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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 26, 2021 3:12am-4:00am PST

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mall in almost two years. so there's just now feeling comfortable to come out and do the shopping. >> reporter: one trend that has caught retailers and police off guard, a rash of high-end theft like at this nordstrom in northern california. officials say organized crime rings are running in, smashing counters, and stealing luxury items, then selling their loot online. most major retailers like target are closed tonight ahead of black friday. stores are stocking up on supplies. they're also beefing up their security. tony? >> those crime videos continue to shock me. jonathan, thank you very much. here's something. shoppers who live within a 50-mile radius of walmart headquarters in arkansas can now get items dropped off by drone. the retail giant is teaming up with the drone delivery company zipline to parachute packages of goods to everyday shoppers. cbs's errol barnett got an
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exclusive look. >> reporter: while the supply chain backlog continues to choke ports and trucking routes, many companies are now looking to the skies for solutions. >> it's unbelievably exciting. we've been working toward this day for many, many years. ple's chief o iam o'connor is officer. >> we have done over 220,000 commercial deliveries in overseas markets. for us the promise of ultra fast delivery is really to give access to all kinds of communities, to all kinds of products. >> reporter: once a customer places an order via the zipline walmart app, items are packaged inside this specially designed box with a parachute. >> the first step we're doing is scanning the package. >> reporter: so by now someone's ordered something. it's been packaged up. and no it's in your hands. >> that's correct. >> reporter: flight operations lead evan briton showed us how it's launched. >> next we'll install the parachute. and load the package into the payload bay. >> reporter: latches in. >> and the next step will be to
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install the battery. inspection complete. zipline 963. >> roger. [ beeping ] >> launching zipline 963 in three, two, one. >> reporter: for now these zips, as they're called, are able to drop payloads within a 50-mile radius of pea ridge, arkansas. but walmart and zipline hope to one day expand the service nationwide. >> if our customers enjoy the service, we'll scale it so in future holidays this is probably going to pay a really big part in get things in a hurry. >> reporter: tom ward runs walmart's last mile delivery operations. >> customers expect us to save them money. they need us to save them time. and when it comes to saving time, what better way to do it then via drone? >> reporter: zipline is part of a growing list of companies looking to make commercial drone delivery more accessible. each zip returns to home base and hooks itself to this suspension cable. >> recovery zipline 963.
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>> reporter: then it awaits its next mission. now, currentrily this service is free. there is no cost to customers as both walmart and zipline gather data and feedback to see if this is something people really want. if so the expectation is that this service could expand across the country. tony? >> meantime, heads up if you live in northern arkansas. errol, thank you very much. there's a lot more ahead on the "cbs overnight now's."
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whether you traveled this thanksgiving or not, we're now taking you to the rolling hills of montana where a native american tribe is celebrating the homecoming of the american buffalo, or bison if you prefer, which one's roamed the northern plains by the millions. here's cbs's michelle miller. >> reporter: buffalo are an elusive breed here on the eastern border of glacier national park. >> they're taking off. they're taking off. >> yeah. they won't wait for us, these ones. >> reporter: but irvin carlson and the blackfeet nation are changing that. they returned 90 buffalo to blackfeet territory, reinforcing a kinship passed throug the ages. >> they were our food, our clothing, our lodging, our tools. they were our whole economy, you know. that's how we existed, on them. >> reporter: when european settlers arrived in the 1800s, the delicate balance shifted. in the 19th century there were millions of buffalo that roamed
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this region. until they were hunted to near extinction. >> the blackfeet captured those calves and they took them across the mountains and they sold them to the canadian government. and that's how they got into canada. and they eventually ended up at the alka island national park. >> reporter: those descendants survived there for more than 100 years. then in 2016 parks canada gave the buffalo initiative permission to return 100 buffalo to the blackfeet reservation. >> when we got back, waiting for us in celebration of these buffalo coming home, that was a real great day for us. >> reporter: they've been living here peacefully ever since. but 13 of them made a detour, continuing on to california's oakland zoo. >> we were able to secure some of these to bring them here to oakland for an incredible not only exhibit but really the educational purpose of why they're here. >> reporter: zoo ceo nick
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dahasia plans to return the ten babies born and bred here to the montana plains. >> there is the red dog that was just born 24 hours ago. watching this young one yesterday literally within hours of birth just trying to stand up and walk, and you can see that right now. getting her footing. >> reporter: the goal is to increase this herd's size and even its territory. what does an animal roaming in the 21st century have to do with how you live today? >> to me it keeps -- it keeps our history and our culture alive. this is home to them, where they originated from and we've traveled a big full circle across the mountains, to canada, to back here to home. >> reporter: it only took 100-something years. >> it only took 100 and some years. >> reporter: michelle miller, cbs news, on blackfeet territorial land in montana. a symbol of freedom in this country since before there was a
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country. there is still much more to come. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. facing expensive vitamin c creams with dull results? olay brightens it up with new olay vitamin c. gives you two times brighter skin. hydrates better than the 100, 200, even $400 cream. see, my skin looks more even, and way brighter. dullness? so done. turn up your results with new olay vitamin c my skin can face anything. shop the full vitamin c collection at olay.com i just heard something amazing! now for the first time one medication was approved to treat and prevent migraines. don't take if allergic to nurtec.
