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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 21, 2021 3:12am-3:59am PDT

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specific needs. >> reporter: today new york city ordered its roughly 300,000 municipal workers receive at least one vaccine dose by the end of next week or have an approved exemption. otherwise, they will forfeit their pay. >> our message is simple. get vaccinated. keep with us. keep us moving forward. anyone who isn't will go off payroll and to unpaid leave. >> reporter: starting today new york city employees who get their first vaccine dose in the next ten days will get a $500 bonus. if cleared by the cdc, the moderna and j&j boosters could be available as early as friday. moderna's booster will be given six months after the second dose, while johnson & johnson's will be two months after the first dose. norah? >> wow, unpaid leave versus $500. nikki battiste, thank you. and here is a sobering thought. some economists believe the supply chain bottleneck could keep prices high throughout next year.
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tonight cbs' carter evans reports the backlog isn't just hurting consumers, it's driving some businesses to the brink. >> we should not have empty shelves. that's not a good sign. >> reporter: ed o'brien's denver company makes some of the most popular outdoor toys on the market. but it's on track for a sales decline of 40%. >> we don't have a demand problem. people want to buy your products. >> yeah, it's a supply problem. >> reporter: that's because he has no idea when his toys will arrive from china. >> we still have containers that we place orders for in march. we have not seen and we don't know where they're at. >> reporter: and because of the huge backlog, he is paying more for shipping than ever. >> the cost per container was $6500 from china to denver. >> how much is it now? >> $50,000. >> reporter: how much have you lost this year? >> we have faced over two million of unexpected expenses. >> reporter: he cannot raise prices on deals he's already made. >> i'm scrambling for friends and family money, banks, everything to keep the business going. >> reporter: nationwide, suppliers cannot get items to
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stores fast enough because there is a shortage of warehouse workers and truck drivers with more than half a million job openings. >> companies almost certainly won't be able to fill all the roles they hoped to this holiday season. >> reporter: andy challenger with outplacement firm challenger, gray and christmas says firmcompanies are trying t entice workers, walmart and target are offering free college tuition. >> what it's mostly doing is hiring away workers from their competitors, and that's why we're seeing some of the highest quits rates that the country's ever recorded. >> reporter: in order for ed o'brien's business to survive, he says he has no choice but to raise prices in the future. >> i would say at least 20, 25% across our board, at least. >> and carter evans joins us now live from denver. and carter, it's so interesting to see what small businesses are suffering, from and what does it mean for consumers? >> well, it means more expensive
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items for us as well, because small businesses just can't absorb price increases this big. they got to pass them on to shoppers. and that's why experts are telling us that sticker shock is going to continue well into next year. norah? >> your reporting really makes it clear. carter evans, thank you. there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." (ringing) - hey kaleb, what's up? how you doing? - hey, i'm good, guess what, i just had my 13th surgery. st hady 17 surge.y?
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- yeah it's true. how are you doing? - i'm doing good. i'm encouraged by seeing how people are coming together to help each other during times like these. - kind of like how shriners hospitals for children is there for us. imagine if i couldn't get my surgery. who knows what would have happened. - same for me. i know my shriners hospitals family will continue to take care kids like us who need them most all because of caring people like you. - like me? - no, the people watching us right now at home. - oh, those people. hi people. - kaleb and i know not everyone can help right now, but for those of you who can, we hope you'll this special number on your screen right now. - you'll be making sure our amazing doctors and nurses can keep helping kids like us, who need them now and in the days to come. - your gift will make a huge difference for kids like us. - ooh, ooh, show them them the thank you gift.
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- okay, okay, hold on a second. with your gift of $19 a month we'll send you this adorable, love to the rescue blanket as a thank you and a reminder of the kids you're helping with your monthly support. - so what are you waiting for? you can use your phone and call, or go to loveshriners.org to give and join with thousands of other generous people who change lives with their gifts every day. - i think that's about it buddy, good job. - my pleasure captain. please call now. if operators are busy with all the other caring people, please wait patiently, or you can go to loveshriners.org to give right away. - [alec] big or small, your gift helps us all. - [both] thank you. (giggling) i've got big news! now, nurtec odt is the first and only medication proven to treat and prevent migraines. don't take if allergic to nurtec. the most common side effects were nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion.
