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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 17, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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it kills germs so you heal four days faster. neosporin. use with band-aid brand bandages. it is thursday, july 17th. look at that beautiful summer shot of new york city. with us on set pulitzer prize winning columnist and editor of "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst eugene
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robinson with us here in new york city. >> and tomorrow! >> we get a two-fer! msnbc visiting professor from new york city university harold ford jr. from washington, "the new york times" reporters jeremy peters along with willie, joe, and me. you're here! where have you been? >> i'm always here. >> it's ban long time. >> willie, i live here and work here all the time, willie. >> night, morning, noon, and night. >> he came into the studio babbling this morning. >> what else is new? >> it was a scene. >> it was like the final seed in like the aviatoaviator. khaki! khaki! cut to the scene and my mother bathing me. a terrible way to start the day!
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final scene of "aviator." when you get to the final scene, you have to turn the channel. the khaki! >> stop! are we all good? >> we are great. we have a lot to get this this morning. horrendous news breaking overnight. five-hour humanitarian truce endorsed by the u.n. began earlier this morning allowing palestinians in gaza to restock supplies and repair some of the damage from the past week of fighting, but the brief pause of violence appears only to be temporary. a senior military official says it is increasingly likely they will put boots on the ground to stop hamas rocket attack. a dozen palestinian militants trying to sneak into israeli through underground tunnels. the conflict has seen the death of 220 palestinians, including as seen on the front page of
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"the new york times" this morning, four children who were targeted as hamas militants yesterday. the four boys cousins who were between the ages of 9 and 11 were playing on a gaza beach. they actually were kept indoors and told not to go out, but they wanted to go out and play and this is what happened just moments later. the israeli military acknowledged the attack. the israelis saying it is a tragic outcome. really. moving on. kabul international airport was under attacked this morning. the airport has served as one of the nato's major operational bases as well as a hub for civilian flights in and out of the country. no casualties reported beyond the death of the four militants behind the attack. president obama is ordering a new round of sanctions against russia over the crisis in
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ukraine and aimed at energy defense companies and russian banks. russian president vladimir putin downplayed the impact of the new sanctions. >> gene, you just -- the news goes back and forth in russia. you think putin is backing up and things are now getting worse and seems like the eu is even starting to get involved with tougher sanctions. >> yeah. you have to worry that the longer this goes on the sort of one day it looks like it's going to be war, next day, maybe not and the next day, maybe war, maybe not. the longer this goes on, the bigger the chance is that something awful happens and there is a miscalculation or the russian militants inside ukraine do something perhaps by putin and maybe not and gives it an excuse or at least a motivation for putin to cross the border. it's just awful. >> a lot going on overnight and all of it bad.
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>> i want to turn to politics now. brand-new polls out this morning that show governor chris christie may have a long way to go if he does run for president. did you guys see these? nbc news/marist poll finds -- they were just out last night so these are new to you, as well as the viewers. >> i watch the show so i can find out. >> sit back and get some popc n popcorn. a third of republican voters in iowa have unfavorable view of him and many in hamp said the same. christie in the single digits when iowa republicans were asked who they prefer for their top candidate in 2016. the answer was undecided which is 1 in 5 voters. jeb bush and rand paul were tied at 12% and next up was paul ryan 11%. there is a much clearer picture on the democratic side, however, in the hypothetical head-to-head
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matchup. 70% of democrats picked hillary clinton for 2016 over vice president joe biden. the former secretary of state had the support of nearly three-fourths of voters in new hampshire and compared to 18% for biden. 94% of democrats in new hampshire said they had a favorable view of clinton. >> boy, that's strong. >> god, that is about as good as it gets, isn't it? >> that's strong. harold, it's wide open in the republican race for that presidential nomination. you ought to run. >> i was thinking the same about you. >> i was thinking the same about willie. >> you see how clocked up? they are all clumped up. boy, that is a party -- i've never seen a party without a leader as much as the republican party, willie, is without a leader today. >> what if you strip out jeb bush and maybe chris christie, if those two guys decide not to run for president? or the undecided guy. >> the undecided guy.
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>> then you don't know who to put on top. let's say jeb bush does not decide to run for president, it's not clear who the front-runner would be, who challenger to perhaps hillary clinton would be. >> i think the front-runner would become rand paul but he is the front-runner until he runs into some sort of establishment republican states, then he becomes not the front-runner any more. >> what about this? jeb bush you need four or five of those guys. look at the poll again and you look at jeb bush and christie you probably put them in a moderate kind of the road. if you add up the other guys the fact rick santorum is there, i know a friend of the show but i'm surprised he finds himself that high in the numbers there. you add the other guys up, rand paul and you see the schism in your party. >> i see a party that is looking for a leader and i think if one leader steps forward, all of those people will blow away. >> who is that leader, though? >> i don't know. that's why i said you should
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run. you would have to go back a long, long way, gene, to find a party as leader-less on the national level. >> some would argue this is a perfect opportunity. >> on the national level, that person carrying the mantle for the party and republican or democratic side, you would yu have to -- i can't think of a time. >> no. but i do go back to harold's point about i think that is one of the reasons why there's no leader, because nobody has been able to span the sort of two wings of the republican party successfully. >> you also have with the two main street republicans that usually win in jeb bush and chris christie. chris christie has some challenges, obviously, he is trying to sort through, even though we will play some tape in a second which show he doesn't seem to act like he has any challenges left. jeb bush, jeremy peters, is
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handling it and kind of wringing his hands and trying to figure out what is he going to do. >> how long can he wring his hands? >> i think he can for a long but i think the longer he is out there the less excited big money republicans seem to be about him. >> jeremy. >> one thing you don't hear as much from jeb bush or his camp is what he is doing in these early states like iowa. so i think as much as that one-fifth of voters who are undecided reflects a lack of a leadership in the party right now, it also reflects that we're a year and a half out from the iowa caucuses and really you only have rand paul and this week, chris christie going to iowa and really testing the waters. rand paul started to build a ground game there and we will kind of see over the next few months the candidates who are serious about running as they do that and what kind of traction they did. >> speaking of chris christie, boy. >> he is -- >> hometown hall meetings.
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>> he is going to iowa. >> calling john harwood obnoxious. >> before he heads to iowa he addressed the business leaders at the cnbc delivering alpha conference. he struck a major tone on a number of issues. when he was asked about the fundamental differences between the two parties, christie shied away from attacking one person in particular. take a listen. >> the fact is that the difference between republicans and democrats are that democrats believe that the government are the people who should be doing those things that mrs. clinton mentioned and republicans believe that the private sector is the place that is better to do that. that is the fundamental core disagreement and now having run a government for five years, i agree with my party. even more. than i did before. >> you see her as a big spending democratic liberal who wants to grow government? >> no.
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i think you said that. >> right. >> christie says that he won't decide whether he would run for president until early next year. saying he truly hasn't made a decision. >> so as we let you go, are you running? >> yeah, it's such a great question. you know, let me give you a different answer because, you know, you were obnoxious enough to ask again. you should be aware of people, in my opinion, who are overanxious to make that decision before they need to. that would, it seem, indicate to me ambition before wisdom, and i don't think that's what you want from a person sitting in the oval office, so i'm going to be very deliberative about this. i've got lots of people who are in my ear all the time, you got to do this. a lot of those people were in my
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ear 2010 and 2011 telling me i had to do it and what they learned is i do what i want to do and what i think is best. so everyone will keep asking and, by the way, it's pretty nice to be asked. you know? because if you really stink, they don't ask! you know? if you're really awful, no one is asking! >> geb, this looks like a guy who is six months out or whatever it's been from bridgegate now, feels like that smoke has cleared. he has got confidence again. we are talking about the possibility of running for president. remember, people said his political career was over. forget running for president that he wouldn't be governor or anything else. i think part of that is that poll we just saw which there is nobody else out there who has stepped forward and taken that and he is saying i see a vacuum and bridgegate is behind me. >> he is looking at bridgegate from 6%. >> i understand. >> it's very interesting. i don't quite understand why you have to kind of go out of your
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way to say that it's obnoxious to ask me if i'm running for president when everyone has been talking about it a long time. i don't think it's -- you kind of wonder about that aspect of christie's style. >> he is joking, i guess? >> it's joking, it's joshing. it's kind of -- i don't know how that is going to play. >> yeah. >> some would say it's obnoxious. >> some might say that. >> obnoxious response. i like it. >> don't ask me, i do what i want to do. well, okay, fine. you know? >> yeah. >> whatever. >> those are the kind of qualities and characteristics that some republicans have been critical of this president about. i'm not necessarily -- for him to show that, it lead me believe this is the kind of guy that would get there and tell advisers you don't know what you're talking about, i know what i'm talking about, i'll do. i in politics, i think is -- >> he kind of tells that to voters too. this is none of your business.
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>> you like that. i think that could be received well and seen for what it is, which is, you know, kind of a tough in your face joking fun personality. >> you need more of that personality? >> no. i'm saying -- >> you talking to me? you talking to me? >> i'll tell you the bigger problem is the state of new jersey and how he allocated funds and port authority funds for perhaps projects that weren't necessarily for the port authority and, i mean, there are things besides bridgegate that i think still have to unravel and it will be interesting to see how those play out. >> i agree. >> bridgegate is not actually the story. >> unemployment rate there. >> there is another bridge:following up on what you were talking about yesterday when they called. every time you say bridgegate, you know what i hear in my head? >> what? >> blah, blah, blah, blah. i'm serious. it's funny. you talk about it and nicole was exactly right. when people say bridgegate, i
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start hearing the voices of the voices from like "peanuts." blah, blah, blah. you start talking about how he is handling his government, how the economy is doing in jersey, the fiscal issue willie brought up yesterday. those are issues that people will worry about in iowa and new hampshire but, you know? let's move on to another candidate. >> what was that walkway that "the new york times" put on the front -- >> the pulaski skyway. >> oh, that is going to shake him up. >> no. >> just wait. >> that is going to shake him up. oh, that is bad noise. hillary clinton is well known for earning large fees. >> she makes tons of money. i am really jealous. >> it's like a lot of money. it's like 50 or sometimes $75,000 for an hour? >> that is harold ford money, man! >> i wish. i totally wish.
