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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  April 21, 2021 11:59am-4:00pm EDT

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covered for her, she was trying to incite violence and in fact there is violence going on right now because of her actions. this is not the first time she has made inflammatory comments. you will see mccarthy bring a resolution to the floor but i would like to see maxine waters apologize for the comments she has made. it is a powder cake there -- keg there and the worst thing you want to do is make it worse, especially to grounds for an appeal. we saw derek chauvin crossed the line, we should be all >> we'll have to leave at this point as the u.s. house is about to gavel in. c-span's long time commitment to gavel-to-gavel coverage of congress. today the chamber -- issue travel ban prohibits discrimination on religion. also consider legislation requiring customs and border protection to provide legal counsel to certain individuals detained at u.s. borders and
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ports of entry. now live coverage of the u.s. house here on c-span. the speake house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., april 21, 2021. i hereby appoint the honorable debbie dingell to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, nancy pelosi, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by chaplain kibben. chaplain kibben: would you pray with me. be gracious to these lawmakers,
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o god, shower your mercy on them as they continue to take on the challenges of their office. schedules press on them, obligations pursue them all the day long. no one more than you knows the pace they keep, the long days and restless nights, the unrelenting schedule they try to master, the flights home to their districts. in you may they find their respite. keep their feet from falling that they may walk before you in the light you shine on their lives. in you may they place their trust. keep their consciouses clear and their motives pure as you guide their decision. in you may they be assured that their worries and concerns are known. keep them in your care that nothing can snatch them from your hand. to you, then, may they be confident of their deliverance and ensure the stamina they provide. to you may you offer -- they
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offer your prays. in your saving name we pray. amen. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 11-a of house resolution 188, the journal of the last day's proceedings is approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from california, mr. vargas. mr. vargas: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition -- colorado seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the
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house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, it is my honor today to recognize the life of cody lister, son of kevin and leean lister aurora, colorado. cody passed on april 8, 2020, in is colorado's second youngest victim to die from covid-19. he was a criminal justice major following his father's footsteps to become a law enforcement officer and an avid baseball player. as a freshman, cody was named team captain of his school's club -- baseball team, first in school history for colorado mesa. mr. crow: he mepd others through his -- he helped others through his love of the name and could be counted on during times of calm and crisis. cody made his community better and in his honor, $1 million scholarship was established at colorado mesa university and a sportsmanship award dedicated to
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a life well lived. cody was an inspiration to others and i could think of few that can -- and i ask his family draw strength from tragedy and to save as many lives as they can during this pandemic. madam speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i rise to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise today to congratulate the dripping springs tiger women's soccer team for their outstanding win in the u.i.l. class 5-a final. dripping springs finished as the class 5-a champion with a record 26 wins. mr. williams: the team showcased their amazing talent, skills on the field and i'm proud that all of their hard work and dedication throughout the year ultimately paid off. so congratulations, again, to the dripping springs tigers. texas 25th congressional
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district is extraordinarily proud of your achievement and we cannot wait to see what you'll do next. go, tigers. in god we trust. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new york seek recognition? mrs. maloney: to seek recognition for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. mrs. maloney: madam speaker, the muslim ban, enacted under the previous administration, is a stain on our country and our nation's history. and as we work to rebuild a humane and just immigration system, we must start by out-lawing any -- outlawing any type of this state-santhsed re-lidge -- state-sanctioned religious bigotry. we do that today by passing the no ban act. this bill strengthens the immigration and nationality act by discriminating religion -- by
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disyim nating on the bay -- discriminating anyone on the basis of religion and it places checks and balances on the president's authority in this area. discrimination based on religion is not who we are as a nation. today we can take the first step towards a more just, humane immigration am is it, and i encourage all my colleagues -- immigration system, and i encourage my colleagues to vote against hate and voting for the no ban act and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today to honor the life of my friend, mike meyer, of wheeling, who passed away earlier this year. besides being a loving husband and father, mike was an incredibly gifted editor at the
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augden newspaper chain. over the years, mike and i had livelily discussions on politics, the fossil fuel energy and what would make west virginia better. he cared deeply about the livelihoods of men and women in the coal and natural gas fields in the valley. mr. mckinley: he asked why people in congress would intentionally inflict injury on these families. our thoughts and prayers are with his wife, connie, and their two children and two grandchildren, as we all mourn mike's passing. mike, you made a difference. you're already missed. madam chairman, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my
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remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. chu: as chair of the congressional asian pacific american caucus, i rise today to join my colleagues in the tricaucus to ensure equitable access to the covid-19 vaccine for communities of color. while we are all equally susceptible to the coronavirus, we are not all equally impacted by it. communities of color are disproportionately likely to be in frontline jobs with greater exposure to the virus, have less access to quality health care, and as a result, have been experiencing higher infection and mortality rates throughout the pandemic. and with over 150 deaths per 100,000 cases, native hawaiians and pacific islanders have one of the highest mortality rates of all groups from this virus. that is why we will be introducing a resolution to address this. if we rely on communities of color to get us through the pandemic, then we need to ensure
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that they are provided equitable access to the vaccine so they can stay healthy. we must make sure all americans have an equal shot to be vaccinated. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to congratulate my good friend, congressman bobby scott, on receiving the lifetime achievement award from the l. douglas at the virginia commonwealth university on april 15, 2021. the lifetime achievement award recognizes an individual virginian whose career represents the highest values of public service and citizenship and who has made substantial contributions to the good of the commonwealth. mr. wittman: congressman bobby scott is incredibly deserving of
