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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 29, 2021 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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>> haas how it got started with a bang. >> we must have gotten a different feed. >> i didn't see that, but good morning. >> must have been on peacock. >> we were there, watching on peacock. >> willie should actually try to not show -- >> i know, i agree. i agree. >> good morning and welcome to "morning joe." it is thursday, april 29th, we are bright-eyed this morning, along with joe, willie, and me, we have white house reporter for the associated press, jonathan lemire. columnist and associate editor of "washington post," david ignatius joins us, and former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner. what did you think of the president's address last night, joe? >> well, it was sweeping, it was optimistic. it was very progressive. very ambitious agenda that i think a lot of people on the left are going to like and others are going to be concerned with the price tag. myself and maybe one or two
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others on this set today may be concerned. but i think most americans, despite what tim scott said in the response about joe biden tearing america apart with his policies, they don't agree with that assessment. they haven't agreed with that assessment over the first 99 days of this administration. and if you look at the flash polls last night out by several organizations, they didn't agree with that assessment last night. this address getting great initial reaction from once again the overwhelming majority of americans. >> as so much of his legislation both passed and proposed has overwhelming support from so many americans. these are initial polls, president biden's address to congress, in the latest cbs u.gov poll, 85% of viewers approved of the president's
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speech, 15% disapproved. the cnn/ssrs poll, 71% said that the president's speech made them feel optimistic. in that cbs poll, 78% felt optimistic about america after listening to the president's speech. 13% felt pessimistic when it came to biden's policy proposals and his speech, 73% said the country was moving in the right direction while 27% said it was moving in the wrong direction. those were snap polls taken immediately after the speech last night. but as we talked about on peacock last night, we put out a transformational agenda. beknew some of it was there. we told the congress and told the country that we are in the middle of four crises, as he laid it out. and it requires this kind of government action. that he's going to step in, in the era that began with president reagan's inaugural address, saying that government is the problem, officially ended last night. >> it did officially end last night. and mika, this was -- john
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heilemann brought it up last night on peacock ping others agreed. this was the most sweeping, progressive agenda that anybody has delivered before congress, as a president. maybe since lbj in '64 or '65. maybe even more progressive and more bushes than that agenda. >> well, and a transitional figure, i don't think so. i think transformational is what joe biden is setting out to do. and by the way, if you look at how the metrics of his progress is that he always overshoots the runway, instead of underperforms. look at the covid shots. 100 million planned by the first 100 days. 220 is the result. by the way, just ahead, we're going to update you on another big story that happened yesterday. the raid of rudy giuliani's new york apartment and office by federal agents. what the major move means for the criminal investigation of former president trump and his
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former lawyer. we're going to get to that in a moment. but first, more from the speech. president biden last night offered an optimistic assessment of america's place in the world, after inheriting what he called a nation in crisis. >> i stand here tonight, one day shy of the 100th day of my administration. 100 days since i took the oath of office and lifted my hand off our family bible and inherited a nation, we all did, that was in crisis. of the worst pandemic in a century. the worst economic crisis since the great depression. the worst attack on our democracy since the civil war. now, after just 100 days, i can report to the nation, america is on the move again.
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i've often said, our greatest strength is the power of our example, not just the example of our power. i've made it known, i've made it known that america is back. and you know what they say. they say, we see america is back, but for how long? for how long? my fellow americans, we have to show not just that we're back, but that we're back to stay. and that we aren't going to go alone. we're going to do it by leading with our allies. >> david ignatius, we really did have a tale of two parties last night. and we have now for quite some time. few would have guessed that joe biden would be the one that
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provided such a clear, ideological blueprint for his party, but that's what history has revealed to us. and then you have the republican response, which, again, a lot of jabs here, a lot of jabs there. but reminds me of that line from "the art of war," that tactics without strategy is just the noise before defeat. i fear for republicans that's what we continue to see, while democrats are coming up with a grand, sweeping, breathtaking and if you're a small government conservative, very concerning agenda. but one that is overwhelming popular with the american people. >> joe, it's fascinating, biden is accelerating in this first hundred days. he was a more confident man last night than he was on inauguration day in my judgment. this is a transformational
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agenda. and "the new york times" wrote in its story this morning that he's trying to rewrite parts of the social contract in america. these are fundamental things. they're going to have democratic support, but i think that the essence of what biden is trying to do is govern over the heads of the republican party in congress, to bet that the american people want and need the kinds of social changes that he's talking about, that they hunger for free community college, that they're desperate for child care to help take care of their kids, so they can go back to work more easily. and that they want to tax the rich more to pay for it. that's the bet that biden's making. i heard in the speech, the usual biden offer to negotiate. he's ready to talk. he has $4 trillion on the table. i can't imagine that at the end of the day, that that's the number that we're going to end up with.
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so, i think, when you look at this speech and you think back four years ago to trump's discussion of american carnage, this is american optimism. this is something at the heart of our politics. this upbeat spirit, never bet against america. it's always a losing bet. that was the basic premise. instant polls say that people like it. we can be sure, as you know, joe, republicans on the hill are not going to like it. so can he govern over their heads? that's what i'm waiting to see. >> well, he certainly has so far, willie. again, you look at these numbers, after watching the speech, and these snap polls, only snap polls, only polls. 78% of americans say they are optimistic about their country. it's interesting, though, that joe biden is delivering this
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grand strategy, the progressive agenda at the same time that he keeps talking about compromise. he's going to compromise. he's throwing a lot of massive numbers out there. i suspect that the president and his people aren't just talking to the republicans. they're saying to joe manchin, hey, don't worry about it. we understand, joe, you've been saying, we have to have bipartisan bills. we have to have bipartisan infrastructure bills. we're hearing what you're saying. let's get to a compromise. so i don't think this is going to be as much as one-sided as the covid bill, only because i don't think joe manchin and kyrsten sinema will give progressives that choice. >> unlike fdr, biden is working with a split senate. he doesn't have any room for error. there's no margin whatsoever. he's got to have everybody onboard, just to get to reconciliation, as you say, with joe manchin and kyrsten sinema.
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and jonathan lemire, we knew what was coming, but to hear it all laid out for an hour last night was pretty extraordinary. just the scope, the size, and the reach of government that president biden is proposing. >> that's right, willie. and first, we shouldn't overlook the striking and historic backdrop of that speech last night. first, of course, two women behind the president, including our first female vice president, kamala harris. and then a chamber that was so sparse because of coronavirus restrictions that you could hear individual people clapping at times, echoing off the chamber's walls. but you're right, this was a proposal of the greatest expansion of the social safety net in decades. and even as the president spoke in like highly personal terms, including mentioning his son, beau, who died of cancer, he's proposing structural change. transformative changes to how the government works. and you're right, joe's on to something there, where white house advisers suggest that the
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language of compromise is aimed at republicans, it's aimed over their head at republican voters, but it's also aimed at moderate democrats to say, look, we're trying, we're going to be out there -- here's the olive branch. we want to make this work. but there's no question that cloaked in the language of compromise are big, bold, huge progressive ideas. and the president also made clear last night, in an extended portion of the speech, that it's about bigger than even just domestic policies. it's about pursuing to the world that democracy can still work. competing with china on an economic level, but also just showing to them the american experiment is not over. especially in the wake of the four tumultuous years of donald trump, the january 6th insurrection. it's about making that bet. it's about saying, look, we're going to fix things at home, take care of our own with these social safety net programs. we'll reform and improve our own democracy as a symbol to the world that it is still the best form of government and is able
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to compete economically, but also on a human rights level with the autocracies rising across the globe, including china. >> and he made the case for these investments by looking back in history at the major investments of our country's time. here is the president officially introducing his $1.8 trillion american families plan, and explaining how he intends to pay for that expansion of health care, child care, and education. >> american families plan will provide access to quality, affordable child care. [ applause ] when i'm proposing legislation, we guarantee that low and middle-income families will pay no more than 7% of their income for high-quality care for children up to the age of 5.
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the most hard-pressed working families won't have to spend a dime. third, the american families plan will final provide up to 12 weeks of paid leave and medical leave. family medical leave. we're one of the few industrial countries in the world -- no one should have to choose between a job and a paycheck or taking care of themselves or their loved ones or parent or spouse or child. 12 years is no longer enough today to compete with the rest of the world in the 21st century. that's why my american families plan guarantees four additional years of public educational for every person in america, starting as early as we can. the great universities in this country have conducted studies of the last ten years and it shows that adding two years of
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universal high-quality preschool for every 3-year-old and 4-year-old, no matter what battleground they come from, puts them in a position to be able to compete all the way through 12 years. so how do we pay for my jobs and family plan? i made it clear we can do it without increasing the deficits. let's start with what i will not do. i will not impose any tax increase on people making less than $400,000. but it's time for corporate america and the wealthiest 1% of americans to just begin to pay their fair share. just their fair share. >> steve, if you look at these programs taken one by one by pollsters, look at the snap polls last night, wildly popular programs. also, extraordinarily expensive,
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$1.9 trillion covid relief plan. a $1.8 trillion education plan. a $2.3 infrastructure plan. last year, i think we spent $4 trillion on covid relief. as everett dickerson would say, a trillion here, a trillion there. after a while, it adds up to real money. very popular, but those numbers, can they -- can those numbers be matched by closing loopholes and corporations and taxing the wealthiest americans? >> actually, i think, joe, everett dirk dirkson said, a bi here, a billion there, and now we're up to a trillion here, a trillion there. that's how the world has moved on in the last 30 to 40 years. on the revenue side, can it be covered by revenues, i think it can be. even the president's proposal would take into consideration
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the jobs plan. it's not quite apples to apples there. and already the tax increases are being negotiated down. the corporate tax rate will probably not go tall way to 28. it will go to 25. the increases in taxes in this bill will be popular. and certainly increasing capital gains rates towards or near income will be popular. i don't think it will get all the way to the 42 or 43% that the president is proposing. it probably will be a gap between the revenues and the expenses. but what i really worry about is the size and magnitude about this. you guys have talked very eloquently about the sweep, the transformation, the support for this. we had 50 years of small government under -- of robust government under fdr, 40 years of government, and now back to robust government. you can see it all put together. you can see the $1.9 trillion from the rescue plan, $2.25 trillion from the jobs plan, so it's $6 trillion in addition, as you pointed out to last year.