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wildfire warnings across southern california today. santa ana winds were gusting as high as 70 miles per hour, and a wildfire that had been under control reignited in the city of riverside, forcing a neighborhood there to evacuate. in the northeast, meanwhile, tonight forecasters are tracking a possible snowstorm that could muck up travel sunday into monday. and dwayne johnson, better known as the rock, went big on giving this holiday. >> thank you for your service, brother. enjoy your new tr- -- what the heck is happening? get out of here, bro! >> allow me to explain. the rock handed over the keys to his personal customized truck to a navy vet named oscar rodriguez. rodriguez had attended a special screening of the rock's new movie. it's called "red notice," by the way. and after the actor heard rodriguez's story he decided to give him the truck. rodriguez is a personal trainer.
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he's also a giver, providing support for victims of domestic violence. he was overcome with gratitu
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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'tis the season not just for giving but also growing. in at least one case cbs's nicole killion traveled to philadelphia to meet a young farmer who is using tiny seeds to great effect in her community. as we continue our series "unifying america." >> we've been growing these seeds together -- >> reporter: for mira mitchell the seed was planted early. >> i've been farming since i was 14. >> reporter: now at 28 she's a seed keeper. >> these are the seeds of the green striped kushah squash. it's the xak same variety as the one my great grandfather used to grow. you can see how beautiful they are. >> almost looked like a pumpkin seed. >> reporter: connecting to her
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ancestral past sprout aid passion for urban crops that emira grows on this urban farm nestled in the heart of philadelphia. >> my favorite speeds are important to the african diaspora. so i love growing any kind of southern pea or black-eyed pea. i grew collard. >> reporter: all cataloged in a seed library where she helps others discover their roots. >> i've cooked recipes from some of the vegetables i've been stewarding here. and i would tell my mom, hey, mom, i made catfish etuoffe with xyz. and she says that's not catfish etouffe, that is smorlthed catfish and grandma used to make it like p. >> this it's also stories of our culture. >> reporter: sowing seeds of the past to sustain the future. nicole killion, cbs news, philadelphia. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues right here. for others check back a little later for "cbs mornings" and
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follow us anytime online at cbsnews.com. reporting from new york, i'm tony dokoupil. this is cbs news flash. i'm elise preston in new york. the threat of wildfires in southern california forced tens of thousands of families to spend thanksgiving in the dark. utilities intentionally cut power as santa ana winds toppled trees onto power lines and homes. a gofundme has raised more than a million dollars for kevin strickland, the missouri man who spent 43 years in prison for a triple murder he did not commit. a missouri judge overturned his conviction this week. but since strickland wasn't exonerated through dna testing, he doesn't qualify for compensation. and for the second year in a row a scottish deer hound named clair is named best in show at the national dog show. the two consecutive wins is
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historic. for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm elise preston, cbs news, new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening and thank you for joining us on this thanksgiving. hope you're having a happy one. i'm tony dokoupil in for norah. for the second year in a row americans are expressing their gratitude in the midst of a pandemic. just yesterday the u.s. recorded more than 111,000 new covid cases and more than 1,600 fatalities. but now more than 196 million americans are fully vaccinated, including nearly 135,000 children between the ages of 5 and 11. with no lockdowns in effect, more americans are also traveling this holiday weekend. 2 million people passed through
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u.s. airports on thanksgiving eve alone. and here in new york city today the streets were once again packed with crowds at the thanksgiving day parade. but while covid vaccines and boosters have helped americans bring back their favorite holiday traditions, health officials do remind us the threat is not over. cbs's elise preston leads us off tonight in new york city. good evening, elise. >> reporter: good evening, tony. thousands of people lined the sidewalk starting here at macy's in herald square to watch the parade. and the people we spoke with said they were happy to take the necessary precautions to celebrate safely with family and friends. it certainly looks and feels like things are back to normal this thanksgiving. in new york city crowds gathered together to watch the macy's thanksgiving day parade. last year's parade was tv only. >> it's nice to be out and about. >> reporter: david dallas orr is visiting from california. >> with everyone being vaccinated we can like all be, you know, around each other and not be as worried about getting
