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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 13, 2022 3:12am-4:00am PST

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>> well, it's got great legal grounds for three reasons: gross negligence, notice of the danger, and breach of duty of care. >> reporter: tonight, ethan crumbley remains here at the oakland county jail. now, an attorney for the district tells cbs news, some of the claims in the lawsuit are false, adding, school officials are cooperating with prosecutors. norah. >> o'donnell: elise preston, thank you. there's breaking news out of the congressional investigation into the january 6 assault on the they want to talk to the top republican in the house, kevin mccarthy. in a letter asking for his cooperation, the committee mentions our interview with the california congressman as the riot was unfolding, where he revealed he had spoken directly with the president. have you spoken with the president and asked him to perhaps come to the capitol and tell the supporters it's time to leave? >> i have spoken to the president. i asked him to talk to the nation, to tell them to stop this.
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this is not who we are. >> o'donnell: the committee wants to question mccarthy about what he spoke about with president trump, hoping to get insight into the former president's state of mind. well, tonight, still no diplomatic breakthrough as the u.s. and its nato allies try to convince vladimir putin to withdraw his troops from the border with ukraine. but the russian leader is demanding a halt to u.s. military deployments in nato countries, like romania, where there are currently about 1,000 americans. cbs' david martin has more on the tense negotiations. >> reporter: u.s. intelligence is tracking still more troops and equipment en route to the border area with ukraine, even as a russian delegation met today with american and allied officials at nato headquarters in brussels. after four hours of talks, chief u.s. negotiator wendy sherman said russian military movements make it all the harder to defuse the crisis. >> is this about invasion? is this about intimidation?
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is this about trying to be subversive? i don't know. but it is not conducive to getting to diplomatic solutions. >> reporter: russia's putin is trying to roll back the nato alliance, which has expanded dramatically in the last two decades. he is demanding ukraine never be allowed to join, and that military deployments be halted in countries like romania. just last month, american f-15s were operating out of one airfield in romania, while u.s. helicopters flew into another-- some of the many deployments ordered since putin annexed crimea. >> it all started with what putin did in 2014. >> reporter: former nato ambassador douglas lute says the deployments are strictly for defense. there are currently 1,000 u.s. military personnel in romania. >> you would need 10, 20, 50 times the numbers of troops that nato has positioned now to pose any sort of serious offensive threat to russia.
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and putin knows this. >> reporter: u.s. officials say they are willing to limit nato exercises, as long as the same limits apply to russia. but for now, the russian but for now the russian military buildup continues for a possible invasion that could begin as soon as the ground freezes to give their tanks better traction. norah. >> o'donnell: david martin at the pentagon, thanks. tonight, calls for justice are growing louder in fayetteville, north carolina, where an off- duty sheriff's deputy shot and killed a black man over the weekend. the deputy is on administrative leave and has not been charged. here is cbs' jericka duncan. >> reporter: this cell phone video captures the moments after off-duty sheriff's deputy jeffery hash shot and killed jason walker in a traffic altercation. hash, a 16-year police veteran can be seen calling 911. >> we have a male jump on my
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vehicle and break my windshield. i just shot him. >> sir, you just said you shot him? >> yes! he jumped on my car. >> reporter: walker, a single father of a 14-year-old, died just 100 yards from his parents' home. he was 37 years old. marlowe walker is his older brother. when you hear that police believe your brother may have jumped on top of this truck and somehow smashed the window, do you think that's what happened? >> there's no way he's able to jump on top of a vehicle, because nobody drives the speed limit in front of my parents' house. there's no way pe matter. >> there may have been an argument that escalated. >> reporter: attorney benjamin crump represents the walker family. >> we believe if a black man shot and killed an unarmed white man, he would be arrested. >> reporter: protesters have called for charges against hash, but fayetteville police chief gina hawkins says the investigation is still in the fact-finding phase, and promises
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transparency. >> individuals are not arrested immediately. so right now, evidence is being collected by the state bureau of investigation. >> reporter: the f.b.i. is monitoring the case. itchy? scratchy? family not getting clean? get charmin ultra strong. it just cleans better, so your family can use less. hello clean bottom! enjoy the go with charmin. don't settle for products that give you a sort-of white smile. try crest whitening emulsions... ...for 100% whiter teeth. its highly active peroxide droplets... ...swipe on in seconds. better. faster. 100% whiter teeth. shop crestwhitesmile.com. do you have a life insurance policy you no longer need? now ca - e a term pshnt. ugply foourti. bud ve $100,00or mor life mlifyo se y. doca finding out what it's worth.
