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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 29, 2021 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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>> reporter: but today, the mayor doubled down. people want these jobs. anyone who doesn't want to do the job anymore, i know someone else will step up and fill it. >> reporter: now, if unvaccinated first responders are set home monday, according to the fighters union, up to 20% of fire houses could have to close. that, of course, would impact the city's ambulance fleet, and, in turn, response times. but the mayor says he has a contingency plan in place, norah. >> o'donnell: all right, we'll be watching that closely. mola lenghi, thank you. tonight, we've got a frightening story of rage in the air. a first class passenger punched a flight attendant in the face twice, forcing the flight from new york to southern california to make an emergency landing in denver wednesday night. cbs' erroll barnett has more.ai passengers voicing frustration as this man is detained by law
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enforcement. cbs news has learned, while in the air, a flight attendant bumped the first class passenger and quickly apologized. rew r, the passenger went to the member twice, breaking bones in her face, returning to his seat as if nothing happened. >> i understand that he actually punched her twice. she had blood splattered on the outside of her mask. >> reporter: the j.f.k. to santa ana flight was diverted to denver, where the suspect was taken into custody, and has been permanently banned from the airline. today, c.e.o. doug parker said it's one of the worst acts of unruly behavior he's seen. >> this type of behavior has to stop. and the best deterrent is aggressive criminal prosecution. >> reporter: it is yet another example of this year's unprecedented level of conflict aboard aircraft. this week, the f.a.a. reported almost 5,000 unruly incidents for 2021, but only 216 resulted in civil penalties. i
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administrator steve dickson told cbs news last month, his agency's efforts to reduce clashes led to more than $1 million in fines, and counting. >> if you misbehave on an aircraft, it's going to be a painful process, and we're going to get your wallet. >> reporter: now, the f.b.i. is investigating. it's unclear if alcohol played a role in this incident, but the f.a.a. says it does factor into many of these unruly passenger complaints. and while southwest and american have suspended alcohol sales until next year, united airlines announced internally it will resume sale of liquor in the main cabin, norah, next month. >> o'donnell: so alarming. our flight attendants do such a great job. thank you, erroll barnett. well, tonight, we're learning details of a huge settlement stemming from the 2015 church massacre in charleston, south carolina. nine people were killed. the federal government will pay their families and others who survived $88 million because of mistakes by the f.b.i.
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cbs's jeff pegues is following this. >> i still re-live, and think about what happened. >> reporter: jennifer pickney is one of the church shooting survivors. she heard the gunshots that killed her husband, reverend clementa pickney, and eight others inside emanuel a.m.e. church. >> i live with it every day. >> reporter: today, she and her daughters stood outside of the department of justice stood and celebrated, while also reflecting on what has been lost. >> no amount of compensation will ever replace my father's life. >> reporter: the survivors will split $25 million, while $63 million will go to the families of those killed. the landmark agreement settled a series of lawsuits brought after the f.b.i. acknowledged that its gun background check system failed to block the sale of the glock 41 murder weapon to dylann roof. a glitch in the f.b.i. database and human error allowed the killer to purchase the gun while
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the background check was still underway. how does this settlement prevent another dylann roof? >> from a legal standpoint, the settlement doesn't do anything to change or alter the existing landscape. >> reporter: what family members of the victims hope is that the settlement will serve as a deterrent. >> this is a nightmare that will never end. >> reporter: kaya singleton wrote a book that he called "i never forgave the killer." his mother myra died in the shooting. >> i have a young daughter that has a fear of sitting in a church, because she thinks somebody of a different color is going to come in there and open fire. >> reporter: in total, the survivors and family members of the victims will receive $88 million. there is symbolism in that number. dylann roof was known to wear the 88, which is considered white supremacist code. norah. >> o'donnell: just got the chills, hearing you say that. jeff pegues, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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yates spent decades at the justice department, and was unceremoniously fired by a newly inaugurated president trump. well, tonight, yates is sharing the story of her breast cancer battle for the very first time. >> it was invasive papillary cancer. >> o'donnell: sally yates was suddenly grappling with a cancer diagnosis during a busy summer, testifying before congress, and speaking at the democratic national convention. >> this was one of those times where the personal and the professional collided. and so, it was, i think, just about five days before i was to testify in the senate judiciary committee about the russia investigation, that i got the final diagnosis, that it was invasive cancer. >> o'donnell: and that's some pretty important testimony that you were about to give. >> it was. i thought about trying to postpone, but it would have been a big thing if i had postponed it. and, there also was this false narrative out there, called obamagate, that president obama and then-vice president biden
