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tv   BBC World News Today  PBS  November 19, 2021 5:00pm-5:31pm PST

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♪ ♪ narrator: funding for this presentation of this program is provided by... narrator: pediatric surgeon. volunteer. topiary artist. a raymond james financial advisor tailors advice to help you live your life. life well planned. woman: the rules of business are being reinvented with a more flexible workforce. by embracing innovation, by looking not only at current opportunities, but ahead to future ones. man: people who know, know bdo.
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narrator: funding was also provided by, the freeman foundation. by judy and peter blum kovler foundation; pursuing solutions for america's neglected needs. and by contributions to this pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. announcer: and now, "bbc world news". >> this is bbc news. here are the headlines. u.s. teenager who shot dead two people and injured another during racial justice protests last year has been found not guilty of murder in a trial that polarized america. belarus' authoritarian leader speaks exclusively to the bbc. he admits his forces may have helped migrants cross into the european union and that he will not stop people from reaching the border. >> i told the e.u. i am not going to detain migrants on the
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border and hold them at the border. if they keep coming, i still will not stop them. >> we will be getting reaction to the interview from the belarusian opposition leader. also on the program, as coronavirus infections surge across europe, austria is making covid vaccinations compulsory and is reintroducing a full national lockdown. kamala harris had become the first woman ever to serve as acting president of the ited states, taking over briefly while joe biden had a medical procedure. ♪ >> hello and thanks for joining us. if you are watching on pbs in the u.s. or around the world. the u.s. teenager shot dead two people and injured another during racial justice protests
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in wisconsin last year has been found not guilty of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued he was repeatedly attacked and acted in self-defense. mr. rittenhouse, prosecutors said the teenager behav like an armed vigilante who provoked several violent encounters. this was the moment the jury read the verdict. >> we the jury finds that defendant, kyle rittenhouse, not guilty. as to the second count, richard mcginnis, we the jury filed kyle rittenhouse not guilty. as to the third count, unknown male, we find the defendant not guilty. as to the fourth count of the information, we the jury filed the defendant not guilty. as to the fist count of the information -- the fifth count, we find the defendant not
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guilty. >> members of the jury, these are unanimous verdicts? does anyone not agree with the verdicts just read? ok, folks, your job is done. >> kyle rittenhouse's defense attorney spoke to the media after the verdict. have a listen. >> to say that we were relieved would be a grossness understatement. kyle is not here. he is on his way home. he wants to get on with his life. he has a huge sense of relief for what the jury did to him today. he wishes none of this wld have ever happened. but as he said when he testified, he did not start this
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. and we are thankful in more ways than one that the jury finally got to hear the true story. and when i say the media, i a talking about social media and things like that, the story that came out from the beginning was not the true story. and that was something we had to work to overcome in court. and we think we did that. >> that is mr.ittenhouse's defense attorney, mark richards. they spoke to my colleague earlier from kenosha. >> this case had been going on for a year because it was last year when this happened, when kyle rittenhouse entered kenosha with a rifle and shot dead two people and injured a third. when the verdict was read out, and has taken more than 26 hours of billable ration, kyle
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rittenhouse did break down in tears. -- deliberation, kyle rittenhouse did break down in tears. when the verdict came out, there were lots of people shouting "free kyle." you have gun groups saying it is a great day for the second amendment. this is why this case is seen as something more than just a local case. it is seen as a referendum almost on the polarizing issue of gun ownership in america. for conservative groups, he is now seen as a hero, as someone who was merely standing up against lawlessness and that he acted in self-defense. for liberal groups, he is the face of a gun culture out of control. they say he is a vigilante that came into a city he had no business being in. being cleared of charges, doesn't mean protesters can earn
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up to any protest with the gun and claim self-defense when things go wrong and t face any consequences? because of the rule of double jeopardy, he cannot be tried again for this case. he has been cleared of all charges and will wal free. >> remind us the events of that night. >> so, the events of last year were to do with a man called jacob blake, local black men shot by white police officers seven times in the back. that sparked racial injustice protests. some turned violent. it was on the third night at kyle rittenhouse entered the city with a rifle. he said he wanted to protect businesses. he wanted to provide security. and that the series of confrontations that happened in which he shot dead joseph rosenbaum and anthony huber and injured a third man were merely self-defense.