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>> "the washington post" reports a public university, suny buffalo. >> it's a state. >> she represented new york state too. >> but she actually did -- >> going back to see the kids. hey, kids, i'm back. your senator is back. i love you! how you kids doing four years later, right? >> for an hour -- >> i'm going to do this for free. brown bag lunches, in the day people would come in and take up their time and give a talk. these brown bag lunches and you're like, so great. like this former retired senator from the state of tennessee, vandy, right? >> lamar alexandra would come in and brown bag it. >> they give the money back to the school. that's nice and would make sense because it's a public university. why would you take money? >> we have so many negative stories, gene. i think we are about hear a feel
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good story about a politician. >> doing the right thing. for an hour, they paid her a fee. there was a contract that was obtained through a freedom of information. they paid her $275,000. >> what? >> for one speech, one hour in october of last year. >> holy cow! >> thousands of students and community members listened to her speaker for nearly an hour. not just an hour. but -- >> that's a big buffalo. >> yeah. contract reveals the lengths to which clinton and her agency commanded control of the setting. everything from the type of teleprompter, a presidential teleprompter, and the scenery even needed final approval. >> this is blah, blah, blah. back to "peanuts" mode. >> to be fair all of that was state money and it was all raised and ticket sales and they gave it all to the clinton global foundation. just in fairness, i think it's
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important to put the facts out. >> okay, but what -- >> hold on a second. >> this is the story is right here. on mrs. clinton. >> harold, does that make it okay or are there other issues that wonder? because if you're building the clinton foundation, you're building the clinton legacy and candidacy, aren't you? or are you just giving money to charity? >> well, look. i don't think there is anything wrong with her making money personally. >> 275,000? >> mika, you know, if she makes $300,000, if the market is willing to pay her that, she has every right to do that. the fact she is giving it to her foundation i think is a wonderful thing. we can gripe about it and talk about it, but i don't see frankly the real problem with it. >> i'm asking. if it goes to the clinton foundation, which it did, is it okay or are we making much to do about nothing? >> i think what harold said, the money that went to pay for that speech probably would not have come in to the university, the
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donors who gave it, gave it to get hillary clinton to the university. they didn't give it for textbooks or to fund the brown bag series -- >> i loved those. >> you know, they gave it for that purpose and who knows. maybe, you know, if that weren't happening, they would have given money for something else. but it was a special secret speaker series they funded. >> special secret -- >> no, not secret. just speaker series. >> tell me what is wrong with this? is there anything wrong or why are we talking about? >> because it's $275,000 is why we are talking about it. it's a lot of money. that is number one. number two is that so much of this money goes into the clinton foundation which i think is doing wonderful work around the world. >> why are we talking about it? >> because people, i think, how much money does the clinton foundation need? >> let me tell you something. you know.
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>> i don't know what to say. stop it, joe! >> when the "new york post" is writing about this story, this is a critical story, right? >> important treatment on page -- >> what page is it? >> 10. >> a lot of headlines today on a different headlines on different topics. >> that's a lot of topics. >> you all can't give me an honest answer. >> the reason we are talking about it, mika, you said all along, when mrs. clinton was asked when the book came out about their money situation she clumsily said we were broke. >> of course they are broke if they are giving all of the money away to the clinton foundation. >> they did face a financial hardship after it but most people who face financial hardship don't have a husband who is president of the united states. >> we talked about west virginia yesterday. i mean, the problem is you had hillary clinton, you had somebody in one hour that can make, you know, as much as some people make in four or five
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years in west virginia. and so it's going to be a real challenge. >> when people talk about if they were way in debt and this and that but the clintons never worried about where their next meal was coming from. you go to west virginia and you go to upstate new york. >> you can go to bronx. >> exactly. a lot of people who wonder where their next meal is coming from. >> is there anyone at this table or watching at home someone came to you and said we will give you $250,000 and you can keep it or go to a charity of your choice who would turn that down? it's a shocking number and a lot of money. >> i think she should be saluted for giving it to the foundation. >> they kept a lot of cash either. >> no doubt but they clearly give a lot to the foundation. each speech we talked about in the show she has given that money to the foundation. so don't get me wrong. they have every right to but to willie's point, ask the question, how many people would
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take $250,000 and give it all to the foundation. >> maybe there is something wrong here. >> i don't think there is anything wrong here. i think a political angle to this that is -- >> coming up on "morning joe," a new push on capitol hill to ease the burden on middle class working families. that's a very important issue. >> that is. >> bipartisan sponsors of that bill senators deb fisher and angus king, join us in the next hour. plus, she has been in films alongside the likes of bill murray, hugh grant and james spader. actress andy macdowell is here with her latest project. up next a hack of wall street exposes who was behind the cyberattack and just how vulnerable is the country? we are going to have the playoffs this year. >> you see alabama is playing
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usc? >> my man man kiffin coaching at ba alabama? look at this deal? i heard it might not happen and now it might happen? >> huge. find your khakis? let's go to bill karins for the forecast. bill? >> good morning, joe. a beautiful weather has arrived in the northeast and the mid-atlantic after the soakings. now our trouble spot is focusing out in texas. we need the rain. we are in a horrible drought but getting too much too soon and too fast. i-35 major high north of the dallas/ft. worth area closed to the north of denton. we have picked up 6 inches of rain and thunderstorms in three hours. that's a pretty epic rainfall. i imagine when the pictures start coming out of that region we are going to have a lot of flash flooding to deal with. that is going to continue through this region and some of the storms work their way through the dallas area during the morning rush hour so we will watch you for that. also beneficial rains up there around wichita falls who has
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seen one of the worst droughts in the last three years in the city' history so take the inch of rain last night. shreveport to on dallas 2 to 3 inches widespread. if you get one of those thunderstorms over you can pick up 4 to 6 inches in a hurry. the cooler air has arrived and not really chilly but the humidity is lower than it has been. pittsburgh at 52 degrees in the morning. may even need a light jacket there. no light jacket needed new york city to d.c. beautiful afternoon and perfect summer weather and low humidity and temperatures in the mid to low 80s and that is a gorgeous day compared to what we have seen recently. the rest of the country looks really nice too. it's actually cooler as far south as atlanta. enjoy our little break from our summer humidity, everyone. washington, d.c. you look great right into the weekend. you're watching "morning joe." we will be right back. ♪
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♪ live look at new york city. there is times square this morning, joe. wake up. it's time to wake up and smell the coffee, okay? >> e>> i need that. >> good to have you here. you're just a little off. >> a long ride. >> take a look at the morning papers. "the new york times" employees of microsoft facing round of layoffs today and largest in the company's history exceeding the 68 6800 employees laid off in 2009. the ceo said microsoft must find ways to simplify and work fastrn and more efficient and so let's fire even. >> that is the problem with the
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economy right now. companies are figuring out how to become more and more, quote, efficient and so often it has to do with firing americans. >> it has to do with discarding hard working americans and making profits. that is the way of our country. oh, and pay them the worst salaries if they do work for us. let's make sure their wages don't change for ten years. >> this is really a great challenge. >> i got a bonus. look at me, ceo. >> seattle times, officials in washington declared a state of emergency in 20 counties as a series of wildfires burn through the state. a combination of high temperatures and strong winds are fueling the fires. the largest has scorched 35 square miles so far displacing hundreds of residents. >> los angeles times norega is suing black ops two for using
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his name. noriega is behind bars for murder and says the film portrays him as antagonist and of heinous crimes. he is seeking damages in excess of $25,000. the best selling video game pulled in $1 billion in sales in just its first -- >> i have go out and buy that. >> i don't know who is more reprehensible? the people who make a game like "call of duty." ." or manuel noriega. joe is joking. >> what do you mean? i used to do that. >> you don't any more. you know how damaging it is to the brain. especially for young people. >> it's damaging to the brain? >> yes. >> do you think that is what happened to willie? >> what? >> to my brain? i'm asking willie if he thinks that is what happened to my brain.
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>> i thought you were talking about noriega. >> no. >> is that the one you're talking trash to 10-year-olds in different states? >> they are talking trash to me! the little punks from scotland. that is how i used to prep for this show. headphones. talked about it and they ripped it out from me on that show netflix. >> if you're looking to vacation in the hamptonons this summer y can stay at billy joel's beach house. you're going to have to do a speech at suny buffalo in order to do that. >> this is where harold stays when he is in the hamptons. >> the piano man's home is available to rent in the month of august to the tune of $100 million. hillary clinton could stay there for an hour as work. the four bedroom hamptons estate sits on an acre of ocean front
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property. interested parties can also buy the home. that is awesome. nearly $20 million. >> where is billy joel's home? harold, do you know? >> i don't know. >> i don't know where he is either. >> is he like east? >> it's a beautiful house. a little higher than i was hoping to spend this month. >> really? >> a quarter of a million dollars for a beach rental. >> give a lot of speeches. >> do you think we could -- maybe we could go out to the hamptons and give a and go stay there. i haven't spent time out in the hamptons. i'm a working class guy. >> yeah. >> but i hear it's nice. >> it is. it is a lovely part of the world. >> do you ever go out there? >> i actually don't. >> i know harold does a lot but i don't. >> they are not all like donny deutsche out there wearing gold chains and everything with lightning bolts on them and everything and speedos? people don't like walk around? let me help y'all out here. willie, who is our next guest?
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tell us about it. >> i'm trying to learn. a lot of people would like to know how the other half live. i've never been out to the hamptons so i'm asking what is it like out there? you don't go out there much either, do you, willie? >> no, i don't but it's a lovely part of the world. yes. >> willie, what are we going to talk about -- >> go down to the ozarks and stock car racing on dirt tracks. >> i see you on one of those atvs. >> that's how we spend our summers, willie and me. >> willie, what is next? in 2010, the u.s. financial industry experienced its biggest cyberattack scare. to date when the nasdaq exchange was reportedly hacked by an unknown attacker and you might have seen headlines like this one in "wall street journal." a statement gave no indication nothing serious had taken place. past four years little said about the case but thanks to our next guest we may be getting some answers and it looks
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serious than we ever imagined. joining us from washington is michael reilly in the upcoming edition of "bloomberg week" michael explains what happened. >> let's explain what we thought we knew four years ago. >> nothing was reported except the existence of a hack and called the director's desk which is sam where companies share financial information and basically nasdaq didn't say much except nothing really happened because nothing was stolen. two, it was a really minor incident. it turned out that wasn't the case at all. there is a lot of hacking i think we all know by now. israelis are hacking and chinese are hacking and u.s. is hacking but usually what they are doing is steal data. this was a very different event. when the president gets involved you know something is different. the president in this case was briefed three times and the reason it goes to the white house is the first time he told about this hack he is told, one, it's the russian government and,
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two, a potential attack tool involved and that means it's a really big deal and means the possibility of taking down a stock exchange. >> what did you find then in the intervening four years now? was it, in fact, the russians? >> it turns into a long -- there is a very intensify investigation and nsa is involved and cia is involved. takes a lot of twists and turns. by the end of it, the best answer that people have come up with is they are really not sure. the fbi finally gets to the point where they think, after five months of investigation, that it still could be the russians and the russian government but what they were after was not taking out the exchange but actually trying to steal the technology of the exchange. the interesting thing about the timing of the attack is happens at the same time moscow is pushing a big movement to make the city of moscow a financial center like london and new york.
