Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 13, 2021 3:12am-4:00am PDT

3:12 am
police say he acted alone and there were no other suspects. all right, tonight the nfl is reeling from a scandal involving one of its top coaches. jon gruden resigned from the las vegas raiders over emails he sent that were anti-black, anti-gay and anti-women. this comes as the league tries to become more inclusive. we get more now from cbs's jericka duncan. >> reporter: to some, jon gruden's exit from football was years in the making. >> from day one, he's been a used car salesman. >> reporter: former nfl wide receiver keyshawn johnson played for gruden in the early 2000s. >> i didn't know that john would say things like that, put them in an email. he just always been a fraud to me. >> reporter: gruden was in year four of a ten-year, $100 million contract. today shoe company skechers dropped him as a brand ambassador. his downfall comes after the nfl began investigating workplace misconduct within the washington
3:13 am
football team. and out of 650,000 emails, "the new york times" obtained some emails exchanged over a seven-year span between gruden and then washington team president bruce allen. gruden allegedly called the nfl commissioner a homophobic slur, denounced women referees, the drafting of a gay player, and slammed players for kneeling during the national anthem. ken belson broke the story. >> but the nfl also understands like i think a lot of workplaces this touches an issue that i think a lot of employers now have to grapple with. how do you police somebody's behavior before they come to your company. >> reporter: bill rhoden writes for the undefeated. >> don't think for a minute gruden is the only person who thinks like that. i just think as we move forward on the story, i want to find out who are his enablers. >> reporter: after announcing his resignation, gruden said he was sorry and that he never meant to hurt anyone. just moments ago, we learned that the tampa bay buccaneers,
3:14 am
where gruden used to work and led that team to its first super bowl championship win will no longer be a part of the buccaneers ring of honor. norah? >> jericka duncan, thank you. well, tonight a perfect storm of high demand and low supply is sending fuel prices through the roof. driving your car is costing a lot more, and so will heating your home this winter. we get more now from cbs's mola lenghi. >> reporter: gassing up is increasingly a hit to the wallet. >> you've noticed the price has increased? >> yes, it is pretty rough. i'm not going lie. >> reporter: henry mcginnis told us it just takes something out of you. hurts the pocketbook? hurts your wallet? >> yeah, hurts my soul. >> reporter: this cabdriver says he spends at least $300 extra a month. so he is shopping around. >> the difference is like 10 cents between the amoco and the mobile gas station and the exxon. >> reporter: this week the national average for a gallon of regular unleaded gas is $3.27.
3:15 am
that's a seven-year high. according to gas buddy, the price of a gallon nationwide has gone up more than 5 cents in just a week. u.s. benchmark crude oil prices rode rose above $80 a barrel for the first time since 2014. chicago area utilities are projecting heating bills up to 50% higher this winter compared to last. the new york department of public service warned residents last week, their home heating bills could jump 21% compared to last winter. >> we're facing a aluminuming energy crisis as we head into what could be a cold winter. >> reporter: alema croft, global head of commodities at rbc markets told us higher oil prices combined with increased demand for oil and concerns about a colder winter in europe and asia means you're paying more. >> i mean, i think it's all connected. >> reporter: well, the price of a gallon of gas here in the u.s. has nearly doubled since april of 2020. and experts say whether energy costs will continue to rise through the winter will largely
3:16 am
depend on the weather. a colder winter will likely mean higher price, norah. >> mola lenghi, that makes sense. thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. instantly clear everyday congestion with vicks sinex saline. for fast drug free relief vicks sinex. instantly clear everyday congestion. and try vicks sinex children's saline. safe and gentle relief for children's noses. (announcer) if you're an american age 50 to 85, and you're counting on social security to help your family with your final expenses, this news may surprise you.
3:17 am
the social security death benefit is capped at just $255 and not everyone is entitled to claim it. today, the average funeral cost is over $8,700. that's quite a big gap. how will you fill it? hi, i'm jonathan, a manager here at colonial penn life insurance company, and with coverage options starting at just $9.95 a month, you can get a whole life insurance plan to help close that gap, with a benefit check paid directly to your beneficiary. if you're between age 50 and 85, coverage options start at just $9.95 a month, and the rate is locked in. and it comes with two lifetime guarantees. one: your coverage can never be canceled. and two: your rate can never go up. call for free information and you'll also get this beneficiary planner free just for calling. use it to record important information and helpful direction for your loved ones. so don't wait, call now.
