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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  October 25, 2021 6:30pm-9:57pm EDT

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garbage on your home if you have electricity turned on. i had a vacant property across the street and it was up for sale through a local realtor. and because i had the electricity on through the winter, they -- >> we'll breakway from this recorded program. get you live to the floor of the house for the very first votes of the week. live coverage on c-span. ms. was and pass h.r. 4111. on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 4111, a bill to require the secretary of the treasury to direct the united states executive director at the international monetary fund to advocate that the fund provide technical assistance to fund members seeking to enhance their compass toy evaluate the legal terms of sovereign contracts and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house
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suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> as the member designated by ms. barragan, i inform the house that ms. barragan will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. desaulnier. i inform the house that mr. desaulnier will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. lieu, i inform the house that mr. lieu will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mrs. walorski from indiana, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mrs. walorski will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from missouri seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. luetkemeyer of missouri, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. luetkemeyer will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. kildee: mr. speaker, as the member designated mr. butterfield of north carolina, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. butterfield will vote yes on
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h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. pascrell of new jersey, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. pascrell will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? >> as the member designated mr. crist of florida, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. crist will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. russ fulcher of idaho, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. fulcher will vote yea on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by representative mcmorris rodgers, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that representative mcmorris rodgers will vote yes on h.r. 4111. mr. speaker, as the member designated by representative smucker, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that representative smucker will vote yes on h.r. 4111. mr. speaker, as the member designated by representative green of tennessee, pursuant to
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h.res. 8, i inform the house that representative green of tennessee will vote yes on h.r. 4111. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from virginia seek recognition? ms. wexton: mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. mek eachin, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. mceachin will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. moulton, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. moulton will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by ms. porter, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. porter will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from delaware seek recognition? ms. blunt rochester: mr.
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speaker, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house ms. kelly of illinois, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. kelly will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from west virginia seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. lahood of illinois, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. lahood will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? mr. disbref mr. jeffries: as the member designated chairwoman eddie bernice johnson, pursuant
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to h.res. 8, i inform the house that chairwoman johnson will vote yea on h.r. 41111. melgd chairwoman zoe lofgren, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that chairwoman lofgren will vote yea on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by congresswoman grace meng, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that congresswoman meng will vote yea on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by congressman brendan boyle, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that congressman boyle will vote yea on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> as the member designated by ms. lori trahan of massachusetts, i inform the house that mr. tray -- mrs. trahan will vote yes on h.r.
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411, the sovereign debt on track capacity act. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia with the massachusetts accent seek recognition? mr. connolly: as the member designated by mr. kind of wisconsin, i inform the house that mr. kind will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mrs. kirkpatrick, i inform the house that mrs. kirkpatrick will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. grijalva, i inform the house that mr. grijalva will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member
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designated by mr. defazio of oregon, i inform the house that mr. defazio will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. mfume of maryland, i inform the house that mr. mfume will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. al lawson, i inform the house that representative al lawson will vote yea on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. cardenas, i inform the house that mr. cardenas will vote aye on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from massachusetts seek
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recognition? >> as the member designated by ms. frankel, i inform the house that ms. frankel will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by congress member costa, i inform the house that congress member costa will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentlelady from florida seek recognition? ms. wasserman schultz: as the member designated by mr. schneider of illinois, i inform the house that mr. schneider will vote yea on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: now for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. desjarlais of tennessee, i inform the house that will desjarlais will vote yea on h.r. 4111. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from connecticut seek recognition? >> as the member designated by ms. wilson, i inform the house that ms. wilson will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by ms. jackson lee of texas, i inform the house that ms. jackson lee will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. takano of california, i inform the house that mr. takano will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for
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what purpose does the gentlelady from the great state of illinois seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. danny davis of illinois, i inform the house that mr. daste will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. rush, i inform the house that mr. rush will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from california seek recognition? ms. lee: as the member designated by mr. khanna, i inform the house that mr. khanna will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. buchanan of florida, i inform the house that mr. buchanan will vote yea on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. david scott of georgia, i inform the house that mr. scott
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will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by ms. williams, i inform the house that ms. williams will vote yes on h.r. 4111. and as the member designated by mr. kehele, i inform the house that mr. kehele will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. tom malinowski, i inform the house that mr. malinowski will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mr. albio sires, i inform the house that mr. sires will vote yes on h.r. 4111. as the member designated by mrs. bonnie watson coleman, i inform the house that mrs. bonnie watson coleman will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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as the member designated by mr. donald payne, i inform the house that mr. payne will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from missouri seek recognition? i mean ohio, i apologize. >> as the member designated by mrs. lawrence, i inform the house that mrs. lawrence will vote yes on h.r. 4111. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. doggett of texas, i inform the house that mr. doggett will vote aye on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. glenn thompson of pennsylvania, i inform the house that mr. thompson will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does gentlelady kansas seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. cleaver, i inform the house that mr. cleaver will vote yes on h.r. 4111.
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the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 190 and the nays are -- 390 and the nays are the speaker pro tempore: the speaker stands corrected. the yeas are 391 and the nays
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are 29. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection, the motion toreconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the ms. waters to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2989 as amended. on which the yeas and nays are ordered the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 2989 a bill to make the information reported toe regulatory agencies and further and artificial to put the aoupts on a path towards building a program to harmonize and reduce the burden while
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enhancing transparency and accountability and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill as amended. members will record their votes by electronic device. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? mr. mcgovern: as the member designated by mr. davis scott of georgia, i inform the house that mr. scott will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mrs. walorski, i inform the house that mrs. walorski will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut seek recognition? >> as the member designated by
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ms. wilson, i inform the house that ms. wilson will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from missouri seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. luetkemeyer of missouri, i inform the house that mr. luetkemeyer will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? mr. cicilline: as the member designated by mr. takano of california, i inform the house that mr. takano will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tphrar seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. buchanan, i inform the house that mr. buchanan will vote yes on h.r. 2989.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does gentlelady illinois seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. danny davis will vote yes. as the member designated by mr. rush, i inform the house that plus rush will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. glenn thompson, i inform the house that mr. thompson will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does once again the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? mr. cicilline: as the member designated by jackson lee i inform the house that ms. jackson lee will vote yes on h.r. 2989. >> as the member designated by
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representative mrs. mcmorrisrodgers, i inform the house that ms. mrs. mcmorrisrodgers will vote yes. as the member designated by mr. smucker, i inform the house that mr. sph-bger will vote yes. as the member designated by mr. green of tennessee, i inform the house that mr. green will vote yes. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does gentlelady from virginia seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. mceachin, i inform the house mr. mceach winin will vote yes. as the member designated by ms. porter, i inform the house that ms. porter will vote yes on
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h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. russ fulcher of idaho, i inform the house that mr. fulcher will vote yes on h.r. 2989. 4
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. butterfield, i inform the house that mr. butterfield will vote yes. as the member designated by phr-rl pascrell of new jersey, mr. pascrell will vote yes on
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h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from west virginia seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. lahood of illinois, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. lahood will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia. wire mr. beyer: as the member designated by mr. barra gone, i inform the house that ms. barra gone will vote yes. as the member designated by mr. desaulnier, i inform the house that mr. desaulnier will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. defazio of oregon, i inform the house that mr. defazio will vote yes.
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as the member designated by mr. mfume, i inform the house that mr. mfume will vote yes. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from. mr. stanton: as the member designated by mrs. kirk kirkpatrick, i inform the house that mrs. kirkpatrick will vote yes on h.r. 2989. as the member designated by mr. grijalva, i inform the house that mr. grijalva will vote yes on h.r. 2989.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. crist of florida, i inform the house that mr. crist will vote yes on ph-r 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from massachusetts seek rebg tpheugsz? >> as the member designated by ms. frankel, i inform the house that ms. frankel will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. takano, i inform the house
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that mr. takano will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from delaware seek recognition? >> as the member designated by ms. kelly, i inform the house that ms. kelly will vote yes on h.r. 2989.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. kehele, i inform the house that mr. kehele will vote yes on h.r. 2989. as the member designated by ms. williams, i inform the house that ms. williams will vote yes on h.r. 2989.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? mr. connolly: as the member designated by mr. kind of wisconsin, i inform the house that mr. kind of wisconsin will vote aye on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady rise? >> as the member designated by mrs. lawrence, i inform the house that mrs. lawrence will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> as the member designated by
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ms. lori trahan of massachusetts, i inform the house that mrs. trahan will vote yes on h.r. 2989, the financial transparency act of 2021 as amended. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. schneider of illinois, i inform the house that mr. schneider will vote yea on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from brooklyn seek recognition? >> as the member designated by chairwoman johnson, i inform the house that chairwoman johnson will vote yea on h.r. 2989. as the member designated by congresswoman grace meng, i inform the house that congresswoman meng will vote yea on h.r. 2989. as the member designated by congressman brendan boyle, i
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inform the house that congressman boyle will vote yea on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. al lawson, i inform the house that mr. lawson will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey rise? mr. pallone: as the member designated by mr. tom malinowski, i inform the house that mr. mall newskey will vote yes on h.r. 2989. as the member designated by mr. sires, as the member designated by mr. -- i inform the house that mr. sires will vote yes on h.r. 298 t.
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as the member designated by mrs. bonnie watson coleman, i inform the house that mrs. watson coleman will vote yes on h.r. 29 # 9, as the member designated by mr. payne, i inform the house that mr. payne will vote yes on h.r. 2989. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> as the member designated by mr. doggett of texas, i inform the house that mr. doggett votes aye on h.r. 2989.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by congress member costa, i inform the house that congress member costa will vote yes on h.r. 2989.
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 400, the nays are 19. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: are there requests for one-minute speeches? for what purpose does the gentlewoman from nevada seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. titus: thank you, madam speaker. i rise to celebrate the life and remember the accomplishments of congressman james h. bill bray. jim was a native son of nevada who served as a judge, a university regent, and a state legislator before being leapted to the house of representatives from nevada's first district where he served from 1987 to 1995.
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congressman bilbray was ahead of his time. he was an environmentalist before going green was considered cool. his legislation to preserve red rock canyon preserved a special place for future generations and his legacy will live on in the wildlife and flora and fauna found there i now ask unanimous consent for the house to pause for one minute of silence in his honor.