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ask your doctor about nurtec today! clerk: hello, how can i? ask your doctor sore throat pain? ♪honey lemon♪ try vicks vapocool drops. in honey lemon chill. for fast-acting sore throat relief. wooo vaporize sore throat pain with vicks vapocool drops. we want to turn now to a story we've been covering closely, america's water crisis. we actually learned today about another city in michigan that is warning residents of high levels of lead in their water. the town of hamtramck just outside of detroit joins benton harbor and flint as the latest we went to capitol hill to get e answers and find out why congress has been slow to act, and slow to help communities like benton harbor, michigan. the predominantly black down where thousands of residents
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have water contaminated with lead. omar villafranca was there last week. >> what water do you use to cook? >> the bottled water. >> reporter: to brush your teeth? >> bottled water. >> reporter: bathe? >> bottled water. >> thank you for having me. >> reporter: michigan congresswoman rashida tlaib has been pushing to get more money to fix the problem. >> we talked to the mayor of benton harbor. he said they need help now. >> tell him i feel it. i'm here, and i'm moving with a sense of urgency. >> reporter: in her state, more than three in four kids tested have detectable levels of lead in their blood. >> reporter: if i'm a parent in your state, what's congress doing? why is it taking so long? >> i think that's why when you talk to my residents, they say we get it. you get it, rasheed. don't they know this ishag? th wrehe frusttis coming in. >> reporter: frustration because tlaib doesn't think there is enough money in the infrastructure plan to replace all of america's lead pipes. >> we know when we see $15
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billion only in the bipartisan infrastructure bill, we saw who put that together. we saw the folks that don't look like us that put that together. and when we talk about equitable distribution, $15 billion is not going to get us closer to that. >> reporter: it will not help black and brown communities? >> it's communities lucky ours that continue to be left behind. but we know with more funding we have a better chance. >> reporter: so you're putting more money for led pipes in the build back better plan? >> yes. another $30 billion which gets us closer to truly getting lead out of the water. >> well, it would cost an estimated $60 billion to replace all lead service lines in the u.s., and the epa, they say six to ten million homes across the country have those lead pipes. we'll continue to watch how congress acts.
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[♪♪] if you're only using facial moisturizer in the morning, did you know, the best time for skin renewal is at night? add olay retinol24 to your nighttime skincare routine. it combines hydrating moisturizers with powerful retinoids to renew millions of surface skin cells while you sleep. plus, it hydrates better than a $100 retinol cream. wake up to smoother, younger-looking skin with olay retinol24. learn more at olay.com this has been medifacts for olay. all right. tonight we're learning about a medical milestone new surge that uses genetically modified animal organs to save the lives of humans. this type of advance is sorely needed because about 12 americans die each day waiting for a kidney transplant. cbs news chief medical correspondent dr. jon lapook has an exclusive interview with the lead scientist. >> reporter: this experimental
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surgery is setting the stage for a revolution in organ transplantation. >> the single biggest problem in transplantation is the lack of organ availability for all the people who need it. >> reporter: there are almost 100,000 americans waiting for a kidney donor. suessfully transplanted a nonhuman kidney into a human. the human immune system rejects organs from animals. but dr. montgomery and his team at nyu-langone's transplant institute genetically modified a pig kidney to make it more come patble. they connected the pig's kidney above the thigh of the recipient's body, outside the body to so they could test it. >> the kidney turned a beautiful pink color. we were taking in what we were looking at, which was incredible. it was a kidney that was immediately functioning. so we came up with this idea of testing it first in someone who
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is recently deceased but is being maintained on a ventilator. >> reporter: the family consented and donated the body for this study. >> they felt really strongly that this would be something that she would want. >> reporter: before this first attempt, nyu created a new board consulting with religious and legal experts and with bioethicists like dr. art caplan, who heads the medical center's center do you have any thoughts that this is the right thing to do ethically? >> i think we should be doing it more often. what we have here is complete volunteerism on the part of the people involved in the experiment with permission and enthusiasm that they want to help. >> reporter: without genetic modification, a transplanted pig kidney would likely have been rejected within minutes. this kidney worked perfectly for 54 hours before being disconnected. what could it mean? >> it could mean that no one will need to die waiting for an organ anymore. >> reporter: dr. j l
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news newyo all right. coming up next, he carries a badge, yep, and a violin. how an officer found two
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for years, a musician from maryland has used his talents to help people through difficult times. but wait until you see what he's doing for an encore. here is cbs' jan crawford. ♪ >> reporter: for classical musician alexander strachan, the violin is for finding connections. he spent the past decade playing for seniors and the terminally ill, including his grandmother, who had alzheimer's. ♪ >> it's almost like she is almost a kid again playing. >> it was something she recognized? >> something she recognized. it's almost like the fog of alzheimer's lift and she was able to see again. >> reporter: earlier this year, strachan found a new way to
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connect with people by coming a cop. >> in some ways it is similar as a musician. i'm going in places where i'm not sure what is going to happen, who upeople are going to react, but it is an adventure. >> reporter: you traded in your violin for a weapon, but you're still serving? >> exactly. ♪ >> reporter: now in uniform, he continues to play, hoping to show a different side of police officers. >> i think it shows that i'm human too. i have hobbies, passions outside of police work. and cops are so talented. people don't see that. ♪ >> reporter: performing with a purpose. jan crawford, cbs news, bowie, maryland. >> and that is the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues, for others, check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm norah o'donnell.