3:18 am
feeling stressed in your skin? not with olay retinol body wash. which improves skin 3x better. from dry and stressed, to bright and smooth. so, i can feel my best in my skin. olay body. fearless in my skin. spray, lift, skip, step. swipe, lift, spin, dry. slam, pan, still...fresh move, move, move, move aaaaand still fresh. degree. ultimate freshness activated when you move. start your day with crest 3d white and from mochaccinos to merlot, ultimate freshness your smile will always be brilliant. crest 3d white brilliance.
3:19 am
100% stain removal, 24 hour stain resistance to lock in your whitest smile. crest. the #1 toothpaste brand in america. well, you probably noticed not only the rising prices at the pump, but also at the grocery store and at your favorite restaurant. with america's economy slowly recovering from the pandemic, we wanted to go to the treasury department, the executive agency tasked with promoting a strong economy to talk to the secretary there, janet yellen. we asked her about the cost issue which impacts so many americans. >> are higher price here is to stay? >> i believe it's transitory, but i don't mean to suggest that these pressures will disappear in the next month or two. this is an unprecedented shock to the global economy. it's led to a huge shift in demand away from services and toward goods.
3:20 am
and it's created huge bottlenecks in supply chains. we have close to 100 ships that are docked outside the ports of los angeles and long beach waiting to unload goods, and a supply chains are very stressed. we get the pandemic under control, the global economy comes back, these pressures will mitigate and i believe will go back to normal levels. >> we're being advise now to shop now for the holidays because of these supply chain issues. what's your message to consumers? >> well, look, we have an economy that's recovering. so there may be isolated shortages of goods and services in the coming months. but there is an ample supply of goods. and i think there is no reason for consumers to panic about the absence of goods that they're going to want to acquire at
3:21 am
christmas. >> reporter: the debt limit debate was kicked down the road for two months from now. >> yes. >> are you confident that congress will avoid a catastrophe come december? >> well, i believe it's absolutely necessary for congress to take action to raise or suspend the debt limit. the debt ceiling is not about future spending and what we would like to see or do. it's about paying the bills that result from decisions congress has made in the past. a failure to raise it to pay america's bills would shake investor and consumer confidence in the willingness of our government to meet its obligations. >> could it lead to a recession? >> absolutely. 50 million seniors would risk not seeing their social security checks arrive on time. our troops would have to worry about when or if they were going to be paid.
3:22 am
this would result in a minimum in a downgrading of the credit rating of the united states. we would see an increase in interest rates on all forms of borrowing, on mortgages, on credit cards, households would see their interest bills go up. >> there is a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news," including a new video of a horrific plane crash. was the pilot disoriented? and important new guidance for those who do you struggle with occasional nerve aches in your hands or feet? try nervivenerve relief from the world's #1 selling nerve care company. nervive contains alpha lipoic acid to relieve occasional nerve aches, weakness and discomfort. try nervivenerve relief.
3:23 am
♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ when i get a migraine, i shut out the world. but with nurtec odt that's all behind me now. nurtec can now treat and prevent migraines. don't take if allergic to nurtec. the most common side effects were nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. ask your doctor about nurtec today.