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and just to put this into some perspective, what you can see, all the way over on the right is the obama stimulus plan, which was $800 billion. so you're talking about something like seven times the size of that. and talking about comparing it to $4.4 trillion a year that the government spends on everything. this is over a long period of time, in fairness, it includes some tax credits, in fairness, but talking about almost 50% more than the government spends just in one year on its normal activities. what i worry about -- sure, i worry about inflation. sure, i worry about the deficit and the debt. but i also worry about the execution job here. this is a massive execution job, the last plan, had 76 different initiatives in it. all have to be created and executed. president obama's plan got a lot of criticism for some very, very small mistakes. the potential for mistakes, failure of execution here is high. and it fails, if it fails, i think it will set back the cause
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of progressivism for several more decades. so getting it proposed is important. getting it passed will be hard, as you guys just talked about. but getting it executed, i think in some ways will be the president's biggest challenge. he's got to deliver, not just package, but actual real results for americans and programs that people perceive are working or else we go back to government being the income again. >> and willie, certainly, whatever happens here, whether it's executed well or not, you will have a government that will have little money to spend on new projects in years to come. that's why it's going to be so fascinating to see how the compromises break out. how much these massive spending bills, proposals are moderated. but on the other hand of that, steve is worrying about progressives, if they spend this money and don't execute well, it
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sets back the progressive cause for a generation. i'm concerned about conservatism. the fact that again, as i've said on the show for four years, five years, conservatives were setting themselves up for the fall. setting themselves up exactly for this moment, because they completely abandoned their small government conservative principles. and now, forget about talking about the numbers, in the past, republicans would be digging through the bills, debating policy. now, they're reduced to talking about mr. potato head, cancel culture, major league baseball, dr. seuss -- >> with no credibility on spend ing. >> with absolutely no credibility on spending. and they don't have a speaker, unlike paul ryan, who can at least talk about policy. they don't have a majority leader in the house that can talk about that. instead, he reads dr. seuss books on the same day that bun
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of the most sweeping relief bills ever are passed. >> yeah, the central attack on the speech last night that we heard afterward from most republicans was that this was a socialist agenda, that it's too much government, they're spending too much money. which, as you point out, rings hallow given their record over the last several years. mitt romney said, boy, $6 trillion. bernie sanders is going to love that. and bernie sanders did, in fact, come out and said how much he loved that. and he looked forward getting to work on it. but most people watching this show and this audience and progressives across the country say, this is all good. this is like fdr meeting a crisis with the new deal. we have a crisis in front of us right now and we've got to spend money. what's your concern over the horizon, not as a republican, of course, in your case, but as somebody who worries about the balance sheet of the government? >> well, you know, it's interesting, willie, because apropos comments were made a minute ago. i don't think tum scott made a
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great case about this. they haven't been able to take it on frontally. i think the three things i worry about it are one, execution, as i said, i won't repeat all of that. secondly, i think there are real concerns around inflation. you can already see signs of it in prices for lumber. if you go to rent a car right now from hertz or avis, you'll find the prices are much higher all over the place. you're seeing people to start to spend money again. that is going to put pressure on prices. it's not going to happen quickly. i don't think we're going back to the early 1960s or '70s, but there's going to be almost certainly an uptick in inflation and the question is, will it be restrained. and the last question, of course, is the debt and the deficit. the cassandras have been predicting the end of the world with debt and deficit for a long time and i'm not going to predict now it's going to happen, but at some point, it could. and certainly, we're adding an enormous amount of debt that will have to be serviced. and it does squeeze out or prevent really much else from getting done for the foreseeable future, because the government has effectively shot its
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bazooka, shot its biggest weapon at this problem and it has to work. >> yeah, you know, also, i've got to say, steve, i'm sure you can echo this. you talk to small business owners, you talk to larger business owners. you talk to people who are trying to hire help for the summer, who are trying to hire help for the summer. you have restaurants who want to reopen. their biggest problem is, they're having a hard time getting people back into work. this is the sort of thing that, well, sometimes you say that on tv and people get upset. there's no reason to get upset at reality. this is something that i hear from progressive restaurant owners, who say, their biggest challenge right now is getting people in the door to start working. and i've been hearing this now for about six, seven months. and they go back to a lot of
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these relief checks. . >> yeah, there's certainly some truth to that, joe. we are paying people in some cases more to not work than they would make working. that will eventually expire. you have had a number of people, particularly women, drop out of the labor force. and whether they're going to come back or not is a question. and you -- and so there is a real question about whether people are going to come back to work in the numbers we need to meet the demand. remember, in addition to all of this stimulus, in addition to all -- as part of all the stimulus that was passed last year, there is by most estimates something like another $2 trillion of excess savings, of money that people didn't spend or money they got from the government in these checks and didn't spend that's waiting to come back out there and people are dying to spend it. and yes, i hear the same thing you hear, that business is having enough trouble getting people to come back to work, especially in the summer, and all of this can create frictions in the economy. this brings me back to my same point, that this has to work,
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and hopefully they've fought through all of these issues. >> and stephanie ruhle, something she reported last night on peacock, that a lot of business owners are expressing a concern about obviously, during covid, a concern about lost jobs. now a concern about -- >> lost labor. >> yeah. >> so steve is in a good mood this morning, not because of joe biden's speech, but because of some wonderful personal news that we will share with everybody's now. steve's beautiful daughter had a daughter. josephine patricia at 6 pounds, 3 ounces. that is a beautiful baby, and steve, you must be over the moon. >> yeah, i'm actually -- i'm reporting from the "morning joe" johannesberg bureau this morning, where my daughter is. but i do -- i do want to say that, as the years go on and as we gather around the campfires, as all families do and tell stories, one story that will be told over and over again is that when this baby was born, her
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grandfather was on the phone talking to uncle joe scarborough about the issues with the biden proposals. that's what i was doing when this baby was born and i won't forget it and neither will she. >> that poor baby! >> of course, i'm on the phone with him, checking in with him to congratulate him, and then we start talking about inflationary pressures that are going to be on the government if all of this legislation passes. he texts me later and says, while we were talking about inflation, my first grandchild was born. >> yes. >> who will love family leave policies and child care, et cetera, et cetera. steve -- >> a wonderful story to tell around the campfire for years to come. >> steve, congratulations. >> congrats, steve. >> that is awesome. >> that is wonderful. >> thank you. thank you so much. federal investigators yesterday seized cell phones and other electronic devices from the manhattan home and office of rudy giuliani. one-time personal lawyer to
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former president trump, according to sources with knowledge of the investigation. the raids suggest the justice department is ramping up its investigation into giuliani's dealings with ukrainian officials used to dig up dirt on joe biden before the 2020 election. remember that? "the new york times" reports fbi agents executed search warrants around 6:00 a.m. at mr. giuliani's apartment on madison avenue and his park avenue office in manhattan. the execution of search warrants is an extraordinary action for prosecutors to take against a lawyer, let alone a lawyer for a former president. the move marked a major development in the long-running investigation into mr. giuliani, which examines some of the same people and conduct that were at the center of mr. trump's first impeachment trial. in a statement from the former new york mayor through his attorney, giuliani denied any wrongdoing and said the raid was a clear example of a corrupt
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double standard, one for high-level democrats, whose blatant crimes are ignored, such as hillary clinton and hunter biden and joe biden and democrats who are prominent supporters of donald trump. >> so, dave aaronberg, let's start with you. and help us sort through this. after four years of donald trump, after one investigation after another investigation, we've actually seen this before. and we hear the news and everybody says, arrests are inevitable. i know michael schmidt has done a lot of reporting on matt gaetz and you know, everybody is thinking that arrests are inevitable. but when i talk to you on so many of these matters, you say, well, it's never that cut and
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dried. and matt gaetz's instance, if he was not involved with the young woman or girl, when she was 17 years old, then there's probably not going to be a crime charged against matt gaetz, based on what we've seen. in this case with rudy giuliani, another example of the fbi going in and people automatically assuming rudy giuliani is going to face jail time. give us the truth. what's the -- >> what do you think? >> what's the deal when you see this? >> joe and mika, good morning. i think this is a big deal. and i think yesterday was a very bad day for rudy, because federal prosecutors cannot get a search warrant based on a hunch. they can't get a search warrant based on a fishing expedition. they've got to convince a federal judge that there is probable cause that a crime has occurred. and that the items that they are seeking would likely contain evidence of that crime. and also, judges don't easily
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given search warrants when it comes to lawyers and their homes and offices, because judges quite frankly are lawyers themselves. and they understand that there are issues of attorney/client privilege and confidentiality, so it does tell you the level of evidence that prosecutors must have against rudy. plus, when you talk about plit sooizing this matter, keep in mind, this investigation started in 2019, the search warrant was only executed yesterday and that tells you that the higher-ups at the department of justice under the former guy, they didn't want this search warrant to see the light of day. so when it comes to rudy, he doesn't have trump or barr to protect him anymore. and that's the biggest problem for him. so as far as when the handcuffs are arriving, it's hard to say. but i think that it's more likely than not that they will be coming. >> michael schmidt, you've been reporting on this so closely for so long.
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let's take a step back for our viewers and explain what this likely was about, as dave says, there had to be fresh cause to go in this warrant at 6:00 in the morning over on 66th and madison, rudy giuliani's apartment to seize cell phones, to seize computers. what likely were they looking for there? >> what they were looking for, and giuliani's side has acknowledged some of this, are communications related to his work for ukrainians. and how much giuliani was pushing their message and what they wanted back home, including looking for what giuliani exchanged with a reporter or this person who claimed they were a reporter, who was writing about this issue. writing stories about ukrainians and ukrainian influence in the united states, stories that president trump's side wanted out there about how the real issue with foreign influence
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came from ukraine in the most simplistic terms. a lot of these issues were at the center of the president's first impeachment. the ukraine-related impeachment. and it cuts directly to giuliani's work. we have to remember that giuliani was running basically his own foreign policy parallel to what the trump white house was doing and was negotiating with foreign leaders about getting these meetings in ukraine. the question is, at the same time, was giuliani also working for ukraine? that may seem a little complicated, but was there sort of a potpourri of clients that giuliani had, including the president, who he was working on behalf of, whose interests he was trying to further. now, we have not seen a ton about this, this federal investigation, as you were saying. it has been going on since 2019. we know that giuliani's conduct
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has been looked at over that period of time. but they have not -- they had not executed this search warrant obviously until yesterday. as you were talking about in the case of matt gaetz, it was at the end of last year, around the beginning of this year that they executed a search warrant to get his phone. that investigation was in a much earlier stage than the giuliani one. so where does it go from here? i think i see it in a larger sort of context, the fact that the justice department has really ramped up its efforts, in a range of different things over the past week or so. and that's a sign of how -- >> let me ask you, though, michael. what's the crime? you talked about him talking to a ukrainian reporter or pushing stories in ukraine. what is the crime that you understand the fbi is going after to charge rudy giuliani with? >> so they're investigating
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fara, or the foreign -- whether you have properly registered to work as a foreign agent. essentially, as an american, can you be hired or work for a foreigner and push their interests here in the united states? can you work for them? and under that sort of, that lobbying, you have to register with the federal government. you have to say, hi, i'm working for these foreigners. i am doing work on behalf of them. what's interesting and different about giuliani's case or giuliani's work here was that he was also working for the president of the united states at the time. it's a real sort of mixture of different things and sort of untangling that will be even more difficult because giuliani is a lawyer and he was working for the president. and the justice department is going to look at those things with much more care. and to the point that was made earlier, to get a search warrant in this case would have to go to
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the highest levels of the justice department because of all of those issues around this. >> all right. michael schmidt and dave aaronberg, thank you so much. david ignatius, what a complex web rudy giuliani and other members of the trump team had with the ukrainians, not just during the campaign, but even before then. >> joe, this -- the search warrant yesterday is the latest chapter in an amazing story of the transformation of one of america's real heroes into what i described in one of my articles as rudy inc. this super lawyer, a lawyer for the president, who was running around ukraine, talking all sorts of questionable people, who was talking with people involved in the ukrainian energy industry. there are reports that he was active in pursuing other business deals and other
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countries. my own guess is that in addition to whatever evidence was gathered yesterday, the justice department must, in this prosecution, have got some witnesses, some people who have flipped, who are prepared to testify. it's hard to imagine this investigation that has been going on for so many months, indictments that were proceeding without having some harder evidence. we'll see what the rudy story is all about. >> we'll be following it. still ahead on "morning joe," republican senator tim scott argues americans should trust him and not joe biden on matters of race. we'll play part of his rebuttal to the president last night. plus, mayor bill de blasio joins us with an exclusive announcement about new york city's fight against the coronavirus. >> it's a big one. also ahead, chairman of the dccc coming back for round two.
