some fashion, i think that he has the potential for being credited as a great president, but it is all going to depend on what actions he takes and whether they can actually come to fruition. >> annette gordon-reed and douglas brinkley, thank you both. still ahead, the delta variant of coronavirus has been detected in every state. what that means for possible new spikes in cases. "morning joe" is coming right back. coming right back
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♪♪ the delta variant of coronavirus is expected to the dominant strain by this fall. and health officials are concerned certain areas of the country could see spikes in cases because of it. nbc correspondent miguel almaguer has more.
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>> reporter: washington and oregon become one of the final states to move into a full reopening -- >> i'm just glad we don't have to wear masks. >> reporter: authorities have determined that the delta variant is threatening to explode in pockets of the country where vaccination rates are low, the strain remains the nation's most serious threat. >> i don't know why we're in such a rush. i think we need to be more careful. >> reporter: citing concern from delta, the state governor said the cdc will follow cdc guidelines, not lifting the mask mandate this fall. and doctors say the strain may have something similar to a bad cold which could lead to further testing and spread but there's a way to eliminate the threat. >> if in fact you're safe from the variants circulating here in the united states, we have three vaccines that we know are safe and effective. >> reporter: for now, the cdc says the vaccinated don't need boosters, but like the virus,
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little is certain as the threat and science both evolve. >> miguel almaguer reporting. walter add atkinson, we've heard exclusively from the direct of the cdc,ful you've been vaccinated, you're safe from the variant. but yet we're hearing here in the united states and other places in europe what it could mean for the fall. >> yes, with the moderna and pfizer vaccines, the ones that are mrna vaccines, they're effective against the delta variant. because that's why people should get them. because coronaviruses mutate very quickly and that's why we have the variants. there may be thousands of mutations but one is more effective. unless we knock down the coronavirus now, we're going to get more variants. while the vaccines right now are good at fighting off the delta variant, people should get them.
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and the good thing about these rna vaccines, if we do get a vaccine that's tougher, you can reprogram the messenger rna, you can say tweak it because now it's mutated. but the best thing to do is use these vaccines that will stop the variant so the variant doesn't get stronger. >> uh-huh. all right. now, we're going to talk about a big moment yesterday. donald rumsfeld passed away at the age of 88. he had a storied career in government, under four presidents and nearly a quarter century in corporate america. a onetime presidential candidate and two-time defense secretary who holds the distinction of being both the youngest and the oldest person to serve at the helm of the defense department. but he is perhaps best remembered as one of the key architects of the decades-long
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wars in iraq and afghanistan. some remember him as a skilled statesman. while others have blamed those interventions for destabilizing the region. and roping american soldiers into endless wars. as a member of the nixon white house, one of his early acts was to hire a young dick cheney, starting a life long friendship with him. he also served as the u.s. ambassador to nato. and was re-called to washington to lead president gerald ford's transition team, after nixon resigned in 1974. he later became the new president's chief of staff. and then in november of 1975, he's secretary of defense. former president george w. bush released a statement that reads in part, on the morning of the
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september 11, 2001, donald rumsfeld ran to the fire at the pentagon to assist the wounded and ensure the safety of survivors. for the next five years, he was in steady service as a wartime secretary of defense, a duty he carried out with strength, skill and honor. and still ahead, we're following a lot of moving parts this morning. president biden is on his way to surfside, florida, right now, to console the grieving families those of the collapse there. he departed a short time ago. plus, the chief financial officer of the trump organization surrendered to new york prosecutors this morning. as he faces charges along with the trump organization itself. "morning joe" is coming right back. ♪♪ ♪ welcome to allstate, ♪ ♪are you down, d-d-down, d-d-down, d-d-down♪ where we're driving down the cost of insurance.