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this award. he's spent more than four decades in public service, serving in the virginia general assembly for 15 years prior to being elected and now serving virginia's third district in the u.s. house of representatives where he's been there since 1992. it's my honor to serve the commonwealth of virginia with a servant leader like bobby scott. we share the same desire to work tirelessly for virginians and to advocate for the needs of the commonwealth. please join me in congratulating bobby scott on receiving the lifetime achievement award and in thanking him for his dedicated service on behalf of all virginians. madam speaker, i yooeb. -- i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i rise today in support of a resolution promoting covid-19 vaccine equity among communities of
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color. communities of color continue to be disproportion ooitly -- disproportionately impacted by the ongoing covid-19 crisis, highlighting health, social, economic inequitying. it calls for the prioritization of areas with high social vulnerability index, s.v.i., for covid-19 vaccination efforts, and working with trusted community partners to have appropriate strategies among their efforts. mr. vargas: the resolution will be introduced this month of april during the national minority health month to promote the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minority communities and underscore the need for these communities to get vaccinated. [speaking spanish] i'm proud to support this resolution, and i thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek
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recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise today in recognition of the 106th anniversary of the armenian genocide. from 1915 to 1923, the ottoman entire engaged in a systemic and organized murder and deportation of an estimated 1.5 million armenians. around the world, leaders have rightly identified these horrific events as genocide. however, despite both the house of representatives and the senate passing resolutions in 2019, recognizing this strategy, no united states president has ever joined in acknowledgment. mr. valadao: this week, we sent a letter to president biden urging him to formally recognize the armenian genocide. many men, women, children immigrated to the united states
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and embraced their new communities and our country. they deserve our recognition. i ask my colleagues to join me in honoring and remembering those whose lives were lost and forever changed by the armenian genocide. madam chair, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise today to commend the president's decision to end the war in afghanistan. now congress must ensure that future commanders in chief can never again wage failed forever wars. this is also a critical moment to show we can defend america and protect the global commons without a $740 billion defense budget. we must repeal the authorization for the use of military force, reassert congressional oversight of war powers and cut the pentagon's budget by at least 10% as we invest in diplomacy, humanitarian assistance, and solving global challenges like
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climate change and pandemic preparedness. mr. auchincloss: lost of 2,700 service members. the generation that fought in this war must now coverage in light of this mistake. let us resolve. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: madam speaker, request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i rise today in recognition of gold star spouses day. earlier this month we honored the spouses who lost a loved one in service and remember their sacrifices. as a son of a navy veteran, proud father of an army soldier, i recognize the challenges our military families face. it's important to remember our freedom is not free. gold star spouses day is the reminder of a cost of war. each year on april 5, it's
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important to take the time to remember, respect, and honor the spouses and their families of our fallen service members. madam speaker, gold star spouses and their families deserve our gratitude today and every day. god bless the brave men and women who put their lives on the line to protect us and god bless their families. thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i rise to recognize the life of major general dan helix. dan grew up in west berkeley, california, and enjoyed a distinguished 41-year career with the united states army and army reserve. on top of his service in the military, he served on the city council for eight years before serving as the director of the
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bay area rapid transit district. after some time away, dan eventually returned to the city council and served two terms as mayor during both of his ten yours. in 1989, dan retired from the u.s. army as a major general. as a korean war veteran, dan earned numerous recommendations, including the naturaly distinguished service medal, the silver star, the legion of merit, the bronze star and purple heart with oak leaf cluster. sadly dan passed away last month at the age of 91. he was a cherished resident of concord who dedicated his life to helping others. he was a mentor to me and many others. please join me in hon yorl major general dan helix for many concontributions to my community and this country. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask
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unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. miss kim: thank you, madam speaker. today i rise to commemorate the 46th anniversary of black april. april 30, 1975 marked the fall of saigon and the end of vietnam war. many vietnamese americans who were alive during the war remember this as the day that signified the loss of a country they once called home. the people left everything they knew to flea commune -- flee communism. hundreds of thousands of vietnamese people have resettled in the united states and built vibrant communities here. congress' 48th district is the proud home of little saigon which is home to more vietnamese americans than anywhere else in the united states. on black april i join the vietnamese americans in our community and around the country
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in honoring those who served in vietnam and those who lost their lives attempting to flee communist rule. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. as necessary. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, as a proud member of the congressional hispanic caucus, i rise in strong support of the try caucus resolution promoting covid-19 vaccine equity among communities of color. mr. garcia: i represent the large immigrant population that has been especially hard hit by this crisis. and now it's the same communities who are still struggling to get the vaccine. yes, vaccine hess tency remains an -- hesitancy remains an issue but the reality is access is an even bigger problem. if we are serious about fighting
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covid-19, we need to meet people where they are and bring vaccines to those who need it most. and we can't do this without engaging with trusted community leaders. i want to take this opportunity to acknowledge some of these leaders in chicago. illinois, a coalition of health professionals and community leaders is one of a kind and stands as a national model from testing to the vaccine rollout, the housing and food assistance, ill now has stood shoulder to shoulder with the latino community in chicago. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. there is no denying that we need to support and all of the above solution for energy policy to secure our energy independent.
