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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 4, 2021 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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this is a clear signal from voters in a blue state. virginia is a very blue state, that they don't like president biden's policy. >> reporter: virginia exit polls showed another troubling sign for democrats. youngkin won in suburbs and rural areas, appealing to independents and making gains with women voters. and he capitalized on concerns about parental control of public education. >> friends, we're going to embrace our parents, not ignore them. >> reporter: the president said today that for democrats to bounce back, they should pass his sweeping social spending plan because it will help struggling americans. when i asked him what he would say to congressional democrats about passing the plan, he said simply, quote, get it to my desk. norah? >> ed o'keefe, thank you. here now to discuss the takeaways from this election is major garrett. hi there, major. let's talk about virginia. >> sure. >> how much was glenn youngkin able to exploit concerns about education, cultural, social issues? >> so let me give you a couple
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of numbers to indicate how much virginia has moved in one calendar year. last year president biden carried suburban voters by 8 percentage points. glenn youngkin, the republican nominee this time to won carried them by 6. that's a 14-point swing in one year. president biden just last year won independents by 19 points. glenn youngkin won them by 4-5. a more than 20-point swing. how did that happen? social issues are important, but i think the education one in virginia was an acute and important, why? because it was proxy for a lot of things. covid fatigue. lots of parents k through 12. what are the rules? how can i get my kid back in school? other parts, how is race being taught or racism. it's a very tender issue, particularly in virginia with its history of race, the confederacy, et cetera. and even transgender issues. it all became a larger issue are school boards listening to and empowering parents or sort of giving them a cold shoulder or the heisman? lots of parents in virginia felt
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they were not getting what they wanted out of school boards and it became a larger question of education and republicans capitalized on that issue, which is rare for republicans to be able to achieve. >> all right. major garrett, thank you so much. we want the turn now to the skyrocketing prices of prescription drugs. democratic leaders just unveiled a plan to cut costs of sometimes life-saving medicine. but as cbs' kris van cleave reports, the drug industry is spending big to keep that from happening. records marilyn rose's chronic myeloid leukemia would be a death sentence without her daily medication. >> i say it's my stay alive pill. >> reporter: but that stay alive pill can cost up to $10,000 a month. she worries without a curb on prescription drug prices, her bill could soar. >> it's a miracle that the drug exists, but the idea that i'm beholden to it is really a little scary. >> reporter: the new compromise plan on capitol hill would offer some relief, gradually allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices similar to private insurers for the first time while capping out-of-pocket costs at $2,000 and setting
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limits on the cost of insulin. this is the time to get real relief to senior citizens who are getting mugged at the pharmacy counter all across the country. >> reporter: the pharmaceutical industry has spent nearly $263 million on lobbying so far this year, employing three lobbyists for every member of congress. >> they have really endless resources to throw at shaping the outcomes of legislation. >> reporter: millions of those dollars are campaign donations. earlier this year, congressman scott peters sparked protests outside his san diego district offices when he came out against a plan to cut drug costs for seniors. he has received nearly 130,000 from the industry. arizona senator kyrsten sinema has gotten about 100,000, and new jersey senator robert menendez has taken in nearly $80,000. i'm curious what message that sends? >> bottom line is i'm supporting a price negotiation bill that has been worked out. what i've said since the very beginning of the discussion, how
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do we ensure that consumers at the counter get relief. >> reporter: new jersey is home to a number of pharmaceutical companies. all three of these lawmakers say they support this compromise, adding it will save billions. norah? >> kris van cleave, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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workforce is burned out. yet applications to nursing schools are rising, driven by young people looking to make a difference. we get more now from cbs' mola lenghi. >> reporter: some people never question what they want to do with their lives. why do you want to be a nurse? >> i can make a difference in someone's life, or even day when they're going through a difficult time. >> i think with the pandemic people shy away from health care now. but watching my friends and family work tirelessly, i've never felt more motivated and excited to be in health care. >> reporter: michael usino of temple university initially expected the interest to be reduced in nursing. >> what we were initially afraid is students were going to be seeing the news and what's happening in hospitals and on the front lines and be dissuaded from nursing. but i think we've been very lucky with this generation of student, feeling that inspiration to want to serve. >> reporter: you've seen the opposite? >> we've seen the opposite effect for sure. >> reporter: nursing applications at temple increased