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♪♪ good morning, and welcome to "morning joe." it is thursday, july 1st. joe will be back tomorrow. along with willie and me, we have former aides to the george w. bush white house and state departments and msnbc political. let's start with the news, the district attorney and new york attorney general have obtained indictments against
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allen weisselberg. the specific charges will not be known until 2:00 this afternoon when the indictments are expected to be revealed. people say they're related to unpaid taxes. and potentially the trump organization as well. the trump organization will be also represented in court by one of its attorneys. the company has repeatedly denied wrongdoing and both attorneys declined comment yesterday. let's bring in "washington post" reporter david fairhold. david help us what we'll see when the indictments are revealed this afternoon. allen weisselberg, it's been said that he is the man in the trump organization who nose where the bodies are buried, if you will, who has been with the trump organization for almost 50 years. what do you expect to see today? >> reporter: well, i think we'll
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finally get some sense about what prosecutors have, we've been hearing about the elephant for months and we haven't seen it. so we're going to see it, especially allen weisselberg who have heard that the charges relate to unpaid taxes as you said for benefit, and is it one apartment, one car or a pattern over many years? i think when we see that we'll start to understand the legal pressure on weisselberg which is really to understand the legal pressure on trump. but weisselberg flipping it one of the things that could happen. >> obviously, you're saying this cannot happen in a vacuum. this could be the tip of the iceberg for the trump organization. what happens here, do you suspect that weisselberg will flip leading to potentially charges on the former president? >> reporter: well, it's hard to know until we see how much jail time if any weisselberg is
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facing. you remember michael cohen, there was a time when he was saying i'll never turn on donald trump. then he sees ten years in a federal case and that changed his mind and he became a witness against him. until we see what weisselberg is facing that could show the next course. i do hope we'll see the district attorney or attorney general say how they view this, do they view this as an end or just the beginning. >> right. also, david, the michael cohen example say very good, because like allen weisselberg, he had extreme closeness to president trump and he also testified on capitol hill, as to how the former president communicated, often saying nothing, but enough, to get them to do something that might have been inappropriate. what makes allen weisselberg different? >> reporter: the difference here is allen weisselberg basically has been in operational control of the trump organization for decades. this is not just a guy who
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advised trump like cohen doing legal work, weisselberg is the cfo, he controls every bit of money that comes in and out of the organization. in fact, he said he even made sure the subsidiaries were buying the right pens. i think prosecutors hope he's going to be able to tell when we did this thing and this thing, here's why i did it, here's what trump told me to do. that would be key to establishing that trump is going to be accused of financial crimes, understood that he was breaking the law when he broke is it. >> david fahrenthold has been covering this story for years. david, thanks so much. let's bring in msnbc legal analyst danny cevallos. danny, we don't know what's inside the indictments. we may know later this afternoon when they're unsealed. what are you expecting to see? >> well, based on reporting, if
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this was a case where this was taxable fringe benefits that went unrecorded and that gave benefit to the cfo and the organization then there are two things to glean. number one, thatgalactically clumsy for the cfo to not know that they were fringe benefits. you would need a car that was free with the advertisement on the side that is only used for business, occasionally personal use and even then that may be a taxable fringe benefit. if it's a late model cadillac you that just drive whenever you want, that's definitely a taxable fringe benefit. so there's that portion of it. the other thing to tnk about in the world of tax prosecution, in many thousands of cases brought a tiny fraction of those are tax fraud cases. within that, i'm not sure there were any taxable fringe benefit cases brought in federal court last year.