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the green new deal introduced yet again rekently seeks to fundamentally change our way of life, cripple american businesses, and explode our national debt. $93 trillion, with a t. let me say it again, $93 trillion. that's how much their proposal will cost over the next 10 years. let's put that into perspective. $93 trillion is more money than the federal government has spent for the entire period from 1979 until the present. madam speaker, that is absurd. worse yet, how do the democrats propose that we pay for it? by raising the taxes, of course, up to 70%. this is outrageous. it crushes jobs, costs an average american household nearly $700,000 through 2029. provides paychecks for people unwilling to work. abolishes airplanes, and fossil fuels. and require rebuilding or retrofitting every building in america. madam speaker, this is -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. it for what purpose does the
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gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise today to encourage co-sponsorship of the congressional hispanic caucus-led tricaucus covid-19 vaccination equity resolution. hispanic, black, asian american, native hawaiian, pacific islander, and native american communities continue to bear the brunt of the covid-19 pandemic. not only are communities of color suffering disproportionately from covid-19 complications, but they are receiving vaccines at a lower rate than their white counterparts. these inequities are not new. they highlight long-standing health, economic, and social disparities. as chair of the congressional hispanic caucus, i have worked with my tricaucus colleagues to introduce this resolution, promoting equity and covid-19
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vaccinations. the resolution calls for solutions like prioritizing vaccines to communities with the highest rates of infections and deaths. working with trusted community partners, and implementing culturally linguistically appropriate strategies. during national minority health month, we must promote vaccine equity to the benefit of all americans. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, today i rise for the concerns over the president's $2 million infrastructure plan. one concern is the steep price tag, but my bigger concern is what the administration is trying to classify as infrastructure. we are at the point of changing
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the definition of what that is. i mean we are throwing everything in except the kitchen sink and the kitchen table and calling it infrastructure. and i think that's irrational and i think that's irresponsible. how can you tell and how can you call this infrastructure bill when less than 6% goes to roads and bridges, 5% goes to broadband infrastructure, and less than 2% goes to the waterways, locks, dams, ports, and airports. less than 2% of our waterways and ports is unacceptable. this type of infrastructure is critical for our hoosiers in transporting our manufacturer and agricultural exports to the global market. if we are going to ask the american taxpayers to take and make these critical and substantial investments, it is our duty to make sure our dollars are spent wisely and efficiently on true infrastructure. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask
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unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized -- the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today to call for a green new deal for america. as one of the youngest members of this body, i'm proud to represent a generation that is taking on climate change with the urgency it deserves. the green new deal is a call to action and blueprint for positive change. it's about choosing justice and progress over scarcity and inequality. it's about choosing to have a plan instead of waiting for a miracle. zagians are all too familiar with how devastating unchecked climate change has been for our community. and those who can least afford it have paid the highest price this. plan is to mobilize and rebuild our economy around clean energy and empower workers and good jobs. madam speaker, my generation knows we can't take small steps to solve big problems. we have to think differently and
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reimagine a better future. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? >> i like your color coated sunglasses there, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? >> i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to pay tribute to my good friend, gerald clark a. true american hero from my district who passedway on april 19. he dedicated his life to helping his fellow veterans and their families and patriotically served his country during world war ii. gerald viewed his time as the u.s. army as at adventure. he fought at the battle of the bulk and lost his leg defending our country. he was awarded a purple heart for his service and sacrifice. he was honorably discharged
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after being hospitalized over a year. then he returned to tennessee, married his wife, raised five children, and continued to serve his community. for decades gerald held membership in the american legion, amvets, disabled american veterans, military order of the purple heart, and veterans of foreign wars. and believe strength is the voice of each organization. he was also a leading advocate of opening a tennessee state veterans home in knox county. thanks to his efforts the home opened in 2006 and my father passed away in that veterans home. i hold it very close to my heart, madam speaker. it is my honor to salute gerald clark one final time here on the house floor. he will be greatly missed. thank you, madam speaker. i yield the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute.
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ms. scanlon: i rise today to recognize the incredible staff of the delaware county covid-19 task force, led by rosemarie holt, for their amazing work along with the thousands of volunteers from the medical reserve corps and citizen corps who have created and implemented new systems to test, feed, and vaccinate tens of thousands of people in our community. these folks have been working day and night to help guide the precedents of delaware county through the challenges of a once in a century pandemic. in an ever changing landscape, they distributed supplies, coordinated communication, and are now helping to ensure that everyone gets vaccinated. i'm proud to honor them today during national volunteer week to celebrate those working behind the scenes to get us back to normal. rosemarie, her staff, and the delco volunteers have been critical to the response and reliefers in our district. for over a year it's been all hands on deck, and we cannot thank them enough for their service. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back.
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for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from iowa seek recognition? >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to recognize a young man in iowa's second congressional district with an incredibly bright future. on june 28, high school senior tony schmidt will enroll as a cadet at the united states military academy in west point new york. everyone knows how tough it is to get into west point with its tall acceptance rate, but getting in is only the beginning. as a 24-year veteran of the army myself, can i speak firsthand of the challenging, fulfilling, and exciting journey tony's about to combin. as the school year starts to wind down, i also want to remind all rising seniors in the second district to reach out to my office if you have an interest to applying to any aor tending one of our four amazing service academies. congratulations to ten tony and
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always remember, go army, beat navy. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from south carolina seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. and rend my remarks. >> without objection, the the gentlewoman from second for one minute. >> thank you madam speaker. ms. mace: i wish a very happy birthday to a south carolina hero, community leader, and someone who just yesterday turned 104 years young. lieutenant colonel retired sam mulr afmente in. he has done so much in his life and i'm proud to recognize him today and am grateful for all of his accomplishments. his legacy is inspirational to our nation and the low country and we owe him so much for his contributions both in military service and in his humanitarian efforts.
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he was part of the greatest generation storming the beaches the normandy where he was wounded and received the purple heart. he played baseball's hall of famererry suito and in and around hilty head the community knows him for his dedication to public service. today we want to wish him a very happy birthday, sam, from congress. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. newman: thank you. i proudly signed a discharge petition in order to vote on the born-alive abortion survivors protection act. mrs. miller: along with my republican colleagues, we're standing up for the voiceless to
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end this ongoing tragedy once and for all. we must end infantcide. 77% of americans support protections for babies born alive after a failed abortion. but speaker pelosi refuses to bring up the born-alive abortion survivors protection act for a vote. this legislation is long overdue. it's time for speaker pelosi and the radical democrats lack of regard for human life and pass the born-alive abortion survivors protection act. my heartaches in all instances when the dignity of human life is violated. as a christian, i believe that the image of god in each one of us gives us the intrinzic work -- intrinsic worth that cannot be assaulted. this bill requires an abortionist to help an infant who survived a botched abortion rather than let them die slowly.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. mrs. miller: thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, madam, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate at 11:51 a.m. appointments. united states-china economic and security review commission. united states senate on narcotics control. signed sincerely, cheryl l. johnson, clerk. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler, seek recognition? mr. nadler: madam speaker, pursuant to house resolution 330, i call up h.r. 1333, the no ban act, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title bill. the clerk: union calendar number 7, h.r. 1333, a bill to transfer
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and limit executive branch authority to suspend or restrict the entry of a class of aliens. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 330, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on the judiciary, printed in the bill, is adopted, and the bill, as amended, is considered as read. the bill, as amended, shall be debatable for one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on the judiciary or their respective designees. the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler, and the gentleman from ohio, mr. jordan, each will control 30 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and
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extend their remarks and insert extraneous material on h.r. 1333. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i yield myself three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, h.r. 1333, the national origin base anti-discrimination for nonimmigrants act, or the no ban act, is an important step of reining in executive overreach and preserving the power of congress to establish our immigration laws. the i.n.a. authorizes the president to suspend the entry of noncitizens when the president finds their entry would be detrimental to u.s. interests. from 1952, when this provision was enacted, until january, 2017, presidents of both parties invoked section 212-f to exclude only narrow groups of individuals, such as human rights violators, north korean officials, individuals seeking to overthrow governments.