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had directed the russia investigation, and directed us to investigate mike flynn. and they specifically pointed to a meeting in the oval office where people were alleging this had happened. well, i had been in that meeting, and i knew that didn't happen. so i did also want to be able to get the truth out there. >> o'donnell: so here you are, just diagnosed with breast cancer, and you feel like you have to go and tell, not only the congress but the world, the truth. >> right. not ideal timing. >> o'donnell: how did you manage it all? >> it was just a few days since i'd gotten the diagnosis, and i would find, as i was trying to get ready for this testimony, i would find myself googling the survival rates for papillary cancer, or different treatments. you know, you couldn't-- i couldn't help but be very distracted by that. >> o'donnell: the type of breast cancer yates had is rare, and she needed a double mastectomy. >> so, i testified in the senate judiciary committee. a couple of weeks later, spoke at the democratic national convention. and then the day after that,
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went in for pre-op, and had surgery the following day. >> o'donnell: yates is now in private practice, and the national women's soccer league has just hired her to investigate allegations of sexual abuse. so, your message to women? >> get a mammogram. get the other diagnostic tests that so many people have had to be putting off during the pandemic. >> o'donnell: the statistics about the pandemic and cancer screening are really alarming. nearly 10,000 people over the next decade will die from breast cancer and colorectal cancer, because of pandemic-related delays. >> it may very well be a looming health crisis that we haven't even really fully begun to comprehend yet. people can try to do something about it, by getting in now. you may have missed those tests during the pandemic time, but it's not too late to go in for those tests now. >> o'donnell: very important reminder. and yates says she's cancer-free essn all right, there is much more
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overseeing facebook, instagram, and messenger. the change comes amid all those allegations that facebook has knowingly caused social harm on its platform. all right, up next, how football is helping a town rise from the ashes.
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>> o'donnell: it's been a rough few months in colfax, california. a fierce wildfire was followed by this week's bomb cyclone. but cbs' jonathan vigliotti reports, some have found hope in an unlikely place. >> ready, go! >> reporter: high school line-backer peter dunham runs into the action, not away. but there was no game plan for what he faced this summer. >> i look up and there's a black plume of smoke right over my house. we watched the house right across the street from mine go up in flames. >> reporter: california's river fire destroyed 142 structures, including damaging dunham's home, and displaced many of his neighbors and friends, like
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those on the falcons high school football team. the senior slept in the bed of his truck, parked at a gr.>> jones, aryou good? all coh tony martelo realized the green gridiron was a place for his team to escape and recover from the charred world around it. >> it allowed the kids to come back to a safe place and it created a sense of normalcy. >> it's definitely an escape, because we all know that we've been affected by it, some more than others, but we're all fighting together. >> reporter: football in the fire-ravaged west has become a form of therapy, not just for players, but entire communities. today, it's the falcons' turn-- >> let's go! >> reporter: --to rally around their home turf. >> being here playing football felt great. it really felt like home, when i didn't have a home. >> reporter: jonathan vigliotti, cbs news.
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>> o'donnell: and that's the overnight news, for some musts continues others check back with us in the morning. reporting from the nation's capital ol i'm norah o'donnell. -- family members separated at the border may get up to $400,000 each as they were separated from the families. under zero tolerance policy. listen up, sheerio's
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he's just released fifth studio album, took to twitter to say it's his proudest piece of work. moresonnected ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news". ♪ >> o'donnell: good evening and thank you so much for joining us, in the words of president biden his presidency will be determined by what happened in the next week. before flying off to europe today the president unveiled new framework for his build back better plan, we'll explain what made it into the proposal and what didn't but first want to put it in perspective just how much spending this on climate change initiatives, the price tag $1.75 trillion combined with the bipartisan infrastructure
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bill and recovery bill passed in march is close to $5 trillion that is a lot of money. but president biden says, if the bills are passed, it would be more significant than what presidents f.d.r. and l.b.j. accomplished, combined. cbs' nancy cordes leads off our coverage tonight from rome, the first stop on the president's trip. good evening, nancy. >> reporter: good evening, norah. this breakthrough comes about seven months after the presi first unveiled his plan. and this newly-released 1,700-page bill still doesn't contain everything the democrats wanted. but tonight, the white house is still touting it as one of the biggest investments in education and childcare ever. just before jetting off to europe, president biden made one last dash to capitol hill-- part celebration, part pep talk. >> i think we're going to be in good shape. >> reporter: he said he's confident he now has the votes to pass a $1.75 trillion plan that would drive down childcare
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costs for most low- and middle-income families, and establish universal pre-k for more than six million three- and four-year-olds. the bill would also boost the supply of affordable housing, increase college pell grants, and close a medicaid gap to cover four million more people. >> it is probably the most consequential bill since the 1960s. >> reporter: this new deal comes after weeks of talks with two moderate senate democrats, who still stopped just short of embracing the bill today. >> i look forward to continue working in good faith. >> reporter: to win their support, president biden has dropped some progressive priorities, like guaranteed paid family leave, and free community college. medicare would be expanded to cover hearing aids, but not vision or dental care. >> it's been a long and difficult negotiation. >> reporter: treasury secretary janet yellen, already in rome, helped to broker the compromise. i can see a lot of americans saying, "wow, a lot of these provisions sound great. what i am really worried about right now is inflation."