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still looking, the data just came out very recently, but i don't know that there were any. just to give you an idea, this is not something taxable fringe benefits that becomes a criminal tax case very often. >> all right. thank you very much. we're going to be following this story and covering it all day here on msnbc as we learn more about exactly what the indictments are going to reveal. so the house is going to move forward for establishing a select committee to investigate the january 6th attack. yesterday's vote was 292 to 190, only two republicans, congressman adam kinzinger and liz cheney voting in part and cheney released a statement, i believe this select committee is our only remaining option. the american people need and deserve a full accounting. we must ensure that what happened on january 6, 2021,
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never happens again. and after spending several months analyzing thousands of videos from the capitol attack, this is from every angle, from people in the crowd, from organizers, from the very beginning, "the new york times" is out with an in-depth look at the insurrection. digging into the details of exactly what happened on january 6th and why. the paper's visual investigations unit filed motions to unseal police body camera footage, scoured law enforcement radio communications, synchronized and mapped out the visual evidence and pored over footage filmed by the rioters themselves. leading to a 40-minute panoramic take on what the "times" calls the most complete visual depiction of the capitol riot to date. and it is. i watched it last night. it is chilling and revealing. here's just a bit of what the
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"times" found. >> -- start fighting the police and with others in the mob, they push through the line. >> over several minutes, it's a brutal fight on these steps. >> at one point, the rioters are held back. but they make a final push up the flight of stairs. at the top, they scuffle again with a small group of officers. who give in after barely a minute. the mob now has direct access to capitol entrances.
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>> i can't believe this is reality [ bleep ] -- >> and hundreds more protesters below surge forward. >> all right. we're going to have a lot more from that "the new york times" investigation. it's gripping to watch. it is the most disturbing thing that you'll see so far on this. elise jordan, it really -- it traces the depth of the sort of cult-like commitment to trump. and why he ran up on the capitol. a close-up look at the crazen massive assault not only on the united states capitol, but our democracy in process but you also really see in blips and images and faces, the heartbreak for capitol cops, for d.c. cops, as they were left exposed and
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incapable of defending themselves and our country for hours. i don't know how you can't look at this and not be moved. >> mika, it's just -- it's medieval hand-to-hand combat. >> yeah. >> you look at that and it's like a modern day version of "braveheart" almost, in the worst possible way. i was looking at the footage just then of what the cops endured. >> right. >> and they're incredible with strength, really having to protect themselves, not escalating. and finally they had to give in and let this insurrectionist mob storm the capitol. and the "times" did such a chilling service by putting all of this together and documenting in such detail what went down because we need to remember, we need to have this select committee. because we need to know the truth behind what happened. and we need to know if anyone from the trump administration played a role in orchestrating
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the rally that led to this horrible day in american history. still ahead, the wild swing in the case of bill cosby, from free man. we'll revisit the decision to overturn his conviction. you're watching "morning joe." we will be right back. ack. ♪let's make lots of money♪ ♪you've got the brawn♪ ♪i've got the brains♪ ♪let's make lots of♪ ♪uh uh uh♪ ♪oohhh there's a lot of opportunities♪ with allstate, drivers who switched saved over $700. saving is easy when you're in good hands. allstate click or call to switch today. allstate cynthia suarez needed to buy new laptops for her growing team. so she used her american express business card, which lets her earn extra membership rewards points on purchases for her business. now she's the office mvp.
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finding something and the us takes gold! ♪ dream on ♪ ♪ dream on ♪ ♪ dream on ♪ ♪ dream on ♪ - yes! ♪ ahhhhhhh ♪ ♪ dream until your dreams come true ♪ bill cosby who was released from a pennsylvania prison yesterday, now a free man after the state supreme court there reversed cosby's indecent assault conviction. the court threw out its conviction saying prosecutors violated the deal meant to shield cosby from prosecution. nbc's correspondent stephanie gosk has details. >> reporter: bill cosby is a free man. his conviction tossed out. his record wiped clean. he cannot be retried. he appeared briefly before
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reporters outside his home. the pennsylvania supreme court ruled that the decision to charge cosby with sexual assault in 2015 was an affront to fundamental fairness and the constitution violated cosby's due process. cosby calling into a radio show. >> this is for all of the people who have been imprisoned wrongfully, regarding of race, color, creed, because they're in there. >> reporter: the 73-year-old was serving a three to ten-year sentence in maximum security prison after a jury found him guilty of sexually assaulting andrea constand. >> i feel like i'm dreaming. >> reporter: constand, a former temple university employee said cosby drugged and sexually assaulted here in his pennsylvania home in 2004, cosby said the interaction was