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that has been his argument throughout. that is what the jury backed him on. they rejected the state's case that kyle rittenhouse was an armed vigilante who inserted himself into a volatile protest where he had no business being. the jury has delivered their verdict. in kenosha, things are calm at the moment. the national guard is on standby in case there is any violence. police are also out here. we have seen a few cars go past as well. kenosha does not want to see a repeat of what happened last year. >> we will be talking later in the program to a lawyer who has been closely following that story. that is coming up in a short while. belarus's longtime authoritarian leader has told the bbc it is possible his border guards might be helping migrants reach poland. thousands migrants,ainly from the middle east, have been trying to cross into the european union at the frontier between poland and pelvis --
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belarus a in recent weeks. in an exclusive sit-down interview with our russian correspondent, he said he has no intention of stopping people from reaching the e.u. >> our guys are helping the polish territory. it is perfectly possible. i think that is absolutely possible. maybe someone helped them. i will not even look into it. >> he told the e.u. that belarus had been stopping migrants. but now, they must catch them themselves trade migrants told us they took that to mean belarus is open to them. >> i told the e.u. i am not going to detain migrants on the border, hold them at the border. and if they keep coming, i still will not stop them because they are not coming to my country. they are going to yours. the west stock talking to us and working with us. if you don't want to, fine.
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we will sort the problem out ourselves the best we can. >> we saw protesters being beaten. we saw young people coming out of detention centers with injuries on their bodies. >> i admit it. >> you admit it? >> they were beaten but there were police beaten up, too, and you did not show this. >> since july, 270 n.g.o.'s have been shut down and belarus. >> i will answer your question. you are upset we have destroyed all of your structures, your n.g.o.'s, and all those you have been paying for. >> alexander lukashenko in the exclusive interview with the bbc. in a sign of how serious central europe's covid surge has become, austria is to make it a legal
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requirement to get vaccinated from february. it is also becoming the first european union country to impose a nationwide lockdown. the austrian chancellor told a news conference the lockdown would begin on monday and last a maximum of 20 days. he said it hurt enormously to have to reimpose restrictions but it was necessary because too many people had chosen not to get vaccinated. >> our goal was to vaccinate the unvaccinated rather than lock down the vaccinated. despite campaigns and discussions in the media, we have not managed to persuade enough people to get vaccinated. the measures we have introduced the past few weeks have helped to increase the numbers of the vaccinated but not by enough. for a long time, it was the political consensus we did not want a vcine mandate. but now, we have to look at the reality. >> the professor of nstitutional and administrative law at the
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university of vienna, we asked him earlier if making vaccination a legal requirement is constitutional. >> i assume it is constitutional. we had it before in austria. we had military vaccination against smallpox until the 1970's. we should not rget there are military vaccination schemes and other european union states which have already been confirmed by the european court of human rights in strasburg. for example, they decided on military children's vaccinations in the czech republic and said this is within the domain of the national legislature to enact such legislation. i think given the danger of covid-19 not only for the public health system but the economy, it seems very much that such a measure could be regarded as proportionate. it is one of the longest migrant trails in the world spanning
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almost the length of latin america. tens of thousands are risking their lives to escape because pretty -- to escape poverty and violence in venezue by making the arduous journey south to chile. mundo have been following a group of venezuelans as they make their way through the desert, and we have this report. >> it is the oldest and driest weather in the world. now it has become the last leg on one of the longest migrant journeys in the world. these venezuelan migrants traveled 5000 kilometers to make it to chile. crossing this desert, they face extreme altitude and temperatures. [speaking foreign language]
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>> it is what she has left behind at home that makes the journemore painful. >> [speaking foreign language] >> but to make it to chile can be the start of a new problem. there is growing anger aimed at the thousands of been is whelan's who enter the country -- venezuelans w enter the country. as migrants reach the border, there is heavy suspicion of new arrivals with reports of robbery and tacks by venezuelans. >> [speaking foreign language]
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>> venezuelans next stop to the capital is in northern chile, a location of protest undocumented migrants. tensions are high here. one of those illegal migrants had just graduated when she left venezuela, but it was not possible to make ends meet. >> [speaking foreign language] >> the crisis in venezuela has left millions desperately looking for a lifeline. but even when they make it to a safer place, the chance of a new life can still be elusive.
