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tv   NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt  NBC  April 9, 2021 5:30pm-6:00pm PDT

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home and in your own bed. have a good night, folks. "nightly news" is next with lester holt. we'll see you at 6:00. bye. tonight the tributes pouring in from around the world for britain's prince philip the husband of queen elizabeth dying at 99 less than a month after a lengthy hospital stay. his death coming at a tumultuous time for the royal family after the departure of harry and meghan how covid is impacting funeral plans. and the royal love story spanning over seven decades. the medical examiner who conducted the autopsy on george floyd testifying what he said about the role drugs and heart conditions may have played in floyd's death. and how another medical expert on the stand challenged his findings vaccinations halted after sites in
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at least three states now report adverse reactions from the johnson & johnson covid shot and pfizer taking a big step toward vaccinating kids the house ethics panel launching an investigation into congressman matt gaetz as he faces a sex trafficking probe. now the first fellow republican to call on him to resign. the massive volcanic eruption forcing thousands to evacuate a four-mile-high plume of smoke and ash cruise ships sent to help people escape and the grammy-nominated rap star being celebrated tonight. >> announcer: this is nbc "nightly news" with lester holt." good evening this they were one of the most famous couples in the world their fairy tale befitting their royal status tonight queen elizabeth's husband of more than 70 years's death has rocked the united kingdom and left much of the world reflecting on their enduring marriage and now crushing loss. on this side of the atlantic we woke up to the news of philip,
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the duke of edinburgh's, passing at the age of 99 a war veteran who married a princess before long living in her shadow when she became queen prince philip's death leaving a deep hole in the collective hearts of the royal family. as the pandemic dictates a scaled-down farewell keir simmons starts us off tonight with the latest from london >> reporter: tonight the queen in mourning announcing with deep sorrow the death of her beloved husband. britain's prime minister paying tribute to prince philip's long service. >> not just as her consort, by her side, every day of her reign, but as her husband her strength and stay of more than 70 years >> reporter: there are flags at half staff and some flowers police keeping crowds back he wanted no fuss. and britain is in lockdown so no state funeral for a prince whose place in history is assured. >> they deserve to,
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you know, remember him how they wish to remember him, in their own way. >> i think i'd want what he wanted so whatever he wanted, that's what we should have >> reporter: he was born a greek royal but exiled with his family, he became in his own words a refugee. he saw action on battleships in world war ii, a brave and brilliant naval officer. an outsider whose wedding to princess elizabeth and then her coronation as queen elizabet stluft him into an unwelcoming british establishment. a proud man whose primary role became supporting his wife, telling nbc back in 1969 there were tensions >> there are a lot of problems inevitably it's an awkward situation to be in >> reporter: there were strains in public too. he had a famously blunt style and at times caused insult, recorded making racist comments >> an awful lot of things that if i was to read them now i'd say good god i wish to god i hadn't said that >> reporter: a man of contradictions pictured killing a
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tiger but an early environmentalist who helped establish the world wildlife fund. through the years he met presidents, from truman to obama, and he guided his family through weddings and divorces the death of diana and most recently the split with harry and meghan tonight among messages from world leaders president biden saying, "jill and i are keeping the queen and prince philip's children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren in our hearts." the duke and duchess of sussex's website tonight saying, "you will be greatly missed." a royal family losing its patriarch. a country watching the end of an era. and a queen who has lost her consort and must now lead alone. >> and keir, i understand we've learned more about what the queen has been doing today >> reporter: that's right, lester. prince charles visited his mother here at windsor castle this afternoon. the queen tonight will spend her first night as queen without prince philip. one big question, of
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course, will harry and meghan attend the funeral? lester >> all right keir simmons in london, thank you. and joining me now is camilla tominey, who has covered the royals for years camilla, with prince philip's death, what will be the impact on the queen going forward? >> well, i think the emotional impact on the queen will be profound, lester this is a man who has been at her side for the entire course of her nearly 70-year reign. and to lose his wise counsel and not lose his role as patriarch of the royal family will come as an enormous blow. >> you mentioned his wise counsel how much influence did he have on the queen in her day-to-day decision-making? >> well, he was the only person really that could give her honest advice that she could rely on. for him to be honest with her and speak without fear or favor. i think that's invaluable according to her reign and going forward she'll be increasingly reliant on the advice of her son prince charles and
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also her grandson the duke of cambridge. >> all right camilla tominey, thanks so much in minneapolis crucial testimony from the medical examiner who performed the initial autopsy on george floyd gabe gutierrez is there. >> reporter: this week medical expert after expert drew this conclusion -- george floyd did not die because of drugs >> i believe the primary mechanism of death is asphyxia, or low oxygen there's no evidence to suggest he would have died that night except for the interactions with law enforcement >> reporter: and today highly anticipated testimony from the hennepin county medical examiner, dr. andrew baker, the only person to conduct an initial autopsy on floyd. >> i was aware that at least one video had gone viral on the internet, but i intentionally chose not to look at that until i had examined mr. floyd. i did not want to bias my exam by going in with any preconceived notions. >> reporter: baker determined that floyd's cause of death was cardiopulmonary arrest, in other words, that his heart and lungs stopped while he was being subdued, restrained and compressed by police officers.
