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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 18, 2021 2:30am-4:00am PDT

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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening. i'm nikki battiste. jericka duncan is off. haiti is one of the world's most dangerous countries besieged by poverty, political instability, and violence. and tonight the fate of more than a dozen american missionaries and family members reportedly kidnapped in the country is unknown. police say they have been seized by a notorious criminal gang. it's the latest in a series of kidnappings and happened just outside the capital port-au-prince. cbs's manuel bojorquez is there and joins us with the latest. manny? >> reporter: by some estimates, gangs control half of haiti's capital port-au-prince and
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kidnappings are on the rise. but the sheer number of victims in this case and the fact they are foreigners is brazen even by the gang standards. the kidnappings reportedly happened as a group of missionaries was leaving an orphanage just outside port-au-prince saturday. an armed gang abducted 16 americans including five children as well as one canadian. the missionaries are affiliated with ohio's christian aid ministries. the group's website says it's haiti sponsor a school program pays for school tuition, uniforms, textbooks and meals for haitians in 52 schools. in a statement about the kidnappings, christian aid ministries said, join us in praying for those who are being held hostage. the kidnappers and the families, friends, shand churches of thos affected. a surge in gang violence including kidnappings of haitians continues to roil this country already in the midst of a political crisis after a presidential assassination in july, and an earthquake that killed more than 2,000 in august.
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the region where the kidnapping of the missionaries happened is controlled by one gang that is known to be among the most dangerous in haiti, blamed earlier this year with the kidnapping of five priests and two nuns. nikki? >> cbs's manuel bojorquez in prt-au-prince. thank you. american workers are testing their power. thousands have hit picket lines in several states amid a nationwide labor shortage seeking better pay, benefits and working conditions. there is even a name for it, striketober. cbs's lilia luciano is in los angeles with more. lilia? >> reporter: nikki, here in los angeles a strike by hollywood crews has been averted for now. but nationwide many workers are walking off the job and right onto the picket line. pandemic pressure is spurring strikes, including this one in a suburb of minneapolis. >> you don't mess with the nurses. >> reporter: a walkout by nurses prompted a hospital in plymouth to close its emergency room.
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>> this is like my fifth picket during this pandemic. i find that deplorable. >> reporter: staffing shortages and the battle over benefits are impacting almost every industry. 10,000 john deere workers are on strike. the illinois-based company is expected to post record profits this year. and a 60,000 mom i -- hollywood worker production strike was averted at the 11th hour. they must still vote on the agreement with the studios. >> union members are steaming mad. 300 wine bottles. >> reporter: alicia is a pabst master in the union. what is the complaint? >> the constant feeling you're going to lose your job. and b, you're never going to sleep. i was never hoping for a strike. i was hoping for a real reasonable contract. >> reporter: they called it a hollywood ending. is it? >> there are better movies.
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things blow up. that's a hollywood ending. it depends on the movie. >> reporter: alicia says she wouldn't call it an ending quite yet. and while crews will be back at work in sets like this one tomorrow, another massive walkout is expected soon by 24,000 kaiser employee workers who voted to strike. nikki? >> lilia luciano, thanks. former president bill clinton is out of the hospital. the 75-year-old spent six days at u.c. irvine medical center, treated for urological and blood infection. doctors say his fever and blood work are normal. clinton will finish a course of antibiotics at his home in new york. democrats in the nation's capital face a fast-approaching deadline to scale back president biden's agenda ambitions. cbs's debra alfarone is at the white house with the details. >> reporter: the house and senate return to washington tomorrow and negotiations will continue over the president's ambitious and expensive agenda, the build back better agenda.
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and no doubt, those will kick start again. >> we're not going to get $3.5 trillion. we'll get less than that, but we're going to get it. and we're going to come back and get the rest. >> reporter: president biden will start off the week with this admission behind him, and negotiations ahead. on the potential chopping block, trillions of dollars courtesy of moderate democrats who are balking at the price tag. that could put the administration's sweeping $150 billion program pushing clean energy in doubt. >> the administration and the president are committed to bold climate action, exactly what legislative form that takes is what's being negotiated right now. but the bottom line is we have to act on climate for the good of our children and, by the way, for the good of our economy. >> reporter: to complicate matters more, liberal democrats say they'll hold off voting on yet another piece of legislation, the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan,
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as leverage to negotiate keeping what they want in the larger spending package. >> i'm not going to predict legislative mechanics. what i will say is that we've got to get this done. >> i hope for democrat gridlock. oftentimes in washington, d.c. gridlock is the better alternative. but when it's democrat gridlock, pray for it. i hope that's exactly what happens. >> reporter: democratic leadership has set a deadline of the end of the month to get both bills passed. president biden said friday there is no specific deadline, but he will push to get everything done. nikki? >> debra alfarone, thank you. spain's erupting volcano on the island of la palma keeps putting on a show and more disruptions. half of the island's flights were canceled today. about 7,000 people have been forced to evacuate. the island's president says there is no end in sight. olympic leaves nothing to chance at the acropolis in greece today. this was the dress rehearsal for
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the beijing 2022 winter games. this flame will serve as a backup for the february event. one hiccough. two protesters were detained for drawing attention to human rights abuses in china. activist greta thunberg took to the stage at a climate live concert in stockholm last night. not to make a speech, but to dance. ♪ thunberg surprised the crowd with those moves. earlier she criticized the upcoming climate summit of world leaders in scotland, saying it's unlikely to lead too big changes. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm nikki battiste in new york. thanks for staying with us. a united nation report casts a harsh light on the growth of child labor around the world. it shows between 2016 and 2020, the number of working children rose for the first time in two decades to 160 million. in africa, more than one in five children works, many of them in dangerous jobs. in the west african country of ghana, debora patta saw kids working in the fishing industry under troubling conditions. >> reporter: the beauty of lake volta is deceptive. these are troubled waters.
