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tv   NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt  NBC  October 29, 2021 6:30pm-7:00pm PDT

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>> also the deadline for new york city workers to get vaccinated will it me fewer police and ambulances on the streets also tonight, president biden overseas without a deal on his agenda back home. the president at the vatican today. what pope francis told him amid calls from u.s. bishops to deny him communion over his abortion stance. also, the first face-to-face meeting with the president of france since the riff with the u.s. over a nuclear submarine deal what president biden admitted during their meeting. the mid-atlantic bracing for the worst coastal flooding in nearly 20 years. will it move out in time for halloween this weekend growing concerns about queen elizabeth's health what doctors have now advised her to do. the crew member in charge of the guns on alec baldwin's movie set. breaking her silence about the deadly shooting, what she says about that fatal live round. and he ran the very first new york city marathon. now on the 50th
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running, he's returning to the starting line. this is nbc night lie news with lester holt good evening, and thank you for joining us the fda tonight has given the okay for kids ages 5 to 11 to receive pfizer covid shots. the first injection is likely just days away. with 28 million children eligible, today's emergency use authorization is a potential game changer in the fight against the pandemic especially in the nation's beleaguered schools. and could narrow the vaccination gap that tonight leaves fewer than 58% of americans fully vaccinated all of this follows the recommendation of a safety panel which determined the child size dose to be safe and effective. the cdc expected now to follow-up shortly with its endorsement tom costello now with late details >> reporter: this afternoon's fda news means hospitals and clinics have just days to prepare for another wave of vaccinations at inova hospital in
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fairfax, virginia, they're prepping to vaccinate 500 young children each day, even bringing in therapy dogs and star wars characters. how do you make this clinical setting less stressful for kids >> lots of things. we give kids stress balls, things to hang on to, distractions, bringing in costume characters we use the word "poke" instead of shots we let kids sit on mom's lap. we let them watch a video for distraction. >> reporter: with full cdc approval expected soon, needless could be going into young arms as soon as the middle of next week. critical to controlling the pandemic and getting kids back to a more normal life. 28 million 5 to 11-year-olds could be eligible for the shot. already 8,300 children in that age group have been hospitalized with covid. 146 have died. the eighth highest killer pfizer's vaccine offered a nearly 91% efficacy in preventing severe infection in children with only a third of the adult's dose offered to kids,
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the side effects were mostly mild. there were no cases of the extremely rare heart inflammation seen in some older boys and young men. >> i think what parents can expect if they vaccinate their 5 to 11-year-old is that a certain percentage will have fever, headache, muscle ache, joint pain the good news is that that just lasts a couple days and then it goes away on its own. >> reporter: children's hospital in colorado was a vaccine trial center now it's preparing for mass vaccinations and urging parents to sign their kids up. >> we have hospitalized over 2,000 children since the start of the pandemic and, so, what's really important to realize is this is happening to children. children are getting sick children are being hospitalized and it's a serious thing for them. >> reporter: with children making up 20% of the population, experts believe vaccinating them is critical to the country achieving so-called herd immunity.
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>> and, tom, government approval aside, the fact remains a lot of parents are still nervous about getting their kids vaccinated. >> reporter: yeah. but experts make the point the more children have been hospitalized with covid than with the flu. and they're very worried about long-term effects on kids, brain fog, muscle aches, headaches that could last for weeks, months, maybe even longer and they really believe the benefits far outweigh the minuscule risks associated with the vaccine. lester >> all right tom costello, thank you. here in new york a sweeping vaccine mandate for municipal workers took effect tonight while numerous other states are suing to block federal vaccine requirements our gabe gutierrez now has the latest. >> reporter: late today as new york city's covid vaccine mandate for municipal workers kicked in, unions for the nation's largest fire department warned of the potential for closed fire houses and longer emergency response times >> new york city is going to come to a crisis on monday morning. >> reporter: earlier today the city said just 67% of its firefighters have received at least one dose those who don't get the shot face unpaid leave starting monday.