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ms. titus: thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? >> i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. back in 2020, when the coronavirus vaccines were developed under the trump administration, joe biden and progressive democrats trashed them in the media. as you can see from these quotes, they were extremely skeptical about the effectiveness of coronavirus vaccine when donald trump was in charge. of course when biden became president the vaccine suddenly became entirely effective and highly encourage. but jen psaki still maintained in july that mandating these vaccines is, quote, not the federal government's role. now president biden is forcing
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millions of americans to choose between getting the vaccine or keeping their jobs my office is flooded daily with constituents who risk losing their livelihoods because of the administration's mandate. apparently protecting american's freedom to make your own health care decisions is too much to ask. so far joe biden's presidency has been defined by his out of touch agenda. a vaccine mandate is not what americans want and is inconsistent with our values. tennesseans believe in freedom from tyranny. our country prospers when our elected leaders protect constitutional rights and free dom. unfortunately this is a not a right for president biden. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to
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address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. for millions of americans a minor or decades-old criminal record can missouri an insurmountable barrier to full employment, housing and education. ms. scanlon: all too often, individuals are unable to get a fresh straiter because having eligible records seerld expunged is difficult or expensive. high legal fees perpetuate the cycle of poverty and make it difficult for people to transition back into society successfully after being incarcerate. that's why i was proud to join david trone and a bipartisan group of colleagues if the house and senate to introduce legislation last weak to help these americans get the second chances they deserve. the fresh start act of 2021 provides federal grants for states with record sealing or expungement procedures to help improve their automated record infrastructure. as we rebound from a once in a
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century pandemic and in the name of fairness and equity, we need to eliminate barriers to employment and champion opportunities for our communities to recover and thrive. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise to express my continued concern and opposition to the efforts from the democrat majority to pass another $3.5 trillion worth of unnecessary spending. if you ask any america cap the biggest challenge they face, it's inflation. we have inflation today primarily because of the last
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unnecessary spending that was passed in this house and that was the $1.9 trillion stimulus bill that democrats passed on a bipartisan basis. we have more inflation than we have had in my lifetime and this body wants to pass more unnecessary spending that will lead to more inflation. enough is enough. we need to move on to this will and take care of the business that the american people wants us to address. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: tprob the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. i rise today to honor a great community leader and good friend. as a anaheim neighbor, manny has
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devoted 30 years of his life to serve his community as an orange county trustees and then as a federal probation officer for almost 30 years and a member of the anaheim parks and recreation commission. today, manny is looking to retire from his federal job as a federal probation officer. i congratulate him for him and i'm honored that he called me his friend. and with that, i yield. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. carter: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. carter: i rise today to
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congratulate the atlanta pwraeufbts for advancing to the world series for the first time since 1999. what the pwraeufbts have accomplished its nothing short of accomplished is nothing remarkable. through many at versussity, the braves were during the month of october. what this team has achieved is nothing short of special and we hope to shock the world. and did he praoeufbg the community of hundreds of millions of dollars, well, you may be able to move the all-star game. and this is going to be electric. i would like to congratulate the mayor and the coaching staff for guiding this team to the 2021
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world series. go pwraoeufbs. thank you, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from wisconsin seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. teufplt without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> a lot has been said about the reconciliation bill we may or may not vote on. the spending out of control and will fan the tphraeuplts of inflation and several provisions designed one more time to replace fathers in the family. today i will talk about the majority's reception with abortion and we have seen this
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to get rid of the mexico city policy and have the united states involved in pushing abortion around the world. a straining and sad thing given how blessed this country has been during our tenure. but in this bill, one more time, be it including $10 billion in funding grants or plans covering individuals up to 138% of the poverty line. this is the one of the most pro-extreme abortion bills. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? >> i rise today to pay tribute and to honor the life of my dear friend green coat springs police chief. -- i'm sorry -- the speaker pro tempore: does the gentlelady seek unanimous consent to speak unanimous consent. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. >> i rise today to honor the life of my dear friend of green
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coat police chief. he passed away last month after a hard fought battle with covid-19. he started his career in and joined the police department. during his 20 years of he served in multiple capacities and and chief of police starting in 2017. he leaves behind a wonderful wife and two children and the citizens. grateful for his decades of service to the community and people for having to know a man. i am personally satend by this loss. he was a friend, mentor and colleague who showed me what selfless public service looks like. and i am forever thankful to
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have known him. rest in peace. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the gentleman from new york, mr. torres, is recognized as the designee of the majority leader. mrs.torres: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and stepped their remarks and include remarks under the subject of this special order. where did we get this notion that the filibuster is more
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worth preserving than the right to vote? that is surely not left of american history and not what we teach our students in the classroom or students at home and that is the lie what dictates what happens here, a lie that comes at a heavy cost to american democracy. it seems there is nothing sacred in american politics, not the truth, not the peaceful transfer of power and not even the right to vote. the voting rights act, the enforcement mechanism have been all been eviscerated. there is section 5 known as free clearance which allows the civil rights division to enforce the
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voting rights act and section 2 which allows the court to enforce the voting rights act and both of these have been gutted at the hands of right-wing judicial activism. this has been a political windfall for the republican party which is intent on holding power by any means necessary, black and brown voters. we are here to tell you that the kopgsal black caucus will not stand by while the voting sraoeuts of plaque americans come under systematic assault. we will fight back because fighting is what we do in the congressional black caucus and many of us who were bludgeoned and beaten so we could have the
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right to vote. i want to interviews our chair, the incomparable joyce beatty. mrs.beatty: thank you, congressman torres and madam speaker. it is my honor to speak up and speak out about voting rights. voter suppression, fighting back, disenvirons franchise, section 4, section 5, section 2, all of which you will hear about tonight. we are here as members of the congressional black caucus because we want to make sure that all of our collusion * aoegs hear our story, a story that they should know so well, a
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story of a lady by the name of sandy lou, a civil rights' activates who didn't know she had the right to vote in mississippi. her granddaughter told that story and as i read that and thought about how she dedicated her life to voting rights, fast forward, think about our beloved friend, colleague, mentor, the late congressman, john lewis, who stood on this floor, at this microphone, and told us his story, told us about that day when he was crossing the edmund edmund pet is bridge and what it
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felt like dogs, police officers, knocked down and could have died. but the story ends with a good message, because he would have done it all over again. he says if you see something, say something. he remind us it is our role to get in good trouble. tonight, we want our colleagues and especially those on the other side of the aisle to know that this is one of our top priorities. we want them to know, four times republican presidents four times we authorized the voting rights act. and el colleagues in senate, this is something we should be honoring and celebrating and as
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we gather here on the floor of the peoples' house to discuss voting rights in america to amplify our power, our message and to announce that we are not going to let the clock be turned back. let me end by saying on behalf of the members of the congressional black caucus, that this is something we are asking all of our colleagues to join in and help us make sure that we can proudly say that we are re-authorizing the voting rights' act. i close by saying, the c.b.c. will do eric everything in our power to defend the right to vote. we are praoept to work overtime
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and we are prepared tore stand up and make so noise, march, protest and yes, even get arrested. i remember that day clearly, fighting, marching, protesting. i thought of john lewis and so many others, pine nears, i stand on their shoulders. tonight i ask us, lest stand together. thank you and i yield back. mrs. beatty: it gives me great pleasure as the chair of the
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congressional black caucus to yield time to my colleague, my friend, i like to call her the current day mother of voting right, fighting and telling her story, leading us with john lewis every year since i've been in congress and before. across the edmund pettus bridge. listening to her so scholarly debate the lawsuits that we've been confronted with. shelby vs. holder. listening to her explain preclearance. and why we must fight. why we must have hearings. why we must get it right because there's so much at stake. madam speaker, it gives me great pleasure to yield time to congresswoman terri sewell. ms. sewell: madam speaker, i want to thank our illustrious
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chairwoman of the congressional black caucus, joyce beatty, for her leadership. i want to thank richie torres for leading us in this special order hour. nothing could be more profound in this hour than to be talking about voting rights. as we speak our nation is facing the most concerted effort to restrict the right to vote in a generation. just this year, 400 bills have been introduced in state legislatures across this nation to restrict the right to vote. and in 19 states, at least 33 of these bills have been -- have become law, including the most egregious of state legislatures, georgia, where now it is a crime to give a bottle of water to a voter as they stand in line. even as our democracy comes under attack, we see republicans standing firm in their
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opposition to protecting the right to vote. a bedrock principle that should never be partisan. just last week we watched as every senate republican voted to block debate on the freedom to vote act. a commonsense bill that would ensure that every american has access to the ballot box. what are they afraid of, i ask. what are they afraid of? last week, last week's vote made clear that senate republicans are unwilling to even debate voting rights, let alone hold a fair vote. this just further demonstrates that in order to protest and protect our right and our democracy, the sacred right to vote, we must reform the fill buster to create a path forward
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for must-pass pieces of legislation. madam speaker, almost three weeks ago we saw senator leahy introduce s. 4, the john robert lewis voting rights advancement act, in the senate. but unless we take action on the filibuster, take action now, this critical bill will face the same fate as the freedom to vote act. the way i see it, every senator is now faced with a choice. it's voting rights or the filibuster. it's protecting our sacred right to vote and our democracy, or the filibuster. it's advancing the legacy of john lewis and the foot soldiers, or it's the filibuster. now i know which side i'm on. i hope our senators will choose to do what's right. and do away with an archaic
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procedural rule that has been used for decades to block racial justice in this country. president biden also understands the urgency of this critical moment. on thursday, at his town hall meeting, we heard president biden express support for reforming the filibuster to pass much-needed voting rights legislation. i'm glad that president biden understands the urgency of this moment and the dire need for federal oversight. you know, it was federal oversight that brought us the civil rights act of 1965. it was federal oversight that allowed those margers to marge a-- those marchers to march across the ed mound pettus bridge in my hometown of selma, alabama. you know when state legislatures go amok it's federal oversight
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we need to ensure that every american has access to the ballot box. madam speaker, it was foot soldiers like our late, great colleague and my mentor john lewis who shed blood on a bridge in selma for the equal right of all americans to vote. if protecting that sacred right is not worth overcoming a procedural rule then what is? you know, madam speaker, it takes only 51 votes to sit a supreme court justice. for a supreme court justice to have life tenure on the supreme court. 51 votes. and yet, it takes 60 votes to stop debate and to allow a fair vote in the united states senate. on voting rights. this is unacceptable. it's un-american. it's unjust. and we in the congressional
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black caucus are saying, this is our message. this is our fight. voting rights. we have no other choice. we must reform the filibuster and we must do so now. when i think about the shoulders on which we all stand, i am reminded of being in this house in 2015 during the state of the union. i had as my special guest none other than amelia boynton robinson who at that time was 103 years old. she was the oldest living foot soldier that marched across the ed mound pettus bridge with john lewis and so many others. in 2015 on the 50th anniversary of the selma to montgomery march she was my special guest. as we waited in a small room off of this chamber for barack
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obama, then president ofese united states, to come and deliver that state of the union, to a person the president's cabinet said the same thing. everyone wanted to take a picture with ms. amelia boynton robynson -- robinson. they kneeled next to her wheelchair and said, oh, miss amelia, we stand on your shoulders. miss amelia, we wouldn't be here without your sacrifice. miss amelia was tired of people saying that to her over and over again. when eric holder, the attorney general of the united states, came and knelt beside her and said, i stand on your shoulders, the she said, get off your shoulders. do your own work, that's what she said. i am here to say we, the members of the congressional black caucus, are doing our own work. we're standing firm, we're
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standing solid, we're standing united in our efforts to bring back the full protections of the voting rights act of 1965. we must do our own work. all of us. it's not enough to say that we stand on the shoulders of giants. we know these giants. our foremothers and forefathers. they were tacticians. they were strategists. they just didn't happen upon selma, alabama. they just didn't happen upon birmingham and memphis and atlanta. they went looking for good trouble. and good trouble they got in we must do the same. we must take a play from their playbook. we must stand firm. we must stand united. we must stand undeterred. in our efforts to beat down any
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barrier that stands in the way of protecting that sacred right to vote. it was john lewis who said that the vote is the most sacred, the most fundamental, right, nonviolent tool, in our democracy. that's the vote. the vote is fundamental to this democracy. and everything else we do. everything else we do will be tainted if every american lacks the right to vote. there's nothing more sacred, more fundamental, to this democracy than the right to vote. how can a procedural rule stand in the way of that right. now, i can tell you that my constituents back home don't understand. they don't understand the filibuster.