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thousands of children are fishing here. some work in the family business. many have been sold into modern-day slavery. godwin labored on this lake for five years, orphaned at 10, he was entrusted into the care of a man who promised to send him to school. >> i didn't know that i was going to fish. >> reporter: and at first he didn't know how to swim. >> they said it's deep. >> reporter: very deep? >> yeah, deep. so i had to go down. >> reporter: if he refused, he was beaten. >> i was afraid. i was thinking, i didn't know where my life will end. i said i would run away. >> reporter: eventually he did escape, saved by wallace who works under cover and has rescued over 150 children for an international charity. we went out on the lake to see for ourselves.
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ricketty vessels filled with kids, adept at unraveling the fine mesh. and when those nets snag on submerged tree branches, they're forced to dive deep into the murky waters to untangle them. adult work made easier by exploiting agile bodies and tiny hands. the eldest here claims the 9-year-old boy on this boat is his brother. how come you don't speak the same language? >> reporter: it's a red flag. another little boy, believe it or not, called freedom. freedom, where is your mom? he, too, is from far away and speaks a completely different language to the others on the boat. within the space of half an hour we've come across four boats in which there could be potential traffickers. do you see this often? >> yeah, we see this often. but when we see them, we come
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back. >> reporter: wallace gathers intel from sources in freedom's village. weeks later he confirmed the child had been trafficked, but it was too late to rescue him. he'd been moved. a tactic slave owners use to evade arrest. during this entire time we haven't seen a single official from either the police or the navy who is supposed to be patrolling this water. and so children are easy prey. why do you think there is so much trafficking in this area? >> due to poverty. >> reporter: and poverty is all around us here. desperate, extreme, persistent. it's not just boys who are trafficked. these sisters were snatched near their family home, only recently rescueds. their eyes tell of horrors they could not speak out loud. warnings of trafficking abound, but they're not a deterrent. as we found out from this slave
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owner turned informant. how much did you pay for a child? that's about $80. and it's a human life. you bought a child. is that not slavery? that's how it is, he shrugs. over 25 years he's bought thousands of children. what's the worst thing you ever did as a slave owner? forcing a kid who doesn't know how to swim to dive to the bottom of the lake, he told us. they could go down and never come up. >> reporter: so many children have died here, but there is another dreadful truth to hear. you were sold into slavery? by my father, he tells us. the child slave has become the master. godwin refuses to go that route. >> i wanted to go to school so that i could become someone.
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i didn't want to do fishing work. >> reporter: he harbors no bitterness towards his abuser. >> he have to be punished. i have to forgive him. >> reporter: how are you able to forgive him, godwin? such a hard time. the unearned forgiveness of a boy whose childhood was stolen on this lake. maybe this time the cycle has been broken. debora patta, lake volta, ghana. heads of state, corporate titans, celebrities, royals and religious leaders will all gather in scotland at the end of this month for the 26th annual united nations climate change conference. it is expected to be the biggest gathering since 2015 when world leaders signed onto the paris climate accord, with nations vowing to reduce greenhouse gases in their own countries. the goals of the paris accord have not been met, and the effects of rising temperatures
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can be seen from glaciers of norway to our own great lakes. ben tracy reports. >> not going to beat mother nature. >> reporter: this is really an example of the force of the lake dennis stankiewicz has lived along lake superior for two decades. it kind of looks like it got bombed out. >> it does, it does. >> reporter: and even in this now long-term relationship, he says the lake still has all the power. he showed us this shattered stretch of road that used to be lakeshore boulevard. >> lake erosion really got the best of it. but ultimately it failed because nature caught up with us. >> reporter: stankiewicz is planning director for the city of marquette, home to about 20,000 people on michigan's upper peninsula. the city had to spend nearly $3 million rebuilding the road 300 feet away from its increasingly unpredictable neighbor.
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>> we're watching the intensity of these storms just get worse and worse to the point that they are really becoming dangerous for our infrastructure and the health and welfare of the community. >> reporter: so you're seeing the extremes get more extreme? >> the extremes are getting way more extreme. >> reporter: the storms fueled by climate change are more frequent and intense. they are battering shorelines throughout the great lakes, turning roadways into rivers and forcing homes off their once lofty perches. >> if we keep going on the path we're on, we don't really know where these extremes are going to take us. >> reporter: melissa scanlon is the director for water policy for university of wisconsin milwaukee. she said michigan hit a low water level in 2013 and swung wildly tos rdechsor normal for lakes to rise and fall. how is that cycle changing? >> the highs are getting higher
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and the lows are getting lower. i'm most concerned about flooding and sewage contaminating the drinking water supply for millions of people. >> reporter: the city of milwaukee sits on lake michigan, and the local sewer district is now tearing out these concrete stormwater channels built in the 1960s that can no longer handle the intense rain events. they are restoring the more natural flow to try to slow down the water to keep it from flooding nearby homes and to keep sewage from pouring into lake michigan if the system gets overwhelmed. >> the city's infrastructures aren't really built to deal with these kind of rainfall extremes. and so we need to figure out how to manage this water and to adapt to the future. >> reporter: of course, the great lakes do not lack for water. they hold 84% of north america's surface freshwater supply. air temperatures in the region are predicted to increase by up to 11 degrees by the end of the century, making those notorious
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northern winters a bit more bearable. that's why places like marquette, michigan, are now seen by some as a climate change refuge. >> and they're finding us, and they're coming. >> reporter: you lead the way. stephanie jones sells real estate in marquette where the housing market is hot and they can't build new homes fast enough. but there are signs the locals would prefer tourists rather than transplants. are folks here ready to have a lot of new neighbors? >> it depends on who you ask. a lot of people have that, i'm here and i want to be the last person, so can we just shut the door behind me feeling. >> reporter: dennis stankiewicz never thought he'd see people moving here for the weather. >> no. i have to be honest with that. >> reporter: after all, marquette put up a sign, proudly displaying its record snowfall of 22 feet. but given fires ravaging the western u.s. and hurricanes hitting the south, this small
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town might have a big future. >> yeah, i didn't see it coming, but this is a pretty good place to weather the storm for lack of a better term. >> reporter: ben tracy, marquette, michigan.