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in the republican rebuttal to president biden's address, senator tim scott defended the country's record on race and voting rights and questioned biden's ability to reunite a divided nation. >> hear me clearly. america is not a racist country. it's backwards to fight discrimination with different types of discrimination, and it's wrong to try to use our
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painful pasts to honestly shut down debates in the present. i'm an african-american who has voted in the south my entire life. i take voting rights personally. republicans support making it easier to vote and harder to achieve. our president seems like a good man. his speech was full of good words. but president biden promised you a specific kind of leadership. he promised you to unite a nation, to leader the temperature, to govern for all americans no matter how they voted. this was the pitch. but our nation is starving for more than empty platitudes. we need policies that bring us closer together. but three months in, the actions of the president and his party are pulling further and further
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apart >> let's bring in eugene robinson. gene, there were some issues here. incredibly, only in america life story, beautifully woven in about stories of his mother, well executed on many levels. it's a very difficult task to be the republican response. but i'm just wondering, are americans going to really hear the message he was sending about joe biden being a divisive figure, being the one who is dividing america, given that we are, what, three months out from an insurrection that interrupted our democracy in action and tortured capitol police officers with american flags and this would be at the hands at the republican president, at the pushing of the republican president. >> right. i think it's pretty clear that americans have not heard that message yet and are not seeing
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joe biden in general as a divisive figure, given his quite healthy approval ratings and the fact that the policies that he's proposing are widely, widely popular. and so that's the republican probe. if they want to oppose all of this stuff, they're going to have to come up with a reason other than, kind of, trust me, you know you don't like him, you know you actually like me. that's kind of the argument, rather than an issue-based argument against what biden is trying to do, or to do it a different way. and that's what was lacking in the response, which as you said, was in other ways, as these things go, more effective than usual. it was better than the usual off-party response, given that
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it's a thankless and difficult task. but to me, it didn't really connect, because it didn't really engage with biden's central arguments about what needs to be done now. and you've got to really have answers for that. >> and tim scott talked about empty platitudes. joe biden was putting forth the opposite of empty platitudes. in fact, he was putting forth plans, major, massive plans up in the $6 trillion range. jonathan lemire, i think if you look at public polling and many americans would say, just the opposite is true of what tim scott put forward yesterday, which is to say, they believe the country was torn apart over the last four or five years and that joe biden is making an attempt to stitch it back together, which is sort of the opposite vision that tim scott put forth yesterday, which is that joe biden, in fact, is tearing apart the country with his policy proposals. >> right. and senator tim scott certainly
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didn't embarrass himself like some who have had to deliver the state of the union rebuttal, remember, bobby jindal was never heard from before after he did so and when marco rubio had his infamous water glass gaffe. but while his performance was fine, the messaging is suspect, because it doesn't quite stick. and president biden, the last thing he is doing here is presenting to be a divisive figure. now, you could certainly object to some of the things he is proposing in terms of the merits of policy, but it's been a deliberate effort here by the white house to try to lower the temperature. to see just how the country was torn apart, culminating on january 6th, by former president trump. and how this president is trying to be far less in your face, far less of a dominating the national consciousness than his predecessor. trying to sort of reach across the aisle. he is, indeed, deliberately quieter but that doesn't mean
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he's trying to be, in fact, far more serious. and he is trying to work out in a bipartisan fashion. now, let's be clear here. let's be candid in our assessment. not a single republican voted for the covid relief bill. they don't seem to be more inclined to support the jobs infrastructure plan. but the white house, they are trying. and particularly on this program, it's so big. they're giving themselves a lot of time to work on it. the contours of this proposal are going to change. things will shrink, things will grow, and they're looking to get some sort of bipartisan buy-in. they're trying to show that they are looking to reach across the aisle. though, of course, they know that they don't have to. that, yes, they have to keep senator manchin, senator sinema, democrats happy, but a lot of the signaling -- the efforts here to reach across the aisle is to do just that. it's showing, we're signaling, we're trying to work. and if the republicans aren't interested, we'll just go it alone. and that's the dilemma that the republicans are put in. where they're not able to really hit back on the president on
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their terms. >> all right. gene is going to stay with us. coming up, we'll dig into what president biden said last night about immigration reform and the border crisis. and whether it was as boring as sleepy ted cruz found it, although you can see, he's like, are the cameras looking, oh, i'm going to go to sleep now. we're back in just a moment. slw we're back in just a moment. finding new routes to reach your customers, and new ways for them to reach you... is what business is all about. it's what the united states postal service has always been about. so as your business changes, we're changing with it. with e-commerce that runs at the speed of now. next day and two-day shipping nationwide. same day shipping across town. returns right from the doorstep, and deliveries seven days a week. it's a whole new world out there. let's not keep it waiting.
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welcome back to "morning joe." it's 51 past the hour. live look at the capitol. the sun is coming up over washington. senator ted cruz who was repeatedly attacked president biden's immigration policy appeared to doze off last night when the president began to speak about migrants at the southern border. take a look. >> if you actually want to solve
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a problem, i've sent a bill to take a close look at it. we have to -- we also have to get at the root problem of why people are fleeing, particularly to our southern border. >> twitter responded with thought bubbles like, dreaming of cancun. senator cruz responded to the many social media mentions with a tweet of his own saying, quote, #boringbutradical. as for president biden's speech, here is what he said about immigration reform. >> on day one of my presidency, i kept my commitments in a comprehensive immigration bill to the united states congress. if you believe we need to secure the border, pass it, because it has a lot of money for high-tech border security. if you believe in a pathway to citizenship, pass it. if you don't like my plan, let's at least pass what we all agree
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on. congress needs to pass legislation this year to finally secure protection for dreamers. the young people who only know america as their home. >> joining us now, "washington post" congressional reporter, mariana sotomayor. mariana, did the president make clear how he would handle the crisis at the border? >> well, mika, he very much actually pinned blame on the trump administration, and you heard it from the beginning of his speech, that he has inherited numerous crisis. and this is one of them. he did note that something that worked when he was vice president was trying to bring together the northern triangle countries and agreeing on a deal. potentially helping them financially to curb any immigration into the united states. and that is something that he actually turned to harris. it's something that he did that he is now tasking his vice president. and he credited her for already starting those negotiations. and at that point, it's not
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surprising, having been in the chamber, seeing a number of republicans kind of scoff during this moment. you played ted cruz falling a sleep there, but there was a moment where house minority leader kevin mccarthy threw his hands up in the air and looked back at his caucus as if to say, what are they saying? it really is an issue and we have covered it extensively for many years. and it's a divisive one. but there are some potential hopes, there are discussions in the senate, there are bipartisan, potentially piecing together as biden signaled, a pathway to legalization for farm workers, for daca recipients. and piecing it together with border security. but again, these conversations are long from potentially striking a deal and getting to a negotiation point that could lead to actual legislation. >> mariana, we've been talking about the popularity and public
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apologying of many president biden's policy proposals and his legislation. but the immigration crisis is a real hear of weakness among americans as they look at what's happening on the border. the administration doesn't want to use the word crisis. it is a crisis. they want to blame the trump administration. but now we're a hundred days into the biden administration. how seriously are they taking this behind the scenes, if not calling it a crisis publicly and what are they doing about it in the immediate term? >> sure, the white house is very much trying to push back and signal against republican attacks. republicans, regardless of when you ask them any question that doesn't have to do with immigration, they pivot to that. and there has been this vacancy from the white house and from democrats and even hispanic advocacy groups to try to push back against that message. there are, obviously, vice president harris trying to have those negotiations behind the scenes, and the white house signaling that they are really taking this seriously.
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but to a broader point, i do want to stress that biden, he devoted a big part of his speech to immigration. that is in large contrast to even president obama. he actually never mentioned immigration during his first joint session address. now, that's not to say that they're going to continue to make this the number one priority of the administration, as much as they are trying to do so. but biden has faced a lot of criticism, even from the beginning of his campaign, from the hispanic community, from advocates to really try and push forward immigration reform and that is something, just by even speaking to it, he's gained some applause, he's gained some support, but we shouldn't expect that these advocacy groups, though they may be happy that he did spend a lot of time discussing and making his promises, that they aren't going to hold his feet to the fire. >> "the washington post's"
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mariana sotomayor, thank you very much for coming on the show this morning. we appreciate it. and still ahead, we'll hear directly from one of the president's top advisers. anita dunn joins us live from the white house straight ahead. and a programming note. we've got a special hour of coverage planned tomorrow at 8:00 a.m. to mark president biden's 100th day in office. you can also catch that airing on peacock. "morning joe" is back in a moment. peacock "morning joe" is back in a moment i'm morgan, and there's more to me than hiv. more love,... more adventure,... more community. but with my hiv treatment,... there's not more medicines in my pill. i talked to my doctor... and switched to... fewer medicines with dovato. prescription dovato is for some adults who are starting hiv-1 treatment or replacing their current hiv-1 regimen. with... just 2 medicines... in 1 pill,... dovato is as effective as a 3-drug regimen... to help you reach and stay undetectable. research shows people who take hiv treatment as prescribed...
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2-2 coming, and jacob strikes off the side. zplst willie geist, we talk about how difficult it is to
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give the response to a president's state of the union address. the only job more difficult in america is pitching for the new york mets. this guy's era is 0.51. he has given up two runs this entire season. the mets lost both of those games. and i re-tweeted the answer to the question, what is the greatest sports rivalry right now? it's degrom versus the mets. >> it's incredible. he's having one of the greatest single pitching seasons in the history of baseball. and he's 2-2 through april, 0.51 e.r.a., two losses where he allowed one run, and he got a no decision where he pitched six scoreless innings. at some point, you have to wonder if he asked out of the place because what's happening to his statistics because of it. he can't get a win in new york with the mets. but my goodness, jonathan
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lemire, this guy is being compared to pedro in '99. he's got as many strikeouts through five games as nolan ryan in 1978, which would be a record. and look at this number. tonight is the 33rd time jacob degrom has given up one run or less in a game in which he will not receive a win. 33, incredible. the red sox crushed jacob degrom last night to the tune of three hits and one run in six innings. it is extraordinary. now, i'll note that from my eyes, there's a hint of blasphemy anytime anyone is compared to pedro martinez. but what jacob degrom is doing right now is simply extraordinary. and last night, the mets broadcast booth, which is as good as it gets were saying that he was off. he didn't have his best stuff. that he had just gone a complete game a few days ago, over a hundred pitches. and was still just toying with the hitters. his fastball only at 98 rather
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than 100. the red sox couldn't get anywhere near him. but he should sue for support. the mets hitters, it is downright criminal how they won't back him up and keep depriving him of wins. >> you know, willie, you look at degrom when he walks on the mound, and you have got to compare him favorably to any pitcher in the 21st century, to pedro, at pedro's height in '99, height in '99. and also, with maddox, with those braves teams. i mean, this guy is just -- he's as good as we have? >> he is. in the last few seasons, he's got an e.r.a. under 2 and he's 27-21 since the year 2018. he should have many more wins than that. the new york media had baked him almost every time he has a game like this to go after his own lineup and he said, last night, i can't control those, i've got to be better in that second
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inning. he gave up one run and he's going after himself after the game. >> that's the humility of bear bryant when i was at alabama, then in the post-preference, he would say, i'm just embarrassed for the state of alabama. i almost feel like i have to give back my salary this week. the mamas and daddies. that was jake degrom last night, the guy is -- jonathan lemire, he is all glass. any other pitcher would be, you know, throwing his glove against the dugout wall or at least leaking things off the record about having -- not this guy. and i know we're going on and on about it. he's an extraordinary player. and he's got just extraordinary class, because he never does what everybody else in the world does, and that is blame the mets' bats. >> jonathan lemire can go on and on about it, because clearly he
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was not focused on the president's speech last night. >> are you not going to let lemire talk? we need to talk about also the red sox pitcher, paveta. not shabby himself. >> this is a two-screen world, mika. i was able to do both things at once. write on deadline about president biden's address and keep an eye on the red sox. >> oh, i see. >> in terms of jacob degrom, he's also, maybe, their best hitter at times. he's hitting over .500. he's supplying the mets' offense himself. he didn't get hit last night, but put the ball in play a few times. he is just -- it is extraordinary, the uphill climb he faces, trying to get anything on the board for his team. but, yeah, joe, nick paveta, to have a solid starter give them some depth there is a key as to why they are currently tied for the best record in baseball. >> and you know who doesn't have
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the best record in baseball anymore, the baltimore orioles. kasie, sadly, we knew this day was coming. it is here. not even in may. it is not too late to convert your boy to being a red sox fan. >> so get this, joe, my husband is a mets fan -- >> oh! >> so if you're me and our family is divided between trying to teach our son about baseball, which option do you choose? i mean, i've got to tell you, i pick the orioles because of all the things you just said about the new york mets, among other things. >> okay. >> listen, he's going to have his heart broken no matter what. it's the hope that -- >> and kasie, before you talk about last night, i would like to put a frame around the fact that jonathan lemire just pointed out that as a man, he can, indeed, multitask. so, hmm, interesting. >> everyone can. >> really?