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roughly 15% this fall. in 2019, almost 7500 people applied for 110 spots. those who want to be nurses are stepping up. even knowing the job can take a lot. >> burnout is like the first thing that everyone mentions to me. they're oh, you're crazy. >> reporter: nursing department chair mary terhaar says temple makes self-care, mental health and learning how to avoid burnout part of the curriculum. >> you think that it's the sciences you need to master or physiology or pharmacology, but you also need to learn how do i take care of myself. >> reporter: despite the challenges, students, future nurses seem encouraged, which perhaps is encouraging for anyone who may ever need a nurse. mola lenghi, cbs news, philadelphia. >> and there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." 156 miles per hour. that's right. that's how fast prosecutors say wide receiver henry ruggs was going before that deadly crash. and the supreme court court hears arguments over handguns in public. do justices think one state's
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henry ruggs appeared in a las vegas court today. the 22-year-old was wheeled into court in a wheelchair the day after the crash. prosecutors say he was driving 156 miles per hour with a blood alcohol level twice the legal limit when his corvette slammed into the back of an suv. a 23-year-old woman and her dog were killed. all right. the supreme court heard arguments today in a major gun rights case involving a new york law that requires people to have proper cause to carry a handgun in public. well, in their questioning, a majority of the justices, including brett kavanaugh and chief justice john roberts hinted they think the new york law may be too restrictive of second amendment rights. all right. a dramatic ending now to a parent's worst nightmare. police in australia released this video moments after raiding a house and finding 4-year-old cleo smith. she actually vanished from her family's camping tent 18 days ago, triggering a massive search. cleo was checked out at a hospital and reunited with her parents.
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a 36-year-old man has been arrested in her abduction. all right. up next, we want to meet some of the candida s who made history
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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it was an emotional celebration as democrat ed gainey became the first black mayor of pittsburgh. pennsylvania's second largest city. but he wasn't the only one that made history. cbs' nancy chen has more on the other notable election day firsts. >> reporter: history made as dearborn, michigan elects adullah hammoud as its first arab-american and muslim mayor. >> to the young girls and boys who have ever been ridiculed for their faith or ethnicity, today is proof that you as american as anyone elseighere i chaptern th. in virgini-- >> is, i was still a jamaican. >> reporter: veteran winsome
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sears will be the state's next lieutenant governor, the first woman to win the seat. voters in new york chose retired nypd captain eric adams to be the city's second black mayor ever. >> we made history in cincinnati. >> reporter: in both cincinnati and boston elected asian americans for the first time in their histories. >> it's been a really unexpected journey. >> reporter: michelle wu is also the first woman and the first person of color to be chosen for boston's top job. >> from every corner of our city, boston has spoken. >> the first is only relevant if there is a second, third, fourth, and then the door is wide open for everyone and there is a lot more change where this is coming from. >> reporter: nancy chen, cbs news, boston. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm norah o'donnell.
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them is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. after a closer than expected governor's race in new jersey, cbs news projects phil murphy will keep his job as governor of the garden state. murphy is the only democratic governor to win reelection in more than 40 years. . ford motors is the first major u.s. automaker to mandate covid vaccines for its 32,000 u.s. employees. workers have until december 8th to get the jab unless they have religious or medical exemptions. and carrie bradshaw said a rent-controlled apartment is forever. now two lucky people will get to see it for themselves. airbnb is recreating the iconic apartment from the show in november for only $23 a night
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just ahead of the latest premiere of "sex & the city." for more informa app on your ce connected tv. i'm tom hanson from new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> good evening and thank you so much for joining us. we begin with the new wave of covid vaccinations ramping up tonight for kids 5 to 11 years old with pfizer's mini dose getting the green light from the cdc late tuesday. health officials say it's a major breakthrough with more than 2,000 schools in recent months stopping in-person learning because of outbreaks. well, walgreens and cvs are now making appointments for kids shots at select pharmacies starting this weekend. but a hospital in hartford, connecticut wasted no time giving out the shots just minutes after the cdc's authorization. and thousands of pediatricians preordered the mini doses, and pfizer says it expects to ship
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about 11 million in the coming days. and it comes as we just crossed a milestone. coronavirus deaths in the u.s. have now topped 750,000. cbs' janet shamlian is going to lead off our coverage at texas children's hospital in houston. good evening, janet. >> reporter: norah, good evening. this is where they're giving the vaccine at the hospital tonight, and it is busy. across the country, appointments at some doctor's offices and clinics are going fast. it's here from the privacy of a georgia pediatrician's office -- >> all good. >> it's a game-changer to us. >> reporter: to a large houston hospital clinic. >> super fast, okay? >> reporter: thousands of parents took their children to get the vaccine on the first day it became available for 5 to 11-year-olds. >> julian has a medical condition we're worried about. now he is vaccinated so it's a relief. >> reporter: the children's version is a third of what older age groups get with smaller needles and distinctive orange packaging.