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in the interim four years they haven't had much luck but into the same time they have two stock exchanges and turn it into a much bigger platform. they were in there to take nasdaq technology to learn from it and replicate it. takes the u.s. government to get to that point and they are not sure whether it was that or something else including criminals. >> michael, what is the potential of this kind of malware? what could happen with something like this going forward? >> that is the thing. we only have a few public examples of something like an attack tool. iranians attacked ramco and erased two-thirds of their computer network. you saw general alexander who is a former head of nsa who is now spending a lot of time on wall street talking about things like wiper viruses where they go into
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a system and basically wipe out entire networks on. if you can do that the possibility destabilize the market is really, really high. i think that is why the nasdaq incidents scared so many people because at least initially they thought that might be what is going on. >> pretty scary and worth a read to get the full story what we don't know and what we know. it's in the latest issue of "bloomberg business week. ." michael riley, thanks so much. >> you bet. the annual espy awards was last night and nothing else is going on in sports, quite frankly. there was a touching moment from michael sam. he made a great speech. "morning joe" sports is next. ♪
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time for sports. last night the 22nd annual espy awards. in 1993 espn created this thing because one night of the year there are no sports during the all-star break so they created an event and give out awards. the night started with richard sherman of the seattle seahawks with best breakthrough athlete. the night ended on sherman and the seahawks winning the espy for best team because somehow
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they are a better team than, like, miami heat or baseball or other sports. the espy for best play, sorry, joe, went to auburn university's chris davis. this is cruel. 109-yard missed field goal return and take a knee. is it over? >> it's not over! >> 34-28 over alabama in the iron bowl. >> blah, blah, blah. >> already won the espy for best game. best game! how is that the best game? >> can you guys turn that off? that is pornography. >> kevin durant home a bapair o espy. he ended lebron james rein in both categories. i love these awards. perhaps one of the most memorable awards of the night came from an speech from the arthur ashe courage award and
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michael same became the first open gay player drafted in the nfl. >> the late great arthur ashe wasn't just great but brilliant took. he with you the wisdom in the world in three short sentences. i'm sorry. stay where you are. i'm sorry. i'm sorry. start where you are. use what you have. and do what you can. those were words to live by whether you're black or white, young or old, straight or gay. to anyone out there, especially young people, they don't -- feeling like they don't fit in and would never be accepted, please know this -- great things -- i'm sorry. great things can happen and you have the courage to be yourself. thank you, and god bless. >> it's a really good speech.
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if you got five or six minutes this afternoon go online and watch the same thing. tuesday night's all-star game failed to mention the name of tony gwynn. fox and mlb statement said the following. we did not want to slight anyone by singling out one individual. >> tony gwynn? >> but it's tony gwynn. >> it was a mistake. >> it was. they screwed up. >> they screwed that one up. >> "daily news." you got this thing right here. what are they doing here? >> too much. >> over the horse and carriage thing? >> the horses. we want to keep the horses, right? >> no need to call the mayor a name like that. >> i'm talking.
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we want the horses, right? >> are you for the horse? >> i'm always for a horse. >> no. i don't even know what that means. >> i don't either. i don't either. >> i think -- i'm all for that. >> whatever that is. >> we know we just need the horses in central park. right? mika? >> well, there's some issues. there's safety issues and there is humanitarian issues for the horse. humane issues, sorry. >> daily news story. >> why are you doing this? up next, mika. >> coming up next. >> one candidate for congress goes to the board to see for himself the immigration crisis describing the fear on the faces of the kids he saw but one very big problem. >> very moving. >> with his statement. >> my god. what is that? >> oh, no! ♪
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♪ ♪ willie, there is nothing sadder than this humanitarian crisis down there. those kids. i'm tearing up right now just thinking about it. >> stop it, joe. >> i'm not alone. >> there's a congressman who cares. thank god. >> these are the guys you meet in d.c. >> he saw the sadness in their faces. a complex issue immigration is. the crisis on the border. here is what happened with one candidate for congress went to see for himself. our phoenix arizona station bram resnick hat story. >> reporter: adam was making a speech. >> the reason lady justice holds a blind! >> then he suddenly stopped. he got word a bus was heading down the road and took off for
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it! >> anything else? thank you. >> reporter: it's what kuasman and others were waiting for a confrontation with a bus full of migrant children. he tweeted from the scene bus coming in this is not compassion but the rule of law. he included a photo of a yellow school bus. >> i was actually able to see some of the children in the buses and the fear on their faces. this is not compassion. when you have a rule of law and a secure border and citizenship and immigration and naturalization process that works it's a sad state of affair for us. >> reporter: which children on the buses were those? >> i saw a school bus full of plenty of children. >> reporter: do you know it was a bus of ymca children on it? >> they were sad too. i was leaving when i saw them.
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people are not happy down the line. that's an error by me. >> they were sad too! >> they were sad too! >> it's a sad over the break down of the rule of law! >> at the ymca camp! you know kids from phoenix, arizona that have a bad day at a ymca camp because they were picked on the right team but sometimes they look just as distraught from honduras. >> hey, i was leaving when that bus came. no, you weren't! you dashed to the bus! you chased the bus for the photo op. >> that was straight out of the came. will farrell! it was straight out of that movie. he said sadness down the line. everybody is sad. >> they are sad too. >> everybody is sad! coming up, we will be right back with more "morning joe." w, threats are always evolving. at first, we were protecting networks.
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coming up at the top of the hour, breaking news overnight from gaza. israeli and hamas take a break from t from the fighting as four kids were killed overnight. a remainder never to ask chris christie the same question twice. >> so as we let you go, are you running? >> yeah, that's such a great question. you know, let me give you a
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different answer. because, you know, you were obnoxious enough to ask again. >> okay! more backlash against hillary for her hefty speaking fees at the university of buffalo. stay with us. we will be right back. and startup ny companies will be investing hundreds of millions of dollars in jobs and infrastructure. thanks to startup ny, businesses can operate tax free for 10 years. no property tax. no business tax. and no sales tax. which means more growth for your business, and more jobs. it's not just business as usual. see how new york can help your business grow, at startup.ny.gov
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♪ it was carefully choreographed to project his power. he took the oath of office for
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another seven years as the president prepared his show of defiance, so the rebels prepared their own. the deaths of four palestinian boys on a beach where they were struck by shells fired by the israeli navy. >> by the seaside in gasses a, a group of children have come to play hide and seek. a missile finds them. >> there was no warning. it wasn't the precision war israeli says it's fighting. a mother asked, "where is my son." then her worst fears came true. [ screaming ] >> the russian leadership will see, once again, it's actions in ukraine have consequences. >> president obama announcing the toughest new sanctions yet aimed directly at the russian economy. >> we live in a complex world in a challenging time. >> new jersey governor chris christie is going to iowa where
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people go to look at their chances to on be president. >> it's pretty nice to be asked. if you're really awful, no one is asking. >> welcome to "morning joe." eugene robinson and jeremy peters is still with us. here on the set, former mccain senior campaign strategist and msnbc political analyst, steve schmidt. nice to see you. >> that christie guy is back. and hillary is back in the news. you got a lot of stuff to talk about. mika is going to take us overseas first. >> i am. we have breaking news to begin with overnight. before we get to politics, we will start with the five-hour humanitarian truce endorsed by the u.n. which began earlier this morning allowing palestinians in gaza to restock supplies and repair some of the damage from the past week of fighting. but the brief pause of violence appears only to be temporary. a senior military official says
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it is increasingly likely the country will put boots on the ground to stop hamas rocket attack. a dozen palestinian militants trying to sneak into israeli through underground tunnels. the conflict has seen the death of more than 220 palestinians, including as seen on the front page of "the new york times" this morning, four children who were targeted as hamas militants yesterday on a gaza beach. in afghanistan now. four hours, kabul international airport was under attack this morning by militants armed with rifles and rocket propelled grenades. the airport has served as one of nato's major operational base and flights in and out of the country. no casualties reported beyond the death of the four militants behind the attack. president obama is ordering a new round of sanctions against russia over the crisis in ukraine and aimed at energy defense companies and russian banks.
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as well as people who supported pro russian separatists in eastern ukraine. russian president vladimir putin downplayed the impact of the new sanctions. we are turning to politics now. we start with brand-new polls on the 2016 field. nbc news/marist poll found a third of republicans in iowa have a favorable view of him and nearly those in new hampshire said the same. chris christie in the single digits when iowa republicans were asked who they preferred as their candidate for 2016. the top answer was and decided and response 1 in 5 voters. bush and paul were second tied at 12%. undecided for 22% of republicans in new hampshire followed by rand paul again and chris christie. >> let's stop and talk about the republicans. go back to that first poll, if you will, the approve/disapproval.
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steve schmidt, man. go back to the one before that, the unfavorables. i've never seen a political party more in need of a national leader than this republican party. you look at these numbers, chris christie is about 50/50. among republicans ted cruz, 19/14. jeb upside down 18/20, 18/15. it's pretty remarkable. have you ever in any political cycle seen a party more devoid than the republican party? >> even in 2012 in that race it was evident in that race that mitt romney was going to emerge as the nominee. you look at this field. one, it wouldn't be more wide open. two, this is historically it's an anomaly for the republican party because the republican
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party typically has someone who is the front-runner who it's evident they are going to emerge at the end of the process. so this field is just wide open. >> there is also, you look at those numbers, they are mad as hell. you look at the numbers it's not like 2008 with the democratic party you had two democrats the party was excited about. here, you got people that the republicans don't even like. i never see these -- you never see these sort of numbers. 50/50 numbers. chris christie basically 50/50. jeb bushes upside down and rand paul 50/50 and marco 50/50. >> those are the first column is iowa. the second column is new hampshire. these are the unfavorable ratings. >> thank you. >> actually, you want to be, what, toward the bottom of that list actually. >> i'm sorry. but you look at -- they are all clumped up. >> they are all clumped up. part of the problem for a lot of them is the fact that they are out of the united states senate
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and republican primary voters across the country, they are so dissatisfied with washington. they can't stand the institution of government in the country. i think it's enormously difficult for anybody -- >> is there any chance a senator is going to get the nomination? >> in my view, no. no chance. >> does anybody think that? gene, do you think a senator is going to get a nomination? >> you know, i can't -- i doubt it. i doubt it. just because of the senators who are trying to get the nomination because i don't think any -- >> steve, are we missing anyone? we look at that list. let's assume for a moment that jeb bush does not run and maybe chris christie does. is there a john cass kasich? >> rick perry will get a second look. he's had a good couple of weeks. at the end of the day we are also devaluing the ability of somebody who can get on a stage and communicate effectively who
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can win these debates. you saw this with newt gingrich. you can wing, who is going to win is going to have a lot of momentum. >> jeb, 12, rand paul, 12, paul, 11. sanatorium,. christie, 8. undecided 20. new hampshire, the same thing in new hampshire too. undecided 22%. 14, 13, 10. everybody is bunched together. you don't have anybody that is sticking out. >> the next president that succeeds the last one is almost always an antidote to them. the notion that barack obama is going to be replaced by a 40 something first-term republican u.s. senator without much of a record of accomplishment, i just think, is ludicrous. if you're marco rubio or some of these candidates who i think have incredibly bright futures in the republican party, should understand that timing is an underappreciate the virtue in
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american politics. >> is it like parties are often in a situation like this? >> what is usual about it for republicans is there is no dominant national leader. not surprising some of them are there but nobody has transcended in that field at all. >> right. >> so when you look at the field right now it's as wide open as it has ever been for on a republican nomination in the modern history of the republican party. >> and, yeah. like steve said, you knew mitt romney was going to get -- i mean, it always made everybody angry, ron paul saying how do you know he is not going to win? i know he is not going to win. four years before that, you knew mccain, like, when he came charging back would figure out a way to do it. bush? i was at the convention in '96 and people were saying bush is our next nominee. in 2000 is at least the way republicans sorted it out so that is what is so strange about this.