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everyone? huh. okay. >> i'm not saying -- >> try to be a mom for a day. >> kasie, your thoughts on how the president did last night? >> it was remarkable. i had the very rare chance to be inside that chamber for that speech and i know joe has attended so many of these. this one was just so extraordinary in that the atmosphere was so different. and so, you know, i spent a lot of time focused on that last night, because it was such a rare opportunity. and you know, i think what stuck out to me the most, too, was the contrast between the speech and the one that i sat through last year. this time we had jill biden sitting basically alone, a few seats down from doug emhoff, our second gentlemen of the united states. last year it was rush limbaugh
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receiving the medal of freedom in a raucous, loud, made-for-tv event. this time, the chamber was emptied out because of the coronavirus pandemic. joe biden in the white house, in no small part, because of the way president trump failed to handle the coronavirus pandemic. failed to respond to that appropriately and americans said, you know what, enough with this. and you saw biden there walking down that aisle, fist bumping with liz cheney. mitch mcconnell was also on that aisle. i saw him having a conversation after the speech with senator rob portman of ohio. it felt very much like the point was to take a step back toward normal and take a step forward as a country to try to continue the great traditions of our democracy, especially in the wake of january 6th. it felt like the grown-ups were back in charge. yes, they're going to fight about what sort of policies we should spend, what is the role of our government in our lives.
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those are all incredibly important and serious conversations. and it was in many ways refreshing of this optimistic time where we're opening back up and have our elected leaders focused on that instead of the distractions we've been dealing with for so long. >> and walter isaacson, we've been talking for the past hour and spoke last night about how sweeping this was, ideologically, perhaps the most sweeping statement to a joint conference since ideologically since lbj in '64 or '65. at the same time, tonally, it was so different, as kasie said, from last year. you had joe biden coming in. it was low-key. he handed his speech to nancy pelosi. he began by saying, hey, thanks for having me. and ended his speech by telling america, hey, thank you for being patient. and also, he used opportunities to thank the republicans, to
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reach out to the republicans, to say, hey, we did this together. there were times he didn't do that, but there were many more where he really provided the sharpest of contrasts with his predecessor. >> total contrast. and i think that's what he was aiming for. and it was amazing to be able to have a conversational tone, almost as if he were channeling fdr fireside chat, which he talked to some when the historians visited him. he talked to dorris kearns goodwin about that conversational tone, he talked directly to the american people. and also do it in a chamber where he was giving a sweeping vision. a sweeping vision that was well-framed, because it was winning the 21st century against china, but also against the whole notion of autocracy. can democraies make the decisions that will allow them to survive? and then the notion of winning the 21st century through science and education, which is what
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eisenhower had done, you know, after world war ii and developing things like the advanced research projects agency that gave us the internet or nasa that gave us the space program or the infrastructure that gave us the interstate highway system. here he was talking about infrastructure to win the 21st century. he was talking about a new arpa, an arpa age, which would be for health. and he was framing it also around middle class families, saying it was all about jobs. i think he was able to really bring it together in a big framework. and i found it extraordinary. >> also with us, white house correspondent for pbs "newshour," yamiche alcindor. yamiche, good morning. it's good to see you. what were your broad impressions of what you heard last night from the president? we've been talking this morning about this sort of transformational agenda and a departure 40 years later from the philosophy, really, laid out by ronald reagan at his
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inaugural address in 1981, where he said, government is not the solution, government is the problem. a full 180, finally, 40 years later from president biden. >> that's right. my impression of the address yesterday was that president biden really leaned in on the idea that our democracy can't fail and that there are a host of people, our adversaries, autocrats that are looking at america, looking at january 6th in particular and saying, if america continues to be divided, if they continue to rage at each other, then the world will be able to in some ways take advantage of that. he really cast almost every issue in that way. when you think about climate change, immigration, education, health care. time and time again, he went back at this idea that we have to compete if the world and to do that, we really have to get our house in order. i was also struck by the fact that he gave congress an actual deadline for when he would like to see the george floyd justice and policing act passed.
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he said by may 25th, which will be one year since derek chauvin now we can say murdered george floyd on that street in minneapolis, minnesota. he's saying, that's when he wants to see congress pass this huge policing reform. i was struck by the fact that he really leaned in on that, really leaned in on this idea that congress needs to act. he said it time and time again. i also think that he was in some ways trying to do a moment, echoing the words of the late dr. martin luther king jr. they were saying that our country really needs to stand up and take advantage of this inflection point that we're all living through when it comes to dealing with pandemic, dealing with racial reckoning. in all, i think this was a speech that the white house in some ways, they were already previewing it. the thing i will also say that there were a couple of moments where the president ad libbed. and when he did, he was talking about china and talking about
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this idea that they are waiting for us to fail. and of course, tim scott came back said that they were empty platitudes and pulling this country apart, but i think that's a hard message to have. when you hear the speech last night, that being said, republicans are hitting the idea that there's too much money being spent. this is a democratic wish list. that is something i'm also hearing from republican voters at times. there is a sense that republicans have a little bit that they could push back on here. >> i think so and as i say a thousand times to make people tired, i guess, but just to let people know, i'm a small government conservative. i think there is too much here. i think it spends way too much money. and if i were in congress, i would be very concerned, but we're in a different time. we're in a different place than we've been over my adult life. gene robinson, in several ways, ideologically, there has been -- even though i'm a small government conservative, i
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always quote alan greenspan, because he's been such a libertarian his entire life. several years ago saying, income disparity is one of the great dangers of our time. i've been looking as a small government conservative at the mass accumulation of wealth over the past 40 years and what we always thought was a pushback against big government liberalism and overreach, well, what's happened is, the biggest corporations have gotten bigger. they consolidated, much of it has to do with technology. much of it has to do with a lot of the laws that we passed. and even people like myself, i'm only bringing up myself, because they're a lot of republicans in suburbs that think like me. a lot of us are saying, my god, this is dangerous, this is unsustainable, we've got to push turn the tide back on this. and i think that's one of the reasons, why biden is getting these extraordinarily high numbers, unifying numbers that we really haven't seen -- i
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haven't seen numbers like i flashed this morning since i read history books about john kennedy. >> yeah, there's a sense, joe, certainly the white house has a sense and let's hope that we are at an inflection point. and i thought that was the kind of most -- the most important presidential ideological statement in many ways since ronald reagan, who said government is the problem. joe biden is saying, no, government isn't the problem. we've gone too far in that direction, we need to bring it back, because there's a lot government can do and must do, and it can't be relegated to this sort of role. you need big government to deal with the pandemic. you need big government to deal
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with the challenge of a rising china. you need big government to deal with income inequality and these disparities that are arguably tearing the nation apart. and you need -- government is not an evil thing. government impact can make your life better. can create new opportunity, can make you healthier and more secure if we all -- you know, if we all push in the same direction, we can accomplish great things. but the instrument of accomplishing that in many instances is, in fact, government. and this is an attempt to sort of change the zeitgeist in a way that no one really has since reagan. ronald reagan shifted the center
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of gravity of american politics substantially to the right. i don't know if anybody else didn't recall the pre-reagan era, but his economic ideas, the idea of tax cuts to somehow increase revenue was considered absolutely kooky and trickle-down economics was not the orthodoxy that it has been for the last 40 years, thanks to ronald reagan. and joe biden is trying to take advantage of this moment, a moment of crisis, really, and shift that center of gravity back toward the left in a really significant and important way. that's what he's attempting to do. >> and trying to show what government can do, he brought up equal pay. who disagrees with equal pay for equal work? well, it might be the government that needs to help with that, because you think private
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businesses are going to do it themselves? absolutely not. >> you know, we're talking about the ideology of last night's speech and what a departure it was. and reaganonomics in 1979 was considered a radical and kooky idea. in 1981, it framed the debate from 1981 through 2020. but there's another part of last night's speech that it really sunk in for the first time, when i heard tim scott's response and how discordant it sounded when compared to what joe biden was actually saying, as far as this guy's tearing the country apart. he's again, he's just, he's not -- if you look temperamentally at his approach, he's actually is a transformative figure, not just
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ideologically, but walter isaacson, a transformative figure at least in my adult life, in being temperate -- moderately temperate. think about, in my adult life since i first got involved in politics in '94, there's bill clinton. and we understand, the culture wars exploded under bill clinton. this guy was, republicans said vietnam draft dodger, this, that, and the other. and everyone remembers how divisive those eight years were. it was political warfare, even though we still managed to get a lot done. george w. bush, the next eight years. i couldn't walk in my upper west side new york neighborhood without having people trying to sell postcards and posters of george w. bush as adolf hitler. it was a very divisive time. barack obama for eight years,
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charges of birtherism. that led into donald trump and of course we know what the last four years, five years have been like. politics has been -- there was that book about the clinton presidency called "blood sport," i think by james stewart. "blood sport ". politics has been a blood sport since at least 1992. and republicans would say, since the bjork hearings. that's when it really all started. but again, here you have a guy last night that republicans have admitted, we can't figure out a way to demonize this guy. so we'll just say he's really old and tired -- >> and divisive? >> old and tire and divisive. >> what?! >> and then of course we get shots of ted cruz sleeping in the audience. so this is not just a shift ideologically, it seems to be a real shift temperamentally. we have our first president since maybe george h.w. bush that the other side just can't
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turn into the bogeyman. >> well, also, einstein once said that american democracy had a gyroscope, just when you think it's tipping over, not just ideologically, but temperamentally and in style, it learns how to right itself. you've seen it happen during the joseph mccarthy years, and for him and for all of us, there's just some bit of magic, where even after a richard nixon, which is incredibly divisive, not even by an election, but just by happen assistance, we get a gerald ford and a jimmy carter. sort of calming figures. then we go back into the divisiveness. joe biden is the right person at the right time, because we need this sort of calming presence, somebody who can speak in a conversational voice to us. and somebody who can sap some of the poison from our discourse and bring up ideas that are
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transformational and historic without being divisive in a way that republicans can latch on to. to give you an example that i find extraordinarily important from last night was the notion of extending education from k-12 and making it from pre-k through 14. in the civil war, lincoln was able to figure out, you know, we're not only fighting a civil war, but we're fighting to be ahead of the industrial revolution. so he creates land grand colleges, places like berkeley come out of that, where the subject of my latest book is -- was based. then, at the beginning of the 20th century, we made high school free and expected and seamless. and now if joe biden can do this, it transforms a country in a way that's non-ideological, and i think that's going to be the most important legacy of last night's speech.