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millions of doses were already on their way to hospitals and pharmacies awaiting tuesday's signoff by the cdc. but while some children quickly received shots, nearly a third of parents in one survey say they won't vaccinate their child.accine immediately, like i did for myself. >> reporter: doctors hope hesitant parents will talk to them first. >> we can get most kids in now and get their second dose three weeks from now with good protection in time for the winter holidays. >> reporter: covid has taken a toll on the unprotected. more than two million 5 to 11-year-olds have had the virus. 8300 have been hospitalized. 173 have died. >> that's to me feels like way too many for a disease, for outcomes that could essentially be eliminated by this vaccine. >> reporter: daniela wilches got the shot at texas children's hospital today. >> almost finished, okay? >> reporter: she just turned 5 yesterday. what made you decide to get the vaccine for her? >> we've lost some family
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members to covid. and so this has been really important for us. and she has some medical conditions which make her more susceptible. >> reporter: to give you an idea of the demand, texas children's hospital currently has 38,000 children signed up for shots between now and thanksgiving. norah? >> wow, that is some strong demand. janet shamlian, thank you. and there is new evidence and we're going to turn now to that rough election night for democrats. in virginia, republican glenn youngkin pulled off a big victory over terry mcauliffe. in new jersey, democratic incumbent phil murphy was expected to win in a landslide, but is leading by tonight by a razor-thin margin. well get more now from cbs' ed o'keefe. >> reporter: big warning signs for democrats as virginia and tighter than expected results in new jersey but president biden and democrats' control of congress in jeopardy. mr. biden said voters sent a message.
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things done.e want uto get of orter:t was clear. ggk's victory over terry mcauliffe in virginia, a state the president had won by ten points a year ago. voters showed they were unhappy with the direction of the country and inaction in washington. some democrats today blame themselves. >> look, congressional dems for terry mcauliffe. if we had been able to deliver infrastructure and reconciliation in mid-october, he could have sold universal pre-k, affordable child care, infrastructure, creating jobs. >> reporter: with the president's approval ratings at a record low, democrats are now trying to figure out how to win in states similar to virginia and new jersey and hold on to their slim majority. >> as one who will be running for reelection in 2022, i need results that i can tell the american people that congress can deliver. >> reporter: republicans who saw democrats unsuccessfully try to tie youngkin to donald trump, relished the results. >> i think this is an earthquake.
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it really is an earthquake. this is a clear signal from voters in a blue state. virginia is a very blue state, that they don't like president bide daens policies. >> reporter: virginia exit polls showed another troubling sign for democrats. youngkin won in suburbs and rural areas, appealing to independents and making gains with women voters. and he capitalized on concerns about parental control of public education. >> friends, we're going to embrace our parents, not ignore them. >> reporter: the president said today that for democrats to bounce back, they should pass his sweeping social spending plan because it will help struggling americans. when i asked him what he would say to congressional democrats about passing the plan, he said simply, quote, get it to my desk. norah? >> ed o'keefe, thank you. all right. we want to turn now to the skyrocketing prices of prescription drugs. democratic leaders just unveiled a plan to cut costs of sometimes life-saving medicine. but as cbs'ris ea pos,he drug industry ishat om
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happening. >> reporter: marilyn rose's chronic myeloid leukemia would be a death sentence without her daily medication. >> i say it's my stay alive pill. >> reporter: but that stay alive pill can cost up to $10,000 a month. she worries without a curb on prescription drug prices, her bill could soar. >> it's a miracle that the drug exists, but the idea that i'm beholden to it is really a little scary. >> reporter: the new compromise plan on capitol hill would offer some relief, gradually allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices similar to private insurers for the first time while capping out-of-pocket costs at $2,000 and setting limits on the cost of insulin. >> this is the time to get real relief to senior citizens who are getting mugged at the pharmacy counter all across the country. >> reporter: the pharmaceutical industry has spent nearly $263 million on lobbying so far this year, employing three lobbyists for every member of congress. >> they have really endless
