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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 3, 2021 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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rittenhouse with his skateboard, reaching for a gun and was shot and killed by rittenhouse. another protester shot and wounded. the defense says rittenhouse felt like he was under attack. >> he runs away from him because he doesn't want the confrontation. he doesn't want trouble. >> reporter: the trial's outcome being watched closely after the shooting became a political touch point with president trump and conservatives rallying to support rittenhouse. and rittenhouse's attorney alluded today that rittenhouse himself would take the stand during this trial, which is expected to last about two weeks, norah. >> nancy chen, thank you. well, it was a record day on wall street. the big three, the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq all hit record highs fueled by a surge in tesla shares and big gains for the energy sector. the dow was up nearly 139 points closing above the 36,000 mark for the first time ever. all right. tonight we're taking an in-depth
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look at the global supply chain crisis and why there are so many snags in the chain. cbs' carter evans and ramy inocencio teamed up to track goods on their long trip from china to the u.s. so we begin across the globe with ramy inocencio in hong kong. hi, ramy. >> reporter: norah, hi. that's right. the early warnings that we're hearing for american consumers to buy their holiday gifts early really is the result of a perfect storm. the pandemic here in china shuttered a lot of factories. but americans stuck at home and still with money to burn actually bought more goods. add to that the shortage of containers, ships, and power that is both electrical and man made. the manufacturing metropolis of guangzhou, china were these high performance speakers begin their long journey to the united states. on a good day, workers here build and box up 2,000 speakers, as long as the electricity is on. >> if we're shut down for more
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than 15 minutes, then it creates a headache. >> reporter: american phillip robertson runs the factory and says random power outages plaguing china are costing him time and money. a generator keeps the factory running. >> so electricity from ato for costs me at least four times more per hour. >> reporter: china is trying to cut carbon emissions, but cuts in coal production have led to record prices. utility companies are not allowed to raise their fees to match. since they can't make money, they stop making electricity. by the time richardson speakers finally leave the factory and head to a chinese port, there is a different power problem, manpower. for every two weeks on the job, dock workers spend three weeks off in quarantine. >> they can be exposed to the covid virus coming in through the supply chain. so that's what china is worried about. >> reporter: one of the world's
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busiest cargo terminals is right there in mainland china. it's called yantian. it is so important to trade. about a quarter of all goods from china get processed through this one port. after a two-week journey across the pacific, most container ships end up here. i'm carter evans at the port of los angeles. when they finally dock and unload, the containers are stacked as far as the eye can see, waiting several days for trucks and trains to carry them across the country. by the time the speakers from china finally land at alto in new york, months have passed and ceo jon haber says he is paying a hefty premium for shipping. >> now it costs like $25,000 and takes 90 days. >> reporter: so it takes longer and it costs like five times as much? >> what a bargain. it's unbelievable. >> reporter: these tiny electronic components are critical for another one of
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haber's products. >> this is more valuable than gold to us. >> reporter: but due to shortages overseas -- >> i'm sending them to product so they can make my products. >> reporter: and send it back to you? >> exactly. exactly. >> reporter: that sounds crazy! >> it's nuts. >> reporter: to avoid raising money, he is already raising prices. do you think they'll come back down? >> i've never seen a manufacturer raise the price and oh, we're sorry, we'll bring it back down. once they go up, they're staying. >>reporter: americans addicted to fast, cheap chinese goods are going to continue paying higher prices at least until the backlog here at the port eases. right now there are 77 container ships just waiting to get in here and youunload, and more one way. norah? >> really fascinating. we should make more of that here in america. thanks, carter. tonight isis is claiming responsibility for the deadly bombing of a military hospital today in kabul. at least 25 people were killed and more than 50 wounded. isis is a rival of the taliban
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and has stepped up attacks since the taliban took control of the country in august. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. (ringing) - hey kaleb, what's up? how you doing? - hey, i'm good, guess what, i just had my 13th surgery. - really? i just had my 17th surgery. - well, you beat me. - well, i am a little bit older than you. - yeah it's true. how are you doing? - i'm doing good. i'm encouraged by seeing how people are coming together to help each other during times like these. - kind of like how shriners hospitals for children is there for us. imagine if i couldn't get my surgery. who knows what would have happened. - same for me.