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they don't understand this archaic procedural rule that's in the senate. i tell them that stands in the way of us passing the john robert lewis voting rights, they say why? didn't we go to the polls in record number, in southern states like georgia, to deliver the democratic majority? and they ask of us, to protect that democracy now. john lewis said that our fight is not a fight for one day. it's not a fight for one year. ours is a fight of a lifetime. to secure that sacred right to vote. when i close my eyes, i can hear him. cant you hear him?
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john lewis said it firmly, he said it often. when you see something that's not right, that's not fair, that's not just, we have a moral obligation to stand up and do something about it. we in the congressional black caucus know that our message, our fight, our cause, is nothing if not to defend the sacred right to vote. it's a right that is fundamental to our democracy and that no elected official, no elected official, should seek to undermine, to restrict, any voice in this democracy. our vote is our voice. in this representative democracy. and when you squelch the voice of one american who has a sacred right and is unable to exercise
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it because the lines are too long, because their names have been purged from a roll, it is a fundamental threat to all of us. injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. we know that. we live that. martin lutherking told us that. but we live it every day. nothing is more fundamental to our rights than our democracy and its foundation its bedrock, the right to vote. when barack obama finally came into that small room off of this chamber, amelia boynton robinson cradled his face. i think all of us understood the import of that moment. here was the first african-american president of these united states.
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and here was a woman at 103 years old who made the ultimate sacrifice, bludgeoned on a bridge, shedding blood on a bridge, in my hometown of selma, alabama, that all of us would have the right to vote. that one day, she would see the fruits of her labor. oh, what faith our foremothers and forefathers must have had. faith. faith. that their sacrifices were not in vain. and president obama said oh, miss amelia, to say thank you doesn't seem adequate. i get to give a speech as the president of these united states and it's because of you. without missing a beat this woman, 103 years old, frail, said, make it a good one! that better be a very good speech.
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we should make every day a good one. we who are the inheritors of this legacy. we who are the beneficiaries of this movement. every day should be a good one. we should not lay our head on a pillow if we have not advanced the legacy of these foremothers and forefathers. every day should be a good one. so we call on the senate to do what we know is right. to do what john said, good trouble. get into some good trouble. let's change those rules. we have it within our power to do so. after all, we control the senate, we control the house. and we have the white house. gavel's given to us by ordinary people who believe that we will take that power and exercise that power on their behalf.
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nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote. so in the name of john lewis, the name of amelia boynton, and the name of all those known and unknown foot soldiers who had the audacity to make this nation live up to its ideals of freedom, justice, equality. are those empty words? we must bring life into those constitutional principles. and we can do so if we have the will to do what we know is right. a filibuster, or voting rights? upholding the legacy of our foremothers and forefathers, or a filibuster? making sure that we do all that
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we can to protect this democracy, or a filibuster? the choices are easy from where i sit. they are easy from where our constituents sit. i ask our senators to do what they know is right. if ever there's a reason to reform the filibuster it's for that actually protected right to vote. we must do so and we must do so now. and pass s.4, the john robert lewis voting rights advancement act. let us restore the full protections of the voting rights act of 1965. let us pass the freedom to vote act which, after all, the first 300 pages written by john lewis, his empowerment act, it's about access at the ballot box. it's about making sure that the
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least of these, the voiceless, have a voice in this democracy. we must restore the vote. voices of the excluded. we can do that. congress can do that. that was what the supreme court said in the shelby vs. holder decision. only congress can come up with a modern day formula to secure the right to vote. to get at the most egregious state actors. we understand that we are threading a thin needle. but we have done our job. and now the senate must do its. let's get rid of the filibuster. let us reform the filibuster at the very least. and ensure that every american has a right to vote and to
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ensure that their vote is counted. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i now yield to congressman evans. mr. evans: i'd like to thank the chairwoman for her leadership of the black caucus for this opportunity. i'd like to thank my colleague from the great state of new york for his leadership. i thank you for your leadership and what you've done. after listening to the mother,
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as the chairwoman says, i don't think it could have been express ed -- she did a fantastic job. i thank you because in my home state of pennsylvania republican majorities in the legislature are trying to stay in power by restricting people's right to vote. for seven years governor wolf veto has protected voting rights. so they are trying to amend the state constitution to bypass him. we have seen these types of voting suppression plans moving forward in several states as well as plans to override the votes at the votes have been
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cast. to those who want to suppress the votes or throw out voting counts, why are you afraid of the voters? let me repeat that. why are you afraid of the voters? fortunately congress can still act. the house has acted twice. we have passed the for the people act almost eight months ago, on march 3. and we passed the john r. lewis voting rights advancement act in august. now the eyes of the nation are on the senate. the senators that the filibuster got -- gut the sacred right to vote? personally i would support an end to the filibuster, but i don't get to vote on the senate rules. according to the brookings
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institute analysis, there are 161 exceptions to the filibuster already. let me repeat that. 161 exceptions to the filibuster. everything from executive branch and judicial appointments. to budget reconciliation, to fast track trade agreements, to military base closures, to armed services, but not for the voting rights. there are 161 exceptions. you heard me just describe to you those exceptions. at a bare minimum senators who support voting rights need to create exception number 162 to the filibuster. a voting right exception. the right to vote is the
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foundation of our democracy. the right to vote is the foundation of our democracy. making the exception to the filibuster saves our democracy. it is important to understand just at this moment this is a moment in history, this is a moment i had the pleasure of serving with the late john lewis on the ways and means committee. i watched him when i was growing up as he walked across the bridge. i was 10 years old. he demonstrated to all of us in this country what it means to be the conscience, very similar to congresswoman joyce beatty leading the congressional black caucus. that the congressional black caucus is the conscience of this congress. and we stand here today to add
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our voices to make sure that people understand that we are in this fight. we are determined in every way that you could think of to fight for that exception on the filibuster. we want to be clear and concise and let people know that we are not accepting this. this is something that is unacceptable. we must have the right to vote. i thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. torres: i yield the floor to congress member mcguff. miss mcguff: first i'd like to
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thank congresswoman and chairwoman joyce beatty of the congressional black caucus for her astounding leadership and really being on the frontline for the congressional black caucus. mrs. mcbath: i want to thank our colleague, ritchie torres, for his leadership tonight on the floor for our special order hour, for voting rights. and i really want to thank each and every one of my colleagues, whether they be members of the congressional black caucus or just colleagues here in this body that have stood and fought for every one's right to exercise their right to vote, to exercise what's important to them in this country, to be fully and freely an american. i want to thank each and every one of you because it's for that reason, those reasons that we are here tonight. madam speaker, i rise today like so many have done before me
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throughout the years. to stand for the right of every american in this country. every citizen, to vote. during the civil rights movement, i was the child in the stroller at the march on washington. and i know many have heard me say before that my father was president of the naacp chapter in illinois. i can still picture him to this day presiding over meetings at our kitchen table in our home. our house was always filled with volunteers and civil rights leaders and workers as they were working on their poster boards and preparations and getting ready for rallies and for marches. as they were preparing to fight for a brighter world. from the time that i could walk as a young child, i was always
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marching with my family. and i have joked with my colleagues over and over again that, you know, the very first song i think i really, truly learned how to sing was "we shall overcome" because that's what we were singing. that's what i remember in my mind. that's the song, those are the words that i knew because i knew that they had depth and i knew they were so important to my family. even though i was so young, didn't understand what we were fighting for, i knew what my parents were doing was vitally important to this nation. i was raised by my parents to always fight for others. and to fight for what is right. and to stand up and to champion and to fight for the least of these. to stand up so that every american's voice is heard, and
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that their voices counted. i remember all the nights that my mother would put my sister and i in the car and we would travel all around illinois, passing out the voice newspaper, which at that time was the illinois civil rights newspaper. i remember getting stuck in the mud at night and being out in parts of illinois that we didn't know where we were, but my mother putting us in the car doing what she believed she had to do to make sure that the american people, and people of color understood the fight that was going on on their behalf. whether they were taking part in it or not. but that they understood and that they knew how important it was for them to be able to exercise what was important to them as human beings, as
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citizens in the united states of america. the struggle for voting rights championed not only by my parents, but embodied by our great friend and colleague, representative john lewis. and inspired by millions of americans. that is still carried on today. that is still so vitally necessary today. i live in georgia. georgia has a profound rich history of all the american civil rights stalwarts that fought on the frontlines for the very voting rights that we still talk about to this day. that we are still having to protect and champion to this day. representative john lewis,
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martin luther king jr., coretta scott king, joseph lawry, c.t. vivian, raffle david abernathy, and of course, andrew young. these are the individuals that were on the frontlines fighting for those of us, members of congress, african-americans, to be in this chamber, to be in this house, to be in this body, to represent the values and the dreams of not only people of our ilg -- ilk, but of the american people. had it not been for those individuals, as representative terry terri sewell has mentioned, the foremothers, forefathers, we would not be here today. free and fair elections are the bedrock of american democracy. that's what this democracy was founded upon.