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>> role reversal, you know? >> role reversal. hillary has got it locked down. >> he says he is not running but he is headed to iowa today. he addressed business leaders at a cnbc conference in new york yesterday. striking a measured tone on a range of issues including the economy and common core education standards. and as you'd expect he was also asked about his presidential ambition. >> so as we let you go, are you running? >> yeah, it's such a great question. you know, let me give you a different answer because, you know, you were obnoxious enough to ask again. you should be aware of people, in my opinion, who are overanxious to make that decision before they need to. that would, it seem, indicate to me ambition before wisdom, and i don't think that's what you want from a person sitting in the oval office, so i'm going to be
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very deliberative about this. i've got lots of people who are in my ear all the time, you got to do this. a lot of those people were in my ear 2010 and 2011 telling me i had to do it and what they learned is i do what i want to do and what i think is best. so everyone will keep asking and, by the way, it's pretty nice to be asked. you know? because if you really stink, they don't ask! you know? if you're really awful, no one is asking! >> steve, we know about his liabilities. they have been laid out pretty plainly. a lot of talk now about what is happening inside the state, the finances are not in good shape there. you just talked about political communication and somebody can stand on the stage and command a debate. isn't he someone who could do that if he can get past his problems? >> look. absolutely. i just think on the planet i live on, right? when you look at what is going on in the middle east, you look at this humanitarian crisis on
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our southern border caused absolutely 100% by the policies of this administration, this tragedy that sun folding. the notion that it's disqualifying because of the bridge i think is an absurdity. he is going to get a second look. he going to have an opportunity over the course of the campaign to go out and communicate. now, i do think, as you move into states like iowa and new hampshire say this as a north jersey native. he has to be extremely cautious on presidential temperament issues. >> i know. i was trying to articulate this last hour. i think the thing about his personality, i thought what would be appealing and, you know, everyone knows we know him well and i saw it firsthand one-on-one, is that he sort of seems feisty and unafraid and seemingly unbeholden. the question is do the problems in his state kind of undermine that? because what he came off as, which i thought was refreshing and i thought people would like he is very different from
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washington. >> you had last week, steve, i don't want to dig into, you know, touch the third rail of republican politics, but you had last week, him -- this is the charm of chris christie. >> yeah. >> tell it like it is, right? but then you have last week, him turning cartwheels and trying to explain how, you know, the clip issue, limiting it to ten rounds in a clip, and then making some preposterous explanation that well, if you only limit it to ten, then you're devaluing the life of the ten children who were killed by that single clip. i just wonder where, of course, a guy who would have made news and actually would have gotten attention is, i'm sorry, what deer needs more than ten in a clip? look. if you need more ten in a clip you need more than ten in a clip would one reason. you think the federal government is coming to take your crops or cows or whatever and you want
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more than ten because you want to kill u.s. soldiers that come to your door. why don't we say you're a survivalist and that is stupid b.s. and blah, blah blah. ten sounds good, i'm going to sign the bill. now that would piss off the nra and we know that but chris christie can't have it both ways. >> you have to be more candor and in your face and not take weasel position. >> you talk about the real world and i understand the world that we live in, the political world we live in, that this is setting off tons of bombs. but in middle america, people are like, and, by the way, rank and file nra members in northwest florida, they are like say to me, i don't need more than ten in a clip. i'm good. i'm taking my son out. i don't need that many. >> with that question. >> roll over and shoot them 40 on more times. >> what that demonstrates in a presidential candidate most candidates don't get this. there is no bad questions. there are only bad answers.
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every answer is an opportunity to reveal an aspect of your character and temperament. if you were the straight talk guy as you said and you get a tough question and, all of a sudden, straight talk melts away into a pile of nonsense, then you look worse than your typical politician because there was never any expectation to begin with that you would be straight talking. >> i have to actually say this is what was is devastating to gary hart in 1988. it wasn't just the scandal. bill clinton survived four years earlier. gary hart was anti-politician for four years. he was the candidate of change and then he gets caught and, you know, a scandal that has been around for 4,000 years. he melted down overnight because of that. i think, right? >> well, i think that is an argument -- that is probably not the only example. >> governor christie was also asked about the divide in the republican party between the establishment and the tea party wing and how a potential
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candidate for president is supposed to balance those forces in a primary. >> always divides inside any vibrant political movement. and so the way to do is about be yourself and see here is what i believe in. and try to convince people that if what they are looking for is a candidate that they agree with 100% of the time what they need to do is go home and look in the mirror. you're the only person you agree with 100 time on these issues. if you try to be that they will perceive you as a phony and they will because you are. own up to what your positions are and say what they are and if that is not good enough to win then you wouldn't want to govern under those circumstances any way because you would have to keep remembering who you pretended to be yesterday and i don't think that is the way to govern. it's complicated enough as it is without having to try to figure that out too. >> jeremy, it is a question we
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have asked every four years a single campaign walking that line winning a primary and prepared to swing back to the middle for a general election. how did this potential candidate do that? >> with christie, i think that is probably his biggest challenge, right? it's a challenge that jeb bush would have if he runs. it's even the challenge that rand paul has if he runs. these candidates are going to have a very hard time appealing to the kind of social conservatives that decide iowa. now that said, a lot of republicans candidates who have won iowa have not gone on to win the presidency and, furthermore, have not gone on to win the republican nomination. i think a lot of this gets overplayed. right now, the republican party is looking for leadership, right? and if there is a strong dynamic engaging figure like christie that people beat up in the beginning but eventually rally around, i could see that happening. >> we are going to bring in nbc
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news chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown" chuck todd. at the top of the hour we went through the polls. we want to know in terms of the presidential field what do they say to you? >> well, to me it's a couple of things. one is christie still got this problem with conservatives to start with that high of an unfavorable rating among republicans compared to everybody else in the field, all right? he's in the 30s. everybody else is either in single digits in the teens and unfavorable ratings in both iowa and new hampshire. it tells you, i think, conservatives, number one, there are some never gotten over the fact he stood with president obama a week before the election. never mind questions about him a conservative. this is not -- one thing people need to realize republicans aren't unfavorable toward him because of the bridge stuff. that is something impacting christie numbers in independents and democrats. among republicans he has this
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ideological test to go through. i think that unfavorable rating before the conservative groups start pounding him, i think, is a real challenge. it wasn't like high in iowa but not eye in new hampshire. it was high in new hampshire and not just an iowa thing. the other thing that jumps out at me is, you know, rand paul, if you're looking who has poll position. you want to call him a front-runner or not, the guy is the one that is the most popular at this point among conservatives. he is running the strongest against hillary clinton in the matchups in these two swing states. if you look at the little things he has been doing the last year who has a better year than running for president than rand paul? >> i don't mean to cut you off but does rand paul have a chance winning any more than his father did and people come up to you, chuck todd, how do you know that ron paul is not going to win? my answer is i voted for him but rand paul is not going win.
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>> where is the party four to eight years ago? >> it hasn't moved that much. >> where is paul in this? isolationism or retreating a bit is actually popular inside the republican party these days. look. i think, joe, ultimately you're right that next year, paul is going to start out as a front-runner but he'll be the guy sort of at the top that everybody is chafising. i think you'll see a pylon on him. probably led by liz cheney. a lot of international wings beat the living daylights out of him. john mccain and things like that. maybe he doesn't survive it, but that doesn't mean he doesn't start out in the -- think of it like nascar. who is running the best laps right now and who has the fastest lap and who starts in the first position? rand paul. >> steve schmidt, i want to talk about the hillary clinton story we were talking about. this is about "the washington post" report that suny buffalo
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paid her $275,000 for an hour speech. there are other constraints in the contract. i think another college paid her $225,000. that is unlv. clinton says all of her speaking fees go to the clinton foundation but first to the speaker's bureau. what is your take on that? the first whiff of this story is kind of shocking. $275,000 for an hour speech. >> by the way, look at the headline. look at the picture. a lot of people say, dah, dah. as far as voters go, they read headlines and they look at pictures. >> a state university. >> they realize she got paid more in an hour than some voters get paid in four years. >> no doubt she will be out talking about student loans and that the cost of higher education and that these loans have to be forgiven. the ludicrousness of that. but i don't understand the
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political tone deafness of it. she is clearly going to be a candidate for president of the united states. the family is worth $100 million. the clinton foundation does a lot of good work on. >> very well-funded. >> well-funded. i don't understand, especially a school in a state you represent as united states senate. go there and give the money back. the tone deafness of it, i think, if you watch her over the last couple of months giving up 30 points, i mean, i think every day that goes on it's more likely you're going to have elizabeth warren in this race or another top-tier democrat to her left running against her credibly. >> i'm really surprised by the tone deafness. >> i don't think we are quite at that point yet. >> it's early, gene. >> if this continued at this rate with this kind of these -- these kinds of incidents or revelations or whatever, then i
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think we could get there. i think right now she is still under hegemonic figure in terms of the democratic race. >> i think she is substantially weakened from where she was just a couple of months ago. i mean, she has gone from the most admired figure in american politics and enjoyed huge support among republicans to 30 points in a couple of months and being president talking about politics. it is a remarkable fall. if this was a republican candidate in the same position, this would be the dominant political headline. >> if this were a republican candidate. >> shouting from the rooftops. >> dot, dot, dot. >> it should be "morning joe" subtitled if this were a republican candidate, dot, dot. or if there were a republican candidate, dot, dot. it's funny, because it's true. >> very quick on this. i don't understand. there is nobody around her that i feel like is thinking about --
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every single day how does she get the nomination and 2016 and how do we use this moment to do that? karl rove in 1997 was thinking about george w. bush's presidential campaign in 2000 every day. david axelrod was thinking about it before barack obama was thinking about it when it comes to running for president in '05 and '06. clear to me nobody around her is thinking about the race because i'm with steve. all of this book tour and all of these decisions to go out and basically make your post-presidential money before you run for -- before you actually are president which is what -- ex-presidents make money like this, not candidates before they run. it tells me there nobody around hillary that is actually thinking every single day what is good for her to become president of the united states. i think there is people around her say that how do we protect hillary clinton and how do we help hillary clinton, the brand. >> right. >> but i don't think anybody around her that thinks about the president because if they were they wouldn't be making these mistakes. >> well put.