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sick. >> reporter: all across the country families are coming together with fewer travel and covid restrictions. more than 53 million people are driving, flying, or taking trains to their thanksgiving destinations. airports saw the highest number of passengers since the start of the pandemic. the tsa screened more than 2.3 million travelers yesterday. >> the risk is worth the reward? >> yes. >> reporter: once you get to your destination dr. anthony fauci recommends gathering only with people who are vaccinated. otherwise, get tested. >> since tests are so widely available now, that should be something that a person should be willing to do rather than put everyone else at risk. >> reporter: covid cases are on the rise in 25 states and hospitalizations are up in 22 states. >> we're really in unchaptered territories. and it's not clear what's going to happen over the next six to ten weeks. >> reporter: to protect yourself infectious disease expert dr.
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michael osterholm says get your booster shots now. >> for those who are fully vaccinated but now have reached that six-month time period after their doses they received, they need to get boosters. >> reporter: and if you plan on celebrating with loved ones over the next few days, doctors suggest spending time outdoors or leaving windows open. just other steps to reduce transmission. tony? >> yeah, good advice. love seeing those familiar thanksgiving scenes. elise, thank you very much. president biden is celebrating the first thanksgiving of his presidency on nantucket, an island about 30 miles off the coast of massachusetts where we also find cbs's nancy cordes. nancy, good evening. i hear it's better there in the summertime. >> reporter: this is true, tony, though the bidens have been coming here to nantucket to celebrate thanksgiving for decades. it's something of a family tradition. it is also for presidents to spend at least part of thanksgiving day with the troops. and so today president biden kept that tradition alive too.
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in a brief break from family time today the president and first lady visited a coast guard station, speaking with about two dozen service members outside and holding video calls inside with troops from all six branches of the military. afterwards, mr. biden was asked what he's thankful for. >> what am i thankful for? i'm not joking when i say i'm thankful for these guys. wherever they are. people wonder what america is. they look and they see them. that's who they see. they don't see us here. they see them. and they make me proud. >> reporter: the president and first lady also called in to the annual macy's day parade. >> happy thanksgiving, everyone. >> reporter: and recorded a video message wishing the nation a happy holiday. one thing mr. boyden can be thankful for today, a note from his doctor saying a three-millimeter polyp removed from his colon last week turns out to be benign. though the doctor noted it was potentially precancerous.
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the polyp was discovered during a routine colonoscopy at walter reed medical center last week. >> i feel great. >> reporter: doctors say such polyps are common, especially in 79-year-olds. the president's doctor is recommending he get a follow-up colonoscopy in seven to ten years. tony? >> that's a good long time, nacy. thank you very much. here's something. shoppers who live within a walrt quarten asa now get its dropped off by drone. the retail giant is teaming up with the drone delivery company zipline to parachute packages of goods to everyday shoppers. cbs's errol barnett got an exclusive look. >> reporter: while the supply chain backlog continues to choke ports and trucking routes, many companies are now looking to the skies for solutions. >> it's unbelievably exciting. we've been working toward this day for many, many years. >> reporter: liam o'connor is zipline's chief operating officer. >> we have done over 220,000
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commercial deliveries in overseas markets. for us the promise of ultra fast delivery is really to give access to all kinds of communities, to all kinds of products. >> reporter: once a customer places an order via the zipline walmart app items are packaged inside this specially designed box with a parachute. >> so the first step we're doing is scanning the package. >> reporter: so by now someone's ordered something. it's been packaged up. and now it's in your hands. >> that's correct. >> reporter: flight operations lead evan briton showed us how it's launched. >> next we'll install the parachute. and load the package into t payload bay. >> reporter: latches in. >> and the next step will be to install the battery. inspection complete. zipline 963. >> roger. [ beeping ] >> launching zipline 963 in three, two, one. >> reporter: for now these zips, as they're called, are able to drop payloads within a 50-mile radius of pea ridge, arkansas.