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this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. we begin with a major milestone in the fight against covid. the united states has successfully delivered 200 million vaccines around the world. usaid hopes to vaccinate 70% of the global eligible population by next year. the nfl plans to end race-based testing for commentia, which may have prevented hundreds of black players from claiming large financial settlements. former players with denied claims will also be able to have their tests reassessed. it was a divine display at the vatican. a little boy overjoyed to meet pope francis, walked on to the stage and wouldn't leave. so he got the best seat in the house, and he even got his own papal skullcap as a souvenir.
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for more news, download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is "cbs overnight news." >> good evening and thank you for joining us. we're going to begin tonight with breaking news, what could be a significant development tonight in the search for brian laundrie, the only person of interest in the strangulation death of his fiancee, gabby petito. laundrie was last seen more than a month ago. well, today human remains along with a notebook and backpack belonging to laundrie were found in a wilderness park in sarasota county, florida, not far from his home. his family actually guided the law enforcement to the location. the fbi says it's too soon to tell if the remains are laundrie's. interest. the young couple, both in their early 20s went on a
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cross-country van trip that they documented on social media. petito was reported missing in september, and by that time, laundrie had already returned home to florida alone. her body was discovered later in wyoming. cbs' jericka duncan is going to lead off our coverage tonight. >> reporter: a discovery today in the florida nature reserve where brian laundrie was believed to be hiding. >> investigators found what appears to be human remains, along with personal items such as a backpack and notebook belonging to brian laundrie. >> reporter: authorities had been searching the reserve for the past month and say the area where the suspected remains were found had been previously under water. a heavy police presence along with the county medical examiner and cadaver dogs quickly descended on the scene. according to a statement from the laundrie family attorney, laundrie's parents decided to search the park this morning and then directed fbi agents and police to the location where they found the belongings.
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the park had been closed to the public until yesterday. e o'toole says today's findings raise questions about laundrie's parents. >> the parents have engaged in behavior that is suspicious, and that has to be resolved. and i think that it ultimately will be terms of whether or not they provided any kind of assistance to their son. >> reporter: the 23-year-old had been the sole person of interest in the murder of his fiancee, gabby petito. the couple had been on a cross-country van trip when she disappeared in august and he returned to florida. last week investigators ruled petito's death a homicide by strangulation. in a recent interview with "60 minutes" australia, petito's mother pleaded with laundrie's parents for help. >> i believe they know probably if not everything, they know most of the information. >> reporter: it's unclear what was in that notebook that investigators found. fbi response teams are still processing that scene there in
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florida, and norah, as for brian laundrie, he was never formally charged with the murder of gabby petito. >> jericka duncan, thank you. also in florida, this was an emotional day for family members of the 17 people killed in the parkland school shooting. more than 3 1/2 years after the massacre, the gunman pleaded guilty today, hoping his life will be spared. cbs' mireya villarreal is in parkland with the details. >> to count 1 of the indictment, murder in the first degree of victim luke hoyer, how do you wish to plea? >> guilty. >> reporter: without hesitation, nikolas cruz pleaded guilty 17 times to murder and 17 more for attempted murder for the deadliest high school shooting in u.s. history. >> count 34, attempted murder in the first degree of kyle lehman, how do you wish to plea? >> guilty. >> i accept your plea of guilty. >> reporter: afterwards, cruz gave a rambling speech where he
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talked about drug abuse involving violence, and he apologized to the victims' families. >> i'm doing this for you, and i do not care if you believe me. i love you and i know you don't believe me, but i have to live with this every day. >> he is doing it for our families. if he wanted to do something for our families, you shouldn't have killed our loved ones. >> reporter: tony montalto sat just feet away from the shooter, trying to hold back their emotions. montalto's daughter gina was 14 years old. >> it was probably the most uncomfortable thing, second most uncomfortable thing we ever had to do. the second one was hugging our daughter's lifeless body. >> reporter: the case now heads to a penalty phase in january. after hearing testimony, a jury will recommend either a life sentence or the death penalty. under florida law, the jury must be unanimous to approve a death sentence. the victims' families are split on what cruz's punishment should be. >> life in prison is a life. he deserves nothing more than the death penalty.