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health officials are warning of a possible twindemic this fall with outbreaks of both covid and the flu. the cdc says an average of 36,000 people died each year of the flu over the past decade, and there are fears this season could be a bad one. janet shamlian has the story. >> reporter: tonight the race is on to get shots into arms. as health officials warn of a potentially dangerous flu season colliding with the pandemic. should we have a tremendously bad flu season, how could that impact the covid situation? >> if we have a serious influenza outbreak on top of covid-19, we potentially are going to overwhelm the health care system. >> reporter: that's why in little rock at the university of arkansas for medical sciences, there is a new strategy. >> that was quick. >> reporter: a one-stop-shop for flu shots and covid vaccines at th clinic. the cdc says people can safely
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receive both at the same time. >> i appreciate you doing this. >> reporter: andrew bens got a covid booster in his right arm. >> here's your flu shot. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: and his flu shot in the left. >> covid is like a wildfire right now. i want to do everything i can to mitigate the spread. >> reporter: the pandemic lockdowns, the cdc says the 2020 flu season was the mildest on record. experts say with fewer people exposed last year, flu resistance is now lowered. so, are we in for a catastrophic flu season? >> i think there is that potential, and i'm very concerned. >> reporter: in arkansas, just over 46% of the population is fully vaccinated against covid, well below the national total of about 57%. the clinic was hoping to reach more unvaccinated people. but giving flu shots can save lives, too. what is your level of concern about flu this season? >> usual. hope i don't get it. >> reporter: many pharmacies across the country are also offering the flu shot and the
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covid vaccine at the same time. in terms of guidance, the cdc is recommending a yearly flu shot fo when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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london is famous for its double decker red buses. some are getting a make over into rolling care centers for the homeless. tina kraus has the story. >> reporter: london's famous red buses usually roll right by hundreds of homeless people on the streets of the british capital. >> 1, 2, 3. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: but a new campaign invites those in need to step on board. >> providing everything from access to a doctor, a dentist, showers, a haircut. >> reporter: three buses have been remodelled, complete with laptops to help the homeless find jobs and open bank accounts. american ex-convict thomas noble is now off the streets. >> i've been broken from front to back and up and down,s been d.
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>> reporter: he found a job with a british charity that trains homeless people as baristas. money raised from the change please program is paying for these bus services. >> we've got to try and make the space as nice as you can and really try and connect with people. >> reporter: the buses will run six days a week over the next two years. each one helping at least six homeless people every day. >> there will be no judgment. you step on that bus, they got you. >> reporter: people can send a text to request a bus to stop by them. organizers say the drive for change is transforming lives. >> we need someone with a before and after photo in a polaroid. >> reporter: a small token for people like thomas to remember just how far they've come. tina krause, cbs news, london. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back for cbs mornings and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com ro
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center ini'm nikky battiste. this is cbs news flash. i'm elise preston in new york. jury selection in the shooting death of ahmaud arbery begins. arbery, an unarmed black man, was running through a georgia neighborhood in february 2020, when he was chased down by three white men who say they believed arbery was suspicious. investigators believe the deadly chase was racially motivated. former president trump will be deposed in a lawsuit alleging his security team assaulted six protesters of mexican origin. during his 2016 presidential campaign. the alleged assault happened outside of trump tower in new york following negative comments trump made about mexico. movie goers enjoy being spooked at theaters. halloween kills topped the box office with $50.4 million in ticket sales. for more news, download the cbs
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news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm elise preston, cbs news, new york. in haiti, a group of american missionaries and children seized by a gang. the latest on efforts to find and free them. also, striketober. from the hospitals to factory floors, workers walk off jobs over staff shortages and more pay. while hollywood workers strike a deal. >> i'm in los angeles. hollywood crews would be going on strike tomorrow. plus covid boosters. who needs them and what about mixing and matching vaccines? we'll get a check-up from dr. david agus. we visit the national zoo where orangutans are the latest creatures getting their shots. presidential push. a deadline approaches to save joe biden's agenda.