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but walmart and zipline hope to seice we'll scale it so in future holidays this is probably going to play a really big part in getting things in a hurry. >> reporter: tom ward runs walmart last mile delivery operations. >> customers expect us to save them money. they need us to save them time. d anentes c iomo tav to do it than via drone? >> reporter: zipline is part of a growing list of companies looking to make commercial drone delivery more acceiblech zip rn. recove96>>ter: where it awaitss next mission. now, currently this service is free. there is no cost to customers as both walmart and zipline gather data and feedback to see if this is something people really want. if so the expectation is that this service could expand across the country. tony? >> meantime, heads up if you live in northern arkansas. errol, thank you very much.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm catherine herridge in washington. thanks for staying with us. today is black friday, one of the biggest shopping days of the year. millions of americans will converge on the malls and the national retail federation expects sales to be up about 10% from last year. but higher prices and global supply chain bottlenecks could spoil that for both shoppers and retailers. meantime, a lot of people who've been shopping online complain the items they want are often back-ordered or out of stock. and to make matters worse, scammers are leveraging the situation by setting up fake websites. anna werner has some tips on how
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to avoid being scammed. >> reporter: most of us are doing at least some of our holiday shopping online, and the scammers know it. it's their big season too. their goal, for you to give them a present. your money. iowa high school senior jace leniger likes music. in particular artist billie eilish. so when the singer-songwriter released her new album over the summer he decided to buy himself a birthday gift of some of her new merchandise on what looked like her bona fide website. >> i started looking around and shopping. >> reporter: he bought a bundle he'd seen on instagram with a sweatshirt, poster and other items. pricetag, about $100. but when the transaction hit his bank account, he says it showed some $79, which he found suspicious. >> and so after that i started to look up the website, look up reviews on the website. and there were over like 1,000 people reviewing this website saying it's a scam, don't buy it, i haven't gotten my stuff in over half a year.
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>> reporter: so what has happened in terms of your money and your merchandise? >> well, i don't have the merchandise or my money. >> reporter: he's just one of thousands of consumers who say they've lost money to scammers posing as legitimate online retailers. >> we have seen a 2,000% in increase over the past three months driven by the supply chain issues that are in this country today. >> reporter: lexisnexis risk solution ceo haywood talco says that equals over 5,000 fake sites, up from just 100 or so earlier this year. as criminals take advantage of consumers' need for products now in short supply. >> what's happening is when you go to some of the big box stores they don't have the toy that you want in stock and then you google it and then you find this really boutique company that is offering the bicycle that your daughter wants and you think, you know what, i'm going to get it.