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>> reporter: legal experts believe defense attorneys for nikolas cruz suggested he plead guilty as a strategy to save his life. they also say we can expect for them to try and prove that he is remorseful now, and that there was a history of mental illness. norah? >> mireya villarreal, thank you. tonight there is new video the fda has given a thumb's up for millions more americans to increase their protection from covid by authorizing the moderna and johnson & johnson booster shots. and regardless of which shot you were initially vaccinated with, the fda says you can use any brand as a booster. we get more deals from cbs' nikki battiste. >> reporter: today's authorization covers moderna recipients who are 65 and older, or at high risk because of their job, living situation or underlying health conditions. any j&j recipient 18 and over is now eligible future a booster too. >> by giving additional doses of
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vaccine for people who were already vaccinated, we're further reducing their risk of sypher hospitalization or death. >> reporter: the fda also authorized mixing brands, but did not weigh in if recipients should stick to a single brand if possible. >> if you got a johnson & johnson vaccine, you do get a bigger boost in your antibody levels if you get the pfizer or moderna vaccine as your second dose. >> reporter: meanwhile, the white house announced it's ready to ship 15 million vaccine doses for the country's 28 million children ages 5 through 11 in anticipation of emergency use authorization by early november. the plan is to work with pediatricians or primary care centers, pharmacies, schools, and rural health clinics to distribute the vaccine with smaller eedles and doses. there will be no mass vaccination sites. >> kids have different needs than adults, and our operational planning is geared to meet the specific needs. >> reporter: today new york city ordered its roughly 300,000
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municipal workers receive at least one vaccine dose by the end of next week or have an approved exemption. otherwise, they will forfeit their pay. >> our message is simple. get vaccinated. keep with us. keep us moving forward. anyone who isn't will go off payroll and to unpaid leave. >> reporter: starting today new york city employees who get their first vaccine dose in the next ten days will get a $500 bonus. if cleared by the cdc, the moderna and j&j boosters could be available as early as friday. moderna's booster will be given six months after the second dose, while johnson & johnson's will be two months after the first dose. norah? >> wow, unpaid leave versus $500. nikki battiste, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> i'm errol barnett in washington. thanks for staying with us. as the fda unveils new guidance on covid booster shots, millions of americans are still refusing to get inoculated at all, and that includes first responders. cities across the country have been issuing vaccine mandates for all government workers, but many of them are pushing back. in seattle, nearly 180 police and firefighters were told to stay home because they refused to take the vaccine. jeff pegues has this story.