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>> well, the president last night outlined his ambitious agenda. now he needs to get it passed and sell it. joining us now, white house senior adviser, anita dunn. welcome back to the show, anita. great to see you. so what's going to be the strategy to sell this all to the american people? it seems to me that some republican constituents would appreciate some of these measures, as well. >> good morning, mika, and thank you so much for having me on. it's great to be back. you know, i think last night, what you heard and what you saw from president biden was outlining a clearer vision for how to get america moving forward again. how to build back better on the economy. but more importantly, really, how to go compete in 21st century. so, last night, he had the opportunity to make his case to the american people and to the congress and starting today, he's starting to -- he's going to begin what we call our getting back on track tour,
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which is america, we're not there yet. there's a long way to go. but we're getting this country back on the right track. and he'll be traveling today to georgia, tomorrow to pennsylvania. the vice president is traveling today and we're going to be out there, cabinet members, everybody, telling the american people what's in these plans and what's in it for them. >> casey hunt? >> anita, good morning, good to see you. my question for you is how much of what we heard from the president last night, how much of this sweeping new families plan is he willing to pass alone with just democratic support in congress? >> kasie, it is so good to see you. listen, the president has made it very clear. he would prefer to work with democrats and republicans because as mika pointed out, these are popular issues, and they're not necessarily ideological issues. paid family leave is important for democrats and republicans. i don't think you have to be a democratic mom to want to stay
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home with your newborn baby or a republican mom. these are republican issues, as the president said. he would prefer to work in a bipartisan way. he would prefer to have congress work in bipartisan way. but what he's also made clear, both on the jobs plan and on the families plan, that inaction is not acceptable to him. at the end of the day, if we have to move forward, we'll move forward. but the white house is already working with bipartisan groups around the jobs plan. we plan to do the same thing with our family plan. we'll have our cabinet members up there starting to work on the component parts of this and see what we can get, kasie. >> so what about democrats then? senator joe manchin already voicing some concerns, your house majority incredibly narrow. are you confident that you can get all democrats on the same page if that's what you need? >> it's the beginning of the process, it's not the end of the process. obviously, the president is a legislator, he knows how to pass bills. so we're going to be talking
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with democrats and with republicans to look for ways we can move this country together, because the one thing that we cann't do is go back to where we were before the pandemic. the president feels strongly this is a moment, a moment where we can go and put the necessary things in place to really compete in the 21st century. and that we can't just sit around letting other countries move forward while we stand still. >> yamiche, jump in. >> good morning, anita. thanks for being here. my question is, president biden put a date on the george floyd justice and policing act, may 25th. i wonder if there are other deadlines for other pieces of legislation that he talked about yesterday, mainly, of course, the american jobs plan and the american family plan. is there a date that the white house is looking at or at least a time frame to say, this is where we'll make a decision to go it alone and this is when we want to see this passed by. >> hi, good morning, yamiche. with the rescue plan, this
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country was in a crisis, the day that president biden was sworn into office. over 4,000 americans died of covid. we had economies shedding hundreds of thousands of jobs. it was a crisis that needed immediate response and we really could not wait for a long, protracted legislative process. these investments, the american jobs plan to create good-quality jobs for americans, the families plan, these are investments in our future. so they don't have the same crisis that the rescue plan had. but they're important. and as the president has said, inaction is not an option. we'll work with democrats and republicans. we'll see how far we can get. so we don't have a firm deadline out there. we'll wait and see how much real cooperation, what kind of good faith negotiations we can get. and so far, we've been encouraged, as the president said last night by republicans in the senate who are engaging with us on infrastructure and
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other issues. encouraged by the bipartisan support behind the endless frontiers act, which is for -- in a research and development, which the president talked about last night. you know, we know that there are republicans who also support components of these plans, and we're going to work with them and see how far we can get. >> the white house senior adviser, anita dunn, thank you very much for coming on the show this morning. >> great to have you here. >> and yamiche alcindor, thank you for your reporting this morning. coming up, according to "the new york times," bill de blasio is finally having fun as mayor. he'll explain why and reveal some breaking news regarding the pandemic when "morning joe" comes right back. the pandemic when "morning joe" comes right back ♪ the light. ♪ it comes from within. it drives you. and it guides you.
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reporting this morning that aides to new york governor andrew cuomo withheld information on nursing home patient deaths from covid-19 longer than previously reported. that's according to interviews and newly unearthed documents. according to the times, quote, mr. cuomo's most senior aides engaged in a sustained effort to prevent the state's own health officials, including the commissioner, howard zucker, from releasing the true death toll to the public or sharing it with state lawmakers. these interviews and documents showed. "the times" goes on, a scientific paper, which incorporated the data was never published. an audit of the numbers by a top cuomo aide was finished months before it became publicly known. two letters drafted by the health department and meant for state legislatures were never sent. the paper continues, the actions coincided with the period in which mr. cuomo was pitching and writing a book on the pandemic with the assistance of his top aide, melissa derosa and others. a lawyer representing cuomo's office told nbc news, quote, the
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whole brouhaha is overblown to the point where there are cynical suggestions offered for the plain and simple truth that the chamber wanted to release only accurate information that they believed were totally unassailable. joe, this keeps getting worse. this story that started with a directive back in march of 2020, to send covid-19 patients back into nursing homes, undercounting the deaths that took place, and now we know again from "the new york times" reporting, concealing the true extent of the problem and all of those deaths inside nursing homes. >> there's been a lot of people analyzing andrew cuomo's political future, talking about the possibility of him moving through all of these crisis, moving through all of these scandals and getting re-elected. i suppose that may be possible, if you look at what's happened in virginia, with ralph northam. but a big roadblock to that are actually possible criminal charges that could be handed down, because of this nursing home scandal, which, of course,
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the authorities are looking at. he will be getting recommendations from the state attorney general on the personal matters and how he behaved inside of his office, but these matters actually mika, possibly care with them criminal charges, which really would bring an abrupt halt to his political career. >> and difficult optics, to be writing a book on leadership during a time like this. joining us now, mayor bill de blasio of new york city, and we know mr. mayor you have a big announcement to make regarding the pandemic. but i guess, would you like to weigh in on the new developments with governor cuomo? any thoughts? >> oh, simply, mika, he should resign. i've been saying this for months. he can't continue to lead. nursing home scandal, sexual
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assault scandal, using staff to write his book. he has to go. it just doesn't end. >> let's talk about the news that you have come on to announce to americans. many americans on both sides of the political aisle growing increasingly impatient with some of the restrictions now that over 220 americans have been vaccinated. >> joe, i've got two plans to announce today, and one of them i know is particularly of interest to you. you've been passionate on this topic. the first plan, the jacob degrom support plan. i think it's a fair use of taxpayer dollars to get this guy some bats. so we're going to step in. >> your other plan? >> our plan is to fully reopen new york city on july 1st.
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we are ready for stores to open, bars to open, offices, theaters, full strength. what we're seeing, people have gotten vaccinated in extraordinary numbers. 6.3 million vaccinations in new york city to date. we're doing a lot to reach people at the grassroots. i love this part. the american museum of natural history is providing free vaccinations under the blue whale and giving away free admissions for anyone who comes, four free admissions if you get vaccinated. we know the vaccination effort is going to grow and grow. we've got to keep working hard at that but what's amazing, every single day, we're beating back covid more and more. a better situation every day. we're ready to take that pathway to a full reopening. >> mr. mayor, this is good news to a lot of new yorkers, was but there is a lot of time between now and then. what thresholds will the still have to meet to achieve this goal of a full reopening by july 1st? >> amazingly, right now, willie,
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we are below many of the thresholds that we had set to show that this city could continue to come back strong. we're going to keep driving down covid through vaccinations. we do have work to do. i want to emphasize, anyone who likes what i'm saying, help us out by going out and getting vaccinated, if you haven't already. and it's free and it's all over the city and now we're doing walkups at sites all over the city. so you know one thing about new yorkers, they're busy and they like convenience. we're giving them convenience. but we are well on the way. our health care teams looked at the numbers. we're well on the way. we have some work to do, but i'm quite confident we'll be ready by full strength by july 1st. >> we're worried about getting everyone vaccinated now there's no excuse not to get one. you can walk in and get one anywhere at this point. when you say full reopening, does that mean indoor dining in new york city restaurants? >> yeah, willie, look, based on all of the progress that we've made in this city, we can go
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back to full strength. we want people to be smart, you know, continue to do the things that we've learned worked. the reason i'm even able to say this to you is because there's been 6.3 million vaccinations. i want to keep that moving. i want people to be smart about, you know, basically -- the rules we've learned, you know, use the masks indoors when it makes sense, wash your hands, all the basicallies. but what we can say with assurance now is we're giving covid no room to run anymore in new york city. we've said a month or so ago, it was the variants versus the vaccination, what was going to win, which one was going to win the race. vaccination is winning this race, going away. 6.3 million vaccinations. covid is plummeting. we now have the confidence that we can pull all of these pieces together and get life back, really, in many ways, to where it was. where people can enjoy it an amazing summer. this is going to be the summer of new york city. you're going to see amazing
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activities, cultural activities coming back. i think people are going to flock to new york city, because they want to live again. >> and with a full city field, the boos will be so much louder for the new york mets. >> but my new plan, the jacob degrom support plan will solve all of that. let's be clear. we're getting him some help. >> don't leave out my yankees, either. let me ask about governor cuomo. can he say in this. can he say, i'm looking at the numbers and say, i don't think so, new york city. >> state government and federal government always have a city, but as mayor of new york city, we're ready to come back and come back strong. we're focused on the data and the science. that's how we've made every decision and that's what's worked. and the data and the science are saying out loud, it's time to come back. >> with all of this information and optimism which is great news for new yorkers listening, what does it tell you about the schools not just in the fall,
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but for the remaining couple of months we have in front of us. with all the vaccination possibilities, with teachers now being vaccinated if they want to be and need to be, shouldn't all the schools just throw open their doors at this point? >> right now where we are, we've invited kids back. it's been very successful. just on monday, we had another 50,000 kids come back to school on top of the 100,000 we had already there already. schools have been incredibly safe. they've been open nonstop. i think we're in really good place right now. but let me tell you something, for september, full strength, no question in my mind, every single child can come back to the classroom and do so safely. and that's really what we need. we need everyone back in school. our kids have gone through so much. i'm talking now as a parent, our kids have gone through trauma, our kids have gone through isolation. they need to be back in school and we'll be ready 100% to have
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our kids back full strength in september. >> music to the ears of parents in new york city. walter isaacson is here. >> congratulations, mr. mayor, kathy and are flying up this saturday from new orleans to come visit new york. because like a lot of people, we're really hungry to come back. this is music to our ears. and you've been successful with the vaccination. i love that notion of going to the museum of natural history and getting it under the whale. but tell me what percentage of people you think are really resistant and how you're going to get those people that are hesitant on the vaccine. are there people who can be convinced or enticed by more whales? >> i think it's more and more the latter. this is what we're finding. there was a lot of hesitancy in the beginning. that has reduced greatly. i think there's hesitancy in some -- some folks are never going to want a vaccine, i understand that. most folks who haven't gotten it
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yet, what we're seeing is, it's a matter of convenience. it's a matter of getting answers to fair questions. we're encouraging doctors now to reach out proactively, individually to patients, answer their questions, make it easy for them to come in and get that shot. we say the pharmacies, go to walk-ins right now, make it easy. what i'm seeing more and more is folks are willing, if they know it's going to be a simple and fast experience and the walk-in reality is change everything. are there some ideologically motivated or otherwise who won't get the vaccine? sure. but the vast majority of people who haven't gotten it yet, we're going to help them get there just we making it easier, more fun, we're going to have incentives. that to me is the way forward. >> mr. mayor, this is eugene robinson. on july 1, are broadway going to be ready to go? all the restaurants ready to go?