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i know my shriners hospitals family will continue to take care kids like us who need them most all because of caring people like you. - like me? - no, the people watching us right now at home. - oh, those people. hi people. - kaleb and i know not everyone can help right now, but for those of you who can, we hope you'll this special number on your screen right now. - you'll be making sure our amazing doctors and nurses can keep helping kids like us, who need them now and in the days to come. - your gift will make a huge difference for kids like us. - ooh, ooh, show them them the thank you gift. - okay, okay, hold on a second. with your gift of $19 a month we'll send you this adorable, love to the rescue blanket as a thank you and a reminder of the kids you're helping with your monthly support. - so what are you waiting for? you can use your phone and call, or go to loveshriners.org to give
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and join with thousands of other generous people who change lives with their gifts every day. - i think that's about it buddy, good job. - my pleasure captain. please call now. if operators are busy with all the other caring people, please wait patiently, or you can go to loveshriners.org to give right away. - [alec] big or small, your gift helps us all. - [both] thank you. (giggling) spray, lift, skip, step. swipe, lift, spin, dry. slam, pan, still...fresh move, move, move, move aaaaand still fresh. degree. ultimate freshness activated when you move. instantly clear everyday congestion with vicks sinex saline. for fast drug free relief vicks sinex. instantly clear everyday congestion. and try vicks sinex children's saline. safe and gentle relief for children's noses.
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ed. amera, and cbs news projects that republican glenn youngkin has won the hard fought race for governor of virginia. defeating democrat terry mcauliffe. while some have called this contest an early referendum on joe biden's presidency. >> my fellow virginians. [ cheering ] we stand here this morning at this defining moment, a defining moment that, yes, started with two people on a walk. and a defining moment that is now millions of virginians walking together. [ cheering ] walking together, sharing dreams
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and hopes, just like the ones thatay been planted on my own heart, dreams and hopes for virginia that soars, a virginia that never settles, a virginia where the virginia promise comes alive for everyone that calls this virginia home. together, together we will change the trajectory of this commonwealth. [ cheering ] and, friends, we are going to start that transformation on day one. there is no time to waste.
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our kids can't wait. we work in real people time, not government time.we're tstore excellence in our schools. we will invest the largest education budget in the history of the commonwealth. we're going to invest in teachers, new facilities, special education. we're going to introduce choice within our public school system. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. new vicks convenience pack. dayquil severe for you... and daily vicks super c for me. vicks super c is a daily supplement with vitamin c and b vitamins to help energize and replenish. dayquil severe is a max strength daytime, coughing, power through your day, medicine. new from vicks.
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for visibly firm skin, get collagen peptide for 2x brighter skin, get new vitamin c can't top this skin shop now at olay.com all right. we are staying on top of that lead water crisis in america tonight. the epa is stepping up its involvement in the benton harbor, michigan water crisis. for years the amount of lead in the city's water supply has far exceeded federal standards. well, federal legislators are now ordering the city to make changes, including replacing filters and replacing all lead pipes. okay. tonight a possible explanation for recent sightings for what has been described as a jet pac-man flying over los angeles. this picture taken by a helicopter crew shows a balloon character from tim burton's "nightmare before christmas" floating above the city. well, in a statement, the fbi says all those mysterious
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sighingings may have just been balloons. okay. up next, you see their sig all aro
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the covid pandemic drove many women out of the workforce. but here in washington, there are signs of improvement. in fact, a company that's been making signs for decades in d.c. is leading the way. here is cbs' kris van cleave. >> reporter: the story of any city can be told by the signs decorating its landscape. and the story behind these signs is being written by women like lenore vocal, a single mom from bolivia. >> it's hard to get started. but when you see the final thing, you feel happy. >> reporter: she works for gelberg signs. over the last eight decades, their signs have become iconic in the nation's capital. instead of cutting back when the pandemic hit their business, they grew nearly 20%. so it's a risk, right?
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and that's business. we're saying you're amazing. you're creative. you have what we need. we know you just lost a job. we can bring you on. >> reporter: many of those hires were women. and while women only make up about 10% of construction and fabrication jobs, gelberg's staff is nearly double that. and in many department, women are the boss. >> women are often innate teachers. they want the people around them to understand. they want the people around them to feel capable, to rise to the next level. >> reporter: bringing in more women, what has that gained your business? >> we've gained a company culture that understands difficult situations, that can read different situations, that is empathetic. >> reporter: a culture showing change can be good for business. kris van cleave, cbs news, washington. >> and that is the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm norah o'donnell.