3:24 am
tonight we're seeing dramatic video of a plane as it nosedived into a neighborhood in southern california on monday. it caused a fireball that destroyed two homes and damaged three others. the pilot may have been disoriented before the crash. tonight southwest airlines flights are running closer to normal. flight aware says southwest only canceled fewer than 100 flights today after canceling more than 2400 over the previous three days. well, there is new guidance tonight on the daily use of low-dose aspirin, which has long been recommended for heart health. a panel of medical experts says most adults should not take aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. adults in their 40s and 50s are advised to take aspirin only if their doctor determines they're at higher risk of heart disease. people who have already had heart attacks or strokes should
3:25 am
continue to take their daily aspirin. good info there. all right. up next, conchas and when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
3:26 am
3:27 am
honor of hispanic heritage month, we visit an art exhibit that stimulates the brain and the taste buds. here is cbs's mireya villarreal. >> reporter: comfort food comes in all shapes and sizes. >> piedras are my dad's favorite bun. >> reporter: for latino families nothing is more nostalgic or satisfying than a concha, a sweet bread often served at breakfast. eva marengo sanchez painted conchas for a new exhibit at the mcnay art museum in san antonio. >> i think that food just so close to our identity. i feel so happy when i'm eating, just like physically and my brain is just happy. >> me too! >> reporter: like the legendary pop artist andy warhol and his
3:28 am
soup cans, curator eddie hayes says this exhibit shows the talent of hispanic artists through something we can all relate to, food. >> as a latino, to see a concha elevated in a space like this is really incredible. >> reporter: do you feel like it says we deserve this place on the wall? >> totally. we're part of the future of this country's cultural fabric. >> for sanchez this is about painting a permanent seat at the table for latinos with art that looks good enough to eat. >> i want to be painting at the very top of my ability because i am representing people that identify with my work. >> reporter: mireya villarreal, cbs news, san antonio. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online any time at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm norah o'donnell.
3:29 am
this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. good news for travel. the u.s. plans to reopen its land borders with canada and mexico to nonessential travel next month. under the new rules, fully vaccinated foreign nationals will be allowed to enter the u.s., regardless of the reason. after weeks of partisan gridlock, the house has extended the nation's debt limit through early december, avoiding economic catastrophe for now. president biden is expected to sign off on the short-term extension soon. and he's lived long and prospered, and now he is going where no other 90-year-old has gone before. william shatner, or captain kirk from "star trek" is headed to space with blue origin, making him the oldest man to go.
3:30 am
for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> good evening and thank you for joining us. we want to begin with the revelation tonight from a coroner in wyoming that gabby petito was strangled to death. the 22-year-old's body was found in wyoming more than three weeks ago, just days after her fiance, brian laundrie, disappeared. the coroner says petito's body had been exposed to the elements and wildlife for several weeks before she was found. he did not offer many details. he wouldn't say if she was buried. but in response to a reporter's question, the coroner did reveal petito was not pregnant. a toxicology report was done, but the results won't be released because of wyoming
3:31 am
laws. laundrie is the only person of interest in the case and remains the focus of an intense musts fo hike in a nare preserve in florida nearly a month ago and hasn't been seen since. cbs's manuel bojorquez is going to lead us off tonight with shocking new details in the case. good evening, manny. >> reporter: good evening, norah. tonight the family of gabby petito had no comment on the day's developments, a story that is largely unfolding in two states, here in florida where the search for brian laundrie continues, and in wyoming, where the county coroner revealed the cause of death, manual strangulation and throttling. >> and the manner of death of gabrielle lorena petito, we find the cause of manner to be, cause, death by strangulation, and manner is homicide. >> reporter: teton county wyoming corner dr. brent blue also revealed how long her body epter: the 22-year-old's ur wee.
3:32 am
body was discovered september 19th in wyoming's bridger-teton national forest. >> i love the van. >> reporter: what started as a cross-country summer trip with her fiance, 23-year-old brian laundrie, devolved into fights, witnessed by passersby and police. >> this is a rough morning. >> reporter: like this one, where officers were called on august 12th in moab, utah. >> she just gets worked up sometimes. >> reporter: on august 27th around the time of petito's death, there was a text message sent from her home that her family questions was from her. on september 11th, they reported her missing after laundrie returned home to florida without her and refused to cooperate with investigators. less than a week later, laundrie was reported missing himself. his parents told police he went hiking at a nearby reserve and feared he may harm himself. his father helped in the search
3:33 am