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the reasons that would clearly serve the national interest. but former president trump abused this authority. twisting it -- twisting it in ways that was never intended. he banned muslims from the united states, an immoral and disastrous policy that traumatized children and families and made us no safer while weakening our standing in the world. the former president then used this section to rewrite immigration laws with which he disagreed. for example, the i.n.a. expressly provides asylum eligibility to any individual who arrives in the united states whether or not at a designated port of arrival. however, president trump invoked section 212-f to deny asylum to those who crossed the southern borders between ports of entry, in direct conflict with the statute. fortunately, the judiciary agreed this was unlawful and stopped the policy from taking in effect. h.r. 1333 will prevent such
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executive overreach by amending section 212-f to ensure it's used in a manner consistent with its intended purpose and historical norms. although president biden has repeated -- has repealed the egregious orders of the trump era, including the muslim ban, we must pass the no ban act to ensure this authority is never abused again. in advancing this legislation today, we uphold our nation's finding ideals and we reaffirm our commitment to the rule of law. this should not be a partisan issue. members on both sides of the aisle should agree that no president, republican or democratic, should be permitted to usurp the powers of the legislative branch enshrined in the constitution. the separation of powers is fundamental to our democratic republic, and it must be protected. i'd like to thank my friend and colleague, representative judy chu, for her leadership and her steadfast commitment to this issue. her efforts led to the introduction of the no ban act.
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i urge all my colleagues to support this important legislation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: i yield to the ranking member of the immigration subcommittee. mr. mcclintock. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mcclintock: this bill presents a simple question -- should we all but strip the president his authority to restrict travel from countries that pose a danger to the united states? ronald reagan and george bush used this authority to protect our country. so, too, did barack obama, and even joe biden, as recently as january 25. president trump invoked this authority against countries that were hotbeds of international terrorism and were not cooperating with the united states in providing basic information about travelers coming from these countries. now, the left calls it a muslim
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ban. what nonsense. the president's orders affected only a tiny majority of muslim countries and a sizeable number of non-muslim countries. the supreme court cited this obvious truth when it fully upheld the president's actions. in fact, when a rogue government changed its policy and cooperated with us, the restrictions were lifted. without this authority, the president would have been powerless to take simple, prudent precautions against terrorists and criminals from entering the united states. the president's ability to protect against threats, negotiate security protocols, and when necessary, to retaliate against discriminatory actions by other actions depends on his having this power at his immediate disposal. this bill instead forbids the president from taking action until he can show it's the weakest possible measure at his disposable. it -- disposal. it requires him to get his own
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secretary of state's permission, which is an absurdity and gives anyone who claims any hard the standing block in federal court. so i ask -- in this world that's becoming increasingly threatening and unstable, does this bill make us more safe or less safe? the answer should be self-evident to anyone who's not completely besojenned with the -- besogened with the woken radical left. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i yield three minutes to the author of this legislation, representative chu of california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for three minutes. ms. chu: i rise today in strong support of my legislation, the no ban act. the muslim ban was always wrong, needless, and cruel, and today, we can make sure it never happens again.
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first, this policy was wrong. america does not ban people because of their religion, and the supreme court acknowledged this when they upheld the third generation of trump's muslim ban. the court insisted in order to prove this wasn't just a religious ban, the trump administration would have to issue waivers to allow those we know are not a threat to travel here. but that waiver process was a sham, with almost all requests ignored, proving the purpose of the ban was to keep muslims out of the country. just as donald trump always said it was. second, the policy was needless. as the supreme court's waiver requirement recognized, america has the strongest and best vetting system in the world. many of those stopped by the muslim ban have been vetted by u.s. officials many times over through many years. and i have met with many of them myself. these are people who are trying to escape dangerous situations or who simply wanted a chance at a better life, and they turn to
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the u.s., as countless of others have done over the generations. but instead of opportunity, they were met with bigotry, sometimes just days before they were supposed to arrive here. which is why, thirdly, this ban is about cruelty. afraid to leave america out of fear they wouldn't be able to return or unable to visit here at all, families were intentionally isolated from each other, missing weddings, funerals, births, and graduations. this past year has shown us what the impact of missing such milestones feels like. and to do it deliberately is inexcusable. thousands of families were separated by this policy simply because of a lie that muslims are dangerous, a lie that encouraged bigotry and xenophobia, even as hate crimes are on the rise. fortunately, president biden understood the harm of this policy and rescinded the muslim ban on the first day in office.
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but we must make sure no president is ever able to ban people from coming to the u.s. simply because of their religion, which is why i am so pleased we are voting to pass the no ban act today. while preserving a president's ability to respond to national emergencies like pandemics, this bill amends the immigration and national act to require that any future travel ban is based on credible facts and actual threats. the bill also requires the president to work in consultation with the department of state and homeland security to provide evidence of why a ban is needed in the first place. i am so grateful to chairman nadler as well as my house and senate co-sponsors for their support, and i urge my colleagues to vote yes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i would yield 2 1/2 minutes to
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the gentleman from arizona, mr. biggs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arizona is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. biggs: i thank the gentleman for yielding time to me. you know, this bill, the president may only act if the secretary of state allows him to act. and that is backwards. the secretary of state should not be authorized in statute to tell the president -- the secretary of state's boss -- that the president may act. it's antithe thfshgs ica -- ant theycal. h.r. 1333 gives authority to initiate suspension of entry, not to the president, but to the secretary of state, in consultation with the secretary of homeland security. but it is the president in whom all executive power vests who determines should sfrend entry and not just in consultation -- suspend entry and not just in consultation with the department of state and homeland security.