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this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. breaking news. cbs news projects republican businessman glenn youngkin as the next governor of virginia. youngkin defeated former governor terry mcauliffe in a dead heat race for the old dominion state. major news for the pfizer vaccine. the cdc has formally endorsed covid shots for children ages 5 to 11:00. the biden administration shipping out 15 million doses nationwide ahead of the decision. shots could be given out as soon as this week. and november 3rd is national sandwich day. who knew? well, mcdonald's veganburger is rolling out just in plan. it was codeveloped by beyond meat and will arrive at eight
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select u.s. locations for a limited time. for more news, download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> good evening and thank you for joining us. the president tonight is leaving scotland with two big commitments that he hopes will slow the effects of climate change. president biden announced today an effort to cut greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to global warming. the president and leaders of nearly 100 nations pledged to cut methane pollution by at least 30% this decade, and that could have a profound impact on the planet. but leaders of two of the world's largest polluter, china and russia, didn't sign the pledge or even show up for the summit. the u.s. is also one of more than 100 nations agreeing tonight to end and reverse
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deforestation by 2030. that includes planting trees and using less paper. and as the president tries to reassert american leadership on fighting climate change, there so and eironmental agenda here at home, including a deal between democrats on lowering prescription drug prices. cbs' nancy cordes is traveling with the president and leads off our coverage from glasgow. good evening, nancy. >> reporter: good evening, norah. before flying home tonight, the president said he could not recall two more consequential days for the future of the climate, and he slammed two of his foreign rivals for being notable no-shows here. >> i'm confident we can do this. >> reporter: in speech after speech here the past two days, the president made ambitious promises to help heal an ailing planet. >> the united states is going to lead by our example. >> reporter: together with other leaders, he pledged to reduce methane emissions worldwide by a third and halt deforestation all together by 2030.
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>> we're ending the great chainsaw massacre. >> reporter: but those kinds of changes don't come cheap. >> $4 billion initial investment. deploy up to $9 billion. >> reporter: and they require the consent of a divided u.s. congress. how do you convince republicans and even some democrats to get behind more spending if they look at this conference and say china isn't meeting these global goals. russia doesn't intend to meet these global goals. why should we? >> because we want to be able to breathe, and we want to be able to lead the world. but the fact that china trying to assert, understandably, a new role in the world as a world leader not showing up? come on. same with putin. he has serious, serious climate problems, and he is mum on willingness to do anything. i feel confident we're going to get done what we have to do at home. >> reporter: yet at home his party is still struggling to
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lock in the votes for mr. biden's build back better plan, which includes half a trillion dollars worth of climate measures. >> the white house knew exactly where i stood. >> reporter: today senator joe manchin from the coal state of west virginia said he still has concerns that need to be addressed as another group of democrats struck a deal on a big new provision that would enable medicare to be able to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies to bring down drug prices. it would also cap out-of-pocket drug costs for seniors at $2,000 a year. >> many of us would have wanted to go much further, but it's a big step in helping the american people deal with the price of drugs. >> reporter: under this compromise, medicare would only be allowed to negotiate down the prices of a handful of very expensive drugs at first, but still, it would be the first time. president biden said tonight he is still confident that he will get the support he needs from democrats to pass his bill,
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though a vote this week, norah, is now looking less likely. >> all right. nancy cordes, thank you very much. we're going to turn now to the breaking news in the fight against covid. the director of the cdc calls this a monumental day. late today pfizer's mini dose of covid vaccine for kids 5 to 11 years old got a thumb's up from a cdc advisory panel. and the first shots could be given out within hours. here is cbs' meg oliver. >> reporter: tonight a final green light from the cdc director will pave the way for vaccinations to begin as early as tomorrow. >> oh, it doesn't hurt at all. >> it's a historical milestone. and not to put too fine a point on it, i think this is really important for families and children. >> reporter: in a large clinical trial, the vaccine was nearly 91% effective, and almost three out of ten parents of a 5 to 11-year-old surveyed said they're eager for their child to get the shots. a third said they will wait to see how the vaccine is working, but nearly a third said they will definitely not get their
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child vaccinated. how do you convince parents that this vaccine is safe and effective for children? >> this is a disease that can cause children to suffer and be hospitalized and die, and it's a disease worth preventing. >> reporter: so far nearly two million 5 to 11-year-olds have had covid. 8300 of them have been hospitalized. 172 have died. >> the mantra was that children suffer this disease infrequently, and when they suffer it, they suffer it less severely. the fact is they can suffer it, and they can suffer it severely. >> reporter: but thanks to families like the chavezes who enrolled their son nico, the and 6-year-old daughter sophia in pfizer's clinical trial, the arrival of a vaccine for 28 million children is now only a step away. >> i thought i don't want to do this, but i should. >> we know that it's scary, but the choices that we're making aren't only affecting us. they're affecting everybody. >> and meg joins us now. a good time to ask how are covid
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cases among children right now? >> norah, when covid first entered the u.s., only 3% of weekly cases occurred in children. that number is now closer to 25%. and as far as vaccinating kids younger than 5, pfizer expects to have its initial data from their studies before the end of the year, norah. >> some really interesting numbers. meg oliver, thank you. there is a lot more news ahead well, it was record day on wall street. the big three, the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq all hit record highs fueled by a surge in tesla shares and big gains for the energy sector. the dow was up 139 points, closing above the 36,000 mark for the first time ever. well, tonight isis is claiming responsibility for the deadly bombing of a military hospital today in kabul. at least 25 people were killed and more than 50 wounded. isis is a rival of the taliban and has stepped up attacks since the taliban took control of the country in august.