last week but so far there has been no sign of him. and while refusing to comment beyond her cause of death, dr. uece >> unfornately, this is only one of many deaths around the country of people who are involved in domestic violence. and it's unfortunate that these other deaths did not get as much coverage as this one. >> reporter: the laundrie family attorney issued a statement this afternoon reminding everyone that brian laundrie remains only a person of interest in the case, and has only been charged with using someone else's financial accounts. it is worth noting that as much interest as this case has garnered, the national crime information center says at the end of last year, it had nearly 90,000 open missing person cases. norah? >> that's an important thing to note. manny bojorquez, thank you. and turning now to covid and news today from moderna. the company is asking the fda to
3:34 am
authorize a half dose booster of its vaccine. it comes ahead of a big meeting of independent scientists who will advise the agency on just that. meanwhile, the biden administration is on a collision course with republican governors in several states over vaccine mandates. here is cbs's nancy cordes. >> reporter: the new executive order from texas governor greg abbott is not subtle. he accuses the biden administration of bullying private entities into imposing vaccine mandates. and then he threatens to fine any texas companies that comply. >> our patience is wearing thin. >> reporter: it was one month ago that president biden announced all companies with more than 100 employees would soon have to require workers to either get vaccinated or submit to regular testing, with even stricter rules for federal contractors. >> if you want to work with the federal government and do business with us, get vaccinated. >> reporter: since then, republican attorneys general
3:35 am
from roughly two dozen states have threatened to sue the administration. texas is one of them. >> and we're extremely concerned about the vaccine mandates from the federal government. >> reporter: the conflict is sure to breed confusion for employers. several major texas-based companies have already announced vaccine mandates. american airlines said today it's reviewing governor abbott's executive order but believes the federal vaccine mandate supersedes any conflicting state laws. >> and clearly governor abbott knows that federal rules supersede state rules, so why do you think he did this? >> politics. >> can you elaborate? >> well, i think it's pretty clear when you make a choice that's against all public health information and data out there that it's not based on what is in the interests of the people you are governing. >> reporter: adding to the confusion here is the fact that the labor department still hasn't finalized the president's new vaccine rules. that's probably going to take at least another few weeks. and even then, there are only
3:36 am
about 800 osha inspectors who will be responsible for ensuring that thousands of large companies around the country comply. norah? >> all right, nancy cordes, thank you so much. the "cbs overnight news" will be well, tonight a perfect storm of high demand and low supply is sending fuel prices through the roof. driving your car is costing a lot more, and so will heating your home this winter. we get more from cbs's mola lenghi. >> reporter: gassing up is increasingly a hit to the wallet. >> you've noticed the price has increased? >> yes, it is pretty rough. i'm not going lie. >> reporter: henry mcginnis told us it just takes something out of you. hurts the pocketbook? hurts your wallet? >> yeah, hurts my soul. >> reporter: this cabdriver says he spends at least $300 extra a month. so he is shopping around. >> the difference is like 10 cents between the amoco and the mobile gas station and the exxon. >> reporter: this week the national average for a gallon of regular unleaded gas is $3.27. that's a seven-year high.
3:37 am
according to gas buddy, the price of a gallon nationwide has gone up more than 5 cents in just a week. u.s. benchmark crude oil prices rose above $80 a barrel for the first time since 2014. chicago area utilities are projecting heating bills up to 50% higher this winter compared to last. the new york department of public service warned residents last week, their home heating bills could jump 21% compared to last winter. >> we're facing a looming energy crisis as we head into what could be a cold winter. >> reporter: helima croft, global head of commodities strategy at rbc markets told us higher oil prices combined with increased demand for oil and concerns about a colder winter in europe and asia means you're paying more. >> i mean, i think it's all connected. >> reporter: well, the price of a gallon of gas here in the u.s. has nearly doubled since april of 2020. and experts say whether energy costs will continue to rise through the winter will largely depend on the weather.
3:38 am
a colder winter will likely mean higher prices, norah. clerk: hello, how can i? sore throat pain? ♪honey lemon♪ try vicks vapocool drops. in honey lemon chill. for fast-acting sore throat relief. wooo vaporize sore throat pain with vicks vapocool drops. frequent heartburn? not anymore. the prilosec otc two-week challenge is helping people love what they love again.
3:39 am
♪♪ you pour your heart into everything you do, which is a lot. so take care of that heart with lipton. because sippin' on unsweetened lipton can help support a healthy heart. lipton. stop chuggin'. start sippin'. ordinary tissues burn when theo blows. so dad bought puffs plus lotion, stop chuggin'. and rescued his nose. with up to 50% more lotion puffs bring soothing softness and relief. a nose in need deserves puffs indeed.