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the stake in strike. they pay for killing relatives in a drone strike. cbs is there and speaking to them. >> i majs timagine there is no compensation that can makeup for the loss. and a rare rock in greenland that could help save the planet. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening. i'm nikki battiste. jericka duncan is off. haiti is one of the world's most dangerous countries bee sieged by political instability and violence. tonight the fate of more than a dozen american missionaries and family members reportedly kidnapped in the country is unknown. police say they have been seized by a knnotorious criminal gang. it's the latest series of kidnappings outside the capital
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port-au-prince. cbs's manuel bojorquez is there and has the latest. manny? >> reporter: haiti's capital port-au-prince, kidnappings are on the rise. but the sheer number of victims in this case and the fact that they are foreigners is brazen even by the gang standards. the kidnappings reportedly happened as a group of missionaries was leaving an orphanage outside of port-au-prince on saturday. an armed gang abducted 16 americans including five children as well as one canadian. the missionaries are affiliated with ohio's christian aid ministries. the group's website says it's haiti sponsor a school program patience for tuition, tune forms, textbooks and meals for haitians in 52 schools. in a statement about the kidnappings, christian aid ministries said, join us in praying for those who are being held hostage. the kidnappers and the families, friends and churches of those affected. a surge in gang violence including kidnappings of
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haitians continue to roil this country. already in the midst of a political crisis, after a presidential assassination in july, and an earthquake that killed more than 2,000 in august. the region where the kidnapping of the missionaries happened is controlled by one gang that is known to be among the most dangerous in haiti, blamed earlier this year with the kidnapping of five priests and two nuns. nikki? >> cbs's manuel bojorquez in port-au-prince, thank you. american workers are testing their power. thousands have hit picket lines in several states amid a nationwide labor shortage seeking better pay, benefits and working conditions. there is even a name for it. striketober. cbs's lilia luciano is in los angeles with more. lilia? >> reporter: nikki, here in los angeles a strike by hollywood crews has been averted for now. nationwide many workers are walking off the job and right onto the picket line. pandemic pressure is spurring
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strikes, including this one in a suburb of minneapolis. >> you don't mess with the nurses. >> reporter: a walkout by nurses hospitaled a hospital in plymouth to close its emergency room. >> this is like my fifth picket during this pandemic. i find that deplorable. >> reporter: staffing shortages and the battle over benefits are impacting almost every industry. 10,000 john deere workers are on strike. the illinois-based company is expected to post record profits this year. and a 60,000 haollywood production worker strike was tentatively averted at the 11th hour. the union members will still vote on the three-year deal with the studios. >> they are steaming mad. >> 300 wine bottles. >> reporter: alicia is a pab master in the union. >> it is a constant feeling you're going to lose your job and be -- you're never going to sleep. i was never hoping for a strike.
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i was hoping for a real reasonable contract. >> reporter: they called it a hollywood ending. is it? >> like the movies, things blow up. that's a hollywood ending. depends on the movie. >> reporter: alicia says she wouldn't call it an ending quite yet, and while crews will be back at work in sets like this one tomorrow. another massive walkout is expected soon by 24,000 kaiser employee workers who voted to strike. nikki? >> lilia luciano, thanks. today dr. anthony fauci said americans shouldn't hesitate to spend holidays with their families if they are fully vaccinated. for the latest on covid and the vaccines, cbs news medical contributor dr. david agus joins us from los angeles. dr. agus, good to see you. the fd sa advisory committee recommended friday they get a second dose. should the dose be j&j or another vaccine? >> nikki, 15 million people in the country got that j&j vaccine
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are basically waiting to see what to do. the recommendations are going to be two months after that shot, at least, you should get a second shot. either j&j or the rna vaccines. the j&j probably was meant to be a two-shot vaccine. getting a second one will raise immunity. getting an rna vaccine will raise it even more. >> on the topic of mixtion and matching which we're all curious about, which provides better protection, mixing and matching vaccines or the same vaccine for all doses? >> if you take antibody level for a surrogate for how much immunity you get, probably mixing gives you slightly better protection with slightly more side effects. i do think getting the same one is okay and you'll get enough protection to get you through delta. if you want more protection, mixing may be of benefit. >> we've seen hospitalizations peaking again. is our country going to be in a better or worse position as we kickoff the new year?
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>> you know, if i had that, i could win in vegas. i certainly think now we're doing better against delta. we're vaccinating 57% of the country. as for the next couple of weeks we're going to start to vaccinate children 5 to 11 should it get approved. and i think it will. that's another 28 million people on the roster that can be vaccinated. i think we're going to be in a much better situation the end of the year. and i would vote good in the holidays we'll be back together without really worrying. >> dr. david agus, thank you. there's a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news."
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." former president bill clinton is out of the hospital. the 75-year-old spent six days at u.c. irvine medical center treated for a urologcal and blood infection. doctors say his fever and blood work are normal. clinton will finish a course of antibiotics at his home in new york. democrats in the nation's capital face a fast approaching deadline to scale back president biden's agenda ambitions. cbs's debra alverone is at the white house with the details. >> reporter: the house and senate return to washington tomorrow and negotiations will continue. over the president's ambitious and expensive agenda.