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>> reporter: how officers and firefighters respond to these mandates could ultimately impact how quickly respond to emergencies. at least that's what one police union is telling us this morning as more first responders walk off the job. late yesterday, seattle police officers and firefighters walked up city hall steps to turn in their boots. they refused to comply with a state mandate to get vaccinated. >> i'm wrapping up my last shift after 20 years. >> reporter: in spokane, tim archer gave up his job. >> i'll be fired tonight by the city of spokane. >> reporter: he also refused to get vaccinated. why didn't you comply? >> i really felt like this is in violation of the civil rights that god has given us. >> reporter: there has been a wave of resignations and firings in fire and police across the country. los angeles fire reports there
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have been at least 241 separations from the department. baltimore's police department is down 279 officers. and in the last couple of years, seattle police said more than 300 officers separate from the department. in massachusetts, the state police union president is threatening that at least 150 state police will resign. what kind of impact could this have? >> we'll have slower responses. there will be case backlogs. processes of evidence, everything from house calls to alarm, burglary call. >> i just haven't seen the data to support that. >> reporter: but that's not what's playing out in some cities like chicago, where a mandate is already in place. only 21 sworn officers and civilian workers are not being paid for failing to comply, and that's out of 13,000 on the workforce. 8 out of 10 are vaccinated. >> officers have come to work. we've been fully staffed. there hasn't been a shift that's
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been short. there hasn't been this 30, 40, 50% shortage that i've heard from various sources. >> reporter: and that is what is happening in chicago. but this the midst of this very heated debate, it is worth noting that one of the challenges that officers on the front line are facing every day is this ongoing pandemic. according to the officer down memorial page, covid is once again the leading cause of death this year, nearly five times higher the number of officers killed by gunfire. >> jeff pegues there reporting from washington. turning now overseas, the united nations says around 95% of the people in afghanistan are going hungry. it's just one more sign of that country's economic collapse after the taliban seized control following the u.s. withdrawal. imtiaz tyab visited a children's hospital in the capital where families are desperate for help. >> reporter: there are few greater agonies for a mother
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than a sick child. 6-month-old sophia suffers from severe anemia caused by acute malnutrition. her mother says we just didn't have enough money to feed her. her father, baba shireen tells us he is desperate. what sort of help does your family need right now? he says "i need food, i have five kids. they're all so hungry." hunger and poverty have long stalked afghanistan's children. but since the taliban seized power two months ago, the nation is spiraling into a deep humanitarian crisis. according to united nations, if urgent humanitarian assistance doesn't come soon, more than a million children will die from malnutrition. signs of desperation can be seen in every corner of afghanistan. this usaid funded world program distribution center is packed,
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but all that's on offer are sacks of flour and a bit of salt. wahed ahmed darmesh is one of the organizers. people come here because they're hungry. they need food. but all you're able to give them is flour and salt. >> right now not enough. but it save their life. >> reporter: while we were talking, the taliban arrived. >> from every day -- >> reporter: this is taliban? and what are they saying? >> oh, they say stop. >> reporter: filming? >> yeah. >> reporter: we overheard one taliban fighter ask his commander if he should kill us. it was time for our crew to leave. as the group tightens its grip on power, afghanistan is barely holding on. the biden administration has already frozen $9 billion in assets, and along with other nations says any future financial support is conditional on the taliban proving it's
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moderated since it was last in power. this is the taliban's chief spokesman. the united nations is warning over a million children will die from malnutrition if nothing is done. can the taliban solve this without the help of the world and the united states? >> he says on the one hand, they say a million children will die, but on the other, the u.s. are holding our money. the u.s. should release our money so we can save our children. >> reporter: this month, world leaders promised $1.2 billion in aid to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe across afghanistan. but it won't do much to bring the economy back from the brink. and won't be enough to help the country's smallest and most vulnerable. imtiaz tyab [♪♪] if you're only using facial moisturizer in the morning, did you know, the best time for skin renewal is at night?