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>> in my opinion, the law enforcement subdual, restraint and the neck compression was just more than mr. floyd could take by virtue of those heart conditions >> reporter: the manner of floyd's death, baker found, was homicide, but the autopsy report did not mention asphyxia or lack of oxygen it did mention fentanyl and meth in floyd's system derek chauvin's attorney has seized on that, arguing that those drugs and underlying medical conditions killed floyd, not chauvin's knee on his neck >> have you certified deaths as an overdose where the level of fentanyl was similar to the level of fentanyl in mr. floyd? >> yes >> reporter: but as baker told the prosecution -- >> mr. floyd's use of fentanyl did not cause the subdual or neck restraint. his heart disease did not cause the subdual or the neck restraint. >> reporter: for floyd's family this week's testimony has been gut-wrenching floyd's niece left the courtroom after seeing the video of her
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uncle's death again. >> it's very hard in there. >> they just watched him die until he was lifeless >> they sat on him like he was an animal or something >> gabe, prosecutors have called a remarkable 35 witnesses. what's next? >> reporter: well, the prosecution is expected to rest its case early next week then the defense takes center stage lester, the biggest question, will chauvin himself testify? >> all right, gabe, thank you. in just 60 seconds, new challenges facing the johnson & johnson vaccine.
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more reactions to johnson & johnson's covid vaccine are being reported tonight. a site in georgia the latest to suspend those shots. this comes as more than 114 million have received at least one dose here's miguel almaguer >> reporter: announced today outside atlanta, the georgia department of public health pausing johnson & johnson vaccinations after eight people experienced minor adverse reactions.
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this week sites in north carolina and colorado also offering johnson & johnson stopped administering the vaccine following similar incidents, though reactions are rare officials say the side effects experienced are common >> with approximately 5 million doses already in americans' arms, we know that even a dozen or so events in several states is a very small number >> reporter: next week a shortage of johnson & johnson doses will impact distribution centers. after a manufacturing mix-up shipments of j&j expected to plummet by 80% and it comes at a troubling time >> michigan is unquestionably a national hot spot right now. >> reporter: in michigan, where cases are spiking, hospitals are canceling surgeries to take in an influx of covid patients the governor won't order new restrictions but is asking the public to take extra precautions. nationwide, infections and hospitalizations are creeping up.
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those on the front lines in big cities and rural communities feeling the impact >> for us nurses it really hasn't gone anywhere we are seeing some younger people this go-round >> reporter: with the young attributing for a rise in cases, pfizer officially applied for emergency use authorization for a vaccine in children 12 to 15 years old a major step toward protecting kids. lester >> some promising news miguel, thank you. a question generating heated debate, should the supreme court be expanded today president biden giving fresh oxygen to the idea kristen welker is at the white house, and kristen, this idea of court packing is very controversial. >> reporter: that's right, lester. president biden is taking one step forward on that explosive issue, today ordering a 180-day study on potentially adding seats to the high court, which has had nine members for over a century it comes amid pressure from progressive
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activists who are pushing for more seats to make the court more liberal. president trump appointed three justices, resulting in a more conservative court. during the primary candidate biden said he was not a fan of court packing but later refused to say what he would do republicans have pounced today, saying this is a case of democrats trying to change institutions when they don't get their way. lester >> kristen welker, thank you. new troubles tonight for matt gaetz. the house launching an ethics probe into the florida congressman who's under investigation for possibly sex trafficking a 17-year-old girl and now congressman adam kinzinger is the first fellow republican to call on gaetz to resign. gaetz denies any wrongdoing he has not been charged. at the southern border troubling allegations of abuse at a federal facility housing unaccompanied children let's get more on that now from morgan chesky >> reporter: tonight new images of the record migrant surge raft after packed raft arriving in texas. as officials here investigate three
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disturbing allegations of neglect, including one involving sexual abuse. inside this san antonio hhs facility housing 1,600 migrant teenage boys >> this is a health and safety disaster that was made by the biden administration >> reporter: hhs not commenting on the allegations, telling nbc news it has a zero tolerance policy for all forms of sexual abuse. we met luis outside that facility, waiting to pick up his little brother, who fled el salvador alone the gang told your little brother that he could either join them -- >> yeah. >> reporter: and if he didn't -- >> they'd kill him >> reporter: they'd kill him >> yeah. >> reporter: his brother part of the record surge of migrants after president biden changed border policy, allowing unaccompanied children to stay in the u.s. many families now allowed to stay too. the border patrol encountering more than 172,000 migrants crossing the border in march, a 20-year high. more than 20,000 children now in u.s. custody.