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consensual. and in 2005, david caster who would later be president trump's impeachment attorney, made verbal agreement not to prosecute cosby if he would give a deposition in constrand's civil case. that same deposition became the basis for a new d.a. to charge him ten days later, days after the statute of limitations expired. the pennsylvania supreme court said prosecutors broke the promise. one of the prosecutors from the trial kristin gibbons feden fought back. >> they're again exploiting our thirst for justice in his name. >> stephanie gosk reporting there. the district attorney who brought the case, kevin steele, said cosby was found guilty by a jury and released on a procedural issue. joining us now, that attorney you saw in that piece. she's an msnbc legal analyst and
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was a prosecutor in the first case against cosby and a special prosecutor in of the second. kristin, take me back to 2005, and bruce castor striking a deal with mr. cosby, a verbal agreement, we're today, that he would not prosecute him if he could testify in the civil case. is that out of the ordinary, something you've seen before or grounds for the pennsylvania court to turn over the decision? >> i do have to say i do respect the supreme court on their findings, not only is it unseen and unheard of, but i would certainly allege that it didn't happen. one of the things that is really important when nonprosecutorial agreements are made, they're in wright, they're approved by the court. and bruce castor who has been a d.a. for a number of years actually knew that and implemented that case and is not
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something that he did not know. so, a verbal agreement like that not only doesn't happen. but i think the other thing to emphasize is that if it were to have happened, is it would have been in writing. it would have been approved by the court. and there were other indicia that i'm happy to go through that kind of firm up for me, at least, the fact that i don't believe that it happened. >> kristen gibbons feden, thank you so much for being on this morning. and still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> if there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, let it be that human rights are women's rights and women's rights are human rights once and for all. >> that was an incredible speech that was then first lady hillary rodham clinton at a u.n. conference on women in beijing back in 1995. one of our next guests says vice president kamala harris is taking the baton on that message
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welcome back to "morning joe." the chaotic race for new york city mayor took another turn yesterday. one day after the city's board of elections released and then rescinded new results in the democratic primary contest. new numbers show former city sanitation commissioner kathryn garcia who was behind by 13 points previously, now trailing former police captain eric adams by just two points. these numbers are largely in line with the faulty results released on tuesday. the boe later called the mishap quote, unacceptable error. 131,000 test votes meant to be cleared from its system were reported in the vote count. this prompted a lawsuit from the adams campaign. yesterday, it announced it is petitioning the court to, quote,
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preserve our right to a fair election process. more than 120,000 absentee ballots still remain unaccounted for as the city uses a ranked choice voting system for the first time. what a mess. here now with more on that, city hall and politics reporter for wnyc bridget burgeon. bridget, i can see how the candidates would be getting pretty stressed out at this point. wanting the numbers to be counted and counted right. and the people of new york as well. >> absolutely, mika. i think one of the most important things when we look at those tallies, though, to remember is that these are just interim results. the results that were released this week were never intended to be the final results. and while the error made by the board of elections was egregious and understandable it would shake the voters and confidence
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the good part it was detected before any certification process. the other part to realize while the race has narrowed significantly with eric adams just two points over kathryn garcia, maya wiley, the tally is eliminated, he's was behind kathryn garcia by votes and like you said, there are 120,000 not included in this tally. so it's very fair to say this race is still wide open, still very much alive. and even though lawsuits while that is something procedurally that candidates do rather routinely. it's a product of new york state election laws, they have to file these orders, in order to protect their rights to challenge any ballots within ten days of the primaries. so that would be friday. so these are preempted actions. but they don't necessarily speak
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to anything that has happened thus far. it just guarantees that these candidates have a right when canvassing these absentee ballots and raised objections. >> brigid, as you said, if maya wiley is not going to drop out of the race, why in the world would shy trailing by a few votes and 120,000 absentee still out there how could maya wiley be eliminated? >> what they were doing is giving us a look at what the primaries looked at on primary night we saw how voters identified their first choice votes. this is the choice they saw taking into people's second and fifth votes. using the algorithm. this is again is a snapshot, we have additional votes that need
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to factor into this total. one of the things is looking at where some of these absentee ballots are coming from. if you were to try to do, you know, a little bit of game analysis, a lot of these absentee ballots are from manhattan. that's when kathryn garcia one the largest share of the votes. however, obviously from all five boroughs, i think one of the things we'll be watching when we see the next tally expected on next tuesday, july 6th, how much dot numbers change? because the one thing that is certain, these numbers will change. >> city hall and politics reporter for wnyc, brigid burgin, thank you for being on. and coming up, the meaning of burnout, dr. lucille mcbride talks about how the pandemic is
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pushing people to the breaking point. we'll read from it straight ahead on "morning joe." ahead on "morning joe.