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bbc news. >> stay with us on bbc news. still to come, kamala harris becomes the first woman ever to serve as acting president of the united states after taking over briefly while joe biden had a medical procedure. ♪ >> he has claimed victory in pakistan's general election. heshe has asked pakistan's president to name her as prime minister. >> he turn himself into police in santa barbara. >> it was the biggest demonstration of the growing european antinuclear movement. >> the south african government has announced it is opening the country's remaining whites only
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beaches to people of all races. >> this will lead to a black majority government in this country and the destruction of the white civilization. >> part of the centuries-old windsor castle, one of the queen's residences, has been consumed by fire much of the day. 150 firemen have been battling the blazwhich has caused millions of pounds worth of damage. ♪ >> this is bbc news. the latest headlines. the u.s. teenager who shot dead two people and injured another during racial justice protests last year has been found not guilty of murder in a trial that polarized america. belarus' authoritarian leader has spoken exclusively to the bbc. he admits his forces may have helped migrants cross into the european union and he will not stop people from reaching the
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border. qatar has drawn frequent criticism over the conditions faced by foreign workers as it prepares to host next year's football world cup. a new report from the international labor organization says the ahorities are not adequately investigating and reporting the deaths of workers, and in particular migrants, in the construction industry. they say in 2020, official figures showed 50 workers died and more than 500 were badly injured. the true figures could be worse. i am joined by the director of fair square projects, a group focusing on labor rights in the gulf. thank you for joining us. first of all, your reaction to what is coming out in this report? >> thanks. i think it is very interesting. a very useful report. i think the key recommendations are crucial. we need more data. we need investigations into
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migrant worker deaths. those recommendations have been made forcefully in the past by human rights watch in 2017 and amnesty international earlier this year. that is key because we need to prevent future deaths. we need to stop more young men and women dying needlessly as they are in qatar. we also need to look back and be able to compensate the families who have lost everything. the figure of 50 workers were only deaths that were classified as work-related. it is impossible to tell if other issues like heat and humidity may have resulted in those deaths. that figure could be significantly higher. >> tell us more about that and why it is important to be able to link these deaths to work. as you are saying, you need more data. why do you need to be able to make that link? >> if you look at the data from
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qatar, we have about 15,000, 9000 are asian dths. 90% are men. we have no idea precisely how that figure breaks down. we have no idea because there are no investigations done into migrant worker deaths. we have no idea the extent to which negligence may be at fault. we have no idea wheer employermight be responsible r overworking the workers or if it is state negligence. is it weak laws and the lack of implementation causing these deaths? because you don't have an answer as to whether a death is work-related, the families at home are not going to get any compensation for the deaths. these are people from the poorest countries in the world. and this is critical. they do not get any answers as to how their loved one died. absolutely no closure. the body comes home in a coffin
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with a death certificate that may say natural causes. it is a problematic situation that does t just exist in qatar. it exists elsewhere in the gulf. this report and the recommendations are crucial to fixing the problem. >> many knowledge gaps worth investigating. we have got the 2022 world cup coming up in qatar. how do you see that situation evolving for the migrants? many of them are in construction. does that have any impact on the situation? >> i think it is going to increase the call for compensation there are two things we need to do. we need to put in place mechanisms to prevent future abuses and loss of life and injuries. we also need to look back all the people who have lost their lives. we need to look at people who have lost their livelihoods. we need to look at people who have had their wages stolen.