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>> well, you know, some of the most important ways in which families see inflation is, they feel they can't afford childcare. and what they're going to see is a massive reduction in the amount that they have to spend for childcare. >> reporter: republicansed >> anybody who votes for any of these bills, without seeing the fine print, is like a rock, only dumber. >> reporter: democrats insist this bill would be fully paid for, in part with the new surtax on billionaires and multi-millionaires. now, a vote probably won't come for at least a week, so the president is going to need to keep his entire party together until then, which won't be quite as easy to do, norah, from here in rome. >> o'donnell: all right, nancy cordes in rome for us, thank you. well, now, let's get to that breaking news on former new york governor andrew cuomo. tonight, a misdemeanor complaint has been filed alleging a sex
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crime. cuomo was forced to resign amid complaints of sexual harassment and unwanted touching from former staffers-- allegations he has denied. we get more from cbs' jericka duncan. >> reporter: months after resigning, former new york governor andrew cuomo now faces a criminal complaint of forcibly touching a woman in the governor's executive mansion last year. according to the complaint filed by an albany county sheriff investigator, "cuomo did intentionally forcibly place his hand under the blouse shirt of the victim, specifically the victim's left breast, for the purpose of degrading and gratifying his sexual desires." i sat down with one of the alleged victims, brittany commisso, cuomo's former executive assistant, for an exclusive interview last august. >> he put his hand up my blouse and cupped my breast, over my bra. >> reporter: while the complaint does not name the alleged victim, the description of the incident closely mirrors commisso's claims.
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>> it was probably in the most sexually aggressive manner than any of the other hugs that he had given me. >> reporter: an investigation by the new york attorney general's office accused cuomo of groping, kissing, and making sexually suggestive comments to 11 women. the former governor has vehemently denied crossing the line. >> let me be clear-- that never happened. >> reporter: cbs news legal analyst rikki klieman. >> reporter: it appears that they believe-- the government believes that there is corroborative evidence. however, the only two people in that room are the alleged victim and the defendant. >> reporter: we reached out to commisso and her attorney, and have not heard back. but ultimately, the albany county district attorney's office will decide whether or not to bring charges based off of this complaint. and just this evening, i spoke to cuomo's attorney, who told me that, "the former governor," she said, "never assaulted anyone," and she also said that she believes that this filing was politically motivated.
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norah. >> o'donnell: all right, jericka duncan with that new information tonight, thank you. story of rage in the air. a first class passenger punched a flight attendant in the face twice, forcing the flight from new york to southern california to make an emergency landing in denver wednesday night. cbs' erroll barnett has more. >> reporter: american airlines passengers voicing frustration as this man is detained by law
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enforcement. cbs news has learned, while in the air, a flight attendant bumped the first class passenger and quickly apologized. later, the passenger went to the galley, punched the same crew member twice, breaking bones in her face, returning to his seat as if nothing happened. >> i understand that he actually punched her twice. she had blood splattered on the outside of her mask. >> reporter: the j.f.k. to santa ana flight was diverted to denver, where the suspect was taken into custody, and has been permanently banned from the airline. today, c.e.o. doug parker said it's one of the worst acts of unruly behavior he's seen. >> this type of behavior has to stop. and the best deterrent is aggressive criminal prosecution. >> reporter: it is yet another example of this year's unprecedented level of conflict aboard aircraft. this week, the f.a.a. reported almost 5,000 unruly incidents for 2021, but only 216 resulted in civil penalties. >> it could result in jail time. >> reporter: f.a.a. administrator steve dickson told cbs news last month, his agency's efforts to reduce clashes led to more than $1 million in fines, and counting. >> if you misbehave on an aircraft, it's going to be a painful process, and we're going to get your wallet. >> reporter: now, the f.b.i. is investigating. it's unclear if alcohol played a
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news". i'm jan crawford in washington. thanks for staying with us. thanksgiving weekend is traditionally the busiest time to travel and analysts are warning of long lines at the airport security gate and check-in counters. one carrier is working to speed up the process. delta airlines testing facial recognition technology designed to reduce the time it takes
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walking into the terminal, boarding the plane and getting set settled, errol barnett has the story fromirportlanta. ep this one of the world'si llple m tn 2.5 million travellers during the holidays, many with devices and maybe have luggage as well. it's a lot. so delta is upgrading things so all you need to be on your way is your beautiful face. >> we are in delta's new tsa pre-check express bag drop facility. >> reporter: his airlines newest attraction years in the making will speed up travel. while major u.s. carriers like united are piloting bio metric id checks, delta wants to be first with full security