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welcome back. now to a development in one of morning's top stories. we told you that the trump organization's chief financial officer allen weisselberg surrendered to the manhattan district attorney's office earlier this morning as he and the company prepare to face charges in connection with tax evasion, brought in concert with the new york state attorney general. and this just in, the trump organization has issued a statement in response. quote, allen weisselberg is a loving and devoted husband, father and grandfather who has been worked at the trump organization for 48 years. he is now being used by the manhattan district attorney as a pawn in a scorched earth attempt
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to harm the former president. the district attorney is bringing a criminal prosecution involving employee benefits that neither the irs nor any other district attorney would ever think of bringing. this is not justice. this is politics. indictments against weisselberg and the company are expected to be unsealed around 2:00 this afternoon. we'll be following that here on msnbc. as for the current president, president biden and first lady dr. jill biden right now are en route to surfside, florida. they will be meeting with first responders who are working tirelessly to search through the mountains of rubble through last week's condo collapse. the bidens will also meet with the families of loved ones killed and still missing. 18 people are confirmed dead including a family of four with two young daughters. 145 people remain unaccounted
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for. it's unimaginable. let's bring in white house correspondent for pbs news hour and moderator of "washington week" on pbs. she's an msnbc contributor. emeche, biden will go to the collapse of the condo in south florida. tell us what that means because we're hearing word on infrastructure and that package struggling a bit. so he's got a lot on his plate. >> he does, mika. and good morning. this is really president biden leaning in on emphasizer in chief. we know this is a place where he really can connect with people and talk about loss in a personal way. he's meeting with officials, the governor, the mayor.
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he's then going to talking to first responders, people searching the rubble, searching for a miracle, and recovering bodies. and then there is this sort of three-hour period in his schedule, where he's scheduled to meet with these families that are missing, have missing loved ones, lost loved ones. that block of time really underscores the idea, the president wants to spend time with these families. i've been talking to white house officials. they expect him to meet one-on-one with as many families as he possible can and led that the needle, and balance what is there which is some have lost hope and some holding out hope and say, please, let's see if there's a miracle here. but to connect and bring sadness in his own sympathy to these
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people and these families. >> before we get to infrastructure, former president trump is moving ahead with a rally in sarasota, florida, scheduled for this weekend, this despite reported pressure from governor desantis to cancel as rescue crews continue to search for the survivors of the surfside condo collapse. the governor's office released a statement yesterday denying that it wanted to postpone the rally insisting desantis is, quote, focusing on his duties as governor and the tragedy in surfside and has never suggested or requested that the stanley cup or president trump's rally should be cancelled. the herald tribune reports, if the rally moves forward he would be faced with the choice of whether to spurn a mentor or participate in a bipartisan event even agency the surfside
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death toll keeps rising, we'll be keeping an eye on that. meanwhile, as i mentioned, back on capitol hill, the bipartisan infrastructure deal struck by lawmakers and president joe biden may now not have enough support from democrats. democratic senator chris murphy of connecticut warned yesterday that if lawmakers aren't allowed to amend the reconciliation bill to add additional spending requests, quote, there is not a path for it or the bipartisan infrastructure package. those comments came as house speaker nancy pelosi reiterated the house won't fault on the bipartisan infrastructure bill until the senate passes both bills. and that's been the crux. the president mentioned that earlier on and then walked it back. but speaker pelosi, yamiche is holding firm.