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heaven, or it's a vision of the road to hell. cattle graze on the lush green pastures of scotland. the environmentalists will tell you when it comes to global warming, meat, and especially beef is among the worst foods we could eat, that the methane cows belch out while turning feed into food is a far more powerful greenhouse gas than even the carbon dioxide produced by burning fossil fuels. so the challenge is to satisfy the world's ever growing appetite for beef while also producing less methane. and here at this experimental farm run by scotland's rural college, they think they found a way, because it turns out one cow is not like another. did it surprise you with the one cow? holy cow. this stomach content is a lot different in this cow than that cow. >> there is a huge variation in
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the stomach. >> reporter: it's all about the stomach -- well, stomachs. cows have four of them. reiner roa is a researcher at the college and has been studying the digestive process in cow, and he found that the microbes in their stomach not only vary from cow to cow, they determine how much methane the cow produces. a brief lesson on bovine biolog is useful here. cows don't actually digest what they eat. the bugs in their gut do. their food mixes a kind of microbe soup in the rumen, or first stomach, and then is rechewed before passing through the rest of the system. and reiner roa's work shows that genetics can predict which animals will have the right micrococktail to produce the least methane. in other words, you can breed low methane producing cattle. so you can select. you can say that cow, that bull, they have good stomach stuff. you can put them together g
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together and make another cow with the same stomach stuff. >> yes. >> reporter: how much less? >> we are predicting we are reducing emission about 50%. >> reporter: 50%? >> yes. >> reporter: these cows wll put out 50% than a normal group of cows would do it? >> yes. >> reporter: how do they know? they measure it. they put cows in hermetically sealed chambers for three days and analyze the gases they belch out. and there is another benefit. producing methane is actually a waste of energy for a cow. the less they produce, the more efficient they are at turning cattle feed into human food. win-win. still, a 50% reduction in greenhouse gas production is not the same as 100% reduction, which is what we would get if we just stopped eating the stuff. >> beef provides about 6% of our protein. 2% global. >> reporter: people everywhere?
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>> worldwide. if you look at the environmental impact, beef is about 30% ofur foods, s emissions. so you have this massive imbalance between the kind of environmental impacts of this product and the nutrition provided. >> reporter: a recent study at oxford university has shown that judged against the nutrition it provides, beef is simply too environmentally expensive. but let's go back to that bucolic scene of those cows grazing on those highland pastures. cattle grazing is arguably the most efficient food producing use to which these foods can be put, because nothing much will grow here other than grass. and there are lots of other areas of the world like that. as with so much of the environmental argument, there is a lot to chew over. mark phillips, scotland. from cows in scotland to rocks in green land, environmentalists continue to find new weapons in the battle
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against climate change. ian lee has this story. >> reporter: who knew destroying the planet could help save it? in scientists blasted open a mountain filled with what they call climate-saving rocks. >> the chemistry is unique. it's created in the early days in the formation of our world. >> reporter: it's called an or though site. what makes this rock so important is calcium, silica and aluminum. >> a very good quality for fiberglass. we also use for ceramics. >> reporter: experts say an ortho site produces less waste in grown house emissions. it's found all around the island in its rugged fjords. >> you find it in canadian, scandinavia, russia, south africa, lots of places.
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>> reporter: so far, miners have collected more than 300 tons, even nasa isookio seef leaown hr
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get this, in istanbul, turkey, there is a stray dog who earned a free commuter pass from the city. he hits 29 subway stops a day, and even hops on the ferry to a resort island on the weekends. tina kraus reports. >> reporter: it's the last call for the daily ferry in istanbul, and this four-legged passenger won't miss the boat. after all, he has a busy schedule to keep. >> he knows where to go, and he has a purpose. >> reporter: for a couple of months now, the stray dog known as boji has been a regular commuter on ferry, buses and subway, catching the attention of passengers and transport officials. >> so it was quite interesting. we had started to follow him.
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>> reporter: they fitted boji with a tracking device that revealed he clocks up about 20 miles a day and loves the city's subways. he favors the middle part of the car known as boji in turkish, which is how he got his name. this woman says i saw him on the internet, so it's nice running into him. boji's star power is soaring on social media, where fellow passengers post their favorite pics. this commuter says it's really nice to see stray animals among us like this. especially when they're so polite. >> you know, when the door is open, you have to let the people out first. he knows that rule very well. >> reporter: the pooch's popularity has earned him a free travel pass for life, along with a permanent place in the hearts of commuters. tina kraus, cbs news. >> andt is the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for other, check back with us later for "cbs mornings" and of
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course follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm errol barnett. this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. we begin with a major milestone in the fight against covid. the united states has successfully delivered 200 million vaccines around the world. usaid hopes to vaccinate 70% of the eligible global population by next year. the nfl plans to end race-based testing for dementia, which may have prevented hundreds of black players from claimiarge financial settlements. former players with denied claims will also be able to have their tests reassessed. it was a divine display at the vatican. a little boy overjoyed to meet pope francis, walked on to the stage and wouldn't leave. so he got the best seat in the house, and he even got his own papal skullcap as a souvenir.

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