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tonight 6 firefighters have been suspended for driving a ladder truck while on duty to the state senator's office and allegedly threatening the senator's staff over the covid vaccine mandate. from coast to coast, more showdowns over shots. los angeles county sheriff, alex villanova is calling his area's covid vaccine mandate a threat to public safety saying it is causing a mass exodus in his department also in california, popular burger chain in-n-out shut down more restaurants rather than comply with mandates. >> i can see where they're coming from that it is not their job to, as they put it, be vaccine police. >> reporter: today, ten states filed lawsuits against the biden administration's vaccine requirement for federal contractors. iowa's governor signed a new law allowing workers fired for noncompliance with covid vaccine mandates to receive unemployment benefits. and next tuesday, a new deadline for the air force. up to 12,000 personnel have rejected orders to get fully vaccinated despite a pentagon mandate
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still the vast majority of active duty airmen, more than 96% are at least partially vaccinated and tonight, word that the u.s. supreme court won't block a covid vaccine mandate for health care workers in maine. back in new york city, officials say the last-minute push is working. the nypd now reporting more than 80% compliance, up from 70% last week. >> i think we're heading in the right direction. >> reporter: and with the rise in vaccinations and the fading delta variant, some encouraging news. new york city reported a covid test positivity rate of less than 1% lester >> all right gabe gutierrez, thank you. at the vatican today, the president and the pontiff. president biden meeting with pope francis and mr. biden making a striking admission while speaking to the french president. peter alexander is at the vatican. >> reporter: for president biden, a day of devotion and diplomacy. america's second ever roman catholic president having a private audience with
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pope francis, with whom he's built a personal bond, giving him a ceremonial commander coin and a compliment. >> you are the most significant warrior for peace i have ever met. >> reporter: president biden was later asked whether the issue of abortion came up >> no, it didn't we talked about the fact he was happy i was a good catholic. >> reporter: that has been a source of controversy with some u.s. bishops recently arguing catholic politicians who support abortion rights, including the president, should be denied communion just last month, pope francis called abortion homicide, but he's never denied anyone communion in the vatican statement, it made no mention of the highly contentious topic. hours later, president biden looked to rebuild trust with america's oldest ally, meeting with french president emanuel macron for the first time since france recalled their ambassador from washington, furious the u.s. took a multi billion dollar submarine deal away from france without notice mr. biden admitting to macron his administration made a mistake. >> i think what
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happened was, to use an english phrase, it was gone without a lot of grace. >> macron looking to move passed the dispute. >> what really matters now is what we will do together in the coming weeks, the coming months, the coming years. >> reporter: the president arriving in europe without the win he had been hoping for, despite pushing democrats in the capitol yesterday to get behind the $1.75 trillion framework for his social spending and climate plan, even arguing his presidency is on the line but while progressives endorse that plan, they still refuse to vote for it or the trillion dollar bipartisan infrastructure bill until they are convinced moderate holdout senators joe manchin and kyrsten sinema are onboard, too. >> we need a little bit more than an iou we need to know what it is that we're going to commit to >> peter joining me now from the vatican
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and, peter, climate is going to be on the president's agenda all this week. >> reporter: yeah, lester that's right the g20 summit gets underway here tomorrow, with climate is a top priority. during that hour and 15 minute private meeting today, president biden says today that pope francis emphasized to him the moral responsibility to protect the planet lester >> all right peter alexander, thank you. new details tonight about the groping case involving former new york governor andrew cuomo. the albany county sheriff says there is overwhelming amount of evidence against cuomo who faces a misdemeanor charge of forcibly touching a female aid he will be arraigned in mid-november. his lawyer says he never assaulted anyone and tonight another pro sports league is under fire the nhl being shaken by a sexual abuse scandal that has cost a head coach and two top executives their jobs stephanie gosk now with late details. >> reporter: it is one of the biggest scandals the nhl has ever faced resignations mounting. florida panthers coach joel quenneville is gone gm for the chicago
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blackhawks and a senior vp for the team also gone. fall-out from the release of an independent investigation that concluded blackhawks management ignored a sexual assault allegation against one of its coaches in 2010. >> i felt like i was alone and there was nothing i could do and nobody i could turn to for help. >> reporter: kyle beach was 20 years old, called up to the blackhawks as an alternate during the playoffs that's when he says the video coach brad aldridge threatened to hurt his career if he didn't engage in sexual acts. a week after the incident according to the law firm's report, beach told the team. >> after being informed of aldridge's alleged sexual harassment and misconduct with a player, no action was taken for three weeks. >> reporter: according to the report, quenneville, the coach at the time, wanted to focus on the finals. when they won, aldridge still had his job and his name on the stanley cup. these photos included in the report. >> it made me feel like i didn't exist. it made me feel that i
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wasn't important. >> reporter: a month later, aldridge resigned in 2013 he pleaded guilty to a sexual misconduct charge involving a minor. aldridge's attorney says his client denies the report's allegations. the blackhawks and the nhl issued apologies the team calling it inexcusable, adding no championship is more important than protecting our players. quenneville expressing his sorrow, admitting he and the team failed the young player the nhl commissioner says he is appalled that beach was so poorly supported have you seen any indication that beyond this very specific investigation the league is looking to address a larger cultural issue >> no. and i think that they will be quite happy to just move on from this, and, you know, if you don't address these problems, you are not fixing the root of it. >> reporter: beach says he hopes the league will choose to focus less on its image and more on
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keeping this from happening again. stephanie gosk, nbc news. in just 60 seconds, new developments in that deadly shooting on a movie set. what lawyers for the woman in charge of the guns are saying about her role. and a new update on the health of queen elizabeth.