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and i wonder if infrastructure is not as sure thing as one who would have thought days ago. >> it's definitely not a sure thing. this is a bipartisan thing but on very shaky ground here. talking to white house officials, the white house is still holding on to the idea that it can be pulled off, this deal struck at the white house can be held together but there are really realtime line issues here. when you think about the fact the republicans would have to wait months for democrats to get the second reconciliation bill in. democrats, especially progressive democrats want more on that bipartisan deal, a little more meat on the bones there. and the president and white house indicated they don't want to add any more spending to things negotiated in that bill. it's already a $1.2 trillion bill. so democras wanting to add something that republicans don't want to do. and we're talking this through, and the president and democrats
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trying to look like they're pulling this off but it's looking very shaky. it's a hard thing to pull off with two bills going at the same time. and with republicans having to wait on this, the closer to the midterms the more unlikely this goes through. >> thank you very much. now to vice president kamala harris who yesterday addressed virtually the generation equality forum in paris. >> if we want to strengthen democracy, we must fight for gender equality. because here's the truth, democracy is strongest when everyone participates and it is weaker when people are left out. when women are heard, when women are heard, whether that is in the courtroom, in the workplace, in the halls of government or at the ballot box, democracy is more complete.
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remember to use the tools of democracy. whether that is the freedom of speech, or the freedom to vote. and if you do not yet have those freedoms, fight for them. and know we will fight alongside you. >> joining us now, founder and ceo of all in together, lauren leader, who writes about the vice president's address for the hill. also with us the chief execive of the times up and ran the council on women and girls as well. >> lauren, i want to start with you, in terms of, if you could frame for us the magnitude or what potentially this speech could mean for kamala harris' vice presidency? >> well, it is certainly an important moment on the world stage really in so many terms a significant speech on the word
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stage. the president of france, the president of mexico both speak right before her. and it is 26 years since hillary clinton famously in beijing at the last world forum on women issues said the famous words women's rights are human rights and human rights are women's rights. it was transformative and led to this collaboration in 180 countries around the world who made significant advancements in gender equality. and the first black american vice president to show on the world stage. >> gina chen, explain if you can, because i've tried on this show, joe biden's commitment to not just pay equality, but
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gender equality, this white house has more women working in it. this is something he's pretty dedicated to. and what is it you think the vice president needs to do in her position to continue with some of the goals that were initially set out by the white house, council of women and girls put together by president obama and you but then gotten rid of by donald trump? >> well, one of the first things they did is reinstitute that effort with the gender policy council, really expand the charge. a highly placed group of folks at the white house, to direct gender policy both international and domestic across all of the federal government. that is step one, working directly with the vice president's office. her speech just pulled it all together. it was accompanied, mika, by a
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lengthy message of commitments to the u.s. government to the international stage as part of the equality forum. what we're doing, including as you talked about with yamiche, the nearly $2 million investment in paid leave, for security for women here in the united states, but commitments on combatting gender race violence around the world. to committing to reproductive health, health care for women domestically and internationally. i'm pleased because the biden administration has really put a robust agenda on the table and are pursuing it vigorously to promote gender equity across the board. >> we're going to talk about that in a second. elise jordan, you have a question. >> lauren, you wrote and forecasted very well for the hill and i encourage everyone to read that. but in the actual remarks it did
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seem more about democracy promotion on those, than about promoting women's rights. and there was such an opportunity there for vice president harris to follow up on what then first lady hillary clinton announced in her historic speech that is just one of the top speeches of all time. where do you -- what do you make of the actual remarks? >> yeah, it is a really tough line for them to watch. only given five minutes it's hard to put a lot in five minutes. tina is right, they put out an extraordinary list of commitments following her speech. so i think hard to capture the full breadth of what the commitments are in the speech. i was fascinated that they focused on democracy because we haven't seen that for all the reasons. it's true the democratic institution is a stabilizing force that enables countries. we saw that in afghanistan, we saw that in iraq.