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>> ex-president money you were talking about she is making. as steve pointed out they are worth $100 million. like, $275,000 is a ton of cash, unless you were worth $100 million. so why do it? why not give the speech and then announce at the end of the speech i'm going to give this money back to suny buffalo for a scholarship fund for journalism or for political science or for disadvantaged youth. whatever. i don't understand. >> i don't either. i think the last year should have been spent why wasn't she running around the world talking about women's rights and equal rights around the world and the lack of it and there are different ways she could have positioned herself this last year and kept her above the fray but on message, right? >> you're excited, mika, aren't you? >> and i don't get it. >> steve brought up elizabeth
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warren. he doesn't sound quite so crazy when he says it. it's when you say it. >> why is that? because he is a male? >> no. it's just because you sound crazy when you start talking about elizabeth warren. >> i just -- she does not strike me as a -- you're going to have to beat hillary clinton and you have to be a better retail campaigner. one thing i feel like we learned about elizabeth warren against scott brown she doesn't seem to be a retail campaigner. she is a very good person at a rally but doesn't strike me as a retail campaigner and a problem in iowa and new hampshire for elizabeth warren. >> she did win, though. >> in a presidential year in a blue state. >> okay. steve schmidt, thank you very much. thank you so much in so many ways. i think it's undermining when republicans say it. i know your game. >> you just can't win. >> chuck todd, we will watch
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"the daily run down" at 9:00 a.m. >> top signs that the u.s. economy has turned the corner. "time" magazine we will reveal the new issue. on the back burner as two senators come together on a bipartisan bill to help working families. the self-described surf and turf caucus, maine's angus king and nebraska's deb fisher join us next on "morning joe"! ♪ ♪ ♪ start a team. join a team. walk to end alzheimer's. visit alz.org/walk today.
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♪ all right. we decided to keep steve schmidt here. steve, we are going to ask you about that thing we were just talking about in a second. first, joining us now republican senator from nebraska deb fisher and independent senator from maine, angus king. they are here with their new bipartisan plan to help working families. it's called "the strong families act." welcome to you both.
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deb fisher, we will start with you. tell us what you are trying to get through here and get done. >> great to be with us this morning. it's just been such a pleasure to work with senator king on a number of pieces of legislation but we are very excited about this one, because it is a balanced approach. it recognizes and respects that families have unique needs and we need to help them with that, offer a good plan, but it also balances that with the cost of doing business that employers face. >> and how did the two of you come together to work on this? and how do you think anything will happen actually in washington that gets you to where you want to go with the working families, the strong families act? nothing seems to be happening there. >> no, no. but as you said earlier, the surf and turf caucus, we try to work on common sense solution that are out there. how is this going to play out? we think it should be a very easy bill to pass because it
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does recognize different needs that people have. it's common sense and we do that. >> and the reality is around here nothing goes anywhere unless it's bipartisan. that is just the arithmetic. the math of the place we have to start from this that basis. i'm an independent and deb is a republican and we think -- this is -- this is working people having some paid family leave and supporting employers who want to provide that, particularly wage hourly workers and that is who really has been left out of this conversation. >> absolutely. >> that is where this is going. we think this is time. we are i think the only industrialized country in the world that doesn't have some measure. paid family leave and i think we have come up with a plan that makes sense and ought to appeal across the aisle if people, in fact, want to get something done. >> willie? >> senator fisher, it's willie geist. i'll read for our audience what is in the strong family act. tax credit for firms that offer
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paid leave and employees take leave on an hourly basis and part-time employees, et cetera. a few other things in there. senator king just touched on it. we are unique in the world and how poorly we do in this area. we have two children. my wife got four weeks or something and then unpaid and she could take disability or cobble together some vacation time to take the time she needed. it's high time, isn't it, that we caught up with the rest of the world here? >> you know, i think we need to recognize that two-thirds of the big companies already offer this and what angus and i are excited about is the focus that we have on working families on those low wage earners, on the hourly earners there. this is going to give them flexibility if they need to take off an hour or two to care for an aging parent or to take a child to the doctor. this will be something they are going to be able to do. but, again, as i said, it also recognizes the cost of doing business and so we are trying to balance that. we are trying to find a way that
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we can encourage employers to offer this and not have it another mandate from the federal government when we are still faced with kind of a struggling economy here. >> jeremy peters, jump in. >> senators, i know one area of bipartisan agreement, in addition to what you're discussing now, is kind of the lack of satisfaction that members of both parties have with this white house's engagement, this president's effectiveness in reaching out to you. i wonder, as we face these issues whether or not you're talking about foreign engagement, immigration law, are you satisfied with the job the white house is doing? are you happy with the president and the role he is playing with you guys? >> i would say any time you can increase dialogue between the branches of the government, the president. the president has said he is looking for more flexibility
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with regards to this issue and wants to work on it and reach out. i agree with that and i know angus does too. we think this is a plan that is going to work. i would like to see him more engaged on issues. >> i was just going to say, generally, i think that is a criticism, but last summer, we did a bipartisan bill on student loans. he got very involved in that and was very helpful in putting that over the line at the end. so i think this is one we haven't discussed it with the white house, but it fits in with the overall priorities talking about trying to provide some additional workplace fedex flexibility to families and i think we can build some momentum here and carry them along with us. i certainly hope so. >> hopefully. as someone who took part in the working family summit, it is certainly part of their core beliefs and goals. so you would think. and senators deb fisher and angus king, thank you very much for sharing with us on the show this morning. >> thank you.
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coming up, space invaders. we will explain how this man is trying to keep you safe from a very big growing problem. plus a new novel ripped from the headlines based on the real life theft of one of the world's most iconic paintings. one of the most prolific and accomplished thriller writers of our time, daniel silva joins us next. ♪ i don't have time enough to cry i was walking down the street one day ♪ alership, you'll find the works! it's a complete checkup of the services your vehicle needs. so prepare your car for any road trip by taking it to an expert ford technician. because no matter your destination good maintenance helps you save at the pump. get our multi-point inspection with a synthetic blend oil change, tire rotation, brake inspection and more for $29.95 or less.
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♪ this is exciting, mika. >> yes, it is. with us here now. >> he hatched "morning joe." he was our first viewer. >> actually, his wife. >> you and jamie were the ones responsible for us being here today. >> here with us now "the new york times" best selling author daniel silva who is out with his 17th novel. this is number 17? >> this is 17. >> willie was showing us. >> good god, danny! >> the heist. >> look at the back. the jacket. >> i love the pictures. >> what are we looking here? >> i'll tell you what we are actually looking at actually. a author who had to pose on 115-degree day in washington, d.c. and the styler thought i
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should was ear a pea coat. i was frying and really upset and it turned out to be a keeper. >> thriller novels. what makes that man tick? >> he wears a pea coat when it's 110 degrees. >>en just a pea coat. >> yeah, i'm not wearing anything else other than a pea coat. >> that is thrilling in and of itself. the heist. we go right into the depths of the syrian civil war. >> we do. only as a thriller can go. we go from an italian art heist that took place in october 1969 in sicily. one of car bagio's let's great pieces were stolen from a chapel. gabriel undertakes a search for painting at the request of the italian authorities and his
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search leads straight into the heart of the syrian civil war and the link is money, of course. >> this is how you write all of these books. you pull pieces of history and current events and kind of weave them together. was it the heist of the painting that started you here and then you went from there? >> i did. it's a -- i've been interested in the topic of art theft for a long time. i think that look a lot of people who are close to the art world get a little miffed when some jackass walks into a gallery and walks off with a painting. the truth is once a paintizing gone the odds of us ever seeing it again are very, very slender. maybe 1 in 10. this is -- car baggio has a hundred painting to his hand and when you lose a painting like this it leaves a huge hole of in our understanding of his art and accomplishments and one would like to hope we will see it again someday but probably not.
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>> what did the writing of this book how does it have you thinking about the arab spring and instability across the middle east? obviously, some interaction with the character but your takeaway. >> i would have to say i was cautiously pessimistic and hopeful at the outset of the arab spring. having lived in the arab world, i was always concerned about what was going to happen when we sort of took the lid off and i have to admit when our first sort of gut response to the uprising in egypt was that mubarak must go, i was a little concerned about that because i didn't know what was going to happen next. >> right. >> we had a similar response in libya. gadhafi must go. look we have now in libya, complete and utter chaos and what is going in syria and assad is still there. so what we have in syria is we have something on a map that is
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called syria but it really doesn't exist any more. and we have a belt of extremism. i like to call it al qaeda stand that stretches from through syria into iraq with isis, of course. and i'm afraid it's going to get much worse before it gets better. >> oh, boy. i'm just curious. why is it that when we lose a remarkable piece of art, it's unlikely that we ever see it again? somebody in organized crime, do they have it like over their mantle next to dogs playing poker or something? why don't we get that back? >> it's a great question and there is a lot of debate within the art world about what really happens to stolen art. is it really hanging on the wall of some rich guy? some guy who is willing to pay a reduced amount for a painting in order to possess it? i personally think that the answer is yes. but a lot of people who are
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involved in art crime would disagree with me. they think it gets circulated within the criminal underworld and so that, say, a gang of croatian criminals who are trying to import heroin from, say, turkey my use the painting as collateral or down payment so that it makes its way through the criminal underworld like it's getting swapped from gang to gang and person to person until someone tries to -- >> that makes a good twist on it. everybody is reading "the heist." everybody is reading it. >> there is a piece of art in joe's house. >> oh, my goodness! >> dick cheney has got it. >> look at that. darth vader has left the bunker! >> what you say to your fans? >> he's on his way to an undisclosed location and taking "the heist" with him. >> daniel silva, thank you very much. >> we do know where one piece of
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valuable art is. it's in joe's house next to some dogs playing poker. >> i got a black velvet jesus. i got a whole collection. up next, "time" joe klein takes on barack obama saying it's time the president stops running away from all of the country's problems. we reveal his piece in the new issue of the magazine next on "morning joe." ♪
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threatening your native species so it's a big problem. >> invasive species are $2 billion problem in america. joining on celt is managing editor of "time" magazine here nancy gibbs with the latest issue. space invaders? >> the u.s. is under assault and costing us billions! >> you guys covered the snails earlier this week. we learned that at l.a.x. they had snails in their airport. the 2 billion figure is how much the government spends in fighting dangerous species. the damage they do is around $120 billion to agriculture and industry. it is a very serious and growing problem to our economy. >> oh, my lord! i'm looking at -- what is that? >> that is a bernese python.