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just in tonight, maryland declaring a state of emergency as a severe storm pushes through the mid atlantic and northeast. heavy rain causing flooding in and around washington d.c 18 million under alert for what could be the worst coastal flooding since 2003 up to three feet in some areas the storm is expected to clear out by halloween on sunday. also tonight, the crew member in charge of the guns on the alec baldwin movie set where a fatal shooting occurred is breaking her silence about the live round in baldwin's gun and what she calls unsafe working conditions here's miguel almaguer >> reporter: saying she's been slandered and falsely portrayed, today hannah
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gutierrez-reed, the 24-year-old in charge of guns on the set of "rust" is sharing her side of the story. in a statement her attorneys write, hannah was hired on two positions on this film, which made it extremely difficult to focus on her job as an armorer. she fought were training but ultimately was overruled by production and her department but tonight sources close to the production say no one was looking to cut corners and she never worked in both positions at the same time. >> although we appreciate the statement given by ms. gutierrez-reed, i think it raises more questions than it does answers. >> reporter: investigators say a single bullet that should have never been onset was placed inside a revolver like this one before alec baldwin pulled the trigger and killed cinematographer halyna hutchins hannah has no idea where the live rounds came from, her attorneys say. hannah and the prop master never witnessed anyone shoot live
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rounds with these guns >> how could the armorer not know there was live ammo being put into these guns? that's exactly what the armorer's job is to do. >> reporter: the sheriff has said the investigation into what happened here could take weeks, even months in the meantime, more witnesses are expected to step forward and share their side of the story. lester >> miguel almaguer in new mexico, thanks queen elizabeth has been advised by her doctors to rest for at least the next two weeks, buckingham palace said today. the 95-year-old monarch was briefly hospitalized last week the queen will not receive any official visits and has canceled her appearance at britain's festival of remembrance on november 13th. up next for us tonight, the sky high prices, the delays what to know about renovating your home in "the price you pay.
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if you have been looking for a new home, then you know the market remains red hot. the median home price soaring above $400,000 for the first time many are choosing to renovate instead, but that's tough as well here's jake ward >> reporter: homeowner and mom amber bissoti saved for years to renovate her home in seattle. >> and our kids are teenagers and they're growing. >> reporter: you budgeted for this one way, and i'm assuming that the price has changed. >> the lumber prices obviously have gone up. >> reporter: for this contractor, josh mcdowell, he says he
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turns away roughly ten jobs a week. now clients may need to wait for lower lumber prices. >> so they have been waiting six to eight months to have their project done and you have to tell them they now need to wait another year or so. >> reporter: in fact, the backup in the workload is to intense, she just took a job working with mcdowell meanwhile, new homes remain hard to come by construction fell by 1.6% in september as supply chain failures continue to choke the market. >> you can understand why now a house costs $700,000 to $800,000 if it costs $200,000 just to add an addition to it. >> there you go. >> reporter: at stewart lumber, basic plywood costs about 25% more today than it did prepandemic. >> you don't want people walking out of your store because prices are just too high. >> reporter: materials like these were bought at a high price. as a result, retailers tell us they can't afford to sell them to you at a loss. even glue costs more if you can get it at all. >> we get it in on a tuesday and we're running out by wednesday.