3:40 am
♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm major garrett in washington. thank you so much for staying with us. school districts across the country are warning students and parents of a zero tolerance policy regarding the destruction and theft of school property. this is an effort to crack down on a new internet craze called the devious licks challenge. this encourages students to vandalize their schools and then share the video online. this month's challenge, believe it or not, slap a teacher. jamie yuccas has the story. >> reporter: tiktok and other social media challenges of course are nothing new. in the past we've seen money
3:41 am
raised for charity, and in the pandemic we saw all those families get creative with danc. but school officials say the latest craze is dangerous and destructive. >> what the [ bleep ] is going on, bro? >> reporter: hundreds of paper dispenser, paper rolls have been ripped off the wall, food and other items smeared across the walls and floors and stalls. >> reporter: clark county's chief communications officer anthony johnson says recent vandalism has caused roughly $20,000 in damages at more than a dozen schools in the tennessee district. the destruction, johnson says, is linked to a nationwide viral challenge called devious licks, encouraging kids to destroy or steal school property and post it online. addison goldberg and lilly lambert attend one of the vandalized emotional schools. >> why does something like that gain popularity? >> it's just wanting the
3:42 am
attention, whether it be positive or negative. they want the attention because they either aren't getting some at home or they just want it was they feel insecure about themselves. >> reporter: now some schools worry that the trend may affect personnel. with the latest rumored viral challenge slap a teacher. this new challenge is assault. are you concerned? >> certainly. assaulting any employee is a zero tolerance offense. >> reporter: fearing the worst, the national education association sent a letter to facebook, tiktok, and twitter demanding the tech giants take action to regulate lies and fix your algorithms to put public safety over profits. becky pringle is president of the association. >> what we are saying to the social media companies is that we would -- we want to work with them to ensure that they not only see it, but they respond to it. >> reporter: in a statement to cbs news, a tiktok spokesperson said the alleged challenge would violate our policies, and we
3:43 am
would aggressively remove such content. but the reality is that we have not found related content on our platform. now, we did reach out to facebook and to twitter but have not heard back yet. the montgomery school district told us more than $6,000 in fines have been paid so far, and according to the school district's policy, a student's report card, transcript and diploma can be held until the student's family pays off those daniels. >> jamie yuccas reporting from los angeles. changing tunes now, you'll understand in a minute. the most influential guitar in the history of rock 'n roll goes up for auction today. it is les paul's number one, the prototype of the first solid body electric guitar ever produced. it took paul 30 years to perfect, and it changed the course of music forever. anthony mason has the story. >> reporter: lot number 1 in what christie's calls the exceptional sale, an auction later this week is one of the
3:44 am
most influential instruments of the past century. so where did your dad keep this? >> he kept this in the basement. >> reporter: open it up for me. this is les paul's number one gibson gold top, the first approved prototype his son gene says of his father's now iconic electric guitar. >> now let me do this very delicately. >> reporter: yeah. >> this that would be it. just stunning. >> reporter: it is stunning. it's absolutely beautiful. >> and the next part that is stunning of how it looked is how he played it. smoet ♪ >> reporter: the guitar made its tv debut on the cbs program omnibus back in 1953. what did this guitar mean to him? >> everything. this was his crowning achievement. this was 30 years of experiments, of his dream and his obsession with getting gibson to make it.
3:45 am
>> reporter: gibson rolled out its first les paul in 1952. it was soon embraced by the guitar gods of rock 'n roll. ♪ the eagles, joe walsh, lead lead's jimmy page, and the stones' keith richards all played a les paul. ♪ >> it's one of those perfect rock 'n roll machines. >> reporter: carey keen of christie's. >> it has the ability to be adrenaline at very high volume with a distortion level that is appealing and wonderful. >> reporter: les paul, who died in 2009 at 94 was a guitar god himself. in the '50s with his then wife mary ford, he had 28 hit records, including his signature tune, "how high the moon."