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hello, how can i? sore throat pain? ♪honey lemon♪ try vicks vapocool drops in honey lemon chill for fast acting sore throat relief ♪ahhh!♪ wooo! vaporize sore throat pain with >> now to this. nearly 1 million americans have died from drug overdoses in
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the last two decades, and more than 70% of them involved opioids. now, an experimental treatment is in the works that could help fight america's opioid epidemic. cbs' dr. jon lapook takes a look. >> reporter: tackling the opioid crisis requires changing strategies and the way we think about addiction, says columbia professor sandra comer. >> one of the mistakes that people make when they think about drug users? "oh, it's somebody's choice to have this disorder." it-- that's not true. >> reporter: it's a medical disease. >> it's a medical disease. and we need to treat it. >> reporter: 100,000 people died from drug overdose over the 12 months ending in may 2021. up 22% from the year before. medically assisted treatments can be effective, but have a relapse rate of about 50%. >> that's why we're continuing to look for new medications. >> reporter: that search led to a new type of treatment-- a vaccine that targets the chemical makeup of oxycodone. comer and her research colleague marco pravetoni are testing the vaccine on volunteers with substance use disorder. >> the idea behind the vaccine
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is after a while, the body will produce an antibody to that particular chemical structure. if somebody uses oxycodone, the antibody will bind to that molecule, and it won't allow it to get into the brain. >> reporter: so the drug would never get to the brain to stimulate the pleasure center. >> that's exactly the way it works. >> reporter: comer says the vaccine provides a safety net for people who relapse despite currently available therapies. >> if they relapse, the vaccine, hopefully, will provide still some level of protection, at least against overdose, and maybe an opportunity for us to reengage them in treatment. >> reporter: comer says the vaccine could be used with current medications that treat drug abuse. and, norah, if it works, researchers hope to target other opioids, including fentanyl and heroin, perhaps in a single vaccine. >> o'donnell: that would be quite a breakthrough. dr. lapook, thank you.
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there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." dramatic new images of that miraculous medevac chopper crash near philadelphia. and the bizarre rampage that grounded an american airlines flight. and, honoring a civil rights icon, with her own barbie doll. with depression, you just feel...blah. not okay. all...the...symptoms. need to deal with this. so your doctor tells you about trintellix, a prescription medicine for adults with depression. okay, feeling relief from overall symptoms. hmm. and teado pact cnical trials. so there's that. trintellix may increase suicidal thoughts and actions in people 24 and younger. call a doctor right away if you have these, or new or worsening depression, or new or sudden changes in mood, behavior, thoughts, or feelings. do not take with maois. tell your doctor about all medicines you take to avoid a life-threatening condition. increased risk of bleeding may occur, especially if taken with aspirin, nsaid pain relievers, or blood thinners. manic episodes, eye problems, low sodium levels, and sexual problems can occur.
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suddenly stopping trintellix may cause serious side effects. common side effects include nausea, constipation, and vomiting. some reports of weight gain have been received since product approval. looking up. time for a change? ask your doctor about trintellix. better skin from your body wash? time for a change? try olay body wash with skincare super ingredient collagen! olay body wash hydrates to improve skin 3x better, from dry and dull to firm and radiant. with olay body, i feel fearless in my skin. ordinary tissues burn when theo blows. so puffs plus lotion rescued his nose. with up to 50% more lotion, puffs bring soothing relief. >> o'donnell: tonight, a chilling new view of that medevac chopper crash outside a church near philadelphia. a home security camera captured the moment of impact. all four people aboard survived,
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including a two-month-old baby. newly-obtained photos show a chopper crew member pulling the infant from the wreckage, and bystanders helping to get him, or her to safety. we learned today the pilot, being called a hero, was seriously injured. the cause of the crash is under investigation. well, a bizarre assault on the cockpit of an american airlines jet landed an unruly passenger in police custody. passengers were boarding a flight from honduras to miami when a man stormed the cockpit, damaged the controls, and then tried to jump out of the window before he was arrested. the passengers and crew had to switch planes. the delay was around seven hours. well, the airline is pursuing possible criminal charges. civil rights icon ida b. wells is being honored with her own signature barbie doll. it's part of mattel's "inspiring women" series. the doll comes with a miniature replica of the "memphis free speech," that's the newspaper where wells was an editor. born into slavery, wells went on to become a trailblazing educator, journalist, anti-
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lynching activist, and co-founder of the n.a.a.c.p. all right, coming up next, we remember the life and music of (dr. david jeremiah) there may have never been another time in history when end times prophecy has been more aligned with the culture and circumstances of the world than it is today. i believe there are ten phenomenon we are witnessing today that were recorded centuries ago in bible prophecy. (male announcer) join dr. david jeremiah in his new series, "where do we go from here?" on the next episode of "turning point." right here on this station.