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centered around facial recognition. members of delta's sky mile who's upload passport detail precheck can soon do this. >> soon as you take your mask off takes the photograph and uses the image withhe number, and making sure there is an image match in the database and our bag tag will print. >> if successful this reduces the need for agents while streamlining check in. delta is partnering with tsa so security lines like these should be a breeze. >> it reduced the element of human error. >> how quick can someone move through security? >> six to ten seconds. >> the final leg you can use your bio metric is at the gate, no id or boarding pass necessary. >> welcome aboard. >> thanks. >> delta's byron merit. >> the biggest hurdles are just speed. you know. we're trying to move as fast as
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we can. second thing is customers are coming back really fast. >> delta is testing this and are >> reporter: travel expert says flyers are overwhelmingly literally ready to face the future. >> our show line survey shows four of five will share bio metric data with an airline they regularly fly to save time. >> reporter: now this will be a gradual roll out, things will move slowly, concourse t in atlanta and concourse a in detroit will have this technology. for those fearful sharing your travel face, delta says it immediately destroys each image, if you don't want to participate you don't opt in. you have always loved vicks vapors. and now you'll really love new vicks' vapostick. it goes on clear and dries quickly. no mess.
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look good. feel good. play good. gillette proglide, five blades and a pivoting flexball to get virtually every hair on the first stroke. look good, game good. gillette. for the past 65 years the utah division of wildlife resources have worked to make sure lakes in most parts of the state are fully stocked with fish, they do it by flying the fish in by plane, this year long drought brought lake levels to historic lows and made the fish drops more difficult, they still went a heads. conor knighton with the story. >>. >> reporter: misty mountain
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mornings in northern utah are sublime, birds are chirping, sun is shining but far-off hum of a propeller could signal a shift in the forecast because that might mean it's about to start raining fish. ♪ every year hundreds of remote lakes in the mountains get an infusion of fresh fish straight from the sky >> there's nothing that teaches you how to do this. >> you don't learn fish dropping in flight school. >> no. >> he flies a small cessna stuffed to the gills with thousands of tiny passengers, his job is to get them all to their final destinations even if there's a floating human in the way. >> when the lake's really narrow
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i have no choice and i drop the fish and i have hit people with the fish. >> do they think it's the end of the world? >> no they think it's pretty cool. it's usually peopleututtiishntot so peake them out of lakes say strange thing our species does. it happens all across the country but the terrain in northern utah presents some special challenges. >> up here there's 650 lake that's we have fish in. and only a fraction of those that we can access with a vehicle. >> ted halos is a hatchery supervisor for utah division of wildlife resources. this is where the journey begins for the fish that are stocked in the alpine lakes more than a million a year raised at that facility in trays, and tubs and tanks. >> it doesn't take long for them to figure it out. >> there they go. >> lakes near the road can be
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stocked with a truck. >> all t rest, a airple is actually the easy option. >> you know, in the olden days before 1956, they used to take pack horses with mail cans and used to take them all summer to do 30 or 40 lakes, we can do 50 or 60 lakes in a morning. >> it's a process that begins early in the morning, just as the sun is coming up. halos and his team measure out loads of trouts in specially designnd compartments. a set of switches up front controls the drops, the plane can hold around 14,000 fish total. soon as it's full, takes off into the mountains, and then the process repeats all morning long. >> getting 1200 fish,
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10.340u7bds. 10.4 pounds. >> each lake receives a specific allotment of fish. >> you don't want to put too many because they over populate d wo't a to survive. if you put too few the fisherman can't fish them out. >> these young fish thanks to their small size can easily survive the splash down. once all grown up will look more like this. >> i'm happy with that. >> so fine. >> getting out to these fish could be just as challenging as catching them. anglers hike miles into the back country. >> what's the furthest you have hiked in for a lake? >> oh, sometimes eight or nine miles. >> he and his son have been fishing together in the mountains since hunter was a boy. during the pandemic families have flocked to utah's lakes, the state broke its all-time