3:46 am
his quest to create a hard body electric guitar had started when he was growing up in wisconsin when a fan passed him a note after a performance. >> he said i could hear your voice fine. i could hear your harmonica fine, but he said i couldn't hear your guitar. >> reporter: and that bothered your father? >> well, i don't think it bothered him. i think it lit him up. >> reporter: one of paul's early iterations he called the log. a door hinge, a string and a block of wood. that's it. >> reporter: he showed it to jim axelrod for this program in 2002. >> this is like the printing press or the model t. >> reporter: it was hardly his only invention. paul also pioneered multitrack recording. ♪ >> reporter: as he demonstrated with mary ford on omnibus with alistair cook in '53. >> who is the voice?
3:47 am
>> that's mary. >> they're all mary's voices? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: paul is the only artist inducted into both the rock & roll hall of fame and the inventors hall of fame. was he as proud of being an inventor as he was being a musician? >> being a musician is why he invented. >> reporter: as les paul himself put it -- >> love to play. love to entertain. loved to make people laugh. make them happy. >> reporter: christie's has put a 100 to 150,000 estimate on the instrument, but gene paul wonders how you value history. what do you hope happens to this guitar? >> i'm going miss it. but i miss dad more. he said to me one time, he said do you realize how many light bulbs edison made before he got
3:48 am
it? and that kind of rings in my mind. what's edison's first bulb? that's how much it meant to dad. ♪ >> anthony mason reporting. guitar collectors tell us christie's estimate of 150,000 for les paul's number one is conservative. they say it could shatter a record for a guitar sold at auction. that record is currently held by kurt cobain's 1959 martin acoustic which sold for $6.2 million. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. do you have a life insurance policy you no longer need? now you can sell your policy, even a term policy, for an immediate cash payment. call coventry direct to learn more. we thought we had planned carefully for our retirement. but we quickly realized that we needed a way to supplement our income. our friends sold their policy to help pay for their medical bills and that got me thinking. maybe selling our policy could help
3:49 am
with our retirement. i'm skeptical, so i did some research and called coventry direct. they explained life insurance is a valuable asset that can be sold. we learned that we can sell all of our policy or keep part of it with no future payments, who knew? we sold our policy. now we can relax and enjoy our retirement as we had planned. if you have one hundred thousand dollars or more of life insurance you may qualify to sell your policy. don't cancel or let your policy lapse without finding out what it's worth. visit conventrydirect.com to find out if you policy qualifies. or call the number on your screen. coventry direct, redefining insurance. you have always loved vicks vapors. and now you'll really love new vicks' vapostick. it goes on clear and dries quickly. no mess. just the soothing vicks' vapor for the whole family. introducing new vicks vapostick.
3:50 am
don't settle. start your day with secret. secret stops odor-causing sweat 3x more. and the provitamin b5 formula is gentle on skin. with secret, outlast anything! no sweat. secret. ♪ all strength. no sweat. ♪ see blood when you brush or floss can be a sign of early gum damage. parodontax active gum repair kills plaque bacteria at the gum line to help keep the gum sealed tight. parodontax active gum repair toothpaste feeling stressed in your skin? not with olay retinol body wash. which improves skin 3x better. from dry and streso
3:51 am
so, i can feel my best in my skin. olay body. fearless in my skin. since the pandemic started, millions of americans have dropped out of the labor force. now some of them are seeking greener fields on the farm. janet shamlian has the story. >> reporter: james marriott leaves for work before sunrise. a drive starting on boston's crowded streets and ending on a road less traveled. the final stretch of his commute, acres of flush farmland. with degrees in neural science and global health, the 24-year-old has recently taken a new job in farming. >> right now we are bunching 150 bunches of cilantro. >> reporter: it's a different skill set, far from the lab of a
3:52 am
biotech company where he used to work developing vaccines. have you heard the term "quarter life crisis"? >> i'm very familiar with that term. >> reporter: is that what this is? >> i wouldn't so much call it a crisis. this was a very intentional decision, and this is not something where i was i don't know what to do. let me just go work on a farm. this is how i want my life to go. >> i got you. >> reporter: on a crisp fall morning at drumlin farm, marriott is not an anomaly. we also met sean moriarty who also left his job as a copywriter to harvest crops. and traded days inside a hospital for bucolic green acres. >> it's beautiful. it feels really god just to be here. >> reporter: almost all these 20-somethings left not just jobs, but in many cases quick careers as the pandemic took hold. >> i was a believe itr n a very stressful time for me. it was just not the right setting. and i think covid certainly sped
3:53 am
up the feelings of burnout. >> reporter: crops manager matt salona tells uspps now looking for work on the farm. years ago salona did something similar, swapping academics for agriculture. >> it makes sense to me. if they try a job, they don't like it, they want to try something else, they have an interest in the environment. >> reporter: what's happening in this massachusetts farm field is part of a seismic shift. a july study found nearly a third of workers urn 40 considered changing careers during the pandemic. what is the commonality among these 20-somethings who are leaving these white collar jobs for farm work. >> we all kind of felt like we were cogs in the wheel of a larger system that we didn't want to be a part of it. and that is our way of taking agency back over our lives and this is what we want to be doing rather than doing something we felt we had to be doing. >> reporter: in other words, a lifestyle change. this group is environmentally minded and wanteto work outdoors. but there is a trade-off.