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there is a crisis on the border made by this president. he actually slipped to say it was crisis. he later said he didn't mean it was a crisis. well, here's the deal. you're housing illegal aliens in hotels. that's the kind of crisis this has become. and the situation is so bad that biden's administration has expanded and reopened facilities to illegal aliens. he has created an inhumane border crisis. if he wants to solve the crisis, he needs to finish construction of the wall, reinstate the migrant protection protocols, reinstate the asylum cooperative agreements and remove the other incentives to am colike $1 -- to come like the $1,400 covid package that was recently passed. he could bring it under control. the best way is to move immigration judges to the southern border to deal with asylum cases that are occurring
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today. not the backlog. those people are already in here. deal with those cases today. this bill, getting back to this bill, is representative of an executive branch that's willing to give over and cede presidential authority to cabinet members instead of the president himself. this bill should not be passed. it should not even be considered. i'll yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i yield 2 1/2 minutes to the distinguished gentleman from rhode island, mr. cicilline. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from rhode island is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. cicilline: madam speaker, i rise in strong support of h.r. 1333, the no ban act. this legislation would prevent future abuses of power committed by the previous administration to its xenophobic muslim ban, a despicable policy which undermined one of our nation's founding principle, freedom of religion.
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my home state of rhode island was established by roger williams, on the principal of religious liberty and separation of church and state. his leadership inspired the framers of our constitution to incorporate these principles into our founding documents. this legislation will help to preserve that principle. from the very beginning, former president trump was clear about exactly what his policy was. an explicit attempt to keep out as many people from muslim majority countries as possible. regardless of whether they were seeking refuge or asylum. it was never designed to make us safer. it was simply a way to spark fear and hatred among our citizens. on his first day in office, thankfully, president biden rescinded this policy. yet the impact of the muslim ban remains. after four years of having this policy in place, the time it takes to reimplement normal regulations and travel policies brings delays in otherwise routine procedures thus delaying the reunion of families. thankfully with the muslim ban
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rescinded, those families can take comfort they are a step closer to being with their loved ones. despite this, it remains necessary to pass the no ban act. without making the necessary reforms to prevent the abuses of power over the previous administration, they could simply be put back in place by a future president. the no ban act makes it clear we stand by the american ideal of freedom of religion. it will provide the necessary limitations on the president's ability to use overly broad terms to inappropriately and incrime senately target and labor ethnic entire groups of racial, ethnic religious minorities because of who they choose to worship. we must not tolerate discriminatory actions that undermine our core values. and threaten our nation's health and safety. i urge my colleagues to support passage of the no ban act. i thank the chairman of the committee for his leadership, and thank congresswoman judy chu for her extraordinary leadership. i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield one minute to the distinguished republican leader, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro tempore: the distinguished leader is recognized -- republican leader investigate for one minute. mr. mccarthy: thank you, madam speaker. at the heart of democrats' border security policy is the assumption that america can assume an unlimited number of illegal immigrants without considering its impacts on jobs, communities, security, and today's world, health. this assumption defies all historical evidence. more importantly, it defies the evidence right before our very eyes. madam speaker, in the last month alone border patrol apprehended the largest surge of migrants in 20 years. 172,000 individuals in one single month. by september we are on track to
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encounter two million illegal immigrants. now, that is about twice the size of the population of delaware. president biden's home state. the surge was directly caused by the actions of the biden administration. on day one president biden issued five executive orders that reversed the commonsense immigration policies that were working. then his administration sent mixed signals to migrants that now is not the time to come. but promising not to deport children and many families. and now on monday's order, it just demonstrates the white house is more concerned about policing border patrol's language than it is protecting our border. now, i'm very glad that president biden finally admitted that there is a crisis at the border. but what we really need is for
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him to admit that his policies and rhetoric caused the crisis to begin with. the results of this crisis are as predictable as they are disastrous. for both migrants and american citizens. just this past weekend, the biden administration was forced to shut down a houston migrant center for children because of unbearable conditions. hundreds of unaccompanied minors had to be shuttled somewhere else. i know everybody in this body understands that that is heartbreaking. it is a public health risk. that's because the biden administration is releasing migrants into american cities without negative covid tests. without court dates. and without a way to track where they will go. already that number is up to 15,000. madam speaker, that doesn't come from me. i saw it on the news today from a democratic colleague who put
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this number out and said it was disastrous. but the border crisis isn't just a humanitarian and public health crisis. it is also a national security crisis. last month i shared some alarming news. when i was down on the border, i was speaking to the border patrol agents and they informed me that individuals on the terrorist watch list were caught trying to enter our country. madam speaker, i know how much you care about protecting this country from terrorism. i thought everybody on your side of the aisle would care just as much. unfortunately, congressman gallego accused me of lying. congresswoman escobar said i was trying to fuel divisions, madam speaker. but the customs and border patrol agency confirmed that four suspected terrorists had been caught, and since then more
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suspected terrorists have been caught at different times and different places from yemen, but not on the same day. two different individuals. now, i'm sure maybe because of the challenges with covid and the distance we must keep that i have not received the apology being accused of a liar on a national security issue, but i assume that will come shortly. the security problem also includes a flow of drugs. when i was on that same border, el paso, talking to some of those same agents, they told me they have never seen the amount of fentanyl that has come across the border in the last month. americans are dying because of cartels are exploiting the biden border crisis to make a profit. fentanyl overdoses are surging across the country. now, in my home state, madam speaker, in the speaker's hometown of san francisco saw more fentanyl related deaths
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last year than covid related deaths, according to the "wall street journal." madam speaker, it's hard to imagine anything more shortsighted than doubling down on biden's failed border policies. but incredibly i said on this floor, the house democrats want to respond to this humanitarian public health and national security crisis by passing a recycled legislation from the last congress. i know, madam speaker, the speaker doesn't want us to work in committees and wants to do it from afar, but i still think we can have new ideas to a bigger problem created by a new administration. they want to strip future presidents of their authority to keep americans safe. that's what the no ban act does. they also want to grant foreign nationals access to lawyers. the foreign nationals have never been entitled to this privilege before. and it will cost taxpayers $825
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million over the next five years. that may not sound much if you just want to throw trillions out there. but that's hardworking taxpayers' money. it is a lot of money. but our democrats working to repair the crisis and the radical policies caused? no. are they working to stop the mass flow of illegal migration? no. are they working to secure our borders? no. the vice president harris has refused to visit the border for 28 days. by contrast, more than a third of the house republicans have been to the border and seen the crisis for themselves. there's even been some bipartisan trips, madam speaker, and i was very excited to hear that in the bipartisan trip it questions were asked. my understanding was the very first question one of our democrat colleagues asked, is it