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all right. we are staying on top of that lead water crisis in america tonight. the epa is stepping up its involvement in the benton harbor, michigan water crisis. for years the amount of lead in the city's water supply has far exceeded federal standards. well, federal regulators are now ordering the city to make technical improvement at its water plant including replacing filters and replacing all lead pipes. okay. tonight a possible explanation for recent sightings of what's been described as a jet pac-man flying over los angeles. in a statement, the fbi says all those mysterious sightings may have just been balloons. okay. there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news."
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> i'm jan crawford in washington. thanks for staying with us. at the u.n. climate summit in scotland, president biden and 100 world leaders signed on to an agreement to regulate methane. it's a greenhouse gas that warms the atmosphere 80 times faster than carbon dioxide. here in the u.s., the proposed new rules will force oil and gas companies to monitor, detect, and fix methane leaks from their wells and face stiff fines if they don't. but methane is odorless and colorless. so the question is how do you know when it's leaking? ben tracy met with some scientists who are working on
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that. >> reporter: inside a hangar in boulder, colorado, this appears to be just another fancy private jet. >> you can always pull these graphs up. >> reporter: but it's actually filled with scientists on a mission to help save the planet. they take to the skies to hunt down an invisible gas, seen here with infrared cameras, which is rapidly heating up the atmosphere. and fueling some of the worst impacts of climate change. what exactly is methane? >> methane is a greenhouse gas. it is the second largest contributor to climate change, and it accounts for more than a quarter of the warming that we're experiencing today. >> reporter: alissa occo is a senior climate scientist at the environmental defense fund. she says methane emissions mainly come from leaks during fossil fuel production, from the digestive tracts of cows when they burp, and from rotting food in landfills.
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and here's why it matters. methane is like carbon dioxide on steroids, 84 times more powerful at warming the planet. but unlike co2, which can stay in the atmosphere for century, methane only lasts for about a decade. >> reducing methane emissions is the single fastest opportunity we have to slow down the rate of warming. >> reporter: if we're able to cut these methane emissions, what impact would that have on warming? >> we have the technologies available to cut methane emissions globally in half over the next ten years. and if we do that, then we can slow down the rate of global warming by 30%. >> reporter: slowing warming could mean fewer destructive storms, wildfires, and heatwaves, and slower melting of the world's ice sheets, which is causing sea levels to rise. >> we need to know how much methane issing emitted from where, and by whom. >> reporter: so you actually detect the methane through the bottom of the plane?