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>> o'donnell: one of music's biggest stars of the '60s has died. ♪ be my little baby ♪ baby my darling ♪ be my baby now. o'donnell: ronnie spector, the lead singer of the ronettes, sang such classics as "be my baby," "baby i love you," and "walking in the rain." spector's look and soaring voice turned the ronettes into one of the premiere acts of the era, touring england with the rolling stones, and was the only girl group to tour with the beatles. spector died today after a brief battle with cancer. she was 78. and we'll be right back.
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and that is the overnight for this thursday. for some of you the tuesday tonights. follow us online at any time.
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i'm norah o'donnell in our nation's capital. good night. this is cbs news flash. republican kevin mccarthy will not comply with an interview request. he was in contact with former president donald trump before, during and after the deadly attack on the nation's capitol. the theranos founder will be sentenced after being convicted of fraud. she is expected to appeal. and take a look at this. a south florida baby dolphin has a new lease on life. the not so little mammal was caught in a net. it nearly jd on the boat before disappearing in the blue.
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for more news, download the app or visit us on your tv. this is the "cbs overnight news." >> good evening. and thank you for joining us. we are covering a number of big stories. i should let you know, i'm joining you from a remote studio.
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>> reporter: northin cr rly rsnt rising prices emptying their wallets, and the store shelves emptying, too. dennis stevenson is a military veteran and retired, with a fixed income and years of experience bargain hunting. he says he's made new cutbacks to keep the refrigerator full. >> that means cutting corners. it really hurts, like, christmas time, like, for your grand kids. >> reporter: today's report on inflation shows ground beef prices up 13%. double-digit jumps in the price of eggs, crackers, and bread; breakfast cereal up 6%, and the
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milk you pour in it? up by more than 4%. the white house today argued president biden's build back better plan, which is still stalled in congress, would help, but acknowledged the pain isn't going away any time soon. >> if you look at the-- the projections by independent forecasters, then you see moderation over the course of '22. in the short term, in the medium term, i think we'll focus on the practical steps we can take, focus working with congress. >> reporter: amid the omicron wave of the pandemic, the problem isn't just the prices of items on the shelves. it's finding and stocking them. supply chain disruptions have starved stores of staples, from the produce aisle to the paper products. at his grocery store in washington, d.c., roy rodman says it's never been so difficult. >> it could be a very stressful time if we weren't able to navigate or get the products, so we're triumphant in putting things on the shelf. >> reporter: food shipments have also hit a pothole. the nation's truckers tell cbs news they're operating with
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80,000 fewer drivers than needed. even a shortage in packaging items from cardboard box adhesives to ink for product labels could snarl production. could this problem of un-stocked shelves in certain stores last as long as the variant does, the pandemic does? >> yeah, it really does. and we've seen it ebb and flow with past spikes. this one's a little bit more challenging because of the transmissibility of the omicron variant. >> reporter: and it's challenging for shoppers like dennis stevenson. it's disorienting, isn't it? >> yes, it's disorienting, and it's frustrating. >> reporter: a survey by an association of the nation's grocery stores finds 80% of them are having trouble recruiting or retaining workers. and that will cause disruptions in the weeks ahead. norah. >> o'donnell: scott macfarlane, thank you. from the rise in inflation to the rise in covid cases, the biden administration has a new plan tonight to keep students in schools as kids in the nation's
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third-largest school district return to the classroom after a week away. cbs' carter evans has the latest. >> reporter: as the omicron surge swamps the nation, a major announcement from the white house: 10 million free rapid and p.c.r. tests will be sent to schools each month in an effort to keep kids in the classroom. >> the nation's schools can and should be open. >> reporter: in chicago, students are back in class with additional covid testing, g a w after teai >> the fact that they're back in person with their friends, with their teachers-- just such a game changer. >> reporter: in los angeles, every student needs to prove they're covid negative, but 78,000 students and staff tested positive after the winter break. and as the new semester began, 30% of students were absent. >> we're not going to eradicate this, but we ultimately will control it. >> reporter: today, dr. anthony fauci gave a blunt assessment of the new normal.