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resources to throw at shaping the outcomes of legislation. >> reporter: millions of those dollars are campaign donations. earlier this year, congressman p e n o ofe came a he has received nearly 130,000 from the industry. arizona senator kyrsten sinema has gotten about 100,000, and new jersey senator robert menendez has taken in nearly $80,000. i'm curious what message that sends? >> bottom line is i'm supporting a price negotiation bill that has been worked out. what i've said since the very beginning of the discussion, how do we ensure that consumers at the counter get relief. >> reporter: new jersey is home to a number of pharmaceutical companies. all three of these lawmakers say they support this compromise, adding it will save billions. norah? >> kris van cleave, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> i'm catherine herridge in washington. thanks for staying with us. the global supply chain crisis continues to slow the economic recovery from the pandemic and is threatening to continue into next year. this morning, we're taking an inside look at the problem from opposite sides of the world. carter evans and ramy inocencio teamed up to track goods on their long trip from china to the u.s. we begin across the globe with ramy inocencio in hong kong. >> reporter: good morning from a helicopter above hong kong, one of the world's busiest cargo
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terminals is just right there in mainland china. it's called yantian, and it is so important to u.s./china trade. all goods from china is processed through this port. it's how american phillip richardson gets his high performance speakers to u.s. consumers. that's been tough since this summer. power cuts have been rippling across eastern china and still are. >> if we're shut downpour more than 15 minutes, then it creates a headache. >> reporter: the electricity was on when cbs news visited his factory in guangzhou, china's manufacturing metropolis. workers assembled speaker driver, installed them in cabinets and boxed them up bound for the u.s., up to 2,000 in a day. richardson says the blackouts have been wasted time and money. >> and sometimes there's no notice. they'll -- the power shuts down
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and 30 minutes later we'll get a call from the village. >> reporter: kerr gibbs is president of the american chamber of commerce in shanghai. >> the power supply problem here is somewhat of a perfect storm. >> reporter: china has been trying hard to cut carbon emissions. but cuts in coal production have led to record prices. utility companies hadn't been allowed to raise their fees to match until recently. since they couldn't make money, they stopped making electricity. and it's not just a shortage of electrical power but manpower at the ports because of covid. gibbs says workers must quarantine for three weeks after working a two-week window, not an incentive to return. >> they can be exposed to the covid virus coming in through the supply chain. so that's what china is worried about. >> reporter: between the quarantines, the power outages, and the manpower problems, it's all led to higher costs even before those speakers leave china. >> we're feeling the price
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pressures now. >> reporter: i'm carter evans. here in middletown, new york, the cost keep adding up for those speakers from phil's factory in china. >> i used to pay maybe $12 per pair to get here. now i'm paying like 60. >> reporter: jon headacher is ceo of alto music. he sells instruments and electronics nationwide and says shipping costs for everything have sky rocket. so it takes longer and it costs like five times as much? >> what a bargain. it's unbelievable. >> reporter: haber started stocking up when the shipping logjam first hit the ports of l.a. and long beach. so you got a room full of guitars? >> that i ordered 15 months ago that are just starting to come in now. >> reporter: wow. >> that's how delayed it is. it's nuts. >> reporter: these tiny electronics are critical to his top-selling audio device. >> this is more valuable than gold to us. >> reporter: but due to shortages overseas -- >> i'm sending them to china so they can make my products. >> reporter: and send it back to you? >> exactly. >> reporter: that sounds crazy.