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it really isn't a company. it's run -- it's a front for a transnational criminal group. >> reporter: and dave hollister with the secret service cyberfraud task force said those criminals' fake sites typically launched from overseas are becoming increasingly sophisticated. >> you know, they learn as they go just like you and i. it's their job. >> reporter: but examine sites closely, he says, and there are often tipoffs. misspellings. grammar mistakes. links on the page that don't work. and a refusal to accept credit cards. >> these websites will often only ask for payment via a wire service such as paypal, venmo, zelle, places where the transaction is put through, those moneys are gone. and it's very unlikely, almost impossible for the consumer to get their money back. >> it's like a virus. it just spreads. it doesn't stop until the consumers stop falling for the
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trick. >> reporter: talcove with lexisnexis estimates consumers in the u.s. will have $20 billion stolen by the end of the holiday season. anna werner, cbs news, new york. for many youngsters all they want for christmas is a new bike, but for some children with disabilities finding a bike that works for them can prove all but impossible. in our series "a more perfect union" janet shamlian has the story of a man in louisiana working to help all kids enjoy the freedom that comes from mobility. >> reporter: for calla roach distance is measured in the smallest of increments. >> come on, you can do it. >> reporter: born with cerebral palsy and epilepsy, crawling is her only independent ability at 4 years old. >> what has this been like for you? >> it's been hard knowing that she may never be able to walk and be like the other children. but she's still kaia. and that's all that matters to
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me. >> reporter: amanda roach is decidedly positive. >> come on, move your feet. let's walk. >> reporter: she'd love for kaia to take part in activities like her friends. >> i'm hoping one day she'll get there. >> reporter: what mother and daughter are about to discover, one day is today. >> okay. we'll tighten up a few things. >> reporter: louisiana retiree andrew mclinden is surprising kaia with an adaptive bike specially built for her ufrpg needs. in this case an extra wheel and straps to help keep her upright. >> look at that. look at that. >> reporter: it's the 430th he's donated after gifting the first one to a family friend 13 years ago. >> the neighborhood kids thought this bike was the coolest thing they'd ever seen. they loved it. and it's all about that inclusion thing. and that's when i knew this is it, this is what we need to do. >> reporter: initially self-funded and now with the help of donations, mclinden has
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created hundreds of moments like these. >> i've never seen that. i've never seen it. >> ooh! >> what is it? >> a bike! >> i like that i can ride that. >> reporter: for kaia it's a stride toward independence. >> what's it like for you when you see that moment, when the child sees his or her bike? >> it's everything. it's what life is about. >> reporter: later in the day bike number 431 is going to max. who has neurological issues including cerebral palsy. >> what is this? >> cool. >> reporter: built to suit each child's needs. the cycles cost several thousand dollars. >> yeah! >> it is a big bike! >> reporter: out of reach for many families strained by medical bills from multiple doctors and medication. >> i think it could help strengthen his legs, his core, and just build his muscles and
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let him just be a kid. >> the things that i get to see with these families and these children is a gift. it's an absolute gift. and it's not lost on me. and i'm very grateful for it. and subsequently, i'll do this forever. >> reporter: a set of wheels. but for all it offers children like max, it might as well be a pair of wings. >> thank you. >> reporter: i'm janet shamlian in shreveport, louisiana. when i get a migraine, i shut out the world. but with nurtec odt that's all behind me now. nurtec can now treat and prevent migraines. don't take if allergic to nurtec. the most common side effects were nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. ask your doctor about nurtec today. when you really need to sleep you reach for the really good stuff. nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. new zzzquil ultra helps you sleep better and longer when you need it most.
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wooo vaporize sore throat pain with vicks vapocool drops. the hottest cartoon in europe is now here in the u.s. and it's got a lot of american kids speaking with a british accent. holly williams introduces us to pepa pig. >> reporter: there are plenty of british icons from buckingham palace to the beatles. but you may be surprised to discover that one of the united kingdom's most influential cultural exports is bright pink and attends nursery school. >> i'm peppa pig. >> reporter: if you're a kid, parent, or carrier of a young child, then peppa pig needs no introduction. >> the queen! the queen! >> hello to you all. >> hello, queen.
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>> reporter: if not, then welcome to her very quaint, very english world. >> the queen loves jumping up and down in muddy puddles. >> reporter: she started out small. 17 years ago on british tv. but peppa's now transformed into a global phenomenon. watched in 180 countries andonen a $4 billion deal to u.s. toy giant hasbro. >> peppa's family motor home. >> we do spend time watching peppa pig. >> reporter: peppa is so famous that hillary clinton gushed about her on a british chat show when she met one of the series voice actors. >> this is going to be huge for me. >> reporter: she has her own theme park in britain with another one scheduled to open in florida next year and a third planned in china.