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really true we are catching terrorists? the shock upon their face when the border agent says yes, from the terror watch list we have caught them. what's really kerk to me, if you read the -- what's really concerning to me, if you read "the washington post," the thousands of people come across a day who are not caught. how many terrorists are in that group? how much fentanyl are those people carrying? we have learned to lead directly to action to be taken here in congress. two weeks ago dr. miller-meeks introduced a bill to require a negative covid-19 test before any illegal immigrant is released from custody. madam speaker, i was shocked that your side of the aisle blocked it. last week, rep carter and peter meijer offered a motion to combat the trafficking of fentanyl which are 100 times deadlier than the regular
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fentanyl. democrats blocked even though 137 of them voted for the same motion last year. could you imagine that, madam speaker? 137 on your aisle voted just last year for that amendment. i guess things have changed. madam speaker, congress needs to do the right thing here. we should not be wasting its time on recycled legislation that weakens our national security. we simply need to return to commonsense border security policies that work. we need to finish the wall and deploy technology to the border. we need to fully reinstate the remain in mexico policy and maintain the robustly implemented title 42 authority. we need to require a negative covid test before releasing migrants. i think that would be common sense. most americans have to have that. we need to send a clear message, do not come to the united states illegally.
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madam speaker, if we want to fix the crisis, we need to fix its root cause. but that root cause isn't only in guatemala, el salvador, or honduras. it's right here in washington, d.c. you see, madam speaker, before the crisis hit there wasn't legislation that was passed. it was just on day one with executive orders. so all they have to do is do the exact same thing they did. take the pen and bring them back. let's bring common sense back to solutions. madam speaker, why don't we bring new ideas to committees? why don't we have members show up for work? and why don't we have committees actually work instead of just picking old ideas when they create add new problem that will only expand it further? with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york is
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recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlelady from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized for two minutes. ms. jackson lee: i thank the chairman for his leadership. i thank congresswoman judy chu for her leadership. madam speaker, i rise with great enthusiasm for the national origin based anti-discrimination for nonimmigrants act, that is the no ban act. i proclaim a breath of fresh air. that was the election of 2020 and the inauguration of it president joe biden and kamala harris, who made it very clear what our position is as relates to those who come to this country. first of all, they did not turn a blind eye to the statue of liberty which acknowledges the fact we are refuge for those who are fleeing persecution. they also understood that we are not a country that discriminates against individuals simply because of their religion. that is what the no ban act
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represented. it had nothing to do with terrorism. i wonder why president trump never said anything about domestic terrorists. why didn't they have a structure to ban them? the very terrorists that jumped this capitol on january of. i'm -- january 6. i'm reminded of a little 15-year-old on the day the ban was issued when i was flying from washington i went straight over to the international terminal because my staff had called me and others had called me. this little boy, innocent with legal documents, tourist visa, coming to visit his family, innocently indicated who he was. of course by law those c.b.p. officers had to detain him. you know what was worse? he was not able to see anyone at that time. but more importantly he wound up in chicago. so i rise to support the no ban act. and i indicate that there is a policy, the border is closed. the vice president will be working on a broader plan for
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dealing with the border. and the shelter in houston was a temporary shelter. it was an emergency shelter. it was rightly closed when other beds were found. 130 of those children were reunited with their families. . mr. nadler: i grant an additional 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for 15 seconds. ms. jackson lee: i'm delighted -- thank you, mr. chairman. i'm delighted this bill includes an important provision of mine offered last year during the committee markup which requires the administration to report to congress on the impacts, positive, negative, unintended of any action by the president, pursuant to executive orders. we know, we know that banning nigeria was the wrong thing to do. i support the no ban act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam
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speaker. i yield two minutes to the gentleman from mr., mr. steube -- from florida, mr. steube. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized for two minutes. mr. steube: this is a dangerous piece of legislation that comes at a time when our national security and our public health are being threatened by a dire crisis at our southern border. only democrats would bring a bill to the floor during a surge at our sore border that would -- southern border that would make it easier for a terrorist to come in the country. as a person who served on operational iraqi freedom, we should not make it easier for terrorist-harboring nations to travel to the united states. with record setting number of illegal crossings and unaccompanied minors, my colleagues on the left continue to downplay the actual facts while terrorists and covid-positive illegal immigrants are granted unprecedented access to our country. the biden administration has driven illegal crossings to
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historic high to loosening restrictions to criminals to give them a free pass. this legislation will be directly responsible for what will go down in history as our biggest failure of border security in our lifetime. now, rather than addressing the hundreds of thousands of illegal boring crossings this year -- border crossings this year, my colleagues on the other side are trying to attack the successful policies from the trump administration that actually drove our border numbers down and kept americans safe. rather than attacking the trump administration, at the expense of the american people, my colleagues on the left should instead think about spending their time trying to reinstate some of his policies that were proven effective, like continuing border wall construction, or ending chain migration. even more hypocritical, while telling american citizens to stay home from work, school, and to refrain from normal life due to a global pandemic, legislation like this keeps sending the message to illegal aliens, even those from dangerous countries, that united states is open for them to flood our borders and be taken care of
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by our taxpayers. at a time when there is a border crisis, a global pandemic, and emerging national security threat, we should not be handicapping any current or future president from exercising their executive authority to keep our country safe. in fact, the obama-biden administration used this authority 19 times during their administration. the only reason why my colleagues are pushing this is because of their hatred for president trump and his actions to restrict entry from certain countries that protected our national security. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. steube: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield three minutes to the distinguished chairperson of the immigration subcommittee, ms. lofgren of california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for three minutes. ms. lofgren: this is an important step towards the enactment on the no ban act, which would prevent overreach in a president's authority to suspend the entry of noncitizens
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into the united states under section 212-f of the immigration and nationality act. as candidate for president, donald trump suggested without any evidence that it would somehow make our country safer banning muslims. immediately after his election, swearing in, he tried to deliver on that promise by using section 212-f, claiming the aed mission of individuals from -- admission of individuals from seven muslim-majority countries would be detrimental to the u.s. in court, the trump administration claimed the ban was necessary to keep our country safe from terrorists. and yet, a bipartisan coalition of former national security officials strongly re-butte those -- rebuke those claims. in addition to this ban, trump administration relined on section 212-f to set clear statutory requirements related to asigh limb.