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as john lewis used to say, freedom is not a state, it is an act. freedom is the continuous action we all must take, and each generation must do its part to create an even more fair and more just society. and together, each and every one of us must do our part. when i think about the fact that my father worked so hard in the civil rights movement, that my father was there, in the white house, with president lyndon bainesjohnson, for the signing of the civil rights act of 1964. when i think about the fact that i am here as a member of congress, because of the work that my forefathers and fore
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parents and civil rights workers and leaders and volunteers and people who just believed, just believed in what the constitution said and meant. believed in that. by exercising the right to society. the fact that now we are still fighting for those same rights and that people live in jeopardy of having those rights taken away is unconscionable. and that for every american that fought or bled or died, gave their life, for people to have the right to vote, what is happening in this body? what is happening in the senate, is unconscionable. and we are better than this. america is better than this. we have been that beacon for the world, for the sense of
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democracy. and we must continue to be that very thing. across america, we are standing up. across america, we will lead the fight for free and fair elections. across america, we will lead the fight to ensure that every american has the right to make their voice heard. across america, we will lead the fight to create a more just society. we must. the times demand it. and every one of us in this body was born for a time such as this. and god demands that of us at this time.
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thank you and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. torres: i yield to congress member lauren underwood. ms. underwood: thank you, madam speaker, and thank you to my colleague for yielding the time. i rise today to urge the senate to defend the american people from the ongoing assault on their sacred right to vote. people of color are disproportionately impacted by the recent onslaught of attacks on this fundamental right by certain state legislatures and partisan litigators. this is only the latest sal vow in a decades-long war on voting rights. a war that has always been and still is fueled by racism. but although people of color are the primary targets of these attacks, we are not the only casualties. the right to vote is the foundation of any democracy.
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without it, the united states would cease to be a government of, by, and for the people. those are the stakes. this is a life and death issue for our country itself. now earlier this year, i proudly voted with most, though unfortunately not all, of my colleagues to designate juneteenth, national independence day, as a federal holiday. with this vote we recognize that america cannot truly be a free country until every american is free. freedom cannot be conditional on who you are, where you live what you look like, how many hours you work. what language you speak. or whats but you ride. that's why every attack on voting rights cracks the foundation of our democracy. if we allow to it keep crumbling away, chip by chip, soon the
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whole structure will collapse. last week, senate democrats brought an urgently-needed voting rights bill to the floor. where every single republican voted to defeat it. of course this defeat was made possible by the filibuster. an undemocratic procedural weapon that has been wielded for a century and a half to block anti-lynching legislation. civil rights and voting rights. americans are tired of seeing their rights sacrificed on the altar of the filibuster. every senator faces a choice about what is more important to protect. an antiquated procedural rule, or our representative democracy. i urge my colleagues in the senate to prioritize our
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democracy. and ensure access to the ballot box is not undermined by restrictive state laws. a democracy for some is not a democracy for all. i yield back. mr. torres: madam speaker, how much time do we have left? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 16 minutes. mr. torres: we will use for a fewer than 16 minutes. madam speaker, the lesson of history is that state and local governments can not be trusted to respect voting rights. in the absence of federal oversight. federal voting rights enforcement is essential, as
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essential as the right to vote itself. and the most power. tools for voting rights enforcement is preclearance. preclearance has been so effective that from 1965 to 2006, it kept 1,200 state and local voting restrictions from taking effect. the john lewis voting rights act would restore preclearance as the gold standard of voting rights enforcement not only for some states, but for all. theon lewis voting rights act makes real the creed of america. liberty and justice for all. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the gentleman from arizona, mr. schweikert is recognized for
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60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. schweikert: thank you, madam speaker. i'm going to try something for the next hour and it's going to be one of those presentations that's always a little on the difficult side because we're going to talk about things a lot of this place and a lot of the country doesn't want to hear. but we call it math. and first premise, i need to ask all of us, if i were to walk into a room of democrats, people on the left, or people on the right, and say what's the biggest threat over the next couple of decades that is facing your country? you'd hear all sorts of things. a couple of years ago with the democrat it was russia, russia. today it may be this or that. i'm going to argue it's demographics.
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you go -- you go, huh? we're going to do almost 38 boards here and walking through the national debt-deficit-spending-spending priorities and the real toifs rev my, taxes what we call receipts. you have to ask yourself, does the next generation, the generation after that, the generation after that, do they have the right to live in a country where there's some prosperity? or has washington, d.c. decided to just destroy those who are heading toward retirement, those who are heading toward elementary school and the future? let's walk through some of the realities of the math. ok. i'm not going to boston we are 1965 and what the mix was. got to understand. in 2021, 77% of all the spending
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in this place, 77% of all the spending was what we call mandatory. formulas. social security, medicare. form lasm only 10% was defense. and 13% was everything else in government. so if you like to think that, well, you've got lots of pro-defense democrats and pro-defense republicans, and then mandatory is a formula that we don't even vote on here. you're electing members of congress to come and vote on 13% of the spending in this budget cycle. this is how out of whack it is. and we're going to walk through how much of this mandatory -- it's demographics. and look. getting older is not republican or democrat. but it is math. it is going to happen. so let's actually walk through a couple of the realities here. and i just threw this -- i know it's impossible to read on a
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camera and those thing, but the point is simple. today's social security is 23% of all spending. national defense is 15%. medicare is 14%. in a couple of years all those change. i'm going to show you some charge -- some charts that if interest rates tick up even a little bit, defense starts to fall to fourth. very, very soon. and to give you an idea, when you actually get up in front of audiences and for conservative audiences the folklore a decade ago was, well, waste and fraud. foreign aid. and then you'd pull up the charts and show it's a fraction of a percent. fine. maybe we should do something different in foreign aid. and yes, the spending from this year has massive fraud in it. but the long-term impacts of those is nothing compared to the fact, going to have to be honest
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and have a conversation about how we save, how we protect medicare and social security. what's going on around this place, you've got politician after politician getting behind the mike tones and saying i'm going to protect medicare, i'm going to protect social security, while they're driving it into the ground. so let's actually start to walk through how fast it's eroding. from 2019 to 2031, and 2031 is how many years from now? nine budget psych frls now? we will have doubled, we will have doubled the debt. you've got to understand how fast this is eroding from us. and the more current numbers, this slide was done about a year or two ago, it's actually much worse with the spending in the pandemic. so let's actually start to also walk through what we need to understand. social security, health care entitlement, interest costs, drive 90% of the 2008 to 2031
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spending hikes. so got to get, let's back that up. if you take a look at social security, medicare and the interest attached to those, that's what drives the deficit. remember earlier comment it's our demographics. and this place is unwilling to actually have honest conversations of how we're going to protect access to those earned benefits because the numbers are so big and so scary, what do you have, what do you have here even today? member after member running to the microphone talking about how we're going to functionally give away more but if you're under 50, we're about to make your future -- it's already baked in the cake. your future is really dangerous right now. so let's actually walk a little
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bit more through what the slides look like. rising social security and medicare shortfalls drive nearly entire 2019 to 2031 nonpandemic, so this is before the pandemic. we start you start to understand, this is before the pandemic calculations, we were heading towards about $2.2 trillion a year in borrowing before the pandemic. that's the baseline number. when you actually start to really understand that this is the general revenues. when you start to add up all the shortfalls, you are heading towards a time where functionally a 30-year government is living on borrowed money. so let's actually do a little bit more. you have all seen this slide. lots of people like to use it. the national debt is set to
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match world war ii peak within a deafnlgt guess what? we are pretty -- within a decade. guess what? we are pretty much there. we have now hit what they call the percentage of g.d.p. why do we use that? because there is this theory that sighs the -- says the size of the economy is what allows you to borrow money. as long as you don't borrow too much money where you start to -- the interest costs start to burden the availability of what they call capital stock for an economy to grow, an economy to have new investments. and the fear is -- it wasn't that long ago we used to talk about when we hit 100% of g.d.p. that means the borrowing, the publicly borrowed money will be the size of the economy. guess what? we have surpassed that. we have done it. you are going to see some boards here that should terrify you.
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long-term baseline, these are all -- i got to give credit where credit's due. manhattan institute, brian, what he does he takes the c.b.o. numbers, and i think some from joint tax, and tries to make them digestible. he also lays out what's the short-term, 10 year, 20, and 30-year lay-ups are. you can go right now to that website and download these same charts for yourself. but the long-term baseline shows unsustainable debt this. side has gotten worse since last year when we presented it. it actually had in 2050. so functionally less than 30 years. we are approaching up to 195% of debt, borrowed money, the size of the total economy. so functionally twice the size of the economy. that number has actually now gotten much worse because what we have done in the pandemic financing.
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and a whole bunch of the other promise that is have come in and the spending that's happened during unified government from the left. once again, trying to actually demonstrate it's not falling revenues. and we have dozens of charts. i only brought a couple of them. on the slide deck that makes it very clear when you look at the red line is -- in ways and means we would call receipts. most people think of it as tax revenues. it's basically where it has always been. if you go back to the 60's and 70's it was about 17.3%. of g.d.p. came in as revenues, taxes. now we are actually heading towards a time where it's about 18 1/2%. so it's actually higher. but what's this line here? you see this -- that's the pandemic. but then you get back to trendline. why is the trendline exploding in that direction 31.8% more
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spending than revenues? demographics. health care costs. so let's do another one. medicare part a and social security trust fund face bankruptcy. the medicare trust fund is gone in about six years. remember, the post tax cuts and reform, when we reform the tax code, because the economy was growing so fast and so many people were working, we actually i think at that time went from four years left in the part a trust fund of medicare, remember only the hospital portion of medicare has a trust fund. everything else comes out of the again fund -- general fund. we actually added a couple years because there were so many people working and therefore paying their fica taxes. but does this concern anyone that social security trust fund
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is gone? the medicare, the hospital portion of the trust fund is gone in functionally five years. is anyone paying attention? once again will we try to manage this by crisis? the scale of these numbers are just stunning. then we live in this financial fantasy world in this place. here's the slide, i have done a version of this slide for a decade now. i have been bid ---been booed in front of audiences for telling them the truth. there's something wrong in our psyche when we are so used to politicians lying to us we almost want them don't tell me the truth. it hurts too much. i have been on this floor dozens and dozens and dozens of times saying there is a path. the future doesn't have to be the debt laden financial collapse. there is a path. but you have to have a
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revolution in the cost of health care. economic growth. there is a series of things. you have to do all of them together. and the thing that terrifies me the most is how many times you have anyone come behind these microphones and talk about the scale of the death that's coming or solutions to it. and the fact of the matter is i don't know if our public votes on this. god knows you don't raise money telling people the truth about what's going on. but i have a 6-year-old daughter. doesn't she deserve to live in a prosperous country? this is going to crush prosperity for everyone. and it's going to wipe out lots of people in retirement. so once again, you got to understand, this chart, this is congressional budget office numbers say in about 29 years we have $112 trillion of borrowing, debt, and this is inflation adjusted numbers. this is in constant dollars.