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>> it's nuts. >> many of these businesses are having a hard time keeping up with the inflationary costs of shipping. >> reporter: he fears the huge stacks of containers at the ports will likely remain without more truckers. the trucking industry is still down 60,000 or 80,000 drivers. these are simply not things that are going to be solved over the course of the next weeks or months. >> reporter: and with the holidays approaching, jon haber is unsure how long his stockpile will last. >> so i can only suggest if you see something that you know you want and it's there, buy it. buy it because you're not going to get it. >> reporter: this week, the port of los angeles started fining companies for leaving their containers here too long. $100 per day, per container and up. that's just adding to the high cost of shipping and americans addicted to cheap and fast chinese goods are paying the price. >> that's carter evans at the port of los angeles. the massive logjam of cargo ships off the coast is not only
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affecting shippers and retailers, it's also causing havoc on the streets outside the ports. shipping containers are stuck on trucks on local streets and even stacked three high in residential backyards. lilia luciano has the story from san pedro, californi >> repr: as the giant shipsed t trucks are rumbling through neighborhoods. >> the weight of the trucks, you can feel literally the house vibrating. >> reporter: abandoning the massive containers at the curb. >> someone is going to get hurt, especially the kids. >> reporter: crews are working 24/7 to off-load the containers on to trains and trucks, but there are few places to put them. ucla professor christopher tang. what is the situation in terms of the docks and containers? >> there are 80,000 containers sitting there. and then many containers are not being claimed. they're stuck. we need to clear all this slow-moving items along the sly chain. >> reporter: nearly 100 ships
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with more than half a million containers are stuck unloaded, problems. neighborhoods are being used for storage. property is being damaged, and trucks are idling for hours. >> they park at the street. you can't get through. it's unsafe. >> reporter: starting next week, officials could begin the process of issuing fines for cargo left on the dock. >> once we clear the backlog after three or four more months, i think that we'll resume the normal operations. >> reporter: the fines are intended to keep the supply chain moving, but residents fear that it will turn their streets into more traffic and also into these cargo dumping grounds. these cargo dumping grounds. >> lilia l spray, lift, skip, step. swipe, lift, spin, dry. slam, pan, still...fresh move, move, move, move aaaaand still fresh. degree. ultimate freshness activated when you move. when you really need to sleep you reach for the really good stuff. ultimate freshness
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swipe, lift, spin, dry. slam, pan, still...fresh move, move, move, move aaaaand still fresh. degree. ultimate freshness activated when you move. the world champion atlanta braves will celebrate their series victory tomorrow with a parade through atlanta and cobb county. the braves defeated the houston astros 4-2, and it capped off a successful baseball season after 2020 was shortened by the pandemic. meanwhile, big changes could be in store for the league, and at the top of their list, robot umpires. brooks silva-braga has that story. >> high inside. >> reporter: when major league baseball wants to audition a new idea that. >> bring it here to the atlantic league. look closely and you'll see the pitching mound has been moved back a foot farther from home
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plate to make it easier to hit. the bases here are three inches wider than normal. that's to avoid collisions. but it's this iphone of the home plate umpire that might truly change this change-resistant sport. a censor above home plate detects the pitch location and relays the data to this device which then sends an audiophile into the ear of the home plate ump, calling him to call a ball or strike. do you remember the first pitch? >> i do. >> ball or strike? >> strike. >> reporter: in 2019, fred de jesus became the first umpire in a regular season game to use abs, the automated ball strike system. what did you think when you first heard about this? >> initially, it was no way, we're not doing. this i've spent way too much money trying to learn the craft of calling balls and strikes. >> reporter: the craft takes years or even decades to
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perfect. and even then each umpire strike zone is unique. >> strike three called and mercer thought it was low. >> reporter: battles over what's a ball -- >> home plate gets covered up. >> reporter: and what's a strike -- >> they're still talking right now about the location of the pitch. >> reporter: have long been some of the most contentious and honestly entertaining in sports. >> isn't this priceless? >> put that in your left ear. >> okay. >> reporter: that could quickly change. this thing is just going to tell me what happens? if anyone with an earpiece can call the pitch. >> oh, strike. >> yeah. >> so you just hear it right in your ear, right away. >> reporter: abs tracks pitches with technology similar to what broadcasters use to show viewers the pitch location. >> we've got the box there. you can see it's well within it. >> reporter: now that virtual box is making the actual call. >> ball. oh, that looked good to me. >> reporter: what happens when the humans become bystanders? mostly they stop arguing with each other.
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>> now they look up at the machine. they give you the old and they go about their business. >> reporter: the powerlessness of the people became clear this past summer in lancaster, pennsylvania. >> oh, that went down as strike three. >> reporter: when a glitch caused about 7% of pitches to be miscalled. >> getting the signal from above. >> reporter: the problem was fixed later in the season, but not before umpires learned a tough lesson about their new role. . >> you do what you're told. it's tough, but we're out here working. >> reporter: you're now trained, though, not to have an opinion about the pitch? >> correct. >> reporter: that's so weird. >> when in rome, do what the romans want. >> reporter: will major league baseball cross the rubicon into automated strikes? they aren't saying yet. >> you know, this is would be a big a big change. we've got to be really thoughtful about it.