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>> virtually everybody is going to wind up getting exposed, and likely get infected. >> reporter: a new study shows that compared to delta, the risk of death from omicron is 91% lower, and the risk of i.c.u. admission is 74% less. but hospitals across the country are still overwhelmed. when it comes to people who are getting very sick in the hospital, who are they? >> it's mostly patients who have not been vaccinated. >> reporter: and nurse zenei triiunfo-cortez says it's creating a strain. it's so bad that asymptomatic healthcare workers in california who have tested positive can return to work immediately. >> as a nurse, coming to work knowing that i am covid positive, i have the potential of further infecting my patients, and my fellow coworkers, which is morally wrong. >> reporter: now, at this hospital in burbank, a lot of people are coming to the e.r. for other reasons, and then discovering they're also positive for covid.
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most are able to go home. but because omicron is so highly transmissible, the biden administration is now considering a program to offer all americans what it calls high-quality masks by the end of the month. >> o'donnell: all right, carter evans, thank you. tonight calls for justice are growing louder in fayetteville, north carolina. the deputy is on administrative leave and has not been charged. here's cbs's duncan. >> reporter: this cell phone video captures the moments after off-duty sheriff's deputy jeffery hash shot and killed jason walker in a traffic altercation. hash, a 16-year police veteran can be seen calling 911.
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>> reporter: walker, a single father of a 14-year-old, died just 100 yards from his parents' home. he was 37 years old. marlowe walker is his older brother. when you hear that police believe your brother may have jumped on top of this truck and somehow smashed the window, do you think that's what happened? >> there's no way he's able to jump on top of a vehicle, because nobody drives the speed limit in front of my parents' house. there's no way possible that he was able to do something of that matter. >> there may have been an argument that escalated. >> reporter: attorney benjamin crump represents the walker family. >> we believe if a black man shot and killed an unarmed white man, he would be arrested. >> reporter: protesters have called for charges against hash, but fayetteville police chief gina hawkins says the investigation is still in the fact-finding phase, and promises transparency. >> individuals are not arrested immediately. so right now, evidence is being collected by the state bureau of investigation. >> reporter: the f.b.i. is
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monitoring the case. jericka duncan, cbs news. new vicks convenience pack. dayquil severe for you... and daily vicks super c for me. vicks super c is a daily supplement with vitamin c and b vitamins to help energize and replenish. dayquil severe is a max strength daytime, coughing, power through your day, medicine. new from vicks. facing expensive vitamin c creams with dull results? olay brightens it up with new olay vitamin c.
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this is the cbc overnight news. >> thanks for staying with us. the omicron variant continues to surge both in the u.s. and overseas. the world health organization expects it will infect half the population of europe in the next six to eight weeks. and dr. anthony fauci says it will find just about everybody in the u.s. whether you are vaccinated or not. in china millions of people living in lockdown. many without enough food or access to medical care. then there is the winter
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olympics in beijing that begin in just a few weeks. >> reporter: with a budget of innerly $4 billion, chinese winter olympic venues are show stoppers. president xi toured the facilities. but behind the upbeat photo op is a vast invasive effort to stop covid spoiling the games. public health swat teams are testing 14 million people for the second time in three days after an omicron outbreak in tianjin, which is commuting distance from beijing. one citizen posted a video showing pic peopl a a mark sto stories where officials had to step in and deliver meals to their residents in the second week of complete lockdown who said they had run out of things to week. officials welded shut the door of a man suspected of having been exposed to the virus.