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you are going to notice the entire 30-year debt comes from medicare and then social security. the rest of the budget is actually in balance. if this place isn't willing to have a ref leution -- revolution in the cost of delivering health care to our brothers and sisters and our seniors, our future is really ugly. and you got to understand there is a fraud around here. you'll get people from the left say, we should do medicare for all. medicare for all is a financing bill. it does nothing to the cost of health care. obamacare, the a.c.a., was a financing bill. it was about who got subsidized and who had to pay. the republican alternative was a financing bill. it was about who got to pay and who got subsidized. none of them are doing things that changed the cost of health care. i didn't bring the slide here
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because i did it just two weeks ago that shows 31% of medicare spending is just -- the single most power thing you could do to help the united states and its sovereign debt and to end misery in our minority treubles and my triballal communities out in arizona is do an operation warp speed, go after type two diabetes. isn't that something republicans and democrats could agree upon? guess what? it has amazing economic impact. we are working on a math problem right now. we believe solving diabetes could be one of the single biggest things you could do to income inevault. shall -- inequality. you take a look at some of our urban minority populations that suffer from diabetes. my tribal communities out west. if you normalize -- what would this population's income and prosperity look like if you cure
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by dye betees. that income and equality number shrinks dramatically. it's solving people's misery. it's hard campaigning on something that's complicated, isn't it? so this is the slide out of everything i'm going show that i actually see in my dreams. it really, really bothers me. because i don't have rely elegant ways to ex-- really elegant ways to explain how distaupian this number s projected 2051 budget deficit are entirely driven, social security and medicare. but you see this number here? it's basically saying almost 21% of the entire g.d.p. will be outlays for social security and medicare. revenues will only be 6%. this gap here is solely living
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on borrowed money. this over here is the rest of the budget. turns out the rest of the budget, revenues actually are outpacing the rest of spending. that's the government. that's defense, environment, that's everything. education. but this gap right here is what brings us to that what was that number before, $112 trillion of borrowing in the next 29 years. you got to get your head around this. that's assuming the c.b.o. numbers that there's no recession. there's no economic slowdowns. there is no major -- there is not another pandemic. that's a baseline number. do you understand how fragile we have made this economy because we are unwilling to tell the truth about these numbers?
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i had a political consultant once tell me, you can't tell the truth about the debt and financing because it will get you un-elected. i'm incredibly blessed. i remember north maricopa county. scottsdale, fountain hills. i represent a bunch of really smart people. and they are not happy when i show them this, but they understand its math. i don't get my head around how this becomes partisan. if you look at the piece of the legislation, they are trying to expand the programs at the same time they are collapsing. the lunacy. let's take a look, let's do the same thing trying to get our heads around. remember this slide was done before the pandemic scale of borrowing. which we'll be paying interest on that for decades and decades because we never pay it off. social security faces
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functionally $35 trillion shortfall. over the next 30 years. now it's 29 years. $32 trillion if you -- if you slu the trust fund balance. functionally just social security has a $32 trillion shortfall over the next 29 years. ok. oddly enough we could sit down around the table and that $32 trillion shortfall on social security, we can figure that out. because it's being a defined benefit system as it is, the math, you have about a dozen, two dozen levers where you could say we are going to subsidizing really, really rich people. we are going to do this, that. there are ways to deal with that. the one that's just brutal math wise is this one. social security is $32 trillion short. medicare is $78 trillion.
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medicare is $78 trillion short. and this one is much more difficult. and yet the solution around here is, well, we'll just subsidize more people and borrow the money. there is a path, but you got to be willing to functionally legalize technology, disrupt the cost of health care, and there are amazing good things happening. you tilely with the message -- messenger, rna if we could invest in we could cure misery today and reap the benefits in the future. and i have only come to the floor dozens of times trying to share that math. once again, let's take a look. this is also something that disharmonious to what a lot of
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people believe. the typical retiring couple, this is before pandemic, will receive $3 in medicare for every $1 they paid in. social security, you functionally get really close to what you put into it. social security's a fairly square deal. medicare we have a problem. that typical retiring couple, two years ago when we were doing this math, brian was doing this math, would put in about $161,000 in the lifetime and taking out and receiving benefits of about $522,000. that gap right there is almost the sole primary driver of most of the u.s. sovereign debt over the next 30 years. if we're willing to have an an honest conversation about what
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do we do to keep our brothers and sisters healthy prork vied access and resources but do it in a modern way and could we bend this cost differential here? because we do that, remember, we were just talking a moment ago, 31% of this is just diabetes. in our seniors. if you took that on, that's the single greatest thing you could do to bending this curve and saving the economic future of this society. and we also need to deal with a bit of the folklore. this is folklore from the left. you do realize the tax code has already been getting more progressive? you do realize the 2017 tax reform was more progressive? than the tax code before 2017. and look, you actually go back to the 1980's, 19 90's, the top
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20% at that time were all paying about 60% of all federal income taxes. today they're paying 70%. this is the top 20%. it's folklore. now it's good political folklore. it's good campaign folklore. we're going to make the rich pay their fair share. fine. stop subsidizing them. we've already done a demonstration here repeatedly that we come up with $1 trillion, $1.4 trillion, of direct subsidies to the really, really, really rich. so the absurdity that's in the current tax plan offered by the democrats is, let's do this. let's raise their taxes, oh by the way, wink, wink, nod, nod, you make $#00,000 a year, we'll give you tax credits of $100,000 if you buy with democrats tell you to buy. ok. why not go further, why not remove the $1 trillion to $1.4 trillion in direct subsidies we give to the rhythm and put that toward balancing -- or actually
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kiloing is the erosion. you're not going to balance. this any politician who said we're going to balance the budget, we're going to pay off the debt and receive sit -- deficit, our job is just to stabilize it at this point because the numbers are so large. if you get somebody behind these microphones and throws out the rhetoric of it's foreign aid it's waste and fraud. we're going to eliminate the balance the budget by doing this, buy them batteries for their calculator because they obviously don't have one. and this comes back to dealing with the reality. no defense cuts. taxing millionaires. cannot finance current deficits. the progressive wish list, if you actually go, the proposals that the left has proposed this year, functionally, the free college, the job garen theerks medicare for all, you start to add that up, if you start to
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wipe out everything else, you functionally have just blown up the deficit by another 34%. the math just doesn't work. so let's actually sort of walk through, this is important. president biden promised in his campaign $11 trillion of new spending over the 10 years. $11 trillion in new spending. and these -- look, they're all cited. they're either c.b.o. or committee for responsible budget. but you start to look at, this is just the campaign promises of $11 trillion of new spending. on top of what is it, the four-plus trillion dollar baseline budget plus the couple trillion additional we did o'the last few years and now you have, what was it, the original scoring of the build back better plan was what, it claimed 3.5 but it scored out to 5, 5.5
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trillion. this is the lunacy we're at. and yet if you come and add up every potential tax hike the left talks about, you know, get rid of any changes we did in tax reform that created the great growth you actually start to take all income over $200,000 and take 50% of it. you make $#00,000 in your household, we take 50% of it. you do all the tax hikes that are in the entire list of the democrats. over a decade you functionally raise $12 trillion. ok. the deficit is already projected before, before the pandemic was going to be over $13 trillion at that time. so you could do every -- and you've got -- that's not assume you just blew up the economy, you slowed dunn growth. madam speaker, may i ask for the time?
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 33 minutes remaining. mr. schweikert: thank you, madam speaker. i know this is a lot of boards but in some ways, you need it to try to drill in because this is -- we hate talking about this around here. it's like, i can't tell you, i will start to do these presentations even with some of my conservative brothers and sisters and they run away from me. but it's the math. if you actually take the progressive programs overwhelmingly benefit the rich. this is one of my fixations here. i thinks this something the left and those of us on the right could come to an agreement on, let's stop subsidizing the rich. you actually start to walk over, you know, the things we provide to families with high incomes and you actually walk through
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the amount, we actually brought a presentation to the floor a couple of weeks ago and showed $1 trillion, $1.4 trillion that goes to the top 1/4 tile. we want to tax the rich but we're going to turn around and hand it back to them. if it's my fourth house and i happen to buy it oen a beach should i be getting subsidized flood insurance? so. the biden budget proposals would add $8.8 trillion in debt over the next decade and that's with the biden tax hikes. how often are talking about that around here? but that's how c.b.o. already scores it. even eliminating all defense
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spending doesn't get you close to actually making a difference in the long-term debt. so think of this. this is the defense line. and the baseline is basically projected to sit about now for the future decades at about 3.5 to 4 percent of g.d.p. ism uh start taking a look, go out to the 2050 number, we're at almost 16% of g.d.p. size of the economy will just be depending on social security and medicare. does anyone sort of see a difference, four to 16? this is the reality. we'll get people who come behind the microphones and say, if we cut the defense, if we do this, we'll balance it. no you won't. that's not the math and you know it's not the math. we need to stop misinforming -- my wife would refer to it as lying, to the public and start telling the truth and treat them
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like adults of what's going on. remember, the problem ultimately isn't republican or democrat. it's demographics. we as a society have made lots of promises and if we're going to keep them we need to tell the truth about the math. turns out, the growth in the economy is crucial, even with my most optimistic math, when we come here and said we can have a revolution, the cost of delivering health care, we can do all these thing, the lynch pin of it is you must have economic growth. you take a look during, when president obama oversaw about a half trillion dollars of new taxes and we functionally lost $3.2 trillion of economic expansion. if we're going to raise taxes, you've got to think it through in a way that what's the
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economic growth effect at the end of the decade? the next decade and the decade after that? because if we don't keep growing the size of this economy, that ratio of borrowing because the borrowing is exploding if you don't -- aren't growing the economy as fast there's a technical economic term for it. it's called we're screwed. even 100% tax rate on small businesses and upper income families could not come close to balancing the long-term budget. take everything. take all the money from upper income. take all the money from small businesses. and you still don't get close to balancing. we all know this. why is it so incapable of this place telling the truth? are we that addicted to the spending, our constituent, our
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voters, our contributors, that addicted to us handing them checks? but this is the basic chart. it makes it very, very clear. you can't solve the long-term budget even if you go out and confiscate 100% of small businesses' wealth and the upper income's wealth. here's where the reality starts -- should be terrifying you. national debt is projected to leap to 200%. 328% of g.d.p. depending on if those biden proposals pass. if there's any interest rate changes. so you start taking a look at this. when you start to see $328 trillion of borrowing in 28 year, 29 years. you get this sort of number if the bide problem posals passed and interest rates go up by 1%.