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our reporter went to florida which is sort of the ground zero for this problem. they have python patrol to hunt these down and probably came in originally as pets. as pets. no one knows how many pythons they are in florida because they are so good at hiding. >> and it seems to be a losing battle too in the everglades where these species are going in and just wiping out an entire ecosystem. >> all the small mammals are disappearing from the everglades, which is a real problem because of these pythons. >> can we move on to the joe klein piece? joe klein reports from texas on the immigration issue and he says obama seems all about decorum. he needs to go to the border on a lot of issues. >> so joe went down to mcallen and spent some time with catholic charities down there, tons of people who he says are dealing with not an immigrant crisis, a refugee crisis. and when the president said he wouldn't go to the border just for a photo op on the same day the white house releases a picture of him playing pool with
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governor hickenlooper. >> bad timing. >> his point is, you cannot just throw in the towel when it comes to leadership. there is a lot that the president could and should be doing. but when you have your consultants telling you whether it's safe to be courageous, you've really taken political courage out of the equation. >> and this is quite a headline. surprise, the economy is not as bad as you think. tell us about that. >> no, it is pretty bad. >> we were writing about the signs that we really have turned a corner. everything from consumer confidence to housing starts to the return of manufacturing, the extraordinary opportunity represented by the fact that next year we will be the world's largest oil producer. he also makes the point that we are, as we have been discussing for a long time, we are turning into two countries. that a typical 20-year-old today, half of them are likely to be on food stamps at some point in their life. so it is not as though this is an evenly distributed recovery, but the sign that we have finally in terms of growth and
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confidence and housing, the housing sector and manufacturing sector have come back from our lows. >> roger writes that americans are spending like they mean it. housing has made a comeback. american made makes sense again. energy production is booming, our environment is getting healthier, american schools are working smarter and social trends are moving in the right direction. >> when we talk about the haves and the have nots and moving in separate directions for certain people when, we talk about wealth redistribution, that's a dirty phrase. so what is the drilldown on how this can be levelled out a little bit better? >> the education piece of it is huge, and we were -- for a long time we were stuck at a 60% high school completion rate. that's now at 80%. it's predicted to get to 90% within the next five or ten years. as more and more companies are relying on better trained workers, and it's manufacturing driven by technology is coming back home, closing that gap is really going to be driven by making sure we have workers who have the skills they need to get jobs that will get them above
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this poverty level. >> really quickly, one of these of roger, he talks about energy production, but american made makes sense again. i hear that from one ceo after another. that bringing these manufacturing jobs back to the united states, like roger is saying, makes sense. >> those are the kind of tax breaks and incentives the government should be thinking about. think about how hugh change the fact that 50% of households in new york city earn under $30,000 a year. that's great for all of us around the table but for half this city and a bigger portion of the country they can't benefit because they don't have the skill set to do it. >> a lot in the new issue of "time" magazine. thank you very much, nancy gibbs. always good to see you. still ahead how the nasdaq got hacked by a foreign government. we'll talk to one of the only people who seems to be getting any answers four years after the major cyber scare. plus, a ruthless former dictator is suing from prison.
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the creators of one of those popular and violent video games on the market. we'll explain why. you are not allowed to play anymore. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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all right. still ahead, a fragile and temporary truce in the middle east just hours after the israeli military foils an underground attack attempt by palestinian militants.
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we have the breaking developments next. plus chris christie tells us when he's going to decide on his 2016 plans and his very classic christie way. and actress andy mcdowell is here. she'll tell us about her new television series and what it's like to be on set with the great bill murray. all that and much more when "morning joe" returns. vo: this is the summer. the summer of this. the summer that summers from here on will be compared to. where memories will be forged into the sand. and then hung on a wall for years to come. get out there, with over 50,000 hotels at $150 dollars or less. expedia. find yours.
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coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. with us on set we have eugene robinson right here, a two-day stint, harold ford jr., and from washington jeremy peters. we've got a lot to get to this morning. actually some really horrendous news breaking overnight. five-hour humanitarian truce endorsed by the u.n. began early this morning allowing palestinians in gaza to restock supplies and repair some of the damage from the past week of fighting, but the brief pause of violence appears only to be temporary. a senior israeli military official says it is increasingly likely that his country will put boots on the ground to end hamas' rocket attacks. just a few hours before this morning's truce, israeli soldiers reportedly stopped a plot by more than a dozen palestinian militants trying to sneak into israel through underground tunnels. the conflict has seen the death of more than 220 palestinians, including as seen on the front
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page of "the new york times" this morning, four children who were targeted as hamas militants yesterday. the four boys, cousins between the ages of 9 and 11, were playing on a gaza beach. they actually were kept indoors and told not to go out but they wanted to go out and play and this is what happened just moments later. the israeli military acknowledged the attack. the israelis saying it is a tragic outcome. really. all right. moving on, for four hours, kabul's international airport was under attack this morning by militants armed with rifles and rocket-propelled grenades. it has served for a hub of civilian flights in and out of the country. no casualties were reported beyond the death of the four militants behind the attack. and president obama is ordering a new round of sanctions against russia over the crisis in ukraine.
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they are aimed at the russian defense industry, energy companies and russian banks as well as people who supported pro-russian separatists in eastern ukraine. russian president vladimir putin downplayed the impact of the new sanctions. >> gene, you just -- the news goes back and forth in russia. you think putin is backing up, now things are getting worse and it seems like the e.u. is even starting to get involved with tougher sanctions. >> yeah. you know, you have to worry that the longer this goes on, this sort of one day it looks like it's going to be all right and the next day maybe not, the next day maybe it's going to be war, maybe not. the longer this goes on, the bigger the chance there is that something really awful happens and there's a miscalculation or the russian militants inside ukraine do something, perhaps prodded by putin, perhaps not, that makes it -- you know, that gives it excuse or at least motivation for putin to cross the border. it's just awful. >> a lot going on overnight and
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all of it bad. i want to turn to politics now. there are brand new polls out this morning that show governor chris christie may have a long way to go if he does run for president. you guys see these? an nbc news/marist poll -- they were just out last night so these are new. these are new to you as well as our viewers. >> well, i watch the show so i can find out. what's it say? >> the poll finds a third of republican voters in iowa have an unfavorable view of him and nearly as many voters in new hampshire said the same. christie is also in the single digits when iowa republicans were asked who they preferred as their candidate for 2016. the top answer, undecided, which was the response for one in five voters. jeb bush and rand paul were second tied at 12%. undecided was also the top response for 22% of republicans in new hampshire followed by rand paul, again, and chris christie. there's a much clearer picture on the democratic side, however,
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in the hypothetical head-to-head matchup. 70% of democrats picked hillary clinton for 2016 over vice president joe biden. the former secretary of state had the support of nearly three-fourths of democratic voters in new hampshire compared to 18% for biden. and 89% of iowa democrats plus 94% of democrats in new hampshire said they had a favorable view of clinton. >> boy, that's strong. >> that's about as good as it gets, isn't it? >> harold, it's wide open, man, in that republican race for that presidential nomination. you ought to run. >> i was thinking the same about you. >> oh, stop it. >> you see how clumped up. i mean they're all clumped up. there is -- boy, that is a party -- i've never seen a party without a leader as much as the republican party is without a leader today. >> and what if yyou strip out jb bush and chris christie. >> or the undecided guy.
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>> then it's really you don't know who to put on top. let's say jeb bush does not decide to run for president. it's not clear who the front runner would be, who a challenger to perhaps hillary clinton would be. >> well, you know, i think the front runner would then become rand paul, but the problem is he's the front runner until he runs into some sort of establishment republican states and then he becomes not the front runner anymore. >> what about this, jeb bush you need four or five of those guys. look at that poll again and look at jeb bush and christie, you probably put them in a moderate middle of the road kind of deal. the fact that rick santorum is there, i know he's a friend of the show but i'm surprised he finds himself that high in the numbers. you add all those other guys up and you see the chism in your party. >> i see a party that is looking for a leader and i think if one leader steps forward, all of those people will blow away. >> but who is that leader?
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>> i don't know. that's why i said you should run. seriously. you would have to go back a long, long way, gene, to find a party as leaderless on the national level. >> some could argue this is a real moment of opportunity. >> blah, blah, blah, but on the national level, that person carrying the mantle for the party, republican or democratic side, you would just have to -- i can't think of a time. >> no. and -- but i do go back to harold's point about i think that's one of the reasons why there's no leader because nobody has been able to span the sort of two wings of the republican party successfully. >> you also have with the two main street republicans that would usually win in jeb bush and chris christie, chris christie has some challenges, obviously, that he's trying to sort through even though we're going to play some tape in a second that show he doesn't really seem to act like he has any challenges left.
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and jeb bush, jeremy peters, is kind of wringing his hands trying to figure out -- >> how long can he wring his hands? >> i think he can wring his hands for a while. but i think the longer he's out there, the less excited big money republicans seem to be about him. >> jeremy. >> one thing you don't hear as much from jeb bush or his camp is what he's doing in these early states like iowa. so i think as much as that one-fifth of voters who are undecided reflects a lack of leadership in the party right now, it also reflects that we're a year and a half out from the iowa caucuses and really you only have rand paul and this week chris christie going to iowa and really testing the waters. rand paul has started to build a ground game there and we'll kind of see over the next few months the other candidates who are really serious about running as they do that and what kind of traction they get. >> speaking of chris christie,
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boy. holding town hall meetings. >> going to iowa. >> calling john harwood obnoxious. >> but he heads to iowa, he addressed the business leaders at the cnbc delivering alpha conference. he struck a measured tone on a range of issues, including the economy and common core education standards. and when he was asked about the fundamental differences between the two parties, christie shied away from attacking one person in particular. take a listen. >> the fact is the difference between republicans and democrats are that democrats believe that the government are the people who should be doing those things that mrs. clinton mentioned and republicans believe that the private sector is the place that's better to do that. that's the fundamental core disagreement. and now having run a government for five years, i agree with my party even more than i did before. >> do you see her as a big spending democratic liberal who
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wants to grow government? >> no, i think you said that. >> christie says that he won't decide whether he would run for president until early next year, saying he truly hasn't made a decision. >> so as we let you go, are you running? >> that's such a great question. you know, let me give you a different answer, because, you know, you were obnoxious enough to ask again. you should beware of people, in my opinion, who are overanxious to make that decision before they need to. that would it seem indicate to me ambition before wisdom. and i don't think that's what you want from the person sitting in the oval office. so i'm going to be very deliberative about this. i've got lots of people who are in my ear all the time telling me you've got to do this. a lot of those people were in my
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ear in 2010 and 2011 telling me i had to do it. what they learned is i do what i want to do and what i think is best. and so everyone will keep asking. and by the way, it's pretty nice to be asked, you know, because if you really stink, they don't ask. you know, if you're really awful, no one is asking. >> gene, this looks like a guy who's six months out or whatever it's been from bridgegate now, feels like that smoke has cleared. he's got confidence again. we're talking about the possibility of running for president. remember, people said his political career was over, forget running for president, that he wouldn't be governor or anything else. i think part of that is that poll we just saw, which is there's nobody else out there who has really stepped forward and taken that and he's seeing a vacuum there and he said you know what, i put bridgegate behind me, i can fill that. >> that's true, but he's only looking at the vacuum from 6%, so he's not -- >> i understand. >> it's very interesting. i don't quite understand why you have to kind of go out of your
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way to say that it's obnoxious to ask me if i'm running for president when everybody has been talking about it for a long time. i don't think it's -- you kind of wonder about that aspect of christie's style. >> he's joking, i guess? >> it's joking, it's joshing, it's kind of -- i don't know how that's going to play. >> some would say it's obnoxious. >> well, some might say that. some might say that. >> that was kind of an obnoxious response. >> and don't ask me, i do what i want to do. well, okay, fine, you know. >> yeah. >> whatever. >> those are the kind of qualities and characteristics that some republicans have been critical of this president about. i'm not necessarily going to -- for him to show that, it leads me to believe that would tell advisers you don't know what you're talking about, i know what i'm talking about, i mean i, i, i in politics. >> but he tells this to voters too. this is none of your business. >> i like that.