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we've seen it around the world. i thought it was a fascinating choice that rather than just exclusively focus on women's rights per se, to focus on a larger picture of women's participation. it surprised me, it was not what i was expecting from the speech. but i think it does signal a commitment from the biden administration, not just at home, where clearly there are significant issues that need to be addressed. as tina said the white house is doing, i think, yeoman's work in trying to address the progressive policies of the last years and catch up for the work that hasn't been done. but to make this commitment globally and to focus on women as anchors of democracy i thought was really, really interesting from this administration. >> so, tina, your organization is really, really focused on getting the families plan where it needs to go. and i agree with it. i think it would be just earth changing for the women of america, as they look for an
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equal place in society. what are some of the stumbling blocks, though, to that getting passed? >> well, you know, we've got our republican, you know, lawmakers in congress who don't think it's important, are trying to say it's not real infrastructure building. and yet we know -- >> why is it important? >> well, it is -- critically -- if you can't leave your house to drive over that road or bridge they're concerned about repairing to get to a job if you don't have caregiving at home already to take care of your loved ones, your children. your sick elderly. for too long, american women have been left out of this. we are behind the rest of the world, since we're talking about a global forum. let's get real, we're one of only two countries in the world without a national paid leave policy. president biden is putting a national leave policy on the table now and we need to fund it or else we're going to get left behind. this is a question of are women going to be included in this
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economy going forward with the investments that the government makes? or are women left behind? and if carrot giving is left out of the proposals we're getting left behind. we already know over 2 million people have left the workforce in the last year and it's largely because of caregiving, the demands at home. we cannot support that without that. >> and we realize the pandemic showed the difference between men and women and what makes it possible for them to keep their jobs and what does not. i mean, if the pandemic did not prove that caregiving is the huge number one issue that keeps them from being able to be a part of professional society, i don't know what it is. tina tchen, and lauren leader, thank you both very much for being on the show this morning. coming up, our next guest says returning to society after the pandemic will require more than just a vaccine and a vacates indication. dr. lucy mcbride on overcoming
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with allstate, drivers who switched saved over $700. saving is easy when you're in good hands. allstate click or call to switch today. the time is now. allstate to stop talking. to start doing. time to create clean energy jobs. it's time to inspire, to hire, to build. and to lead. it's time to shine. and to move. time to punch the clock, roll up our sleeves and get to work to fight climate change. our president put forward a plan to create clean energy jobs in big cities, small towns, and everywhere in between. now it's time for congress to get it done. a new study sill separates another heavy toll of the pandemic. numbers from the national health interview survey and the cdc found 40% of americans reported
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symptoms of anxiety or depression during the pandemic compared to only 11% before. joining us now, practicing internist dr. lucy mcbride. the doctor has a new piece in the atlantic titled by now, burnout is a give. it reads in part, simply being human carries occupational risk. now is the time to redefine burnout as the mental and physical fallout from accumulating stress in any sphere of life, work, parenting care giving or managing chronic illness. to muster the energy for reentry into non-pandemic life people need more than a vaccine and a vacation. people need a acknowledgement of their life, a wreckoning with how they lived life before the pandemic and how to recover. let's start with the number, more than 40% of americans say
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they experienced depression right now during this pandemic. ? >> that matches what i am seeing in my practice. people are wired and tired. they are exhausted from 16 months of disrugs of their lives, the contours of their everyday distance have been completely thrown out the window. kids haven't been in school. parents have been struggling to manage parenting, working, parenting, caring for elders. as our previous guest on your show explained women have taken a unique toll during the pandemic juggling all of those responsibility. burnout has been defined as a workplace phenomenon. i beg to differ. being human carries risk, particularly in a pandemic when we are living through global trauma. >> it is perspective.