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retail ready to go? have you talked to those sectors and is that the date that works for them? >> in terms of restaurants, in terms of retail, there's no question in my mind, july 1st will work for so many of them. broadway takes time, because they have to mount a whole production. they have been aiming for september, most of the shows. some of the smaller shows might be able come in earlier. but one thing for sure, we've been vaccinating the broadway community. literally, we have a vaccination center right in the middle of times square. it's been a huge hit, pardon the pun. and people have been flocking to it. the whole broadway community, whether you're on stage or behind stage, everyone's been coming there, getting vaccinated. it's actually been run by folks who work in broadway and are doing this for their fellow cultural, you know, workers to help them come back. so i would say you should expect broadway full strength in september, but i would love to see some of the smaller shows up in july and august.
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>> mr. mayor, i'm going to wildly veer off-topic and ask you to weigh in on this next story, which has a huge connection the new york city. federal investigators yesterday seized cell phones and other electronic devices from the manhattan home and office of former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. the one-time personal lawyer to former president trump according to sources with knowledge of the investigation. so mr. mayor, what do you make of this? obviously, in order to make a complete search of a home and an office, there's something there there. what's your gut from knowing rudy giuliani and what you've seen over the past few years? >> you know, it's a sad thing to have to say about a predecessor, but rudy giuliani has just come unhinged in every sense. and you know, he attached himself to donald trump, but
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then went even farther and decided to be one of the most extreme voices in the trump world. and his regard for the law he left way back on the road. he went from someone who once upon a time, as a u.s. attorney, we thought was an example of upholding the law to someone who has just no respect for the law whatsoever. sadly, mika, this does not surprise me one bit. >> new york city mayor bill de blasio with big news about new york city opening up july 1. thank you very much. really appreciate it. look forward to it. >> thank you. >> and still ahead, chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee sean patrick maloney joins us on the heels of president biden's speech last night. "morning joe" is coming right back. night. "morning joe" is coming right back
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everyone is now eligible to get vaccinated right now, right away. go get vaccinated, america. go and get the vaccination. they're available. we can't let our guard down. but tonight, i can say because of you, the american people, our progress these past 100 days against one of the worst pandemics in history has been one of the greatest logistical achievements, logistical achievements this country has ever seen. >> president biden talking a lot last night about science, the science behind the vaccines and even in our competition with china and walter isaacson, that was something he wanted to talk about. what struck you? >> i think that's going to be one of his legacies, that he wants to be a science president. this is particularly important
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as we come out of an era that seemed to be anti-science. he mentioned how eisenhower created an advanced research agency for defense and biden said he wanted to do one like that for health care, for health technology, for health science, for cancer. he looked at mitch mcconnell and said i know you named that cancer fight after my son, beau. he's been very interested in that. and as i mentioned, our investment in research and development as a country has gone down from 2% of our gross domestic project down to below 1%. if we're going to compete with china, we have to be the people who are developing things like the messenger rna vaccines he talked about. and i think he's deeply dedicated to that and that will be a longer lasting legacy, just as eisenhower's was creating nasa and creating the internet and creating the interstate
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highway systems out of the scientists and technologists that he brought into the white house. >> casey, you had a unique position. you were inside the chamber watching and reporting out all these great details of who was on their phone, who was loudly opening a blanket and putting it over her lap, whose phone was ringing, but you also noted some of the dynamics between different members of congress and between president biden and liz cheney, for example, who shared a fist bump on the president's way into the chamber. >> yeah. you know, i spent a lot of time just trying to take advantage of the fact that, especially under these pandemic circumstances, it was very, very rare to have one of these seats in the chamber. it was an honor to be able to be there. you're looking at that fist bump that liz cheney got from president joe biden and i spent a lot of time watching her because she obviously has been a focus lately from former president trump. he's been feuding in some ways
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or at least there's been a chill between her and the house minority leader, kevin mccarthy. i did not see cheney and mccarthy speak to each other in front of the cameras. now, they were both part of an entourage that went behind the scenes so it's entirely possible and probably likely that they spoke out of view of the cameras, but that chill seemed to remain there when she was on the floor. but that wasn't the case with the president as we saw with the fist bump and mitch mcconnell acknowledged her giving her a hand motion and then a handshake that really kind of underscored, i think, where he and she are in terms of the future of the republican party, the problems that arised out of the january 6th insurrection and tells you a lot about what that means going forward for the kind of role she's likely to play as we try to get back to the serious governing that we were talking about before. >> all right. still ahead, to hear james
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carrville tell it, testimonies have a messaging problem. he says the party barely beat a world historical buffoon and wokeness is part of the reason why. we'll talk to former obama adviser david plothabat just ahead. and this event, a very special event to celebrate the enormous sculptures of my mother, emily benish brzezinski. she go back over 60 years of her incredible career. it's part of the inaugural art springs virtual benefit and you can buy a ticket. we're going to have some great speakers. my brothers will be there. i'll be there, musical guests and you can take part by visiting npaart.org. it all kicks off at 8:00 p.m. eastern time tonight. "morning joe" is coming right back. tonight "morning joe" is coming right back agine a comfortable night's sleep without frequent heartburn waking her up.
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the tone of the address was significantly different from a year ago. the sergeant of arms had some fun with it. >> ladies and gentlemen, i am relieved to announce after four years of bat [ bleep ] lunacy a calm, reasonable president of the united states hala -- luelia. >> that's how it got started with a bang. >> we must have gotten a different feed, actually. >> i didn't see that, but good morning. >> we were there watching on peacock. >> should try to not show. in that position. >> i agree. i agree. good morning and welcome to "morning joe." it is thursday, april 29th. we are bright eyed this morning along with joe, willie, and me, we have white house reporter for
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the associated press, downthan lamere, columnist and associate of "the washington post" david ignatius joins us and former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve ratner. what did you think of the president's address last night, joe? >> well, it was sweeping. it was optimistic. it was very progressive, very ambitious agenda that i like. i think a lot of people on the left are going to like. and others are going to be concerned with the price tag. i myself and maybe one or two others on this set today may be concerned, but i think most americans, despite what tim scott said and the republican response about joe biden tearing america apart with his policies, they don't agree with that assessment. they haven't agreed with that assessment. if you look at the flash bowls last night, they didn't agree
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with that assessment last night. this address, getting great initial reaction from, once again, the overwhelming majority of americans. >> as so much of his legislation, both past and proposed has overwhelming support from the majority of americans. these are his initial polls, these are snap polls, president biden's address to congress in the latest cbs yougov poll, 85% of viewers approved of the president's speech. 15% disapprove. 71% said the president's speech made them feel optimistic about the country's direction and in that cbs poll, 78% felt optimistic about america, 13% felt pessimistic when it comes to biden's policy proposals and his speech. 27 said it would move in the wrong direction. so those are just snap polls
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taken immediately after the speech last night. he put out a transformational agenda. we knew that it was there. some of it has passed. but he told the congress and he told the country that we were in the middle of four crises, as he laid it out, and he requires a government action that started in an era saying government is the problem, officially ended last night. >> it did officially end last night and john heilemann brought it up like night on peacock. i think others agreed. certainly this was the most sweeping progressive agenda that anybody has delivered before congress as a president. maybe since lbj in '64 or '65. maybe even more progressive and more ambitious than that agenda. >> and a transitional figure, i don't think so. i think transformational is what joe biden is setting out to do. and by the way, if you look at
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how the metrics of his progress is that he always overshoots the runway instead of underperforms, look at the covid shots. 100 million planned by the first 100 days. 220 is the result. by the way, just ahead, we're going to update you on another big story that happened yesterday, the raid of rudy giuliani's new york apartment and office by federal agents. what the major move means for the criminal investigation of former president trump and his former lawyer. we're going to get to that in a moment. but first, more from the speech. president biden last night offered an optimistic assessment of america's place in the world after inherenting what he called a nation in crisis. >> i stand here tonight, one day shy of the 1 hundredth day in my administration. 100 days since i took the oath
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of office and lifted my hand off our family bible and inherited a nation, we all did, that was in crisis. the worst pandemic in a century. the worst economic crisis since the great depression. the worst attack on our democracy since the civil war. now, after just 100 days, i can report to the nation america is on the move again. i've often said our greatest strength is the power of our example, not just the example of our power. my conversation with world leaders and i have spoken to over 38, 40 of them now. i have made it known, i've made it known that america is back. you know what they say? the comment i hear most of all from them, they say we see america's back. but for how long? but for how long?
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my fellow americans, we have to show not just that we're back, but we're back to stay. and that we aren't going to go alone. we're going to do it by leading with our allies. >> david ignatius, we really did have a tale of two parties last night. ask we have now for quite some time. few would have guessed that joe biden would be the one that provided such a clear idea logical blueprint for his party. but that is what history has revealed to us. and then you have theparty. but that is what history has revealed to us. and then you have the republican response which, again, a lot of jabs here, a lot of jabs there, but remind me of that line that tactics without strategy is just the noise before defeat.
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i fear from republicans, that is what we continue to see while democrats are coming up with a grand sweeping breath taking and, if you're a small government conservative, very concerning agenda. but one that is overwhelmingly popular with the american people. >> joe, it's fascinating. biden is accelerating in this first 100 days. he was a more confident man last night than he was on inauguration day, in my judgment. this is a transformational agenda and the "new york times" wrote in its story this morning that he's trying to rewrite across the social contract in america. these are fundamental things. and they're going to have democratic support. but i think the essence of what biden is trying to do is go over the heads of the republican party and congress to bet that the american people want and need the kinds of social changes that he's talking about, that
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they hunger for free community college, that they're desperate for child care to help take care of their kids so they can go back to work more easily, and that they want to tax the rich more to pay for it. that's the bet that biden is making. i heard in his speech the usual biden offer to negotiate, ready to talk. he's got $4 trillion on the table. i can't imagine that at the end of the day, that's the number that we're going to end up with. so i think when you look at this speech and you think back four years ago to trump's discussion of american in carnage, this is american optimism. this is something that just is at the heart of our politics is that upbeat spirit. as biden said, never bet against america. it's always a losing bet. that was the basic premise. instant polls say people like it. we can be sure, as you know,
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joe, folks on the hill are not going to like it. can he govern over republicans' heads? that's what i'm waiting to see. >> he certainly has so far. you look at these numbers after watching the speech and these snap polls, only polls, 78% of americans say they are optimistic about their country. i don't think i've seen those numbers, actually, since i've been in public life for a quarter of a century. it's interesting, though, that joe biden is delivering this grand strategy, this progressive agenda. at the same time, he keeps talking about compromise. he's going to compromise. he's throwing a lot of massive numbers out there. i suspect that the president and his people aren't just talking to the republicans. they're saying to joe manchon, hey, don't worry about it. we understand, joe. you've been saying we have to have bipartisan bills, we have to have bipartisan infrastructure bills.