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i think that could be received well and seen for what it is, which is, you know, kind of a tough, in your face joking fun personality. >> you think we need more of that in politics? >> no, but the personality could be received well. >> are you talking to me? >> the bigger problem will be the state of new jersey and how he allocated funds, port authority funds for perhaps projects that weren't necessarily for the port authority. i mean there are things besides bridgegate that i think still have to unravel and it will just be interesting to see how those play out. there is bridgegate is actually not the story. >> the unemployment rate there. >> there's another bridge. >> to follow up on what you were talking about yesterday with niccole, ever you time you say bridgegate, you know what i hear in my head? >> what? >> blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. no, i'm serious. niccole was exactly right. when people say bridgegate i
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start hearing the voices of the parents from like peanuts. there they go, let them talk, when are they going to get back and then you start talking about how he's handling his government, how the economy is doing in jersey, the fiscal issue willie brought up yesterday. >> those are real issues. >> those are issues that people will worry about in iowa and new hampshire but, you know -- >> okay. so let's move on to another candidate. >> what was that, that walkway that "the new york times" put on the front? >> the pulaski skyway. >> that's going to shake them up in dubuque. that is going to shake them up, man. oh, that's bad noise. hillary clinton is well known for earning large fees for her speeches. >> she makes tons of money. i am really jealous. she gets paid so much. >> it's like 50 or sometimes $75,000 for an hour. >> that's harold ford money, man. >> i wish. >> my god.
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"the washington post" reports this, cindy buffalo of public university, which is the state -- >> she did it for free there, didn't she? >> no, you know what, it would be nice because it was public -- >> well, he represent ed new yok city state. hey, kids, i'm back. your senator is back. i love you. how are you kids doing four years later, right? >> for an hur -- >> i'm going to do this for free, brown bag lunch. did they have that where people would come in and take up their time. >> talks. >> they give talks, these brown bag lunches. and you're like it's so great. like this former retired senator from the state of tennessee went to vandy, right? >> lamar alexander would come in and brown bag it. >> they give the money back to the school. that's nice. and that would make sense because it's new york, her state and it's a public university. why would you take money. >> we have so many negative stories, gene, it's good. i think we're about to hear a
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feel good story about a politician. >> doing the right thing. so for an hour they paid her a fee. there was a contract that was obtained through a freedom of information -- they paid her $275,000. >> what? >> for one speech, one hour, in october of last year. >> holy cow. >> thousands of students and community members listened to her speak for nearly an hour. not just an hour. >> that's a big buffalo. >> the contract reveals the lengths to which clinton and her agency commanded control of the setting. everything from the type of teleprompter, a presidential teleprompter, and the sets and the scenery even needed final approval. >> this is all blah, blah, blah. i've gone back to peanuts mode. >> in fairness to her that money was state money, it was through endowment or ticket sales and they gave it all to the foundation, to the entire clinton global foundation. so just in fairness i think it's
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important to put the facts out. >> hold on a second. >> the story is right here on mrs. clinton. >> harold, does that make it okay or are there other issues that wonder? because if you're building the clinton foundation, you're building the clinton legacy and candidacy, aren't you? or are you just giving money to charity? >> i don't think there's anything wrong with her making money personally -- >> $275,000 an hour? >> if she makes $300,000, if the market is willing to pay her that, she has every right to do it. the fact that she's giving it to her foundation is a wonderful thing. we can gripe about it and talk about it but i don't see frankly the real problem with it. still ahead, why there will be 70 andie macdowell look-alikes around new york city today. seriously? but the real andie macdowell will join us on set to explain -- we think it will be the real andie macdowell. she's beautiful. i love her, she's amazing.
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>> she's from south carolina. >> is she? well, i had dinner with her l'oréal boss yesterday so we're going to be talking about that. plus the rules of parenting in the digital age. an important word of caution before you post pictures of your kids on facebook. up next, hacking the nasdaq. how safe are we when a nation state managed to attack the u.s. and our government still can't figure out why that happened. something like that. but first there's bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill. >> good morning to you, joe and mika. yesterday we had flash flooding that was pretty extreme in areas of colorado. colorado springs was one example of that, with just the skies opened up and the water just started flowing everywhere. colorado springs and that steep terrain, the water was flowing fast too. now that was the storm system yesterday. that same storm system has now moved down into texas. this picture just taken moments ago. this is i-35. it is closed. this is a major highway north of dallas-ft. worth heading up
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towards oklahoma city. in sanger it is a river over the water. these two vehicles were stuck. they were rescued by the fire people there. they have had estimates of up to 10 inches of rain just north of denton. my computer is estimating 6 1/2 but there's a weather watcher who says in his backyard he's between 9 and 10 inches of rain since midnight. that's why we have epic flooding in that region. that rain is pushing down into central and north texas so the dallas-ft. worth area, you are going to get this heavy rain and flash flood potential this afternoon and later this morning. so that's the travel trouble spot. the rest of the country is actually looking nice, including the northeast and the mid-atlantic, no problems at all. a very dry, beautiful day. we leave you with a shot of new york city after days of high humidity and heavy rain. it looks like you have a great forecast right through the weekend. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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let's take a look at the morning papers. "the new york times," employees at microsoft are facing a major round of layoffs today. reports say the layoffs will be the largest in the company's history, exceeding the 5800 employees laid off in 2009. in a letter to employees last week, the company's ceo said, quote, microsoft must find ways to simplify and work faster and more efficiently. >> and there you go. >> so let's fire everybody. >> there you go. that's the problem with this economy right now. companies are figuring out how to become more and more, quote, efficient. >> really? >> and so often that has to do
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with firing americans. it is -- >> it has to do with discarding hard-working americans and making record profits. >> it is the economic challenge of our time. >> that's the way of our country. oh, and let's way them the worst salaries if they do work for us. let's make sure their wages don't change for ten years. >> this is really -- >> oh, i got a bonus. >> a great challenge. >> look at me, ceo. "the seattle times," officials in washington declared a state of emergency in 20 counties as a series of wildfires continue to burn through the state. a combination of high temperatures and strong winds are fueling the fires. the largest has scorched 35 square miles so far, displacing hundreds of residents. >> "the los angeles times," exdictator of panama, manuel noriega is suing the creators of the video game call of duty block ops 2 for using his name and likeness without his permission. lawyers for noriega who is
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behind bars for murder says the game portrays him as an antagonist. >> true. >> and the culprit of numerous heinous fictional crimes. noriega is seeking damages in excess of $25,000. the best-selling video game pulled in $1 billion in sales in just it's first week. >> i had to go and buy that one. >> i honestly don't know who is more reprehensible, the people who would make a game like call of duty, sorry. >> what are you talking about, man? >> or manuel noriega. >> back off, it's a great game. put in my little head phones and -- >> joe is joking. >> what do you mean? >> nothing. >> i used to do that. >> and you don't anymore? >> but you don't anymore. you know how damaging it is to the brain, especially for young people. >> it's damaging to the brain? >> yes. willie, what's next? you were in 2010 the u.s. financial industry experienced its bigger cyber attack scare to date when the nasdaq exchange reportedly was hacked by an unknown attacker. you may remember seeing headlines like this one in "the wall street journal" at the
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time. nasdaq issued a simple two-paragraph statement that gave no indication anything serious had taken place. well, over the past four years little has been said about the case, but thanks to our next guest we may finally be getting some answers and it looks to be a lot more serious than we ever imagined. joining us from washington, michael riley and the upcoming issue of "bloomberg business week" michael explains what happened. michael, good morning. >> good morning. >> let's just recap what was reported at the time four years ago, what we thought we new at that time. >> almost nothing was reported except the existence of the hack. it was in a relatively isolated system called the director's desk which is a system where companies share financial information. basically nasdaq didn't say much except, one, nothing really happened because nothing was stolen and, two, it was a really minor incident. it turned out that wasn't the case at all. there's a lot of hacking, i think we all know by now. the israelis are hacking, the
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which chinese are hacking, the u.s. is hacking. usually what they do is stealing data. the president in this case was breached three times. the reason it goes to the white house, he's told it's the russian government and two there's a potential attack tool involved. attack tool means that's a really big deal. that's the possibility of taking down a stock exchange. >> so what did you find in the intervening four years now? was it in fact the russians? >> it turns into a long -- there's a very intensive investigation. nsa is involved, the cia is involved, and one of the things that takes a lot of twists and turns. by the end of it, the best answer that people have come up with is they're really not sure. the fbi finally gets to the point where they think after five months' investigation that it still could be the russians and the russian government, but what they were after was not taking out the exchange, they were after actually trying to steal the technology of the
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exchange. the interesting thing about the timing of the hack is it happens at the same time moscow is pushing this big movement to make the moscow -- basically the city of moscow a financial center, like london and new york. they haven't had much luck doing it but at the very same time they merged two stock exchanges and are going to turn it into a much bigger platform. one of the theories is they are there to take nasdaq's technology so they could replicate it or learn from it. but it takes the u.s. government a long time to get to that point and they're not even sure whether it was that or whether it might have been something else, including criminals. >> so, michael, what is the potential of this kind of malware. nasdaq didn't crash, our economy was okay, but what could happen with something like this going forward? >> that's the thing. we only have a few public examples of something like an attack tool. stuxnet obviously is one. the iranians attacked aramco and
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erased two-thirds of their computer network. i think what is increasingly worried, you saw general alexander, former head of nsa, he's now spending a lot of time on wall street talking about things like wiper viruses where they go into a system and basically wipe out entire networks. if you can do that, the possibility to destabilize the market is really, really high. i think that's why the nasdaq incident scared so many people was because at least initially they thought that might be what was going on. >> it's pretty scary, worth a read to get the full story of what we know, what we don't know and what could happen with something like this. it's in the latest issue of "bloomberg business week." coming up, your biggest tech questions answered. we're joined by someone whose family name suggests she knows a lot about the digital world. more "morning joe" next. because there's nothing more exhilarating than a powerful ride. and you can get that in places you might not expect.
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la quinta! if energy could come from anything?. or if power could go anywhere?