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i think it is important for people to hear and know that there is nothing wrong with you. as you told one of your patients, you are human, you are human, you are collecting all this personal trauma over the last year and a half or so. the first step seems to me to be to say, it's okay. we all have some version of this, we are all feeling what you are feeling. and the next question is what to do about it. >> right. it is normal to experience some level of anxiety, fear or distress. that's part of the human condition. we are long overdue to recognize that human beings are more than just a set of boxes to check. my job is to assess people' mental and physical health in tandem. one of the things i am talking with patients about every day is validating and normalizing their lived experience, regardless of what it is. because we all bring, you know, our whole selves -- we should bring our whole selves to the
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doctor. one of the ways that we need to deal with this is the society. we need to live with the fact that we created this hostile culture that existed before the pandemic and then the pandemic sort of threw lighter fluid on the grill or on the fire of despair. now we are expected to rebound and go back to our old lives without contemplating for a minute about how to gain agency in your own lives and how to think about if we have that luxury to change parts of our lives that we have control over. >> yeah. i am wondering about our young people, in their 20s and early 30s, dr. mcbride, who seem haven't come back to work. i talked to ceos across different industries. they all seem to be having the problem where it is safe to come back, but it is especially the younger people who don't want to. whether it has been a year in
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isolation, whether they are afraid to come back -- or is it something else? i mean, is this burnout? or is this a different type of psychological strain? and is the answer to let them stay home? because, often, it's people, when people are together, number one that's how younger employees grow and learn and develop themselves and get promotions. but also, number two, i think it's part of the solution to the problems they are confronting, being so lonely. >> i think that's right. i think yun people suffered a unique toll in the pandemic. particularly kids who are out of school and robbed of their normal existence. yeah, i think we need to have a reckoning societally, we need to have employers understand that people bring their whole selves to the workplace. you know, there is no one one size fits all recommendation for every individual, which is why i will hopefully always have a
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job. but some people will benefit from flexibility in their workplace, and from, you know, having abscess to affordable child care even supplied by the employer. in other words, you know, we need to think broadly at this watershed moment of the pandemic on how to support individuals in society and how to support ourselves as we muster the energy to re-enter life when life has taken a huge, huge change. >> dr. mcbride, i've been observing that there almost seem to be two camps of people in how we approach what happened with the pandemic. the camp that's very hesitant to re-enter. and then the camp that wants to just ignore that everything over the past year happened and just move on completely without addressing it. how scarred do you think, and how seismic of an experience was
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this last year compared to, say, world war ii and the american home front experience? i feel like now nationally we all have an obsession over hoarding toilet paper, kind of the way our grandparents thought about sugar. >> right. i think it would be abnormal to not have some sort of an emotional reaction to the collective trauma we've been through. what i am seeing in my office is the physical, mental, and, you know, whole health fallout from being under siege, no matter who you are, what changes to your life happened during the pandemic. you have no doubt experienced some sort of truma. it's really important that we acknowledge that, and that we bring it to our own attention, to our doctor's attention. i hope some day we live in a world wherever american has unfettered access to a primary care doctor, which is hub for
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problem solving for mental and physical health needs where we can be readily seen and heard and medical and mental health issues where addressed in concert because after all we are complex individuals. >> as always, thank you very much for coming on the show this morning. before we close, willie, i would think you concur that if you haven't seen the "new york times" video representation of what happened on january 6th during the capitol insurrection -- and that's on nytimes.com. it is 40 minutes long. it is a moment by moment look at the insurrection as it happened from so many different angles, willie. >> yes. we are learning this morning, mika, that kevin mccarthy has threatened any member of his caucus to be stripped of committee assignments if they
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accept an offer from nancy pelosi to sit on the select committee. put that together with that video, 40 mutes from the "new york times." republicans want to bury the truth of what happened on january the 6th. that does it for us this morning. we will see you right back here tomorrow morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. hi there. i'm stephanie ruhle. it is thursday, the 1st of july. we start with breaking news. allen weisselberg, one of president trump's closest longtime allies, the chief financial officer of the trump organizations that officially surrendered to the police. this picture from the "new york times" shows the moment it happened. 6:17 a.m. this morning, after weisselberg was indicted by the manhattan district attorney and the new york attorney general. we expect those charges to be officially unsealed -- that means we know what is inhe

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