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-- asylum. section 208 allows individuals to apply for asylum whether or not they arrive at a designated point of arrival. the law could not be clear, but apparently unhappy with it, he invoked section 212-f to deny asylum to those who cross the border between ports of entry rather than seeking to amend the law by working with congress. this was an attempt to rewrite our nation's immigration laws in direct violation of the constitutional separation of powers. the power to write the law is ours. not president's. fortunately, this ban has now been reversed by president biden. but this bill is still important. it's important to take action to prevent any future president from trying to usurp the legislative power of the congress. i want to thank representative chu for her persistence in
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pursuing this bill. i think it's important to note that the president, if this bill passes, retains ample authority to act in the national interest of the united states to protect our security. the bill allows the president to suspend the entry of individuals or class of individuals if he determines that they would undermine the security of the united states. to be clear, under the current bill, if the president determines is a national security issue related to a particular country that is so significant that it can only be addressed by suspending the admission of all nationals of that country, the president could still do so. it's important that we also address the issue of children at the border. this bill isn't about children at the border. we -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. lofgren: will the gentleman
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yield an additional 15 seconds? mr. nadler: i yield an additional 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. lofgren: we must make sure that the law is adhered to by the president. we must deal with the issue of unaccompanied children at the border and deal with the crisis in central america that is causing it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. bishop. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized. mr. bishop: thank you, madam speaker. 172,331 border patrol apprehensions in march. a 233% increase in fentanyl seized. the worst crisis in 15 years. but more than that, no peak in
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sight. president biden and the democratic majority bury their heads in the sand. they have put the united states government, charged with enforcing the border, in the service of mexican drug cartels and their criminal enterprises. i've been there. i've heard from the c.b.p. and democrats choose this moment to advance this bill to hobble the authority of the president of the united states to protect the nation by excluding foreign nationals. he or she might identify as posing a danger. think north korea. in fact, they strip the president and transfer to the secretaries of state and homeland security the president's long standing authority to protect the nation in this way. and in case you would have
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concluded otherwise by the rhetoric, this is not limited to a religious criteria for entry. i offered an amendment in the judiciary committee to defer the effectiveness of this unwise legislation to understate until the current crisis can be brought under control by restoring the trump administration's successful remain in mexico policy. but democrats rejected that and refuse to consider it on the floor. customs and border protection advised us the week before last they told the administration revoking remain in mexico could cause a disaster, but they did it anyway. and here they doubled down. just the latest i have had that today -- just the latest evidence that today's crisis, there is no intention to control it. yeah, there's a plan, but the plan is to build out the
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capacity for bringing people illegally into the united states. a crisis. they serve the people of the united states of america. you can't have a country if you don't have ard boer, and i yield back -- if you don't have a border. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i now yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from new york, mr. jeffries. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. mr. jeffries: i thank the distinguished chair for his leadership. the foundational motto of this country is e pluribus unum, out of many one. it doesn't say out of many europeans one. it doesn't say out of many anglo-saxons one. it doesn't say out of many christians one. it certainly doesn't say out of many nations except muslims one. e pluribus unum, out of many one.
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that's what makes america a great country. and no matter what xenophobic behavior that's coming out of the halls of this congress, we will not let anyone take that away from us. not now. not ever. vote for the no ban act so we continue our country's long, necessary, and majestic march toward a more perfect union. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield 3 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from kentucky, mr. massie. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky is recognized for 3 1/2 minutes. mr. massie: thank you. wow, the rhetoric is hot today. bigotry, xenophobia, discrimination. that's what's coming from the left side of the aisle. they say that biden rescinded the trump's muslim ban. that they -- he's rescinded the muslim ban.
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i want to ask them -- which muslim ban are they talking about? which one are they talking about? are they talking about the one they voted for? by the way, i think it's inappropriate to call it a muslim ban. but let's use their language. are they talking about the bill that 165 of them voted for, including the chairman of this committee, the author of this bill, the chairwoman of the subcommittee, are they talking about the bill that they all voted for in 2015 that obama signed into law called the visa waiver program improvement and terrorist travel prevention act of 2015? i don't think trump was president in 2015. obama signed this bill. what did it do? it named four countries, four countries, not seven. we'll get to seven later. it named four countries to ban. what were those four countries? by the way, the aclu was not happy about this when obama did
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it and the democrats on the other side of the aisle -- iraq, syria, iran, and sudan. and now the democrats are complaining that the president has too much power to protect this country, and they want to take some of it back, but they gave obama the power to add three more countries. what were the three he added? libya, somalia, and yemen, in 2016. interesting. so where does that bring us to? it gets us to seven. seven countries. did these overlap or maybe five of the same countries? the seven exact same countries that democrats voted for that everybody over on the other side of the aisle who are hurling claims of xenophobia voted for it, the same seven countries, are now in and on the website at the state department that joe biden runs. now, what does this do? again, i want to be clear, it's not a total ban. by the way, trump's wasn't either. it was a temporary suspension.