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the build back better agenda, and no doubt, those will kick start again. >> we're not going to get $3.5 trillion. we'll get less than that. but we're going to get it, and queer going to come back and get the rest. >> reporter: president biden will start off the week with this admission behind him, and negotiations ahead. on the potential chopping block, trillions of dollars courtesy of moderate democrats who are balking at the price tag. that could put the administration's sweeping $150 billion program pushing clean energy in doubt. >> the administration and the president are committed to bold climate action. exactly what legislative form that takes is it what's being negotiated right now. but the bottom line is we have to act on climate for the good of our children and, by the way, for the good of our economy. >> reporter: to complicate matters more, liberal democrats say they'll hold off voting on yet another piece of legislation, the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan
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as leverage to negotiate keeping what they want in the larger spending package. >> i'm not going to predict legislative mechanics. what i will say is that we've got to get this did you think. >> i hope for democrat gridlock. oftentimes in washington, d.c. gridlock is the better alternative. when it's democrat gridlock, pray for it. i hope that's exactly what happens. >> reporter: democratic leadership has set a deadline at the end of the month to get both bills passed. president biden said there is no specific deadline, but he will push to get everything done. nikki? >> debra, thank you. the united states has offered to pay the families of ten civilians, seven of them children killed in a botched drone strike. in happened in the final days of america's withdrawal from afghanistan. cbs's imtyaz tyab is in kabul where he spoke with the families of the victims. >> reporter: this is what the military called a righteous strike after firing a missile
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thinking it was an isis-k target. but it's been a living nightmare. the predator drone that targeted his brother on august 29th killed him and nine others, mostly children, including two of his own sons and his baby daughter. the pentagon now calls it a horrible mistake and has offered the family compensation of an undisclosed sum as well as the opportunity to settle in the u.s. >> i imagine there's no compensation that can make up for all that you've lost. he says, no compensation can take away my pain, and those who died will never come back. as he shows his photos of his children who were killed in the strike, his uncle couldn't hold back his tears, saying, i feel very sad, especially when i see their pictures. it brings me back to that day. the hell-fire missile strike
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was days after an isis attack that killed 13 u.s. service members and nearly 150 afghans trying to evacuate from the kabul airport after the taliban seized control of the country. according to the pentagon, six drones tracked this white toyota seen here on security camera video for eight hours, believing it was linked to an imminent attack by isis-k. instead, it was being driven by zamari amadi who worked for a u.s. humanitarian aid agency specializing in malnutrition. >> it is assessed it is unlikely the vehicle and those who died were associated with isis-k or were a direct threat to u.s. forces. i offer my profound condolences to the family and friends of those who were killed. >> reporter: a painful mistake the amadi family will have to live with no matter how much they are compensated. imtyaz tyab, kul. a lackrss
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partly behinddela across the country. the shortage is expected to reach 100 now by 2023. it is part of the transportation clogging u.s. ports especially in california. but as chris of our chicago station wbbm reports, problems can create opportunities. >> reporter: trucker shortages have left cargo ships like these stacked up off the coast of california. >> look at the truck realistically. >> reporter: and left classrooms for would-be truckers in chicago at capacity. >> wow, i mean, the demand is probably never been greater obviously just from an industry standpoint with the shortage of drivers. >> reporter: vernon cooper ones progressive truck driving school in south suburban lansing. class is 160 hours at a cost of $4,000. starting salary ranges between 60 and 80,000. and a new trend, 25% of students here are now female. >> by the end of october i should be done. >> reporter: she left a job as an occupationa wre
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co ker hrs four a day. this mid-life reboot has triggered an entrepreneurial spirit. >> i'm going to try to get with a company that i can grow with and that i could probably perhaps buy my own truck and be my own owner-operator. >> there's a supply side, getting them trained, getting them in trucks, and then getting equipment to account for the increase in demand for freight. >> reporter: nick najar is the director of transportation for land-o-lakes dairy. trucking and engineering parts vital to making logistics work, it may leave store shelves thin this season. for gia, job security has never been better. >> with this, i know i can go and work as many hours as i need to, you know. i don't have to be limited to just four hours. >> reporter: and as that guessing game continues, those leaving truck driving school ar making year one whaterans years.
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chris, cbs news, arlington heights, illinois. there's a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." start your day with crest 3d white and from mochaccinos to merlot, your smile will always be brilliant. crest 3d white brilliance. 100% stain removal, 24 hour stain resistance to lock in your whitest smile. crest. the #1 toothpaste brand in america. (announcer) if you're an american age 50 to 85,
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and helpful direction for your loved ones. so don't wait, call now. clerk: hello, how can i? sore throat pain? ♪honey lemon♪ try vicks vapocool drops. in honey lemon chill. for fast-acting sore throat relief. wooo vaporize sore throat pain with vicks vapocool drops. the smith sewn january national zoo said lions and tigers that tested positive for
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covid are recovering there. zoo staff are taking precautions to protect other animals. as cbs's weijia jiang shows us. >> reporter: during the pandemic this became an iconic image at the national zoo. good luck sticking a mask on one of these guys, so when one big cat caught covid-19 in september -- >> well, one of our great cats contracted covid. >> reporter: how do you think they contracted covid? >> so, they got it from somebody who looks like you or i. so from a human. >> reporter: chief veterinarian don believes an asymptomatic staffer transmitted the virus to the great cats. >> we really started having concerns about three of the cats. they weren't drinking and they weren't eating so they weren't drinking or getting water from their food. >> reporter: he worried a 16-year-old lion would die. like the others she recovered. still, the outbreak was a reminder. it's not just people, but certain animals that can get sick with covid-19.
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great apes, including orangutans are among the most at risk. this week they became some of the first at the zoo to get vaccinated. >> a lot of training, a lot of trust between the animals. and immediately after receiving that vaccine, i think two orangutans rubbed the injection site which i do, too, when i get the shots. >> reporter: he is hopeful the vaccine will prevent other animals from struggling like shira did. >> the severity of the disease, it seems like it's changing. our cats here were really hit hard by it. >> reporter: the two-shot vaccine was developed specifically for animals by a veterinary pharmaceutical company, being administered at zoos around the country under emergency use. >> given how sick the cats got, you must be very relieved that there is a vaccine available. >> yes, it's really a game changer. but i know those of us that are getting the animals vaccinated, especially those of us who have dealt with these situations, we're feeling a lot happier than
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we did six months ago. >> reporter: the great cats will get their shots in about 90 days weijia jiang, cbs news, washington. >> how beautiful are those animals. next, greta thunberg takes a surprising spin on the world stage. when i get a migraine, i shut out the world. but with nurtec odt that's all behind me now. nurtec can now treat and prevent migraines. don't take if allergic to nurtec. the most common side effects were nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. ask your doctor about nurtec today. [♪♪] if you're only using facial moisturizer in the morning, nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. did you know, the best time for skin renewal is at night? add olay retinol24 to your nighttime skincare routine. it combines hydrating moisturizers with powerful retinoids to renew millions of surface skin cells while you sleep.