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>> reporter: experts say you'll want to wait until next year at least to get started on a new project. adjust your designs to use less wood, if you can and plan for these new prices because they may not fall. >> the plywood and stuff like that, they will never come back down to where they were. >> reporter: jake ford, nbc news, seattle. a holiday known as day of the dead is about to be celebrated for many, it is taking on added meaning this year with the toll of the pandemic here's morgan radford. >> reporter: lupe calderone lost her mother to covid in december, just weeks after her father's death. >> it's two of the people that i love the most. >> reporter: now she's turning those memories into an ofrenda, or offering, a tradition of día de muertos or day of the dead. >> i want to honor them for everything that they've done for us it is a day for me to commemorate them and show them the love that we have for them. >> reporter: the holiday began in mexico nearly 3,000 years ago. those who celebrate
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believe on midnight of october 31st, the souls of their loved ones come back to visit. and when they do, ofrendas make them feel at home how tall is this >> 15 feet >> reporter: that's why isabella grande made hers bigger than ever why was it especially important for you to make this this year? >> i've seen a lot of people, family, friends, dying of this virus. i want to lift up the spirits and just to remember that they will never be forgotten. >> reporter: here in the national museum of mexican art, this ofrenda honors latinos who died of covid. does this day have a different significance this year because of covid? >> it is more important than ever. we have not been able to mourn as a community. this year the day of the dead really allows for that to happen. >> i put a candle. i put their favorite food as if they were alive to me. >> reporter: alive through memory and tradition. morgan radford, nbc news chicago up next, i hit the road with a marathon man making history and inspiring america.
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finally, just over a week from now, thousands of runners will hit the pavement for the 50th new york city marathon, including one man who was there from the very start returning now with a different motivation that's inspiring america. larry tractinburg has been down this road before one of the original 55 runners who completed the first new york city marathon, which in 1970 was an understated event, confined to manhattan's central park what's it like to be in central park again? >> this is amazing
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it's great. >> reporter: there was no fanfare back then no roars from crowds lining the streets and no buildup. >> a little blurb in "the new york times" saying there was going to be a marathon in central park. >> a teenager then now the 67-year-old is back, returning to the starting line for the marathon's 50th anniversary. >> reporter: what do you think when you watch the new york city marathon now? >> all these years i have been in oregon watching it on tv, you know, it's like there has been this pang in me, god, i got to get back there some time to do this thing it makes me home sick every time i watch the marathon. >> reporter: what made you decide to come back this year to new york city? >> so, you know, i always had this pipe dream, you know, kind of like that i would return. >> reporter: for larry, november 7th marks more than just his story of triumph he represents the resilience of all the runners, regaining their stride after a
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canceled race last year just one of the many things the pandemic had taken from the city. >> the city is going to be open again it is going to be a celebration. and i said, you know, i want to be part of that celebration, part of my history, you know, like why shouldn't i be there >> reporter: a finish line that once felt so far now the start of a comeback and i'll be doing a little running myself next week, mostly racing for planes as we take the broadcast across america to austin, texas, st. louis, washington, d.c., nashville and phoenix where i will be reporting on top issues affecting you from crime to jobs, housing to education. and that's "nightly news" for tonight. thank you for watching, everyone i'm lester holt. please take care of yourself and each other. good night
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♪ i see trees of green ♪ ♪ red roses too ♪ ♪ i see them bloom for me and you ♪ (music) ♪ so i think to myself ♪ ♪ oh what a wonderful world ♪
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i'm raj mathai, next on nbc bay area news tonight, a major decision. a local county just announced it's dropping almost all the indoor mask requirements. also, take a look. the party is on. 70,000 people tonight at outside lands in san francisco. we are there on opening night of the three-day festival to take you behind the scenes. and the new information about the student who wore that kkk costume on campus. many people are questioning the school's form of punishment. and a rough year for lake tahoe but the extreme weather is also bringing an early start to ski season. good evening, this is nbc bay area news tonight, i'm raj mathai. you can feel the energon

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