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or if light could seek out the dark? what would happen if that happens? anything. oh, look at that. >> hi, thomas. >> we got a little gridlock going on, on a manhattan thursday morning. welcome back, everybody. we're very excited because with us is former facebook executive, randy zuckerberg. >> hi, randi. >> she is going to be hosting a
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new show on sirius xm's channel 111. also with us, we're just as excited because we have cnbc's brian sullivan pushing it there at the table. >> well, that's pushing it. >> even i admit that's a stretch. >> i tried to sell it. >> talk about your show, we're very excited. >> you guys were such a supporter of my book that came out in the fall, and it's just been so fun to watch that community grow. it seems people are very interested in learning about tech and kind of a fun, approachable, every person way so that's what i'm going to be doing on my talk radio show. >> are you going to give top tips -- >> top tips on parenting in the digital age. >> let's do that. >> can we do that right now? how do we parent in the -- yeah, yeah. >> the first thing is to make sure you're setting a good example. you don't know how many parents i see that are lecturing their kids don't text, don't do this and then they're turning around and sending e-mails. >> you see this all the time. if you're hanging out with mika,
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it's just like, hey, gram, mika is always on the phone, isn't she? >> graham? >> you know, graham, totally. >> graham, you're going to believe a guy in pink pants? >> those are not pink pants, they're nantucket red. that's a big difference. number one, set the good example. what's number two? >> that's exactly right. also make sure that you're taking time as a family that's completely unplugged time. it's getting harder and harder. and also i think there's -- you want to encourage a love of tech but at the same time you want to balance that with not having your children be very tech. >> you walk into a restaurant, barnicle and i have talked about this, you walk in and a family of four, and they're all sitting around the table drooling. >> i've seen that. >> at restaurants. it's like, come on, talk to each other. >> it's the wave of the future to see kids with the ipads, the parents with their phones. so what would you say about a detox? if you're going to -- mika tried this at christmas time, tried to
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detox, right? >> i got sick. i seriously almost had a nervous breakdown. >> there are baby steps that people can take to introduce tech withdrawal symptoms and appease them, right? >> i say to try to carve out at least an hour or two every day. go for a run, meditate, do yoga, do something that you -- go swimming. >> i do that. >> because unless you're that person with the phone in the ziploc bag. >> mika's phone is always with us. always with her, as graham was just saying. >> there was a study that came out by some of my professors at my alma mater, virginia tech, which showed that the presence of a phone on the table actually does reduce the value of a conversation by eliminating empathy from the people that are involved. they actually sort of proved this using brain scans and whatever it was, people are like uh-huh, but they don't really care. the other thing i love about you, thank you, i've got to give you this. >> fist bump. >> she is leading the push for
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the end of anonymity on the internet and it's getting worse. google did something the other day which is not cool. >> what happened? >> on youtube it used to be you had to put your full name when you left a comment. now you can leave an anonymous comment. >> that's awful. >> we've all seen how that plays out online. also there's an app called secret that just raised about $25 million where anyone can go on, anonymously post, oh, there's an anchor on "morning joe" that does this and no repercussio repercussions. >> it's unbelievable. >> what do you think about the whole right to be forgotten. you know, there's this -- in europe and there was a ruling about people who have the right to be forgotten when all this untrue stuff comes up on google, and there's also the search, the actual search. >> and this really goes to managing your reputation online. you have people who have stellar reputations. i remember there was a great man, a great journalist, a great everything and yet something chased him around for years that he was responsible for the death
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of bobby kennedy. it was the greatest slander. and he finally -- he had the power to fight back but so many people don't. how do you -- >> you're right. >> you can have a great reputation all across your life and then on the internet it can be a sewer because of some horrible human beings. >> you have an excellent point. in our real lives we have control over our reputation, our identity. online it's not just what you post, it's what everyone else posts and says about you. unfortunately, i mean -- >> and like you said anonymously. >> it's very dot complicated because we live in this world where kind of anyone with access to a laptop or a phone can have an opinion on you that now lives on forever. >> so what do you do? >> well, i think there's several things that you can do. >> it's not just the opinion, it's the facts, the lies, that is so maddening, and yet google and other searching ins allo ie that to happen. >> the first thing i suggest to people is at least have a profile on all the top social
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media sites even if you never update because they index very high on google. just having a linkedin, a twitter, a facebook, means when someone puts your name into google, those all show up first, not the lies that people tell. >> i should get on facebook. do you know anything about facebook? >> i've heard it's just some little company. >> he dropped out of harvard? who does that? >> i have to ask, do you have advice for parents on social media, and you say don't necessarily post pictures of your kids like online. >> why not? >> on facebook accounts and stuff. what? i thought it was cute. look how cute my kids are. >> on one hand i think it's nice to post the occasional family photo. you're connected to people online, your relatives want to see it. on the other hand, you're creating a digital footprint for your children before they even have a say. none of us -- we didn't grow up in that age where we got online at age 13 and there were a
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million photos of us already online. now parents are creating a digital identity for children before they even can do anything about it. >> can i ask one more quick question as a parent. if you give your kids phones and they talk to their friends and everything, whose phone is that? >> it is your phone. >> thank you. thank you. >> it needs to come with rules. >> that's right. any time you want to take it away and look in it, is that what you can do as a parent? >> absolutely. >> thank you. >> as long as you set those boundaries ahead of time. although i do think a healthy relationship with tech is based on some level of mutual trust. just like you give a child a bicycle, you trust them that they're going to use it. >> you sound like you have an ax to grind. >> get more advice on how to navigate our wired lives in the afternoon mojo section of our website, afternoonmojo.msnbc.com. thank you so much. >> good to see you again. >> you're like -- i can't believe how many things you do.
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she's on stage, writing books, on the radio. it's complicated. we'll be checking out dot complicated on sirius xm's business radio channel. randi zuckerberg, thank you very much. brian, thank you. coming up next, a story way too familiar to millions of women in america who struggle to balance career and family. look who's here? >> andie macdowell is standing by with a look at her new show. also something that we see celebrities do often now that andie was the very first to do 30 years ago. we'll tell you about that when we come back. if energy could come from anything?. or if power could go anywhere?
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our paths couldn't be more
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different. >> this isn't about judgment, this is about trust. >> you don't trust me? >> i didn't say that. as this conversation goes on, i'm starting to wonder what else you might be hiding from me. >> i'm not hiding anything. >> a lie by omission is still a lie, and in some cases it's worse than a lie. not telling me about jerry is a lie and not wanting to talk about it is a big red flag. >> this is getting out of hand. >> no, jack. this is a relationship. >> there you go. >> why does that make me so uncomfortable? it makes me uncomfortable. >> because it's a relationship, joe. >> i've been there. >> from the hallmark channel -- >> take a breath. >> that wasn't me. >> it's going to be okay. >> i just heard that speech a couple of times. okay, we're good. >> this is a relationship, joe. here with us now, the star of the show, andie macdowell. it is so fun to have you on the set. >> thank you so much. >> i had dinner with someone you might know last night. we were talking about you and how amazing you are. >> that's nice.
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>> karen fondue. >> oh, i love her, she's fantastic. >> do you want to explain who she is? >> l'oréal, big l'oreal executive. way up there. >> and she had the most amazing things to say about you. >> oh, that's nice. >> so happy to have you working for them for such an extended period of time. >> yeah, yeah. >> and relationships come and go in most industries. >> i was thinking about that, how long it's been yesterday. but i can keep count of how long -- when i've done things by my children. >> oh, good, good. >> i would just -- i just had become pregnant and i was in discussions with them about the contract and i had to tell them i was pregnant. so i know exactly when i got -- that was the big one. >> how old is your child? >> he's 27. >> that's amazing. >> it was actually -- i was 27 when i got the contract, when i was signing the contract, so i was 28 when i had him and i'm 56 now. so that's how i can tell because next year i'll have a 7 so that should be like 30 years.
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>> all those years with l'oréal. did you think when you were signing -- >> '85. it would have been 1985 because he was born in '86. >> did you think when you were signing with l'oréal that you would be almost three decades later still with -- >> no. >> oh, my god. >> actually when i first started modeling, i spent no money because everybody said it won't last, to save your money, and that it would not last. but thank goodness i saved my money anyway. >> good for you. >> that's a good habit. >> listen, this looks great, this cedar cove. it makes me uncomfortable. >> small town. >> of course you can do a zillion movies and you've always be identified with "groundhog's day," greatest movie ever. but tell us about it. >> i'm having a great time. this is hallmark's first scripted series. debbie has been very successful on the hallmark channel. people love her work and resonate with it and we're having a great time.
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we were very fortunate last year, we did really well. we were number one in their time slot, which is great. and so -- especially for their first -- you know, their first series, scripted series. and we have a new show runner this year. we learned a lot last year. i'm working with a great group of actors, it's a great ensemble. some new, young characters coming on. they wanted me to talk about that. we have in new, young characters coming on. >> are you going to make them uncomfortable like you make me? >> you play a judge in a small town. >> correct. >> and how do you think viewers are going to -- how is your character going to develop for the viewers over the second season? >> you know, one thing i love about the character i play is that she's the moral compass of the town. being a woman i think i congratulate hallmark for having such a strong character played by a woman. but also, you know, it's a romance so everybody loved the romance between me and jack. >> we saw the bench, the park
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bench sglecene. >> our relationship is going to be challenged. it's like any relationship in the beginning is easy. falling in love is an easy thing to do, but to have a relationship is complex. so you're going to see a little bit of that this year. >> hear that? >> say it again. >> it is true, falling in love is very easy. >> you mentioned your age just a few minutes ago. are things changing for women in the tv and film industry, for women who, like everybody else, grow older? >> we are changing. we're changing. i would love to have equal rights, i'd love to have equal pay. i would love to have the concept of equality to become a greater concept. i had a meeting one time a long time ago in hollywood for a really well written piece of material and the director actually told me in the meeting that they were going to hire the
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male first because people go to movies to see men. and it is a concept and it does exist and it blew my mind. i told him right there, i said, look, i don't think that i'm the right person for that. i think renee -- how do you say her name? >> zellweger. >> i think she's the right person for this. obviously i didn't get this job. she's the right person for this. it made me angry because it was wrong, it is wrong, and that concept still exists. it does exist on some level. i think it's wrong. people will watch material because material is good and it doesn't matter if the men -- if there's a male lead or female lead. >> listen, it's changing, look at "orange is the new black." >> and look at hallmark. >> look at you. >> hallmark loves having strong women and i congratulate them. >> i think we should call karen and you should do another ten years with l'oréal. >> we're not going to let you negotiate a deal because you'll say somebody else should be
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there. >> i might. >> you know what, she's worth it. >> thank you. >> the season premiere of "cedar cove" will air on the hallmark channel this saturday at 8:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m. central. andie macdowell, thank you so much. so great to have you on. >> i really appreciate it. thank you so much. >> we'll be right back. completely unbelievabowl... totally delectabowl. real silky smooth or creamy broths. everything she's been waiting for. carefully crafted with real seafood, real veggies, and never any by-products or fillers. wow! being a cat just got more enjoyabowl. fancy feast broths. wow served daily. over 20 million kids everyday in oulack access to healthy food. for the first time american kids are slated to live a shorter life span than their parents. it's a problem that we can turn around and change. revolution foods is a company we started
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welcome back. it's time to talk about what we learned today. gene, what did you learn? >> i learned that chris christie thinks it's obnoxious to ask him whether he's running for president. >> like obvious questions.
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>> no, he was kidding. >> i don't know. >> brian. >> plug our own network. the interview you referenced was on cnbc, so great job to our entire staff. >> yeah, john harwood, excellent. thomas. >> i learned that you get what you pay for, and if you're going to book hillary clinton, you're booking the one and only hillary rodham clinton and it's going to cost you a pretty penny. >> $275,000, that's almost as much as you get paid for a speech. >> you're so funny. >> what did you learn? >> first of all, it's nice to have you back. more "morning joe" in the studio tomorrow. oh, my gosh, special appearance by morning joe and gene both on set. >> so you'll be back too. >> and i also learned you will trust a guy in pink pants before you trust me. >> once again, nantucket red, not pink, big difference. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around, because right now we've got chuck todd and "the daily rundown" straight ahead. [ male announcer ] we know they're out there.
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