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we're hearing what you're saying. let's get to a compromise. so i don't think this is going to be as much as one sided as the covid bill only because i don't think joe manchon and kierstin sinema are going to give them that choice. >> biden is working with a split senate. there's no margin whatsoever. he has to have everybody on board just to get to reconciliation, as you say with joe manchon and sinema. jonathan lamere, we knew what was coming, but to hear it all laid out for an hour was pretty extraordinary, just the scope, the size and the reach of government that president biden is proposing. >> that's right, willie. the speech last night, first of all, two women behind the president including the first female vice president, kamala harris.
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you could hear people talking at times. but you're right, this was a proposal, the greatest expansion in decades. for transformative changes to how the government is on to something where white house advisers suggested that compromise is aimed at republicans, it's aimed over their head at republican voters and it's aimed at moderate democrats to say look, we're trying. we want to make this work. >> and the approximated made clear last night, it's bigger than domestic policies.
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it's about proving to the world that democracy can still work, competing with china on an economic level, but also to show you the american experiment is not over. there were four tumultuous years of donald trump. the january 6th insurrection. it's a symbol to the world that it is still the best form of government that is able to compete economically and on a human rights level. >> say it out loud, weighing over politics and policy, when "morning joe" comes right back. a continuous glucose monitor,
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here is the president introducing his $1.8 trillion american families plan. and explaining how he intends to pay for that expansion of health care, child care, and education. >> american families plan will provide access to quality affordable child care, guaranteeing -- i am proposing legislation guaranteeing for high quality care for children.
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between the job and a paycheck or taking care of themselves and their loved ones and parents and child. 12 years is no longer -- to compete with the rest of the world in the 21st century. that's why my american families plan guarantees four years of public education for every person in america starting as early as we can. the great universities in this country have conducted studies of the last ten years. that shows that adding two years of universal high quality preschool for every 3-year-old and 4-year-old, no matter what background they come from, puts them in a position to be able to compete all the way through 12
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years. so how do we pay for my jobs and family plan? i made it clear we can do without increasing the deficits. let's start with what i will not do. i will not impose any tax increase on people making less than $400,000. it's time for corporate america and the wealthiest 1% of americans to just begin to pay their fair share. just their fair share. >> steve, if you look at these programs tailg taken one by one by pollsters, you look at the snap polls last night, wildly popular programs. also extraordinarily expensive, a $1.9 trillion covid relief plan, a $1.8 trillion plan. last year i think we spent $1.4
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trillion on covid relief. a trillion here, a trillion there. after a while, it adds up to real money. very popular, but those numbers, can they -- can those numbers be matched by closing loopholes and corporations and taxing the wealthiest americans? >> actually, i think, joe, durkson said a billion there and a billion here. that's how the world has moved on in the last 40 or 50 years. i think there's two issues here. one of the revenue side, can it be covered by revenues? theoretically, it can be. even the president's proposal would take in the case of the american jobs plan, 15 years of revenue toes pay for eight years of expenses. so it's not quite apples to apples there. and also the tax increases are being negotiated down. the corporate tax rate will probably not go all the way to 28. it will go to 25. the increases in taxes in this bill are going to be popular,
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but certainly increasing capital gains rates toward ordinary income will be popular. i don't think it will get all the way to the 42 or 43% that the president is proposing. so there probably will be a gap between the revenues and expenses. but what i really worry about is the size and magnitude of this. you guys have talked eloquently about the sweep, the transformation, the support for this. we had 50 years of small government under a robust government under fdr. we had 40 years of relatively small government and now we're back to a robust government. if you look at this chart, joe, you can take the numbers you were just talking about and see it all put together. you can see the 1.9 trillion from the rescue plan, now another trillion 8. so it's $6 trillion in addition as you pointed out to last year. what you can see over on the right is the obama sympathy ewe husband plan so you're talking about something like seven times the sides of that and you're
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talking about comparing it to $4.4 trillion a year that the government spends on everything. this is over a longer period of time in fairness and it includes some tax credits, in fairness, but you're talking about almost 50% more than the government spends just in one year just on its normal activities. and what i worry about, sure, i worry about inflation, i worry about the deficit and the debt, but i also worry about the execution job here. this is a massive execution job. the last plan, the jobs plan alone had 76 separate initiatives in it. all have to be created and executed. oh, president obama's plan got a lot of criticism for some small mistakes. the potential for mistakes, failure of execution here is high. and if it fails, i think it will set back the cause of progressivism for several more decades. so getting it proposed is important. getting it passed will be hard as you guys were just talking about. but getting it executed, i think in some ways is going to be the president's biggest challenge. he has to deliver not just
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passage, but real results for americans and programs that people perceive are working or else we go back to government being the enemy again. coming up, president biden calls on congress to pass the george floyd police reform bill by the end of may. reverend al sharpton joins us on that and much more when "morning joe" comes right back. orning joe" comes right back. i'm morgan, and there's more to me than hiv. more love,... more adventure,... more community. but with my hiv treatment,... there's not more medicines in my pill. i talked to my doctor... and switched to... fewer medicines with dovato. prescription dovato is for some adults who are starting hiv-1 treatment or replacing their current hiv-1 regimen. with... just 2 medicines... in 1 pill,... dovato is as effective as a 3-drug regimen... to help you reach and stay undetectable. research shows people who take hiv treatment as prescribed...
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senator tim scott defended the country's record on race and voting rights and questioned biden's ability to reunite a divided nation. >> hear me clearly. america is not a racist country. it is backward toes fight discrimination with different types of discrimination. and it's wrong to try to use our painful past to dishonestly shut down debates in the present. i'm an african-american who has voted in the south my entire life. i take voting rights personally. republicans support making it easier to vote and harder to cheat. our president seems like a good man. his speech was full of good
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words, but president biden promised you a specific kind of leadership. he promised to unite a nation, to lower the temperature, to govern for all americans no matter how we voted. this was a pitch. you just heard it again. but our nation is starving for more than empty platitudes. we need policy and progress that brings us closer together. but three months in, the actions of the president and his party are pulling us further and further apart. let's bring in pulitzer prize winning columnist and msnbc analyst eugene robinson. there were some issues here. incredible only in america live story, beautifully woven in with stories about his mother, well executed on many levels. it's a very difficult task to be the republican response. but i'm just wondering, are americans going to really hear
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the message that he was sending about joe biden being a divisive figure, being the one who is dividing america, given that we are, what, three months out from an insurrection that interrupted our democracy in action and tortured capital police officers with american flags and this would be at the hands of the republican president at the pushing of the republican president. >> right. i think it's pretty clear that americans have not heard that message yet. and are not seeing joe biden in general as a divisive figure, given, you know, his quite healthy approval ratings and the fact that the policies that he's proposing are widely, widely popular. so that is the republican problem, they want to oppose all this stuff. they're going to have to come up with a reason other than kind
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of, you know, trust me, you know you don't like him, you know you actually like me. i mean, that's kind of the argument rather than an issue-based argument against what biden is trying to do or to do it a different way. and that is -- that is what was lacking in the response, which as you said was in other ways as these things go more effective than usual. it was better than the usual off party response, given that it's a difficult task. but, to me, it didn't really connect because it didn't really engage with biden's central arguments about what needs to be done now. and got to really have answers for that. coming up, oh, boy, congressman shawn patrick
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i know you're tired. everyone is a little tired this morning. the last time we had congressman shawn patrick maloney on of new york, it was a little reactive. >> we're both believers of mindfulness. >> no. >> and we always say don't be reactive. >> mr. maloney, you were reactive. joe, you were reactive, and i want you both to take three deep breaths and try this again. it's going to be okay because you guys are actually friends. joining us now, congressman sean patrick maloney of new york. also joining us, msnbc political
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analyst david pluff. he served as a senior white house adviser to president obama and managed his 2008 campaign. >> also very mindful. >> he is mindful. >> and host of msnbc's politics nation and president of the national action network, reverend al sharpton is with us this morning, as well. >> peace. >> mvp. >> exactly. exactly. so, rev, let's start with you. what did you think of the speech last night? >> it thought that it was an excellent speech. it was well delivered. and i thought it was substantive. he did not try to become a firing orator. that is not his style. he almost was a conversationalist. and you know as one that is a menace, you can be one with fiery oratry to try and inspire people or you can sooth them into listening to you. and he was like having a conversation with the american people. i thought it was very effective,
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but it was substantive. i certainly was happy to hear him encourage the congress incentive to pass the george floyd act. he was very specific. and i think that he did himself and the nation a real service. i was very disappointed in tim scott's rebuttal, but i was more than impressed with the president's speech. >> why were you disappointed with tim scott's rebuttal? >> i don't think that he rebutted. i think he came with a lot of talking points from the republicans. he never addressed the specific things that the president laid out. it was more bowing to the throne of donald trump and i met tim scott, talked to him. i think he's brighter than that and better than that. i think he really embarrassed himself last night. >> so, congressman, how did joe biden do? how do you think he helped the cause as the head of the dccc? >> first, joe, i'm reminded of
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the wisdom of the ages, happy wife, happy life. so i think the goal this morning should not be to -- yeah, you got it. >> yeah, exactly. >> look, i think he did great. i mean, come on, the guy is talking about four more years of preschooling, two years of community college for free, talking about child care. he's talking about paid family medical leave, these are things that the working and middle class families that i represent in the hudson valley of new york know and understand and care about. it goes right to the family budget on top of the rescue plan which is putting shots in arms and money in pockets and the jobs and infrastructure plans. i think we're doing big things. and the american people are going to feel it and i think it's going to be a big deal come next year when the republicans are still talking about nothing and we've got a record of results. >> so, david, timing is also everything. bill clinton can tell us all that. he beat george h.w. bush running against the economy that fourth
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quarter after the election. ended up being pretty strong. joe biden enhearting an economy on the rebound. we just got breaking news that the u.s. economy grew at a 6.4% annual rate in the first quarter. jobless claims also down to new pandemic lows. >> right. well, first of all, joe, i would say this. obviously, congressman maloney's job first and foremost over the dccc had on is to retain the majority. but one of the problems is we got dunn with one election and we look through the prism of the next election. and we have a bunch of crises out there and that's one of the reasons joe biden is so popular. last night we had a popular president who has done popular things in his first 100 days quite effectively. and so -- and i thought in addition to the proposals, it's how he delivered them. i agree with reverend sharpton. and carville talked recently
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about democrats too often, talked like they're from the faculty lounge. he was directed to people out there who didn't go and graduate to college necessarily, certainly didn't go to post college. folks who are working hard, that have been hurt hard by this pandemic. midterms are very challenging. in my view, the best politics is to deliver for the american people. that will help swing voters, but keep the base intact and you have to have both. the notion that it's one or the other is crazy. you need both to have a successful election in competitive states. >> david mentioned that james carville interview with fox. let's talk about that, democratic strategist james carrville weighing in on weather
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the democratic party needs to change its message egg. he said, quote, we lost congressional seats, we didn't pick up state legislature. so let's not have an argument about whether or not we're off key in our messages. we are. and we're off because there's too many jargon and there's too much esoteric ya that turns people off. he spoke more about what he sees as the problem. >> we come across as condescending to people. and i know out here, democrats out in the rest of the country feel like they are being talked down to. and we just got to use straightforward language. this other faculty lounge nonsense, let those people -- if i go ask them, they ought to stay out of trying to get political language because they don't know what they're talking about. >> so, rev, in that interview with fox, james carville said wokeness is a problem. we all know it. he talked about the terms like
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latin x which only 3% of adults say they have used, 70% of adults say they've never even heard of that term. what do you make of his broad argument there? >> i think that he has some very important points there. the objective of communicating is to connect with who you're trying to communicate with. and i think too many times that we have people that are in the democratic party on that -- in the left or woke that want to impress you rather than engage you. and that's why i think biden has been effective. he engages people. he makes people feel like he's talking to them. he referred to last night when he had the conversation, got on his knee and had the conversation with george floyd's daughter and the meeting with the family that i was in the room with attorney ben crump. that made him communicate with the whole family that he saw them as a person, as a family, a little girl, rather than coming in quoting some tims things that
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he had learned in political science and he's talking as objects. and i think carville is right, you must connect with people on the ground. we believe politics is local. you have to talk to local people in a way they feel you understand their life, not that you're in an ivory tower sipping lattes talking down to the masses that you only understand intellectually. >> there's the rev talking about those latte liberals he's been talking about for a couple of years. david pluff, let me ask you quickly, because i remember hearing barack obama after leaving the presidency, i believe it was a mandela speech. and he in his own gentle way was pushing back against wokeness. and he said, hey, listen, you can't tell entire swaths of the population that they can't engage in certain debates because they're white or because they're men.