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massive testing is going on with home visits to make sure no one slips through the cracks. and china has launched a huge booster program, offering shots to anyone over three years old. authoritarian china wants a covid free olympics to impress the world. all athletes will be sealed in what's meant to be a virus-free bubble. elizabeth palmer, bangkok. venice's famous canals are flooding the streets for often and more severely. when the tide rolls out, the venice lagoon is giving up secrets of the past dating back to time of the romans. >> reporter: you may think you have seen venice. turns out that's just the tip of the iceberg, a fisherman turned amateur ark yol gist. these 220 square miles are
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gurgling with ruins like this olive mill. so many underwater riches you can trip under them. this island is one of dozens that used to be a medieval monastery. >> wow. this is where the monks would live and they would pray. >> before it sank. but the side is a time machine, he says. when it's low, it takes you back even further to the romans who fled the barbarian invasions. >> i'm just shocked that we can reach down and pick this up, this piece of ancient roman history is right here for anybody to just pick up with their bare hands. if it only ended there. but these islands were once a burial ground for plague victims. so human remains from the plague are just washing up on the shore. climate change is swallowing
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venice, flooding the city more frequently and severely than ever. but it is also laying waste to its lagoon. to capture it, this american artist is in a race against time. >> i love to paint the lagoon because i think it's beautiful. but sometimes when i'm painting out here, i think it comes to me so -- so strong. you're painting before it's gone. you're painting it before it's gone. >> reporter: but it is more than just history that's vanishing. this was once a fisherman's paradise. so how has fishing changed? but today, he says rising temperatures have brought an invasion of jelly fish, clogging his nets meant for soft shell crab. my son wanted to be a fisherman, he says, but i won't allow it.
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there's no future here. an ecosystem, landscape and way of life each in its twilight. indeed, this isn't just a local threat to venice. it is the global threat of climate change. scientists have warned new york, miami and los angeles to pay close attention to this lagoon. d n lp. and move the waste that weighs you downlpcholes metamul psyllium fgels and slows sugar absorption
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one of the most common new year's resolutions is to declutter and get rid of all that unwanted stuff from your closet, your attic or your garage. put them on e-bay or simply dump everything in the trash. don't do that. but a growing number of americans are offering their unwanted stuff to their neighbors for free. it is part of a movement called buy nothing. a firsthand look at how it works. >> reporter: stopping at a neighbor's home to drop off a fondue pot she's never used. the buy nothing face group she helps run. in the last six months wharks have you given? >> clothes, books, shoe.
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a couple pieces of furniture. >> reporter: people post photos of what they're giving away. >> earrings, propane. it runs the gamut. >> reporter: members can ask for something they need. everything is donated. trading, bartering, buying or selling not allowed. these friends started the buy nothing movement in 2013. >> i think we originally were thinking, okay, we can all offer up what we'd like to give in this hyper local gift economy and try to solve this question of do we have too much in our homes? can we share our bounty? >> reporter: they didn't realize then what's apparent now. it is about more than declauterring and economic needs. >> i have to say in the last year and a half i have made so many lasting friendships just from this group. that's the friend of the group in the soul is basically
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learning to know who your neighbors are,elping each other and becoming a true community. >> reporter: jordan has received things like this lamp, these chairs and a table. but perhaps the most important gifts came when her daughter was born in october 2020. jordan had an emergency c-section. she posted a desperate plea in our buy nothing group. formula? baby is not doing well on breast milk. the response overwhelmed here. >> when i got home, my front porch and inside was full of formula. at least 15 people. it really shows that, you know, you are never alone. it's okay to ask for something and, you know, be loved on by people. >> reporter: buy nothing spread to 7,000 communities across 40 countries. more than a million and a half people joined. and the number of people taking part in buy nothing groups now tops five million worldwide.
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>> reporter: are the buy nothing groups on the internet the last kind corners? >> sometimes it feels like that to me and i think because in a buy nothing community you know you are speaking literally to your neighbors. >> reporter: with the record inflation, it came a financial and emotional lifeline. >> it really brings joy to others, but honestly brings more joy to yourself helping others. it is good to receive, too, and build a community. it is really worth doing. >> reporter: the woodlands texas. the pandemic has exposed a problem affecting millions of americans. while food insecurity is on the rise, a huge amount of food is being wasted, either rotting in the fields or being thrown away. there is a program in los angeles trying to break that cycle of waste.