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you've got to understand how fragile we are. is there anyone here that's a fan of tarvetion lep, who wrote "black swan," said, you can see these things coming, there will be other black swans. we have made this country incredibly economically fragile because these numbers are coming. this one happens to come if the biden administration gets their proposals but even if they don't you're still well over 200% of debt-to-g.d.p. as the baseline. the share of federal tax revenues spent on interest, on the national debt, is projected to surge. here's the simple thought experiment. today interest, with our incredibly low interest rates, is about 9% of g.d.p.
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if we get two points interest rate hike, in 2051 it's 100% of g.d.p. is just interest. doesn't this terrify anyone else? i can't bealone in looking -- i can't be alone in looking at these numbers and panic for my society, my country, my daughter. since 199, 0 knopp defense discretionary spending has grown four times faster than defense. this is important because we keep getting -- seeing people come behind these microphones talking about the skyrocketing cost of defense. nondiscretionary is growing four times faster. over the last 20 years. four times fast every. -- faster. and you saw it in the opening slide that basically said, 70% of all our spending is
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mandatory. today. 10% is defense. and everything else is what we really get to vote on. coronavirus legislation. and we're all guilty on this. democrats substantially more guilty but we're all guilty. push the 2021 federal spending past $50,000 per household. so if you're a household out there in this pandemic cycle do you feel you got $50,000 worth of value? because you're going to pay for it the rest of your life, the rest of your kids' live, the rest of your grandkids' lives, because of interest. but functionally this spike you see here was $50,000 per household. that's what we kid in the pandemic. you've got to understand, we had
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an incredible free ride the last couple of years. the federal reserve functionally financed our debt. and now we're financing our own inflation. i'm sure some of you have been to a grocery store, filled up your gas tank. welcome to what happens when you doe keynesian economics. but here's the reality. see the line down here? this is china. this is japan. this is the rest of the world. this is the federal reserve. the federal reserve is functionally about five times more financing our debt than china and japan together. we're playing a shell game ourselves. we're financing our own debt. and then you wonder why you have inflation.
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and we have all been in this body. and i know there is angst, but if you look at the last 40 years, the only times we have had any attempt tore bend the spending curve, bend the borrowing curve has come out of negotiations to raise the debt ceiling. budget bills, we have had a number of them. remember the budget control act. now, the problem is, we had some of these where we set the baseline and they were working and this place runs away from them. but there is a fraud in those and they were tied to discretionary spending, not the mandatory driving the debt. and look, some of my brothers and sisters on the left have
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said it is tax reform. it's just not true. you look at the contributors that if everything from tax reform was extended permanently, it is a tiny fraction. and that is assuming without c.b.o. numbers and weren't giving us the numbers we had in 2018 and 2019. but that's not the math. and the six major deficit reduction deals that we have had since 1983, you take a look at them. almost all of them was on discretionary. and saved us some money and we did raise some more taxes and we did a little bit in the early 1980's under reagan under mandatory associate security and you look at them and they had an
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effect. remember the surpluses in the late 1990's? but today, we let it get away from us. you take a look at what became of the $1.7 billion -- remember 2013 until this year, it was supposed to be about $1.7 trillion in reductions in spending. remember the budget control act, except, what happened? well, time after five and republicans and democrats * cats and we lost much of the value. so we did gain about a trillion dollars in savings over those 10 years. could have been doubled that if we hadn't whittled it away.
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the last thing, and i hope our brothers and sisters on the left will step up and help us on this one, we look at the current number, the number is higher than this because this slide is a couple of months old but we have identified over $200 billion in missed and fraudulent claims and payments. -- during the pandemic. you have seen some of the crazy stories how much fraud there has been in california. we need to tell the truth about health care costs and medicare driving our debt. but i believe in a holistic theory, you need to go after everything and the fraud in the last few years and bending the
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curve on delivering health care and there are ways to do it. this place needs to stop being so fearful about the debt and deficit. and if we don't grow up, it's going to take our head off. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the chair recognizes the gentleman from connecticut for 28 minutes.
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mr. himes: i ask unanimous consent that we have to welcome the ranking member and the republican appointees and very important committee for this special order where the members are going to highlight the initial thoughts that we have on how we might address this. in our first hearing, one of our witnesses called it a committee of historical and based on 1938 and that that was in a moment in worst economic crisis. the great depression showed far too many citizens could be impoverished forces and showed that free phargt capitalism was an unparallel and subject to
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manipulation and prone to collapse as it did in the early 1930's. the safety net is morrow bus than it was and today our economy demonstrates more income and income disparity. that is not a red problem or a plus problem or a northern or eastern problem. it affects every one of our districts. market economies don't work if they are working as unfair. our system rests on the premise that every american counts. the idea that hard work and playing by the rule to climb the ladder has been essential. it defines the american dream and when my parents were born,
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children were expected to make more money. today, fewer than half the children will outearn. i see this at home. some of those people i represent are 15-minute drive will take them into cities with honoredous poverty where poverty is scares at best. addressing that issue in a bipartisan way and having made that point, before we enter into a colloquy, i would love to invite the gentlemanfrom wisconsin to make any comments he wishes to make.
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>> we will be exploring and addressing economic challenges we are seeing across this country. we are on a fact-finding mission as we find solutions to create opportunities. leading up to the covid-19 pandemic, america sought progress. in 2019, household income grew, the largest increase. minority communities saw greater growth. and coming out of the covid-19 pandemic, something has changed which is why the work of this select committee is so timely. labor force participation those seeking work and across this country there is a disconnect between available jobs and
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workers ready to work. they should be encouraging work and dignity. families across the country from kep northbounda to orlando are being hurt. and they feel it at the grocery store and they feel it for shopping for their kids. but it is devastating to low-income americans. i look forward to working with you to empower workers to prosper and expand opportunities for all families to succeed, i yield back. mr. himes: we will be engaging in a colloquy. but i thank the ranking member and i know we are anxious to get to our members and affirmative ideas. but the ranking member and i
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were in lorraine, ohio last week, courtesy of the the gentlewoman from ohio and we were struck by a couple of things. i was impressed by the optimism by people in the town that were affected badly. i came away by the potential role for education. and one of the amazing works that are lorraine was doing and i personally hope and i know there is a conversation that training and education won't start but as early as possible and i would hope that education and training might be one of those areas we find bipartisan agreement. >> there is education and particular work force development and not lost on any of us and the disconnect. there is over 10 million jobs
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and we continue to have a disconnect getting workers and the jobs and we saw it in lorraine, signs looking for workers as we walked into the hearing and i remarked that there were help-wanted signs across the street and people are still unemployed and look at the aspects of the education in the united states and make sure we are connecting workers with jobs that are still available. mr. himes: i was startled by that sign as well. we are in a depressed with a big closed steel mill with help-wanted signs. there are lots of ropes for the current disconnect and i think it's in the millions of jobs going begging and i was really
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impressed by the fact that you had in a town where there were surplus workers a steel plant looking for more employees. mrs.steel: we see businesses to navigate through the and we will be having a hearing coming up on navigation and many businesses and the struggle and automation and future job growth. mr. himes: i look forward to working with him and his memberships. i know both of us feel strongly about the members to offer up their ideas and i will begin and the chair won't be yielding and will give a whaefb when time is running slow. the gentlewoman from california has made a contribution, the
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cram from california, ms. jacobs. mr. jacobs: thank you to the rank member and i welcome our member and we are going to have strong debates and economic inequality and deserves all the energy bass we are at a pivotal moment. the bottom 50% holds 2% of the wealth and the top 1% holds a third and i have experience with that. the most consequential day of my life, the day determined whether or not i grew up with opportunity or privilege was the day i was born and that is true for so many kids and unlike that kids that were born in 1989.
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some were born into generational poverty, i was born into wealth. i was born. and for decades our policies have benefited people like me. in addition to being immoral, economic inequality is a threat to our national security ann the health to our democracy. our colleagues are thinking about how we remain competitive. with those the one crisis, that is more difficult. i represent san diego in congress. we are one of the wealthiest counties. we have man shopbs on the beach and more than 40% of our kids are experiencing poverty before
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the pandemic. we have got to do better and i'm grateful that we are taking to grow back better act. and i know our disagreements are real. but i have faith that together we can work to find solutions like the child tax credit and start these programs had wide bipartisan support. thank i yield back. mr. himes: i thank the gentlewoman from california. take pleasure welcoming the gentleman from oklahoma to the committee and invite her to make any remarks she'd like to make. >> thank you so much, mr. chairman. it is an honor to be selected to the committee. i look forward to working with all the members, including ranking member styles on this very important issue. i'm honored to be selected to serve on the select on economic disparity. i look forward to working with
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all my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to dive deep into the issues at hand where we can find areas to work together to craft bipartisan solutions. mrs. bice: in contrast to my friend and colleague from california, i was born the daughter of an immigrant. my father came to the united states with no mon i. in purr -- with no money. in pursuit of the american dream. he went to college, graduated. started his own, today is a very successful businessman. i look forward to discussing in this committee the ways we can foster the american dream with american citizens across this country. the mission of the select committee is certainly worthy of consideration. the question of why some our fellow americans are being left behind in the economy demand our time and attention. one of the most worrying economic statistics of the past year and a half is that the u.s. labor force participation rate is the lowest its been since 1977, nearly 45 years ago. millions fewer americans today
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are employed or actively seeking work compared to just two years ago. that has create add wide ranging challenge for american families and for our economy. help wanted signs as was mentioned earlier have become ubiquitous across the nation as stores, restaurants, manufacturers, and others struggle to find employees to continue operations. it is vital that we must find the root causes and craft the appropriate solutions. to that end, here are a few areas i think the select committee should focus its time and energy on. first, we should begin to review and unwind federal policies that have disincentivized participation in the labor force. many of which were created at the end of the code of pandemic. second, we should refocus and strengthen our nation's education and work force development programs. it is clear our nation's education system leaves many americans behind. saddles students with large amounts of debt. and often promotes pricily
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degree programs with very poor job prospects. i believe we need to do a better job of matching work force development programs to the actual needs of employers. aligning job training curriculums to meet the commands of employers who need skill workers would almost guarantee jobs for those who complete the programs. third, we need to reform our nation's criminal justice system and reinvigorate efforts to rehabilitate the nearly 95% of prisoners who would eventually be released from prison. sadly all too often we hear of individuals released with just the clothes on their back and one way bus ticket. this level of support doesn't set up individuals for success. i'm proud earlier this year the state of oklahoma set up a program to began preparing inmates nine months before their release with work force training to obtain documentation to get a job, transportation, and housing. improving programs to transition the formerly in-rated back to
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society are worth our consideration and can save taxpayers in the long run. finally, i would be remiss if i didn't note the importance of regulatory relief and tax reform as exee components of all this. as someone who worked in the private sector for many years, including running my own firm and working for a family company, i can say with kernt that tax policy and government regulation have tremendous impacts on the decisions of businesses to hire, expand, and make investments. in closing i would like to express my appreciation for being object the committee and look forward to working with my colleague to dig deeper. thank you, chairman himes and ranking member styles for setting this special order this evening. mr. himes: it's my pleasure to yield a little time to the gentlelady from minnesota, mrs. craig. mrs. craig: thank you so much, mr. chairman. i am so incredibly honored to be appointed to the select committee. studying economic disparities and fairness and growth. welcome to my republican colleagues.