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>> reporter: morgan sue ward is in charge of abs. he says even if the technology works -- he thinks it will -- it's surprisingly hard to define what should count as a strike. >> what we figured out pretty quickly is nobody really likes the rule book zone, and it doesn't match with what people understand the strike zone to be. >> reporter: so in the atlantic league, they squished the strike zone to be shorter top to bottom, but 3 inches wider side to side than the rule book dictates. >> ooh, okay. i thought that was outside. >> yeah. >> reporter: still, the biggest difference i noticed -- >> i just want to try to throw one strike. >> reporter: was mental. there is almost this emotional personal relationship between the pitcher and the batter and the umpire. now it's all standing around like waiting for the algorithm to tell the people what the truth is. >> oh, inside. i thought that was pretty close. >> reporter: it's a very different experience standing on the field i found in just a few pitches. >> yeah. and i agree. you're putting your finger on what a lot of our players and coaches have felt.
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you're glad that there is total objective judgment being made on what you're doing on the field, but part of the humanity of this game that you love and that you're devoting your life to is being taken away somehow. rr: i like a profound step toward letting machines control the human world, wally bachmann says -- >> i had to see it work. >> reporter: embrace it. >> it worked. it's more defined. the strike zone stays the same wherever you go. >> reporter: the former major league infielder now manages the atlantic league's long island ducks. and having spent most of his life carefully evaluating the performance of human umpires -- >> be an embarrassment to professional baseball being like that. >> reporter: he has made a cold calculation. >> this is way more accurate than an umpire. and will it be in the big leagues? absolutely. >> reporter: how soon will it reach the majors? well, with the players' approval, it could be used next season, even if they don't agree, the league has the power to force it in a year later.
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the mlb umpires union, which declined to comment for our story has already agreed to allow abs, but the umpires
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now that the cdc has approved the pfizer covid vaccine for children 5 to 11, parents across the country are lining up to get their kids vaccinated. the move comes after thousands of tests on some brave youngsters, and that includes a little princess from texas with a heart of gold. janet shamlian has her story. >> reporter: at 7, julianna graves already knows her destiny. >> when i grow up, i'm going to be a princess. >> you are? >> a princess that helps a lot of other people. >> reporter: but she was born without something a princess needs for good deeds, a healthy heart. in 2014, at just 17 days old, julianna became the youngest heart transplant recipient ever at texas children's hospital. what can you tell me about your heart? >> that my heart is very
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special. >> reporter: this is the moment the mom who donated her infant's heart heard it beat in julianna last year. >> we feel grateful that a family chose to give julianna a heart at their darkest hour. >> reporter: now it's their turn to give. >> they're going to take your blood pressure, okay? >> reporter: even though she spent so much of her life in hospitals, julianna said yes to the vaccine trial for immunocompromised children, requiring at least nine more visits. >> that's it. oh, my gosh, you're done! >> all right! >> yay! >> reporter: even she knows a princess can't just talk the talk. >> it is good to help other people because you are being helpful and kind. >> reporter: a reminder, it's not the size of a heart that matters. janet shamlian, cbs news, houston. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for "cbs mornings," and follow us
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online all the time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm catherine herridge. this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. after a closer than expected governor's race in new jersey, cbs news projects phil murphy will keep his job as governor of the garden state. murphy is the only democratic governor to win reelection in more than 40 years. ford motors is the first major u.s. automaker to mandate covid vaccines for its 32,000 u.s. employees. workers have until december 8th to get the jab unless th unless religious or medical exemptions. and carrie bradshaw said a rent-controlled apartment is forever. now two lucky people will get to see it for themselves. airbnb is recreating the iconic apartment from the show in vemb just ahead of the latest season premiere of "sex & the
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city." for more news download the latest on your cell phone or connected tv. it's thursday, november 4th, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news." razor thin victory. new jersey governor phil murphy wins re-election by a close margin. why it's doing little to ease concerns about the democratic party. aaron rodgers benched. the star quarterback for the packers reportedly has covid, and now there are questions on whether he broke nfl rules. sabotage on set? the theory some lawyers are raising about the deadly shooting on alec baldwin's latest film. good morning, and good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. we begin with a major

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