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for those with parents in the u.s. there's the possibility of a reunion. in ohio orvalina arellano is overjoyed to be back with her kids, who made the journey from honduras. back in san antonio luis and his brother have reunited too. did you feel safe inside >> [ speaking foreign language ] >> reporter: he told us he witnessed no abuse. clutching a rosary, he says a prayer for the mother he left behind. and tonight we have asked hhs repeatedly to see the conditions inside that san antonio facility for ourselves, but those requests have all been denied lester >> okay. morgan chesky, thank you. three months after the riot at the u.s. capitol we are gaining some new insights into the attack with more here's richard engel. >> reporter: in a joint collaboration nbc news and the online investigative group bellingcat have reviewed and in cases uncovered thousands of hours of cctv footage, intercepted audio and cell phone video much of it taken by
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the rioters themselves we have identified more than a dozen critical moments and individuals that together show the attack was both planned and improvised while police were completely overwhelmed. [ screaming they were calling out the whole time, "traitors. join us. we are the good guys we like cops." >> they had a good way of showing that. >> reporter: how did that sound to you, when they were like we're the blue lives matter guys? >> it enrages you. it enrages you they had the nerve to be beating officers with the blue lives matter flag. people that say that didn't happen, it's on tape they've got some nerve saying they're doing this for us. what in what world does that make sense? >> richard engel reporting. and richard, thanks. see more of his story sunday at 10:00 p.m. eastern on msnbc and next week, an examination of
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extremism in america on all the platforms of nbc news. let's turn now to our reporting on the american worker and why a california company decided to pay all of its workers more here's jo ling kent. >> reporter: in sonoma county, graton resort and casino is betting on its workers >> our ancestors had a strong ethic of taking care of one another. >> reporter: after shutting down for three months last year the casino, owned by the federated indians of graton rancheria, bucked national trends this spring, permanently raising starting wages for all workers to $17.50 an hour for tipped jobs and $18.50 an hour for non-tipped jobs. employees earning a salary got a 10% bump. >> i was able to get my daughter braces it's improved our lives. >> reporter: chantee giroux is working toward a college degree >> the raise is definitely going to make me able to pay that off a lot quicker. >> reporter: how could you afford to raise everyone's wages in
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such a difficult time? >> it was very difficult. we were closed for 92 days and we kept their benefits all the way through. i've always believed in putting money aside for a rainy day. >> reporter: but for millions working on the front lines like grocery store cashiers, this hasn't been the case. many who received hero pay during the pandemic have had the extra compensation revoked, and efforts to raise the federal minimum wage recently failed in congress according to the congressional budget office, increasing it to $15 an hour by 2025 would benefit up to 27 million workers and lift nearly 1 million out of poverty but on the flip side, an estimated 1.4 million workers would lose their jobs. for the casino paying workers more is a gamble that's worth it >> you keep the best team members it makes economic sense for the business if you do well, you must do what you can for those who have enabled you to do well >> reporter: jo ling kent, nbc news up next for us
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here tonight, an explosion of scams involving those covid vaccine record cards we'll tell you what you need to know about all this
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wanna help kids get their homework done? well, an internet connection's a good start. but kids also need computers. and sometimes the hardest thing about homework is finding a place to do it. so why not hook community centers up with wifi? for kids like us, and all the amazing things we're gonna learn. over the next 10 years, comcast is committing $1 billion to reach 50 million low-income americans with the tools and resources they need to be ready for anything. i hope you're ready. 'cause we are. a volcano eruption has forced thousands to evacuate in the caribbean island of st. vincent. the blast sending a plume of ash into the sky four miles high. cruise ships have been sent to help the evacuation that's the first eruption there since 1979 the music world has lost a grammy-nominated star. rapper dmx has died, days after a heart