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i'm especially grateful to be taking a fresh look at how we build economic growth in our rural communities. the challenges facing rural america while long-standing have been made even more urgent as a result of the covid-19 public health crisis. in congress, it is our responsibility and our moral duty to respond to the unique needs of our rural communities. right now in small towns across my district, a lack of reliable internet access is preventing entrepreneurs from growing their small businesses. hire -- higher insurance premiums and out-of-pocket health care costs are putting a strain on families' bottom lines. access to health care sometimes means driving an hour to the nearest hospital. we must enter this work with an open mind to examine the issues and we must build a road map that ensures our rural communities are not left behind. to be sure, the build back better act has many provisions
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designed to address growth in rural america. most notably the president's rural partnership program, which would empower local communities to shore up unreliable electric grids, childcare, and support small businesses that power local communities. these long overdue investments won't reverse all of the economic decline we have seen in our rural communities. but it's a start. to put into place an economic foundation that paves the way for consistent, long-standing growth that has eluded our rural commutes for decades -- communities for decades. i came to congress to deliver these solutions for my constituents and now we have an opportunity to step back and examine these issues with fresh eyes. we cannot let this opportunity pass us by, mr. chairman. and i thank you so much for your work. i appreciate the opportunity to be on the select committee. mr. himes: i thank the gentlewoman from minnesota.
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i'm just going to note to the ranking member i have four members, good enthusiastic turnout. we'll need to be a little bit disciplined about roughly two minutes each. with that it looks like we'll hear from the gentleman from ohio, mr. davidson. mr. davidson: i thank the chairman. i thank the ranking member. the speaker and the minority leader. it's nice to have this committee to focus on such an important topic and to do it in a bipartisan way. i'm sure we'll have our differences of opinion. but i hope we find some common ground. frankly, one of the bills that i have worked on for a long time is the people care act. it would create a bipartisan commission for republicans, for democrats -- four republicans, four democrats and would reform all 90's plus means tested programs. we spend about $1 trillion a year for reference we spend about $750 billion on defense. far more just on poverty assistance. many of those programs aren't as effective as they could be. it wouldn't cut any funding.
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it wouldn't necessarily cut any programs. but the commission could redesign them to do things like end benefit cliffs. that's important, as people start to recover, as they start to get back into the economy and participate in the work force, when they get a raise, a promotion, sometimes when they get a job, they get put on a cold turkey program, they lose their benefits. it creates a lot of fear and turns a safety net into a snare. up f one of the things driving the safety net is wages are going up. that doesn't mean inflation is a good thing by any means. inflation is hitting wage earners very hard and retireees even harder. it is changing how far a housing voucher will go, for example. or whether somebody gets a raise they might not have updated the benefit program from the federal safety net to recognize that. and now they are facing a cliff. we need to address the drivers of this inflation. that goes to the destruction of the value of our money. the massive spending that we do
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often in the name of compassion is growing the wealth gap. this is fiscal and monetary policy. we have big deafs, it -- deficits it grows inequality. in the name of helping people. there are so many more issues that i hope we get to. it's an honor to serve with my colleagues and i look forward to hearing their ideas and growing from the experience. i yield. mr. himes: i thank the gentleman from ohio for his generous comments. recognize another one of our stalwart midwesterners, the gentlelady from wisconsin, who was one in lorain, ohio. ms. moore. ms. moore: thank you so much, mr. chairman, and mr. ranking member. i'm so delighted to have been appointed to the select committee. the speaker, of course, said that we should make proposals that make our economy grow for everyone. empowering american economic growth while ensuring that no one is left behind in the 21st drepry -- century economy. it's no secret that our country is marked by unequal access to
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god-paying jobs, health care housing, childcare, and many other things. i can't dwell on all those things with the short period of time. these disparities have the impact the ability of many communities to escape poverty. especially people of color. i do want to dwell on a couple things. proposals that i think are extremely important. to close the economic gap, the wealth gap, and the housing gap. first of all i think that all of our workers deserve paid family leave. a universal comprehensive paid family and medical leave program. only about a third of the americans in the highest quintile receive any kind of paid family leave. while 92% of workers in the lower quintile have no paid
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family leave. we should enhance the child tax credit and earned income tax credits. these are things that -- while there is a very high cost of poverty, there is a big huge outcome and harvest from investing in our children. people around the globe have noted that it really creates better workers, better educational outcomes, a better health care outcomes. we also need to address the uncompensated care that so many family caregivers, especially women, are providing. a half trillion dollars a year in uncompensated care. and we need to address that. i think if we boost the c.t.c., the earned income tax credit, provide paid family leave, we will begin to see the beginings around the edges of reducing some of the disparities. with that i yield back to you,
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mr. chairman. mr. himes: thank you. i thank the gentlewoman fromis wisconsin and take great joy in welcoming to the committee, the gentlelady from florida, mrs. cammack, for her remarks. mrs. cammack: thank you chairman himes. i rise today as a mevment select committee on economic disparity and fairness in growth, a.c.a. the economy committee on the economy. over the past few minutes we have heard a variety of arguments. there is absolutely no doubt that every member here today has a vested interest in ensuring our nation remains prosperous for generations to come. while we may disagree on solutions, we will work together to address economic challenges that we see across this country. economic prosperity for all americans is imperative. when we know that prior to code of americans saw tremendous progress. in 2019 alone the median household income grew by 6.8%. the largest increase ever recorded in american history. with historic legislation passed by the house of representatives anti-trump administration, we
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saw minority -- and the trump administration, we saw minority communities grow, with incomes levels rising 7% for hispanics and african-americans. following the pandemic we have seen labor force participation plummet. as the policies proposed by our colleagues across the aisle have incentivized unemployment. we have not seen since the carter administration. which for the record was more than a decade before my time. as we begin to prepare to explore what we can do to empower workers for the jobs of the future, and encourage all american families to see the nation wide, i'm focused on communities like mine in north central florida which a lack of broadband rural areas suffer from lack of investment which affects our school children, telehealth, opportunities, commerce, and so much more. now, in an agricultural district heavy like mine, i want to highlight the high trade deficit, need for improved trade agreements which help florida
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pours -- producers in my own state. during the pandemic farmers had to destroy crops and dump milk because the demand was low. cheaper produce from other nations continue to be imported cutting out the market from our producers. simply put the economics of u.s. production in agriculture is in peril. finally, i would like to bring attention to issues hot in the headlines these days. educational freedom, school choice, and rights of parents to have a say in their children's education, which we all know education is a direct correlation to prosperity. we know that american was built on equal opportunity, not equal outcome. rather than asking what more government should do, we should ask where government can be removed and should be removed. federal regulations cost $1.9 trillion spent on reporting, compliance, and more which could be better served in investing in employees or in work force development or underdeveloped communities across the country. as we begin our work on this select committee, i am committed to working with my colleagues to pursue meaningful opportunities
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for all americans, regardless of their location, regardless of their background, regardless of education, regardless of whatever box they check. it's well past time we stop seeing government as the solution to our problems because after all, it is the incredible opportunities here today in america that have allowed me, the daughter of a single mom, a young woman from rural america, that has conwith homeless to the house of representatives in under a decade. it's time we expand those opportunities. not restrict them. thank you again to chairman
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himes as well as ranking member styles. i am honored to serve on this select committee. mr. himes: i'm grateful for her highlighting the theme. and batting cleanup, our last member is a hostes in ohio and i take great pleasure in welcome ing ms. kaptur. ms. kaptur: thank you for bringing the committee. i rise to offer my strong support for pending new investments in our workers and families and our communities. as was highlighted in our hearing, our region has been battered by an economy that rewards the 1% and billionaires at the expense of workers. in northern ohio, we are seeing the possibility of restoring new hope and new opportunities. the parents and grand parents of 150,000 children from working families and struggling are seeing taxes cut through the child tax credit and in transnational corporations that outsource jobs, our hard-working
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families are seeing the tax dollars returned directly to them. a recent study from the united way showed that they are not eligible for paid paid leave. rebuilding our bridges and roads and poerts and to spur a real revival of our industrial heart left hand. i ask unanimous consent to place the additional statement in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. himes: may i inquire of the time remaining.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the chair recognizes, mr. keller until 10:00 p.m. mr. kelly: -- 6
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>> i ask unanimous consent that each member may have five legislative daze to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection >> my distinguished colleagues and i stand here on he veterans. and let alone a prolonged wait to benefits and programs they have earned. the national personnel records sent i.r.s. is responsible and at this moment there is a backlog of half a million requests dating back to february of 2020. some veterans have been waiting for over a year and a half for their service records to access benefits and request campaign service medals and much more. we honor the service and
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sacrifice and active-duty personnel and any delay is unacceptable. we interviewed the records act, legislation that will compel the records center to alimb fate the records request. dating back more than a year, there has been a broad push to work toward the unacceptable backlog. the records act is an opportunity to achieve this. our veterans fought for us and we must fight for them. i appreciate my colleagues joining me this evening together in support of this goal. i yield to the gentleman from florida, mr. rutherford, two minutes. mr. rutherford: i thank my good examine friend from pennsylvania for this opportunity. you know, madam speaker, i rise
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to talk about the fundamental roles of the congress and that is to help our constituents navigate the bureaucracy and get the documents they need and deserve and they run into difficulty at the v.a. unfortunately the national personnel records center is still not fully opened. and to safely reopen during covid-19 pandemic. this has case workers in my office to help my constituents in a timely manner. this has resulted in 500 refresh your recollection requests. over 500,000. to fix this problem, i'm proud to support the records act and
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bringing this bill to the floor. this bill will ensure that the national personnel records center is operating full-time at full capacity now. american set advance deserve better than what they are getting from this administration. let's pass the records act. >> i thank my colleague in making sure we help our veterans and the records center has the resources. and with that, i yield to my good friend, the gentlelady from florida, mrs. cammack. mrs.cammack: i rise to support in support of the records act to