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the island of la palma keeps ing on a sw and more sruptions.haend canceled today. about 7,000 people have been forced to evacuate. the island's president says there is no end in sight. olympic left nothing to chance. in acropolis, this was the dress rehearsal for the beijing 2022 winter games. this flame will serve as a backup for the february event. one hiccough, two protesters were detained for drawing attention to human rights abuses in china. activist greta thunberg took to the stage at a concert in stockholm last night. not to make a speech, but to dance. ♪ thunberg crowd with those moves. earlier she criticized the upcoming climate summit of world
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leaders in scotland saying, it's unlikely to lead too big changes. when we return, buried deep inside a
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finally tonight, minors and investors are getting excited about unique rocks found in greenland. they're similar to those found on the moon and could be critical to our future on earth. cbs's ian lee has the story. >> reporter: who knew destroying the planet could help save it? in greenland, scientists blasted open a mountain filled with what they call climate-saving rocks. >> the chemistry here is unique. it's in the formation of our world. >> reporter: it's called a northosite. it contains only three minerals. calcium, silica and aluminum.
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they are crushing it for other items. experts say it produces less waste and greenhouse gas emissions. it is found all around the island's rugged terrain in turquoise fjords. but that's not the only place. >> you find it in canada, scandinavia, russia, south africa, lots of places. >> reporter: so far, miners have collected more than 300 tons. even nasa is looking to see if what they learn down here could help them someday mine similar rocks on the moon. ian lee, cbs news. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back for cbs mornings. and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm nikki battiste.
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this is cbs news flash. i'm elise preston in new york. jury selection in the shooting death of ahmaud arbery begins. arbery, an unarmed black man was running through a georgia neighborhood in 2020 when he was chased down by three white men who say they believed arbery to be suspicious. investigators believe the deadly chase was racially motivated. former president trump will be questioned. the alleged assault happened outside of trump tower in new york following negative comments trump made about mexico. movie goers enjoy being spooked at theaters. halloween kills topped the box office with 50.4 million in dickette sales. for more news, download the cbs
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news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm elise preston, cbs news, new york. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening. i'm nikki battiste. jericka duncan is off. haiti is one of the world's most dangerous countries besieged by poverty, political instability and violence. tonight the fate of more than a dozen american missionaries and family members reportedly kid no napd in the country is unknown. police say they have been seized by a notorious criminal gang. it is the latest in a series of kidnappings that happened outside the capital port-au-prince. cbs's manuel bojorquez is there and has it latest. manny? >> reporter: in haiti's capital
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port-au-prince, kidnappings are on the rise. the sheer number of victims in the case and the fact they are foreigners is brazen even by the gang standards. the kit nappings reportedly happened as a group of missionaries was leaving an orphanage outside port-au-prince on saturday. an armed gang abducted 16 americans including five children as well as one canadian. the missionaries are affiliated with ohio's christian aid ministries. the group's website it's haiti sponsor a school program pays for tuition, uniforms, textbooks and meals for haitians in 52 schools. in a statement about the kidnappings, christian aid ministries said, join us in praying for those who are being held hostage. the kidnappers, and the families, friends and churches of those affected. a surge in gang violence, including kidnappings of haitians, continues to roil this country, already in the midst of a political crisis after a presidential assassination in july, and an earthquake that killed more than 2,000 in
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august. the region where the kidnapping of the missionaries happened is controlled by one gang that is known to be among the most dangerous in haiti, blamed earlier this year with the kidnapping of five priests and two nuns. nikki? >> anorqu iin thk you. american workers are testing their power. thousands have hit picket lines in several states amid a nationwide labor shortage, seeking better pay, benefits and working conditions. there is even a name for it. striketober. cbs's lilia luciano is in los angeles with more. lilia? >> reporter: nikki, here in los angeles, a strike by hollywood crews has been averted for now. but nationwide many workers are walking off the job and right onto the picket line. pandemic pressure is spurring strikes including this one in the suburb of minneapolis. >> you don't mess with the nurses. >> reporter: a walkout by nurses prompted a hospital in plymouth to close its emergency room.
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>> this is like my fifth picket during this pandemic. i find that deplorable. >> reporter: staffing shortages and the battle over benefits are impacting almost every industry. 10,000 john deere workers are on strike. the illinois-based company is expected to post record profits this year. and a 60,000 hollywood production strike was temporarily averted this weekend at the 11th hour. the union members must still vote on the three-year deal with the studios. >> union members are steaming mad. 300 wine bottles. >> reporter: alicia is a pab master in the union. what were some of people's complaints? >> the constant feeling you're going to lose your job. and b, you're never going to sleep. i was invnever hoping for a str. i was hoping for a real reasonable contract. >> reporter: they call it ea hollywood ending.