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attack dmx, whose real name is earl simmons, had a string of hits in the late '90s and early 2000s and also appeared in several movies he was just 50 for many those white covid vaccination cards feel like a ticket to better days. but the fbi is warning fake ones are being sold online. here's vicky nguyen. >> reporter: tonight the fbi warning against using fake vaccine cards to enter schools, mass transit, workplaces, gyms or places of worship because it puts you and others at risk of contracting covid-19 the market exploding for those who want proof of the shot without the actual jab as more businesses and events are requiring vaccination or testing results for access they don't seem hard to forge >> yeah. because there's no in visual signature, any type of validation for the cards. >> reporter: mark ostrowski is a cybersecurity expert who showed us examples his team found on the web ranging from $100
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to $600. >> it says it ships from the united kingdom worldwide. so it's possible you could pay and not get a forged card and just get ripped off >> absolutely. that's always the risk >> reporter: creating and using a forged card is criminal >> you recreated the card without authorization, that is misuse of a government seal and that's a federal felony there's a reason you can't lie about things that can put people's lives at risk. in the complaint that just came in today an individual was posting on social media that their girlfriend works at a vaccine facility and she took the cards and gave it to him and then they subsequently filled it out with false information. >> reporter: investigators want to hear about these scams. report them to 1-800-hhs-tips if you already have your real vaccine card, keep it at home. e-mail a photo of the front and back to yourself and don't share pictures of the card on social media with your name and birth date that information can be used to steal your identity lester >> all right, vicky, thanks and we'll be right back
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finally, our cynthia mcfadden with a royal love story >> reporter: as fairy tales go, this one has lasted for most of the past century once upon a time in 1939 our princess, a shy, horse-loving 13-year-old, went on holiday and spied a most handsome prince >> she fell desperately, desperately head over
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heels in love with him. at first sight >> reporter: but he was soon off, joining the royal navy to fight the second world war. they wrote letters and fell in love and like in all good fairy tales the wedding made the people very happy. >> londoners slept in the streets to see the future queen and her husband. >> reporter: broadcast around the world it was 1947. and when the king died and she became queen, the prince in our story did a very hard thing for princes to do gave up his own work and kneeled before his wife they made a life together, sprinkled with humor >> tolerance is the one essential ingredient of any happy marriage it may not be quite so important when things are going well but it is absolutely vital when things get difficult. and you can take it from me that the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. >> reporter: she knew she'd picked a prince of a prince. >> he has quite simply
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been my strength and stay all these years >> reporter: some 20 years ago she shared her love for him in a most queenly way "our country owes my husband a greater debt than he would ever claim or we shall ever know." that sounds just about right for a fairy tale, which happens to be true. cynthia mcfadden, nbc news >> and that's "nightly news." thank you for watching, everyone i'm lester holt. please take care of yourself and each other. right now at 6:00, let's play ball, jessica. a home opener like no other. giants' fans were back inside oracle's park for today's big game. >> oh, man. it is amazing, right. we've been waiting for this for so long. >> the one thing fans had to prove in order to enter the park. plus ambulances rush to vaccination clinic in the east bay. the reason? reactions to the vaccine. which one and what you need to know about it. but first, the flood gates
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are opening. all adults in california will be eligible to receive a vaccine next week. we will tell you about a shortage that's coming at the exact wrong time. the news at 6:00 starts right now. good friday. thanks for joining us. i'm janelle wang. >> and i'm jessica aguirre. it is a big week ahead for vaccine eligibility. next week on april 15th anyone at least 16 years old will be eligible to get the vaccine regardless of health risk. the date quickly approaching as concerns grow over our upcoming vaccine shortage. today south bay congressman visited levi's stadium to get a firsthand look at the vaccination site and to reassure workers that the vaccine shortage is being addressed. he also responded to questions about how santa clara county vaccine sites will be able to keep up with the surge of people who want a shot. santa clara county says it has more than 9,000 j & j doses last week but will get less than 3,000 next week. >> so it was something that

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