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make reform to the national records center which has failed our vet raps. i would like to share a story from my district about a 99-year-old marine who has been suffering from alzheimer's, her family has been attempting to obtain a form to apply for her v.a. pension. this would grant her a placement in a nursing home equipped to handle a alzheimer's patient. but they have sent aedly. their justification, in writing, this request does not constitute a medical emergency. she is 99 years old and dedicated her life serving as a marine and suffering from a dell bit tating disease and the center asked the family that she
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has been will skpwrufd pulling the record. again, a 99-year-old marine veteran. a personal records center can no longer rely on the and this is their excuse. they have an octobers to fulfill these claims to our vet raps who have served. if the national personnel records and feel no shame while the records' request goes unfulfilled, hundreds within florida's 3rd congressional district, constituents of mine, it is time for congress to intervene. excuses be damned. and with that, i yield back. >> what an out standing lady and
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you talk about excuses and i was raised by my grandmother and she told me my brother and i, excuses are weak. this time we show our business and with that, i would like to yield 2 1/2 minutes to my colleague and friend, representative khrao*eud from clyde from georgia. mr. clyde: veterans and their families. through their service, these men and women have earned benefits and validated by the individual service record. the repository is the national personnel records center. it is behind in its work. the backlog to maintain military records jumped to over 500,000
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requests. 500,000 veterans who are waiting on documentations they need to get benefits including the g.i., v.a. loans, life insurance and even burial benefits. when these issues were first reported last year, the national center stated that the pandemic has been unable to and congress appropriated additional funds and to help expedition the records. the center did not tkprapbt its employees the technology to work from home until early 2021, a year after the pa*frpb began. and also, the ar kheufift of the
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united states that oversees the operations noted in his kor respondens he expects to he limb nature the backlog by the end of fiscal year 2022. that means this time next year, a whole career. that is unacceptable. each member has one veteran in their district impacted, probably, many, many veterans and time for us to step up to the plate and demand results and show us these requests are being answered in a timely manner. part of that is through the introduction of his bill, the records act. i appreciate his efforts and i am proud to join him in this fight and with that, i yield
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back. >> i appreciate your remarks and there are veterans in our nation and we have the privilege to represent and you mentioned about the records center worrying about danger. they didn't worry about danger. and i am glad to be joined by my colleague from pennsylvania, representative kelly. mr. kelly: we are good friends and incomplete agreement on what it is we are trying to do tonight, mr. speaker. there are 54,000 veterans. these are men and women that have served in military. 1-13 are military veterans. roughly 520,000 pending v.a. claims for disability,
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compensation and benefits are out there. and 190,000 are considered to be backlogged and are considered to be three months old and can't get the information they need. 30% of these cases were considered backlogged and over four months people are waiting. the national personnel records center is operating at 45% while almost every other business and government entity is operating at full capacity. this bill is preventing them and prevents staff from accessing those records. representative keller's bill would require the national personnel records center employees to return to the job at 100% capacity and improve the
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operations at the center. this is not just a request or honoring the service of those who have given all to defend this country. they aren't looking for anything special or out of the ordinary or going beyond what they were hired to do, they are looking to receive their benefits. how can this nation turn their back and how can this groupry fuse to do in a timely fashion and prevent this from happening further? all all we are asking for is for people to do their job. what an unusual concept? not doing it from home but going to the scwob and doing the job for those who put their life on the line for this nation. incredible it would take a bill
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from congress for people to dot job they were hired to do. and fulfill the responsibility to our veterans. i thank representative keller for bringing this forward. i would urge this body to take a look what we are doing right now and somehow, and somehow come to an agreement that there is not -- this won't be a request. this is a responsibility to those who have served us so well. i thank representative keller for including me tonight and all the rest of my colleagues. again, this is not just a request. this is a responsibility. i thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: i thank the gentleman. he makes a very valid point that the rest of america is going back to work and doing what they need to do at full capacity. working at 100%. and to have a government agency working at 45% for those who have done, as he pointed out, for those who have done so much for us is unacceptable. i appreciate his help with this.
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i also look forward to hearing what my great colleague and friend from wisconsin, mr. grothman, has to say. i yield two minutes. mr. grothman: i would also like to speak on behalf of congressman keller's bill. one of the things we do as congressmen back in our district is constituent work. and probably one of the areas which is -- we are busiest is in the areas of helping our veterans. whether it's getting burial benefits, veteran benefits, or lost military awards we have to contact the national personal records center. unfortunately, as been mentioned, for over a year now the national personal records center has been operating at well under capacity. this is an insult to our veterans. their excuse for not operating is of course, the covid. my staff has toured the national personal records septre and it is a large warehouse very spread
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out. unlike where most of americans have had to work the last two years, you are not squeezed up in a cubical next to somebody else. unfortunately, and this may be is an indication of the overall carrying of the -- caring of the federal government. unfortunately they have not been open. at a time when not only our veterans have given so much, but a time when so many taxpayers have been working around the clock. every time i go home, i go buy a couple cheese factories, i go by there 1:00 in the morning. they are packed with people. they never stopped working. here we have a massive warehouse with lots of space between people and we are told it is too dangerous to go to work. that is preposterous, it's an unsalt to our veterans. an insalt to our taxpayers. i urge this body to pass
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congressman keller's bill as soon as possible. thank you. i yield the remainered -- remainder of my time. mr. keller: i thank the gentleman. so very put that we have people for which we work. that are veat rans. go to work every day. maybe aren't veterans but taxpayers and expect the government to work. that's all we are asking for. people every day in america go to work. and they produce goods. they provide services. the americans that have served, our veterans, and those serving deserve a government that is responsive to the needs that they have because of what they have earned. they are not asking for anything special. they are saying, look, we have earned these benefits. and to gain access to them we need you to do your job. who would have thought it would have taken an act of congress to try to get them to do their work? it's time that we make sure that
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the national personnel records center does its job for our veterans. to make sure that they have a plan that this never happen again. we cannot, we cannot let down our veterans. because of some bureaucracy. because somebody doesn't want to make sure that it runs efficiently and effectively. it needs to be done. it needs to be done now. in closing, just let me say we must first and always remember our veterans and active duty military personnel. also i like to thank my colleagues for their participation this evening. this is an important issue. it's widespread. it transcends party lines. these aren't veterans -- they are americans. not republicans, not democrats. they are americans. and they are an outstanding group of americans. and i notice i was joined here
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by a colleague of mine. before i close i will recognize a gentleman i have known for quite some time, actually a member of the military -- i knew you were still a member of the military. a veteran then. a good friend of mine. a great american from pennsylvania. congressman scott perry. mr. perry: i thank my friend, the gentleman from pennsylvania, for bringing up the subject and offering me the opportunity to stand in support of his legislation, the records act, to let you know and what you probably already heard that literally hundreds of thousands, 500 thousands, 600,000 veterans are waiting their care based on the inability of the v.a. to get to the records. they can't prove that they are due the care, they earned the care without the records. the v.a. has this backlog which takes them a year, maybe two out
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where they can't access the records to get the care that they have earned. and so i commend the gentleman for his efforts with the records act. i have a similar bill, the wingman act, which allows congressional staffers, given the appropriate approvals, to go in and help veteran do the same thing. get through the backlog. mr. keller has a response, he's got a solution. i'm working on a solution. you know who is not working on a solution? the v.a. it's not the people down in the trenches doing the hard work, as usual as the administration, the upper staff that has failed in this endeavor. if we can do anything in the united states of america, of all the billions we spend, here, across the globe, anywhere and all the different programs that we have, the least we can do, the least we can do is take care of those who have safeguarded our freedoms and have earned the care that they deserve to get.
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the overwhelm thing that stands between them and that -- only thing that stands between them and that care is accessing their records. they cannot right now because this back doing -- backlog, mr. keller's legislation will fix that. i urge my colleagues to support it. i urge everybody that's a veteran or family member supportive of a veteran to write, contact their congressman, their member of congress and urge them to support this legislation. let's see if we can fix the circumstances at the v.a. for these veterans. with that i yield back the balance of my time. mr. keller: i thank my good friend, mr. perry from pennsylvania. who said so very well these people earned these benefits. our veterans earned these benefits. they protected our freedom and way of life. they didn't question was it too dangerous to go do that job. they went and did it. they went and did it. they earned benefits. what we need to do, we need to
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make sure the bureaucrats, running this -- as he said it's not the people that get the work done every day. but it's the managers the national personnel record center that need to make sure they do their job and put together a plan to address the issues. to get our veterans the necessary records in a timely fashion that they need to gain access to the benefits they earned. as i mentioned before, this is an issue that is not a republican or democrat issue. it's an american issue. it's about helping americans. it's about helping americans that have helped humanity around the globe. stood up for freedom. stood on that wall and made sure we were safe. now it's our time to stand up for them and make sure they get the benefits they earned. we all urge the national archives and records administration to immediately take all steps to address this problem and prevent it from ever happening again. with that i close and yield back. thank you very much. the speaker pro tempore:
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pursuant to section 11-b of house resolution 188, the house stands adjourned until 10a.m. tomorrow for morning hour debate and noon for legislative business >> c-span is your unfiltered view of government. funded by these television companies and more, including buckeye broadband. ♪
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buckeye broadband supports c-span as a public service, along with these other television providers, giving you a front row seat to democracy. >> wednesday morning, the attorney general testifies at an oversight hearing the senate judiciary committee. live coverage begins at 10:00 eastern on c-span3, online at c-span.org, or watch full coverage on c-span now, our new video app. >> president biden was in new jersey promoting infrastructure legislation and the build back at her spending agenda. this event was held at a new jersey transit maintenance facility.

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