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>> things blow up. that's a hollywood ending. depends on the movie. >> reporter: alicia says she wouldn't call it an ending quite yet, and while crews will be back at work in sets like this one tomorrow, another massive walkout is expected soon by 24,000 kaiser employee workers who voted to strike. nikki? >> lilia luciano, thanks. former president bill clinton is out of the hospital. the 75-year-old spent six days at u.c. irvine medical center treated for a urological and blood infection. doctors say his fever and blood work are normal. clinton will finish a course of antibiotics at his home in new york. democrats in the nation's capital face a fast-approaching deadline to scale back president biden's agenda ambitions. cbs's debra alverone is at the white house with the details. >> reporter: the house and senate return to washington tomorrow and negotiations will continue over the president's ambitious and expensive agenda. the build back better agenda,
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and no doubt, those will kick start again. >> we're not going to get $3.5 trillion. we'll get less than that. but we're going to get it. and we're going to come back and get the rest. >> reporter: president biden will start off the week with this admission behind him and negotiations ahead. on the potential chopping block, trillions of dollars courtesy of moderate democrats who are balking at the price tag. that could put the administration's sweeping $150 billion program, pushing clean energy in doubt. >> the administration and the president are committed to bold climate action, exactly what legislative form that takes is what's being negotiated right now. but the bottom line is we have to act on climate for the good of our children and, by the way, for the good of our economy. >> reporter: to complicate matters more, liberal democrats say they'll hold off voting on yet another piece of legislation, the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan
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as leverage to negotiate keeping what they want in the larger spending package. >> i'm not going to predict legislative mechanics. what i will say is that we've got to get this done. >> i hope for democrat gridlock. oftentimes in washington you see gridlock as the better alternative, but when it's democrat gridlock, pray for it. i hope that's exactly what happens. >> reporter: democratic leadership has set a deadline of the end of the month to get both bills passed. president biden said friday there is no specific deadline, but he will push to get everything done. nikki? >> debra, thank you. spain's erupting volcano on the island of la palma keeps putting on a show and more disruptions. half of the island's flights were canceled today. about 7,000 people have been forced to evacuate. the island's president says there is no end in sight. olympic players apparently leave nothing to chance. at the acropolis in greece today, this was the dress rehearsal for the flame lighting
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for the beijing 2022 winter games. backup for the february event. one hiccough, two protesters were detained for drawing attention to human rights abuses in china. activist greta thunberg took the stage in stockholm last night. not to make a speech, but to dance. ♪ thunberg surprised the crowd with those moves. earlier she criticized the upcoming climate summit of world leader in scotland saying it's unlikely to lead too big changes. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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overnight news." i'm nikki battiste in new york. thanks for staying with us. a united nation report casts a harsh light on the growth of child labor around the world. it shows between 2016 and 2020, the number of working children rose for the first time in two decades to 160 million. in africa, more than one danger. in the west african country of ghana, debora patta saw kids working in the fishing industry under troubling conditions. >> reporter: the beauty of lake volta is deceptive.
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these are troubled waters. thousands of children are fishing here. some work in the family business. many have been sold into modern-day slavery. go godwin labored on this lake five years. he was entrusted into the care of a man who promised to send him to school. >> i didn't know that i was going to fish. >> reporter: and at first he didn't know how to swim. >> it was deep. >> reporter: deep? >> yeah, very deep. so i was afraid to go down. >> reporter: if he refused, he was beaten. >> i was afraid. i was thinking, i don't know where my life will end, so i said let me run away. >> reporter: eventually he did escape, saved by wallace who works under cover, and has rescued over 150 children for an international charity. we went out on the lake to see for ourselves.
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ricketty vessels filled with kids, unraveling the fine mesh. when they snag oees they are forced to die deep into the murky waters to untangle them. adult work made easier by exploiting agile bodies and tiny hands. the eldest here claims the 9-year-old boy on this boat is his brother. how come they don't speak the same language? it's a red flag. another little boy, believe it or not, called freedom. freedom? where is your mom? he, too, is from far away and speaks cetel difntce of halfn h we've cous i which there could be potential traffickers. do you see this often? >> yes, we see this often. when we see them, we come back.
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>> reporter: wallace gathers intel from freedom village. weeks later he confirms the child had been it was too late to rescue him. he'd been moved. a tactic slave owners use to evade arrest. during this time we haven't seen a single official from the police or the navy who is supposed to be patrolling this water. and so children are easy prey. why do you think there is so much trafficking in this area? >> due to poverty. >> reporter: and poverty is all around us here. desperate, extreme, persistent. it's not just boys who are trafficked. these sisters were snatched near their family home, only recently rescued. their eyes tell of horrors they could not speak out loud. warnings of trafficking abound, but they're not a deterrent, as we found out from this slave
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owner turned informant. how much did you pay for a child? that's about $80. >> reporter: and it's a human life. you bought a child. is that not slavery? that's how it is, he shrugs. over 25 years he's bought thousands of children. what's the worst thing you ever did as a slave owner? forcing a kid who doesn't know how to swim to dive to the bottom of the lake, he told us. they could go down and never come up. so many children have died here, but there is another dreadful truth to hear. you were sold into slavery? by my father, he tells us. the child slave has become the master. godwin refuses to go that route. >> i wanted to go to school so
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that i can become someone. i didn't want to do fishing work. >> reporter: he harbors no bitterness towards his abuser. >> he has to be punished, but i forgive him. >> reporter: how are you able to forgive him? such a hard time. the unearned forgiveness of a boy whose childhood was stolen on this lake. maybe this time the cycle has been broken. debora patta, lake bolta, ghana. his of state, celebrities, royals and religious leaders will gather in scotland at the end of this month for the 26th annual united nations climate change conference. it is expected to be the biggest gathering since 2015. one world leaders signed onto the paris climate accord, with nations vowing to reduce greenhouse gases in their own countries. the goals of the paris accord have not been met and the effects of rising temperatures
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can be seen from glaciers of norway to our own great lakes. ben tracy reports. >> not going to be mother nature. this is really an example of the force of the lake. >> reporter: dennis has lived along lake superior for two decades. >> it kind of looks like it got bombed out. >> it does. >> reporter: even in this now long-term relationship, he says the lake still has all the power. he showed us this shattered stretch of road that used to be lakeshore boulevard. >> lake erosion really got the best of it. but ultimately it failed because nature caught up with us. >> reporter: stankowicz is planning director, home to michigan's upper peninsula. the city had to spend nearly $3 million rebuilding the road f increasingly unpredictable neighbor.