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>> yeah, that's correct. >> reporter: and that's where the plane comes in. >> up front is actually methane air itself. if you look up, you can see two lenses. >> reporter: the scientists call it methane air. they've been flying it over what's been known as the permean basin, more than 86,000 square miles in texas, the largest oil field on the planet. special sensors on the plane detect methane leaks from oil and gas facilities on the ground. according to edf, those industries account for about a quarter of all human-made methane emissions. and knowing where the leaks are can help in identifying the polluters and holding them responsible. >> i see workers capping hundreds of thousands of abandoned oil and gas wells. >> reporter: president biden wants congress to spend $16 billion to help stop the methane leaks that scientists are seeing from the air and soon from space. a new $90 million satellite called methane sat is being built by the environmental
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defense fund in part with money from amazon founder jeff bezos' earth fund. they plan to launch it next year atop a spacex falcon 9 rocket. once in orbit, it will find and map methane leaks around the world 24 hours a day. >> this is the structure. >> reporter: steve stagg is ceo of blue canyon technologies which is building the satellite, including the solar panels that will act as its wings to power its flight. >> so what we're seeing here, this is pretty much as big as it is, and then the solar arrays come out from there? >> that's exactly right. this is the size of it. the solar arrays will extend 10 to 12 feet on each side of the satellite. >> this will absolutely be a game-changer. >> reporter: reducing planet warming emissions has been melissa's life work since a trip to greenlad during college. >> i watched as ice was melting off of glaciers and just rushing out into the ocean. >> reporter: and she now has one very personal reason to work even harder. >> i have a 2-year-old daughter. and it really worries me what
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the climate will be like when she is my age. i look at my daughter every day and i just want the best for her. and a huge part of that is the world that we're leaving behind. >> reporter: a world we still have a chance to save. ben tracy, boulder, colorado. here in the u.s., only 30% of methane emissions come from oil and gas production. the rest comes from landfills, coal mining, agricultural, and believe it or not, beef production. cow, as it turns out, are a big contributor. mark phillips reports. >> reporter: cattle graze on the lush green pastures of scotland. the environmentalists will tell you that when it comes to global warming meat and especially beef is among the worst foods we can eat. that the methane cows belch out while turning feed into food is a far more powerful greenhouse gas than even the carbon dioxide produced by burning fossil fuels.
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but here at this experimental farm run by scotland's rural cod beus insut ones not like another. did it surprise you one cow, you thought -- holy cow. this stomach content is a lot different than this cow han that cow. >> there is a huge variation in the stomach. >> reporter: it's all about the stomach. well, stomachs. cows have four of them. >> we are putting -- >> reporter: rioter roa has been studying the digestive stomachs of cows and finds they not only vary from cow to cow, they determine how much methane a cow produces. a brief biology lesson on bovine here. cows don't actually digest what they eat. the bugs in their gut do. their food mixes with a kind of microbe soup in the rumen, or first stomach, and then is rechewed before passing through
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the rest of the system. and reiner roa's work shows genetics can predict which animals will have the right micrococktail to produce the least methane. in other words, you can breed low methane producing cattle. so you can select. you can say that cow, that bull? >> yes. >> they've got good stomach stuff. >> yes. >> reporter: put them together and make another cow with the same stomach stuff. >> yes. >> reporter: how much less? >> we are predicting that we are reducing emission about 50%. >> reporter: 50%? >> yes. >> reporter: how do they know? they measure it. they put cows in hermetically sealed chambers for three days and analyze the gases they belch out. and there is another benefit. producing methane is actually a waste of energy for a cow. the less they produce, the more efficient they are at turning cattle feed into human food. win-win. still, a 50% reduction in greenhouse gas production is not the same as 100% reduction,
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which is what we would get if we just stopped eating the stuff. a recent study at oxford university has shown that judged against the nutrition it provides, beef is simply too environmentally expensive. but let's go back to that bucolic scene of those cows grazing on those highland pastures. cattle grazing is arguably the most efficient food producing use to which these fields can be put because nothing much will grow here other than grass. and there are lots of other areas of the world like that. as with so much of the environmental argument, there is a lot to chew over. mark phillips, cbs news, scotland. americans are eating less beef than ever before. when the "overnight news" returns, we'll tell you about the explosive growth of meatless meat. stay with us. better skin from your body wash? try olay body wash with skincare super ingredient
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for your worst cold and flu symptoms, on sunday night and every night. nyquil severe. the nighttime, sniffling, sneezing, coughing, aching, stuffy head, best sleep with a cold, medicine. frequent heartburn? not anymore. the prilosec otc two-week challenge is helping people love what they love again. just one pill a day. 24 hours. zero heartburn. because life starts when heartburn stops. take the challenge at prilosecotc dot com. america's growing appetite for meatless burgers is now taking hold in the fast food industry. burger king, mcdonald's, taco bell and others have already added plant-based options to their menus, and smaller local restaurants are joining in. nancy chen follows the food revolution from the farm to the table. >> reporter: near times square, one of the best joints for a burger with all the fixings
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isn't serving any meat. april tam smith is the co-founder of ps kitchen. the vegan restaurant was one of the first in new york city to serve the brand beyond meat back in 2017. >> i remember when we first opened, the questions were usually around what's in this? wow, it's really good. what am i eating? >> reporter: fast forward to today. as meat alternative products are creating new appetites for all. >> the people who are coming in wanting to try this burger, are they vegetarian or meat-eaters? >> i would say mostly meat-eaters. i would say 80% of our people are just regular people, people who are just craving burgers. >> reporter: a recent survey found nearly nine in ten americans eat meat as part of their diet, 25% say they're at least willing to try plant-based burger alternatives. that includes this oklahoma girl. so this is the beyond meat burger. and there is absolutely no meat in this. >> no, not at all.