3:54 am
beyond calloused hands and sore backs, the job comes with a pay cut. your income has dropped by half? >> a little more than that, yep. it's been a life adjustment. i mean, it's certainly reevaluating what i choose to spend my money on. >> reporter: whether the move is permanent she is not sure, but it helped to realize the fragility of life and spending time doing what makes her happy. >> i couldnt of thought that it might just be a break, and maybe it is, and maybe it's not. it feels like a shake of the snow globe, i guess. it's little flurries everywhere right now, but good things, i think. >> reporter: sean moriarty can see a future in farming, saying the work is meaningful. >> you know, i did not feel like what i was doing mattered at all. and that's why okay, i got to leave this. >> reporter: and james marriott, pursuing a masters in epidemiology says it's the right choice for right now. >> i don't see myself doing this forever, but i'll always kind of keep farming with me in some
3:55 am
way. >> reporter: the pandemic's impact. for some rethinking what's important and venturing into new
3:56 am
3:57 am
as parents and politicians battle over mask mandates and vaccine requirements, some students and their teachers are taking a low-tech approach to keeping their schools safe from coronavirus. dr. jon lapook tells us more. >> reporter: an army of do-it-yourselfers at uc san diego is thinking inside the box. >> these are the instructions. >> reporter: building 250 homemade air purifiers for classrooms and labs around campus as an added layer of protection against covid. four air filters make up the sides. as airflows in, an electric fan on top draws out the powerified air. >> the virus, if it's there, will get trapped in the filter
3:58 am
material. >> reporter: professor kim appr prather filters. >> the filters make four walls. >> reporter: from 9-year-old kahlan? hawaii to robots on the east coast. jim rosenthal, who helped design the box, knows a thing or two about air filters. his company makes them. are you getting, forgive me, fan mail? >> my fan mail is basically all the people who have adopted this project as their own. >> just put that down to cover that. >> reporter: this one was the letizia family's product. >> a big s. >> with a custom design. >> beautiful! >> reporter: dr. jon lapook, cbs news, white plains. >> new york. >> and that is the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some you have, the news continues. for other, please check back later for "cbs mornings." of course, you can follow us online at cbsnews.com. and please join me for my podcast, the takeout. this week i'm speaking with national education association
3:59 am
president rebecca pringle. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm major garrett. i'tom hanson in new york. this is cbs news flash. i'm tom hanson in new york. good news for travel. the u.s. plans to reopen its land borders with canada and mexico to nonessential travel next month. under the new rules, fully vaccinated foreign nationals will be allowed to enter the u.s., regardless of the reason. after weeks of partisan gridlock, the house has extended the nation's debt limit through early december, avoiding economic catastrophe f now. president biden n is expected t sign off on the short-term extension soon. and he's lived long and prospered, and now he is going where no other 90-year-old has gone before. william shatner, or captain kirk from "star trek" is headed to space with blue origin, making him the oldest man to go. for more news download the cbs
4:00 am
news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. it's wednesday, october 13th, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight, pandemic progress. the u.s. will open the canada and mexico borders for vaccinated travelers. how soon the new policy will go into effect. gabby petito autopsy. a coroner says the 22-year-old died by strangulation. what else was revealed about her death. explosive wildfire. flames shut down a major freeway in southern california as it threatens more than 100 homes and ranches. well, good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. we begin with a breaking announcement from the white

32 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on