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>> we're watching the intensity of these storms just get worse and worse to the point that they're really becoming dangerous for our infrastructure and the health and welfare of the community. >> reporter: so you're seeing the extremes get more extreme? >> the extremes are getting way more extreme. >> reporter: the storms fueled by climate change are more frequent and intense. they are battering shore lines throughout the great lakes, turning roadways into rivers and forcing homes off their once lofty perches. >> if we keep going on the path we're on, we don't know where these extremes are going to take us. >> reporter: melissa scanlon is director for the water power company in milwaukee. lake michigan hit a low record level in 2013 and swung wildly to record highs in the past few years. so it's normal for the great lakes to rise and fall. how is that cycle changing? >> the highs are getting higher
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and the lows are getting lower. i'm most concerned about flooding and sewag coinating t drig supply for millions of people. >> reporter: the city of milwaukee sits on lake michigan, and the local sewer district is now tearing out these concrete stormwater channels built in the 1960s that can no longer handle the intense rain events. they are restoring a more natural flow to try to slow down the water to keep it from flooding nearby homes. and to keep sewage from pouring into lake michigan if the system gets overwhelmed. >> the city's infrastructures aren't really built to deal with these kind of rainfall extremes. and so we need to figure out how to manage this water and to adapt to the future. >> reporter: of course, the great lakes do not lack for water. they hold 84% of north america's surface freshwater supply. air temperatures in the region are ictedncreehe end of the
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century, making those notorious winters more bearable. that's why places like marquette, michigan, are seen by some as a climate change refuge. >> and they're finding us and they're coming. >> reporter: you lead the way. stephanie jones sells real estate in marquette where the housing market is hot and they can't build new homes fast enough. but there are signs the locals would prefer tourists rather than transplants. are folks here ready to have a lot of new neighbors? >> it depends on who you ask. a lot of people have that, i'm here and i want to be the last person. so can we just shut the door behind me feeling? >> reporter: dennis stankowicz never thought he'd see people moving here for the weather. >> i have to be honest with you. >> reporter: after all, marquette put up a sign proudly displaying its record snowfall of 22 feet. but given fires ravaging the western u.s. and hurricanes hitting the south, this small
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town might have a big future. >> yeah, i didn't see it coming, but this is a pretty good place to weather the storm for lack of a better term. >> reporter: ben tracy, marquette, michigan.
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health officials are warning of a possible twindemic this fall with outbreaks of both covid and the flu. the cdc says an average of 36,000 people died each year of the flu over the past decade, and there are fears this season could be a bad one. janet shamlian has the story. >> reporter: tonight the race is on to get shots into arms as health officials warnful a devastating flu season colliding with the pandemic. should we have a tremendously bad flu season, how could that impact the covid situation? >> if we have a serious influenza outbreak on top of covid-19, we potentially are going to overwhelm the health care system. >> reporter: that's why in little rock at the university of arkansas for medical sciences, there is a new strategy. a one-stop shop for flu shots and covid vaccines at this clinic. the cdc says people can safely
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receive both at the same time. >> i appreciate you doing this. >> reporter: andrew bins got a covid booster in his right arm. >> here's your flu shot. >> reporter: and the flu shot in his left. >> covid is like a wildfire right now, and i want to do everything i can to mitigate the spread. >> reporter: with pandemic lockdowns, the cdc says the 2022 flu season was the mildest on record. experts say with fewer people exposed last year, flu resistance is now lowered. so, are we in for a catastrophic flu season? >> i think there is that potential, and i'm very concerned. >> reporter: in arkansas, just over 46% of the population is fully vaccinated against covid, well below the national total of about 57%. the clinic was hoping to reach more unvaccinated people. but giving flu shots can save lives, too. what is your level of concern about flu this season? >> usual. hope i don't get it. >> reporter: many pharmacies across the country are also
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offering the flu shot and the covid vaccine at the same time. in terms of guidance, the cdc is recommending a yearly flu shot
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london is famous for its double dekker red buses. while some of them are getting a make over. turned into rolling care centers for the homeless. tina kraus has the story. >> reporter: london's famous red buses usually roll right by hundreds of homeless people on the streets of the british capital. >> 1, 2, 3. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: but a new campaign invites those in need to step on board. >> providing everything from access to a doctor, a dentist, showers, a haircut. >> reporter: three buses have been remodelled, complete with laptops to help the homeless find jobs and open bank accounts. american ex-convict thomas noble is now off the streets. >> i've been broken from front to back, up to down. it's been bad.
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>> reporter: he found a job with the british charity that trains homeless people as baristas. money raised from the change, please, program is paying for these bus services. >> you have to try and make the space as nice as you can and really try and connect with people. >> reporter: the buses will run six days a week over the next two years. each one helping at least six homeless people every day. >> there will be no judgment. you step on that bus, they got you. >> reporter: people can send a text to request a bus to stop by them. organizers say the drive for change is transforming lives. >> we leave some with a before and after polaroid as a token. >> reporter: some remember just how far they've come. tina kraus, cbs news, london. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back for cbs mornings. and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the broadcast
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center in new york city, i'm nikki battiste. this is cbs news flash. i'm elise preston in new york. jury selection in the shooting death of ahmaud arbery begins. arbery, an unarmed black man was running through a georgia neighborhood in february 2020 when he was chased down by three white men who say they believed arbery was suspicious. investigators believe the deadly chase was racially motivated. former president trump will be deposed in a lawsuit alleging his security team assaulted six protesters of mexican origin during his 2016 presidential campaign. the alleged assault happened outside of trump tower in new york following negative comments trump made about mexico. movie goers enjoy being spooked at theaters. halloween kills topped the box office with $50.4 million in ticket sales.
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for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm elise preston, cbs news, new york. it's monday, october 18th, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news." missionaries kidnapped. 16 americans and one canadian are taken by a gang in haiti. why the criminal group is said to be among the most dangerous in the region. school walkout. the massive protest planned across california today involving educators, students, and parents. hollywood ending. an 11th hour deal is reached between studios and union leaders. the final hurdle to keep movies and tv shows in production. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. we begin with a kidnapping of

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