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he said we want everybody to engage in the debate. that's how we win elections. and that took me back to, you know, his introduction in 2004. his vision that we're one america and everybody should be involved in the debate. >> right, joe. he's a former community organizer, but any good organizer will tell you that the best organizing starts with listening, not lecturing. you're not talking, you're listening to people finding an opening, finding a way to engage them. so i think this was less. james was clear about this in his piece. it's less about with what we stand for. it's communicating. you have a republican party that is increasingly getting comfortable with white supremacy. so we have to call that out and have to fight that, have to fight for the george floyd policing act. but we have to remember that the people who decide elections, again, this isn't just the trump, obama, biden voters.
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the young people who we need to vote and continue to vote, they are not by definition as engaged in politics. they actually aren't as liberal as activists are. so we have to have a message that reaches them, engages them, that's relevant to them. because at the end of the day, the image they needs to have is joe biden and all the democrats in congress are waking up every day running for the wall, to increase their pay, to increase which are child care, to do things like climate change, of course. criminal justice reform, of course. but we have to understand both sides of the electoral conversation, swing voters and important registration and turnout targets, if it looks like we're lecturing to them, we will be unsuccessful. >> and politicians will and you're exactly right, david, and it's so fascinating, i've spent the past several years criticizing people in bubbles. and criticizing woke america. and i woke up the day after the election absolutely shocked
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because donald trump did better with hispanics than i expected him to do because he called hispanics breeders. he said one -- i thought one racist thing after another. i was surprised that he went up even slightly with black voters. but it's a congressman, a lot of times people, they look at their own lives. and it was a real learning lesson for me that actually i was even isolated. here i don't live far from miami dade and i had republicans telling me the entire year, we're going to do great in miami dade. you guys are missing it on the hispanics. you think that they're listening to everything donald trump is saying. they're not. they're firemen, they're police officers, they want to get back to work. it was even a real awakening for
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me, a guy who is a small government conservative. >> right. and one of the reasons you are good at this job, joe, is you had those antenna and you can hear it. and one of the reasons i'm glad i represent a district that voted for donald trump is i know i can't just talk to people who already agree with me. i think sometimes the democratic party is too good at talking to people we already agree with. but, look, we also have to stand for something and we want real change always comes with a price. there's always some friction. so i think balancing that, of giving people a vision, respectfully, knowing they have a place in this new america that we're building where they can have a good job and good health care where the kids can have a good future, regardless of where they live. it doesn't matter whether you want to college or not. i think the president was speaking last night to moms and dads out there who are just trying to pay the bills, go to work, do the right thing for the community. and that's the key. and if we keep talking like that, and more importantly deliver results, then the
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politics are going to take care of themselves. >> and congressman, the ideas that he put forward last night, the president, obviously they're very expensive, but they're very popular. we've showed the polls over the last couple of months for these major pieces of legislation. so is it your impression sitting where you sit and serving in that congress that this is just going to be party line votes all the way, that there's not going to be, despite attempts by the white house to get some republicans on board for infrastructure, at least pieces of it, let's say, that the future of washington or at least the immediate future is just party line votes and using reconciliation to get big legislation through? >> well, look, i mean, we all want republicans to come to the table. and one of the frustrating things is that you may have noticed, they don't have any ideas. they don't have an idea for the pandemic, they don't have an idea for vaccinations or for infrastructure. they don't have an idea for much. and governing, of course, is more than criticizing the other party. so we're all for bipartisanship. but look, if i go to my
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constituents and i say we're going to increase the state's d.o.t. budget by 40% under the president's plan, fix your roads and bridges, the water systems, i can increase it by 20% if susan collins votes for it, what do you think they're going to say? the point is if the question is doing the big things that the republicans that i represent, at the supervisor level, the mayors, the county executives, i talked to them every day. they love the rescue plan, they love the jobs plan and they want it done. so let's not confuse republicans in congress who are trying to criticize and obstruct just to get back to power. let's not confuse that with what the american people want and need across party lines. and we're going to deliver and then we'll stand for re-election and they can decide. >> yeah. you know, david, every time we have conversations like this, it certainly makes sense at the national level and then i get off the show and i'm like, oh, wait a second. i'm not thinking like, you know,
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a former member of congress because what is true and congresswoman aoc's district i new york 14. it is a delicate balance that nancy pelosi has to strike every day to figure out how, like you said, rev up the base but at the same time still reach out to those swing voters. >> right, joe. every swing congressional district, every swing senatorial gubernatorial state, every battleground state, they're close for a reason. the winning side generally is the one that has the turnout advantage. or -- sometimes and -- wins over moderate voters. that's the recipe. you don't have to trim your sales to be both. you can to be smart about
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communicating. let's talk about what the president is proposing. he talked about the ideas are popular, pre-k, help with childcare, how you pay for them is even more popular. so you've got both sides of the equation, and i think whether it's spanberger or mark kelly or some of the great recruits that congressman maloney's already landed, they can go out there in any part of the country and see this is what we're going to do and how we're going to pay for it, ask the wealthiest 23% to pay a little more in taxes. that is a winning message and i don't think democrats should hype it. again, we're not saying, there's no revenue to pay for any of this, unlike the trump tax cuts, which were funded by taxpayers, basically as a giveaway from working people to the actual wealthy. so this is a set of idea bong on the expenditures and revenue side that, again, poll in the
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70s in some places, even congressional districts that are quite competitive. again, you can do a lot with this, not just right now but from now until the end of the election. >> david, reverend al sharpton, thank you both. chair of the dttt, congressman sean patrick maloney, thank you as well. nice job. you guys were great. up next -- what president biden last night called one of the greatest logistical achievements this country has ever seen. that's next. ever seen. that's next. ing nexium 24hr to treat her frequent heartburn, marie could only imagine enjoying freshly squeezed orange juice. now no fruit is forbidden. nexium 24hr stops acid before it starts for all-day, all-night protection. can you imagine 24 hours without heartburn? ♪ limu emu & doug ♪ liberty mutual customizes your car insurance so you only pay for what you need. thank you! hey, hey, no, no limu, no limu! only pay for what you need. ♪ liberty. liberty. liberty. liberty. ♪
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biden: when i think about climate change, the word i think of is jobs. vo: and these aren't just the jobs of tomorrow. they're the jobs of right now. good paying jobs to modernize our infrastructure. in manufacturing. construction. engineering. they're in our cities... in our suburbs... and our small towns... we take on climate change... and we build back better with clean energy jobs. biden: so let's waste any more time, let's get to work.
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who goes right back to sleep after getting an alert of an unusual charge on their credit card? you do. round the clock fraud protection. one of the many things you can expect when you're with amex. grandparents hunging their children and grandchildren instead of pressing their hand against a window to say good-bye means everything. those things mean everything. they're still, you all know it, you know it better than any group of americans, there's still more work to do to beat this virus. we can't let our guard down.
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but tonight i can state because of you the american people, our progress these past 100 days against one of the worst pandemics in history, has been one of the greatest logistical achievements, logistical achievements this country has ever seen. >> president biden last night on the logistical effort to get vaccines from pfizer, moderna and johnson & johnson into the arms of hundreds of millions, leading to over 27% of americans being fully vaccinated so far. and as part of our "50 over 50" ongoing series, there's one thing worth noting about this massive distribution effort -- three women, all over the age of 50, are behind it. let's bring in chief content officer and forbes media and editor of "forbes" randle lane.
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let's blast from this list incredible women from each major company, starting with 55-year-old kathy weigel from johnson & johnson. >> biden talked about america using world war ii language, talked about the arsenal vaccination part, harkening back to fdr. now kathy languageal at j&j, you can't win a war without supplies and she's in charge of the supply chain at j&j. her job is get parts to people, making sure the tylenol lines lines were running 24/7 and now in charge of ten manufacturers across four continents. getting the vaccines out. >> i love it. and the next woman is on list is kelly sussen at 59, leading supply chain efforts and also working side by side with the ceo at pfizer. >> sally sussen is really with
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an external facing job. she has government experience. she started as senator eagleton -- in senator eagleton's newsroom out of missouri, started in national trade and estee lauder. here she helped roll out the first vaccine approved across the world. somebody asked her how she stays so calm, and she's like are you kidding me, the entire world pressure is on our shoulders and we feel it. but they really delivered. >> sally has an incredible calm during catastrophe. function and disaster, finish in style, my school motto. that's sally. 55-year-old dr. careen la goff. tell us about her. >> she's brand new in the job at moderna. she has a doctorate in
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pharmacology, applied at roche, et cetera, et cetera. but she has the biggest job of her life, to get the moderna vaccines out and her job is not done. there was news overnight in the moderna committees that 3 billion doses in 2022 next year, because this isn't over, she's talking about new variants and boosters. these women were doing this, their job is just beginning. it's not like we're going to return to immunity and be done. it will be an ongoing challenge and these women are making it happen. >> randall, for the "forbes" 50 over 50 list, which we're looking forward to, give us benchmarks as to when we will reveal the list. i ask you maybe to speak with the backdrop of last night watching two women sitting behind the president of the united states as he was making an address to giant session of congress, that was history made last night. >> the visuals were incredible on women two, two women who
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reached the pinnacle of their careers after 50. nancy pelosi was almost 50 when she was first elected to congress. people don't realize her entire political career is basically after 50. and kamala harris, of course, now rising up to be the highest-ranking woman in the history of the federal government, vice president after 50. to see that engine blooming over 50, we will roll this out right after memorial day and we've seen an incredible, incredible volume. it will be game-changer. >> i love it. "forbes" randall lane, thank you so much. if you want to learn more about "50 over 50" go to knowyourvolume.com or forbes.com and click on 50 over 50. tomorrow on "morning joe," we have a special 8:00 a.m. hour for you, a look at president biden's first 100 days. the accomplishments, the fights still to come and also why the first 100 days of a presidency is something we focus so much
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on. that is tomorrow at 8:00 eastern time right here on msnbc. and that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. hi, there, i'm stephanie ruhle, where else? live in washington, d.c. it is thursday, april 29th. president biden's 100th day in office. in the next hour, president biden heads to suburban atlanta for a rally as the administration starts the job of trying to put their very ambitious words we heard last night into action. last night the president laid out a massive jobs and family plan that he says is aimed squarely at helping the american middle class. >> the american jobs plan is a blue collar blueprint to build america. that's what it is. and it recognizes something i've

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