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we need to redress for that. that is crucial part of the conversation that has to take place now before the start of the tournament. hopefully, thiwill give the information and ammunition for influential groups and individuals who want to make a difference in qatar to call for it very persuasively. >> an important issue to be aware of. thank you very much for joining us. let's go back to our top story. kyle rittenhouse, the american teenager who shot and killed two men and wounded another during protests last year in wisconsin, has beencquitted on all charges. lisa bloom is the trial attorney following the case. thanks very much for joining us. was this a surprise, this verdict? >> this was not a surprise because in this case there was video that recorded almost every moment of the incident.
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the jury heard all of the testimony, b they also looked carefully at the video. and they determined that in each of the three incidents when kyle rittenhouse shot people with his ar-15 automatic weapon that he did it in self-defense. it seems shocking that this young man crossed state lines with this weapon and went into the incident of civil unrest and killed two people and walks free, but the jury dermined he acted in self-defense. >> talk to us about how the verdict came about. many people might haveeen the footage you mentioned but probably not many people followed the whole trial. what are the things the jury would have deliberated about? >> the trial took two weeks. the jury deliberated for three and a half days. they had five counts to decide whether he was guilty or not. they had to decide whether in each incident he shot in self-defense. the defense was that he was being threatened with rocks. he was being chased.
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one of the men who was shot swung a skateboard at him like a bat. another one pulled out a weapon. the jury had to look moment by moment just before each of the shootings to determine whether he was reasonably in fear for his life at the time he shot. kyle rittenhouse testified through tears that he was in fear in each of the moments, in the jury agreed that he was in fear and killed and soft offense. >> this case was controversial. it did divide america. is the verdict likely to do the same? >> we are very divided on the issue. many of us think he should never have been there in the first place. there was no reason for him to cross state lines to procure this ar-15, to inserhimself into urban unrest. the question is, who was inciting violence? there were people who said he was the one inciting violence by walking around with a gun, by appearing to be in active shooter.
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people were trying to defend themselves from him. the larger question is whether americans should have the right to walk around with guns in general and especially large automatic weapons that are often used in active shooter situations. that controversy continues to rage. >> it certainly does. lisa bloom, thank you for joining us with your thoughts today. >> thank you. >> staying in the u.s., kamala harris has become the first woman in american history to become acting president of the united states. she took over briefly as head of ste and commander-in-chief while president biden had a medical procedure under anesthetic. jen psaki said ms. harris was in the white house during mr. biden's colonoscopy which was carried out as part of an annual physical checkup. in the last few minutes, president biden departed walter reed medical center and has
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resumed his presidential duties. our senior north american reporter has the latest. >> a little bit of history. last november, kamala harris became the first woman vice president in u.s. history. it was only a matter of time before she became the first acting u.s. president. joe biden is not the first president to have handed off powers like this. george w. bush did it in the early 2000's. ronald reagan did it. george h.w. bush did it. with biden undergoing a routine physical and the fact that colonoscops are routine for someone of his age, it is not surprising he invoked the 20 for the amendment to the constitution which governs incapacitated presidents that temporarily hand over presidential powers to kamala harris. >> let's bring you some lovely pictures to end on now from the longest partial lunar eclipse.
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it could be seen from japan or the united states. nasa says the partial eclipse lasted for three hours, 28 minutes, and 26 seconds, with the longest since 1440. thank you for joining us. stay with us on bbc news. narrator: funding for this presentation of this program is provided by... narrator: financial services firm, raymond james. man: bdo. accountants and advisors. narrator: funding was also provided by, the freeman foundation. by judy and peter blum kovler foundation; pursuing solutions for america's neglected needs. and by contributions to this pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ ♪
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narrator: you're watching pbs.
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♪ ♪ narrator: funding for this presentation of this program is provided by... narrator: : pediatric surgeon. volunteer. topiary artist. a raymond james financial advisor tailors advice to help you live your life. life well planned. woman: the rules of business are being reinvented with a more flexible workforce. by embracing innovation, by looking not only at current opportunities, but ahead to future ones. man: people who know, know bdo.

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