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it's made with pea protein. >> all right. >> this is really good. it just tastes like a regular burger. >> reporter: as for where much of it cops from, near the south dakota border in dawson, minnesota are the seeds of a food revolution. brother and sister tyler lorenzen and nicole atchison have the largest pea protein plant in north america. what exactly is pea protein? >> pea protein is protein that comes from peas, and not green pea, actually yellow field peas. there is actually 20% protein in peas which is quite a bit for most vegetables. >> reporter: a chance to change what we eat and how we farm. nicole, which us surprised to learn, even on the drive in here, i'm passing fields of crop, that those crops aren't necessarily going to people. and for the most part, they're actually going to livestock. >> yeah. and that's i think surprising for a lot of people. because as we drive around, we think oh, look at all this food that we're making. >> reporter: they work for the network of more than 400 farmers
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to produce pea plants. they're one of the most nurturing crops you can grow which is great for crop rotations. what does this mean for farmers in the united states these days? >> we've worked over the last 20 years to adapt varieties that can grow in the heartland. peas are typically grown in canada. so we've really adapted them to new climates which gives farmers more revenue opportunity. >> reporter: one of the biggest properties is for beyond meats. found now in mcdonald's, taco bell and panda express. it seems like the industry of plant-based protein has really gone through a revolution these past few years. >> yeah. i think the biggest change has been the products on the market really mimicking their counterparts that are coming from animal proteins. >> reporter: with flavor and look, pea protein is prove tock more than just a food trend. the meat-eaters that are coming in and trying these plant-based burgers, what are they seeking? >> i think often it's just genuinely delicious. you don't really feel like
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you'rie missing out on somethin. but at the same time a lot of us are more aware of the environmental im ct now.
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if you've already been out holiday shopping for your young one, you probably found a lot of the hottest toys are in short supply. wendy gillette has the story. >> reporter: the deluxe interactive jj doll requires feeding, while batman's new transforming bat cave is designed to keep preschoolers absorbed with the caped crusader for hours. >> and there is all kinds of surprises to find. it comes with batman. we have a working elevate were sounds. >> reporter: little ones are also drawn to this mini bumper car. >> it lights up. it's safe for indoors. you can take it out, and it goes 1 miles an hour, so it's nice and safe. >> reporter: these sisters couldn't stay abring the l.o.l. surprise! omg house of surprises when they recently checked out the toy insiders holiday top 20
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in new york city. >> it had so many accessories and like how it's colorful. and it has a lot of design in it. >> reporter: what's old is new again on the list, like the pokemon trading card game celebrations elite trainer box and tamagotchi pics. >> you can take pictures and put yourself into here and take pictures with your pet. we have never seen that before. >> reporter: knostia is also back in the form of this kitty zoo print cam. just like the old polaroid, kids can take pictures and print them. but this holiday season supply issues could bring coal to kids' stocks instead of the toys they want. >> we've never seen anything like it. on one hand, the toy industry is doing so well. on the other hand, there is going to be big challenges for the holiday season. >> reporter: her advice, if you see a toy on the shelf that tops a child's wish list, grab it. the next time you shop it might be gone with no more shipments
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on the way. wendy gillette, cbs news, new york. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm jan crawford. this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. breaking news. cbs news projects republican businessman glenn youngkin as the next governor of virginia. youngkin defeated former governor terry mcauliffe in a dead heat race for the old dominion state. major news for the pfizer vaccine. the cdc has formally endorsed covid shots for children ages 5 to 11. the biden administration shipping out 15 million doses nationwide ahead of the decision. shots could be given out as soon as this week. and november 3rd is national sandwich day. who knew? well, mcdonald's veganburger is rolling out just in plan. time. it was codeveloped by beyond meat and will arrive at eight select u.s. locations for a limited time.
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for more news, download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. it's wednesday, november 3rd, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news." break ing overnight, election results. republicans claim victory in virginia's gubernatorial race. we're tracking other major contests decided across the nation. covid vaccine for children. the cdc approves pfizer's dose for kids ages 5 to 11. how many parents plan to vaccinate their young ones right away. to first -- the braves are world champions! >> baseball's best, the braves capture their first title in 26 years. why it seemed almost impossible just a few months ago. [ cheers ]

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