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at this warehouse, they're delivering change. >> there is a crisis of indifference. >> reporter: james and aiden riley like to tackle tough projects. they have been at it since middle school. >> part of the reason our friendship stayed strong is because we liked to do projects together. as we got older, it was something that was fruitful for us. >> reporter: launched during the pandemic, farm link is their most ambitious project yet. >> we're growing enough food to feed every person in this country and every person on the planet. >>s a the student-led movement with the goal of connecting farms across the country to food banks that need it. >> reporter: one of their first farme ers asked for help on tiktok. with restaurant demand down, thousands of pounds of onions piled up. the supply chain is broken,
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guys. we can't get them to the city. we still have to throw them away. >> reporter: instead the farm link team connected him to those who needed his produce. >> hey, i hear you're having trouble moving onions. we'd like to help. >> once we got that early deliver 'of onions, the photos and videos circulated quickly. hudreds of e-mails from people around the country asking if they could help. >> reporter: it's a heart-breaking dilemma. >> farmers are paying $80 a ton in some instances to throw out food. >> the skin is dried. >> it got rejected because it has some spots. >> reporter: and dumped in landfills creating green house gases. >> one of the most significant roles in climate change. >> rotting and producing methane.
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>> our job here is to create a bridge between that mountain of food. >> reporter: any more food over there. demand is constant with rising grocery prices and double lines at food banks. >> we still need that fresh food and the health benefits it gives. >> reporter: now operating in 48 states, this month farm link hit a milestone. 50 million pounds of produce recovered, the equivalent of 42 million meals. >> it is satisfying to see how proud farmers are. they take a lot of pride in their work in feeding other people. the last thing they want is for their food to go to waste. >> reporter: in march, the congress mall medal of honor society recognized them with a public service award and last month they hit the forbes 30 under 30. now they want to expand a paid fellowship program. >> we're designing the future of our food system, it needs to be people from all walks of life. >> and not just people who have
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the luxury to donate that time during the week. >> reporter: these friends saw a when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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the nationwide labor shortage as reached sporting events. leagues can't find enough referees. >> reporter: these tough 12-year-old girls have a powerful command of the puck. simone has been on the ice since she was five. >> i just take my mind off everything. >> reporter: but play is on pause for many kids. games are getting canceled because there aren't enough referees. >> i played as a younger player. >> reporter: bob joyce says at one point in the season the organization was down nearly 900 officials. >> we looked into it. one of the reasons was abuse. abuse and mistreatment by parents and players. >> reporter: mistreatment like this, a massachusetts referee
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punched on the ice by a youth hockey coach and this referee plowed down on a california soccer field. why do you think we're seeing more of these incidents? >> i think there is a general lack of respect in the last couple years. anyone can say anything now. >> reporter: there has been a dramatic drop of refs in youth sports nationwide. based on early data, an estimated 30,000 high school referees have quit since 2018. >> i don't think there hasn't been a game where i've never been yelled at. >> reporter: aj has been a referee for 13 years. how does jeopardize the safety of the kids on the ice? >> you may miss a major penalty and that could be life changing to that player. >> reporter: do you think this issue impacts the future of youth hockey as you know it? >> absolutely. >> reporter: simone hopes that doesn't happen. she dreams of going pro and just wants to play.
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alyse preston, cbs news boston. and that's the overnight news for this thursday. reporting from the nation's capitol, i'm ben tracy. this is "cbs news flash." republican kevin mccarthy will not comply with an interview request from the january 6th committee. the house minority leader was in close contact with former president donald trump before, during and after the deadly attack on the nation's capitol. now to the trial of elizabeth lms. she will b sente sentenced on september 26th after being convicted of fraud. she is expected to appeal. and take a look at this. a south florida baby dolphin has a new lease on life. the marine mammal was caught in a net when a police officer cut it free. it nearly jumped in the boat before disappearing.
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more news on the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. it's thursday, january 13th, 2022. this is the "cbs morning news." seeking interview. january 6th investigators want to talk to representative kevin mccarthy about the capitol riot. why cbs news is mentioned in the request. prop supplier sued. the new twist into the deadly shooting on the movie set of "rust." caught on camera -- new video shows the moments before a medical helicopter crashed to the ground with everyone on board surviving. well, good morning, and good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. there is cautious optimism this

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