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record for fishing license sales. for halos those numbers represent an opportunity to get a new generation hooked. the way he sees it, he's helping stockpile memories. >> it's pretty scenery, can take your kid there and catch trout that kid will remember that for the rest of his life. we're creating memories for families and kids that they'll never forget. >> conor knighton in utah. 2500 miles east fishing industry in new england is battling a growing problem on the ocean floor, called ghost gear, tons of fishing line and lobster track threaten the marine life and we travel to address what's done with the problem. >> reporter: on the surface, looks like a classic new england picture perfect postcard but lurking a few feet below,
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another world. one of long-forgotten fishing nets, ropes and lobster traps tangled over the years by storms and rr if you t it over the side it never leaves it's still there. >> this lobsterman has worked the waters off portland for more than 40 years and led us three miles o shore to white head passage brought up a bunch of gear twisted with his own. >> that's probably six or eight traps, a rope, a string and gill metal drifting around the bottom. it was wrapped in lobster gear i was actively fish. this is gill net. >> it's known as ghost gear. >> it's a trapped door. this is what we use in late 08s, early 90s. >> how long do you think this has been under water? i'm estimating, 50 years plus
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>> in 2019 he helped to recover this seven ton of ball ghost gear, but just a fraction of more than 600,000 tons of fish gear added to the oceans each year. >> it's really out of sight out of mind for mostfo r r: g ghostni conservativecy, an alliance -- >> ghost gears is really harmful to fishers and coastal communities who depend on income from fishing and it is a problem pretty much anywhere you find fishing. >> anywhere in the world? >> all over the world. >> reporter: ghost gear can unintentionally trap, injure or kill marine life. last year divers freed this whale from tangled fishing net
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near italy. >> is this in the prevention or removal of ghost gear. >> it's about both, preventing it from ending up in the ocean and minimizing the damage and recovering what is easily able to be recovered. >> like the ghost gear he found on a dive at the end of a fishing pier in downtown portland there was so much a train had to be brought in to lift it out of the water. ladder. traps. nets and ropes. two tons in all. >> fisherman don't want a finger point at them because they're not doing it on purpose but they have to realize to be stewards and help with the process, then pretend it is not there. >> how important is that partnership? >> it's critical, they know where the stuff is. i don't dive. we can't do it without them. >> a sometimes tedious task what feels like a drop in the ocean
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but he wouldn't have any other way. >> how do you feel bringing this up. >> i'm a fisherman and i feel responsible for bringing it up. >> removing the ghost gear of years' past and keeping hen itiy
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ay but in on t or treating got underway early for a very special reason. >> all right! >> reporter: like most kids this six-year-old loves halloween, the candy and the costumes. >> she was it's best mary poppins you ever seen. >> ever. >> what was your favorite? >> cupcake. >> reporter: but this year in this maryland neighborhood halloween was different. >> happy halloween! >> reporter: casey, joyful little girl who loves the outdoors was diagnosed this summer with brain cancer.
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>> i got 15 ivs. >> yeah because you have really small veins. >> reporter: after radiation chemo start the just before halloween so the neighbors helped her have her favorite day early. >> everyone wanted to be there. >> reporter: showing the love and power of community. >> we did 100% for casey, not for us at all. at the end of the day i was reflecting on how completely happy i was. it's been a while since there's just been joy. >> joy. >> yeah. >> a good day. >> it was really, really great to have that feel and that good day. >> reporter: a good day, a real treat. >> so struck by the strength of that little girl and her parents, we're praying for casey's recovery. and that is the overnight news for this friday. for some the news continues, for others, check back later for "cbs mornings" and follow online
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any time at cbsnews online. reporting from the capitol i'm jan crawford. ♪ this is cbs news flash i'm tom hanson in new york. president biden is set to meet pope francis at the vatican in a few hours, kick off to his second major forin trip, they will discuss ending the pandemic, tackling the climate change and caring for the poor. familyembers separated at the border may soon get up to $450,000 each, as they were separated under the trump zero tolerance policy. and listen up sheerios what ed sheeran fans are called he
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just released fifth studio item, he recently test positive for covid but took to twitter to say it's his proudest piece of work. more news on your cellphone or connected it's friday, october 29th it's friday, october 29th, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news." president biden abroad. the commander in chief kicks off his european tour today after announcing the framework of a long negotiated spending plan. criminal complaint. disgraced former new york governor andrew cuomo has been ordered to appear in court after being charged with groping a woman. and facebook's new look. the company unveils a new name as part of a major rebranding effort. how it plans to reinvent itself.

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