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and some american parents have even complained that peppa is giving their children british accents. >> how clever. >> it doesn't matter. find i anew best friend. >> reporter: they call it the peppa effect. she's a very english pig and a lot of the storylines are quite english. why does that translate around the world? >> we're talking about very human emotions and feelings. so the dynamics are -- resonate with internationally, with any family. because we all love our children. >> reporter: its storylines are simpler than many other children's cartoons, but a single episode can take months to craft. >> we actually kind of create the flow of logic that is very easy to follow for a 4-year-old. >> there's no nasty conflict. and there are no really evil characters. >> nothing's ever allowed to get to a point of real conflict. which is part of the simplicity of the storytelling, making sure that we're not overcomplicating the stories really. so we can stay that pure and in
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the moment. >> and also -- >> reporter: some of peppa's anthropo morphic friends are voiced by illustrious british actors. >> fog. >> reporter: brian blessed is an acclaimed shakespearean performer with a famously loud voice. [ tarzan yell ] who plays grampy rabbit, a fitness-obsessed senior citizen. >> wobble like jelly! >> reporter: it's a very joyful, happy world. do you think that's important to the success of peppa pig? >> it does embrace happiness. it has many levels. but it brings joy. it makes people happy. >> reporter: but even peppa pig has experienced controversy. one episode was pulled off screens in australia where poisonous spiders abound. >> bye-bye mr. skinny legs. >> reporter: some say daddy pig has been fat-shamed in the
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series and claim the cartoon reinforces gender stereotypes. but the show's current makers say from te very beginning the 4-year-old pig has been ahead of her time. >> she was a female role model, which was actually very rare at the time. it was very much speaking to kids on their wavelength at that time in a way that other shows weren't. >> hey, how are you doing? i'm miss rabbit. >> reporter: peppa's latest episode see her family take a vacation in america. a road trip from coast to coast. >> new york. the city that never sleeps. >> it's a much busier screen than you normally see with peppa. >> i can see a big green lady with an ice cream. >> that's the statue of liberty. >> she doesn't know what that is. >> yeah, absolutely. >> she thinks it's a lady with an ice cream. >> and they're eating ice cream. so it's perfect. it's the perfect opportunity. >> reporter: it's an eccentric love letter, sent from britain across the pond. >> are we in hollywood yet,
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daddy pig? >> reporter: and everything you'd expect from a badly drawn cartoon pig who's won a global following by
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in england the decades-long effort to clean up the river thames is working. the watterway is again home to fish and wildlife including seals, whales and even sharks. ian lee has the story from london. >> reporter: you wouldn't have london without the thames. the iconic river snakes through the city. and for the first time in decades its aquatic residents are getting some major attention. >> bringing ecosystems and habitats and species back to health and even restoring them. >> reporter: down on the banks researchers are getting down and dirty to see how the river's doing. >> tiny little ones now. >> reporter: the results of their health check, a lot better than 60 years ago. >> well, we've gone from the river beidevo o fe >> reporter: the river was so polluted in 1957 scientists
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declared it biologically dead. today sea life has returned. >> reporter: abundance of marine mammals, seals, sharks even. >> reporter: 115 types of fish and 92 bird species now call the river thames home, including three types of critically endangered native sharks. while the river's health is better, scientists worry the tide could turn. with pollution and climate change threatening to undo years of progress. >> fish and other species depend on water temperature to trigger really important things like spawning or growth. and so if you change the water temperature they get the triggers wrong, so start spawning at the wrong time of year. >> reporter: it's not just fish at risk. researchers are working to protect everything from sea horses and eels to seals to make sure these sea critters are around for years to come. ian lee, cbs news, london. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for "cbs mornings" and follow us online all the time at
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cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm catherine herridge. this is "cbs news flash." i'm elise preston in new york. the threat of wildfires in southern california forced tens of thousands of families to spend thanksgiving in the dark. utilities intentionally cut power as santa ana winds toppled trees onto power lines and homes. a gofundme has raised more than a million dollars for kevin strickland, the missouri man who spent 43 years in prison for a triple murder he did not commit. a missouri judge overturned his conviction this week. but since strickland wasn't exonerated through dna testing, he doesn't qualify for compensation. and for the second year in a row a scottish deerhound named clair is named best in show at the national dog show. the two consecutive wins is
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historic. for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm elise preston, cbs news, new yo . it's friday, november 26th, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news". black friday shopping. americans could spend a record amount of money this holiday season. the items that some experts say are almost impossible to find. sounding the alarm. a new covid variant is moving fast in south africa. why some health leaders are especially concerned about this outbreak. and later, a second chance at life. the outpouring of support and money for a wrongfully convicted man who spent decades in prison. good morning, and good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green.

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