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but what they have done and what joe biden perpetuates on these same seven countries -- this is not a muslim ban. but he's doing it to the same seven countries. perpetuating the terrorist travel prevention act of 2015, he's saying you can't get a visa waiver if you're from one of those seven countries. now, which is worse? i mean, you could say, ok, it's not racist to just make it harder to travel if we do it for five years or do it forever. that's not racist or xenophobic. but if you do it for six months, like trump proposed, 180 days, well, now that's racist right there. it's so ridiculous. i can't even believe they have the audacity to pretend they didn't vote in 2015 to add these seven countries. look, let's just get back to protecting this country. let's don't use these -- these bills and these provisions to say that one side is racist or one side is xenophobic or you're
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a bunch of bigots. the president was not xenophobic when you put these seven on his list because they were the seven that the democrats on the other side of the aisle chose, they're the seven that obama chose, and with that i say, let's protect this country and get back to working together and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlelady from washington, ms. jayapal. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from washington is recognized for two minutes. . ms. jayapal: let's get back to protecting american, that's what we want to do. anijita is an asylee from iran. the last time she spoke to her father he told her when she returned home he would sit with her on the terrace and talk politics. that never happened. due to trump's muslim man, she
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could not get travel documents to see her dad before he died or mourn with her family. for four years families remained separated. that's not the america we want to protect. american businesses and universities couldn't recruit top candidates. and our nation's doors were closed to people seeking refuge. president biden rescinded the bans, but we must pass the no ban act to prevent any future president from issuing discriminatory bans. that day i was in my first year in congress, i rush to the airport along with my chairman and many other members in congress and we worked with attorneys to file the national suits that called for an emergency petition that blocked the president's order from taking effect. and we were also able in seattle to go on to the tarmac, madam speaker, and stop a plane from
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taking off with an emergency habeas from a judge there that allowed us to get two people back in that should have been here in the first place. just imagine the hearts and the souls of people whose lives were thrown into chaos thinking that they were going to come and land in the united states with valid travel documents and then they were turned away by a president who issued a muslim ban. the reason we need this bill is to make sure that that can never happen again. yes, we want to protect america's values. and we believe that the way to do that is to pass the no ban act. thank you, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. roy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for three minutes. mr. roy: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the gentleman from ohio. i would note that for all of our friends and fellow citizens who are watching home on c-span, are you seeing something go across
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your screen that says, prohibiting religious-based travel restrictions. the c-span i would say be better. don't take the talking points from my democrat colleagues about what we are actually debating here on the floor of the house. because it's not that. what we are talking about is a power grab by democrats who for some reason want to continue to perpetuate the lie there was ever a muslim ban. it is literally not true. it is absolutely not true. and no matter how many times they say it, it doesn't make it more true. for example, the gentlelady referred to litigation. let's look at what the united states supreme court said precisely about what president trump did to try to secure the united states from terrorists. remember what we are talking about. the president of the united states, president trump, workeding to secure the united states from terrorists. the court said the proclamation
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is expressly premised on legitimate purposes, preventing entry of nationals who cannot be adequately vetted and inducing other nations to improve their practices. the text says nothing about religion. plain none the less emphasize five the seven nations currently included in have muslim majority population. yet that fact alone does not support an inference of religious hostility given the policy covers just 8% of the world's muslim population and limited to countries previously designated by congress or prior administrations as posing national security risks as my friend from kentucky just laid out. these are the facts. do not listen to democrat talking points being thrown on the screen on your c-span. do not listen to repetitions and lies about muslim bans when it is not true. the facts are completely opposite of that.
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and let's also add one more point. as we talk about this, our borders are wide open. as we talk about this foreign nationals come in between ports of entry because border patrol's distracted, processing immigrants who come here because democrat policies entice them to be abused by cartels, cartels have operational control of our border. and while they exist in the district that i represent where children are in cars being driven by american citizen employees of the cartels being taken to stash houses to be put into the sex trade. we sit here and listen to this? this is what we are focusing on? taking away the constitutional authority of the president to protect us from terrorists? terrorists are able to come into our southern border between points of entry because my democrat colleagues and this administration flat out refuse to do their jobs to secure the border of the united states. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired.
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members are reminded to direct remarks to the chair and to -- not to a perceived viewing audience. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: how much time is left? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york has 13 minutes. the gentleman from ohio has 14 minutes. mr. nadler: thank you, madam speaker. i now yield one minute to the gentleman from california, mr. correa. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for one minute. mr. correa: thank you, madam speaker. when the president first announced his muslim ban, i immediately went to l.a.x. i went because constituents were telling me that they couldn't get their relatives into the u.s. individuals that were traveling to the u.s. that had been approved by the u.s. state department could not enter the u.s. i saw people who thought they were here for a regular routine visit approved by the u.s. government denied.
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denied on a whim. this bill is simply about making sure that no future president, obama or trump, no future president will ever be able to deny entry into the u.s. based on religion or race. that's what the bill is. it's not about any specific president. it's about doing the right thing. in america. with that i yield. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield two minutes to the gentleman from tennessee, mr. burchett. the speaker pro tempore: gentleman from tennessee is recognized for two minutes. mr. burchett: thank you, ranking member jordan, for yielding. right now we have an immigration disaster at the southern border, madam speaker. i have biden administration's own creation. instead of putting a stop to this madness, my colleagues across the aisle are encouraging this open borders agenda by bringing the no ban act to the floor today. the no ban act limits the president's ability to make executive decision abouts who
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should be allowed to enter our country. this would dangerously weaken the president's executive authority on important issues related to national security. to put this reckless idea into perspective, customs and border patrol agents recently caught two yemeni terrorists at the southern border. thank god law enforcement caught these terrorists, but this is why executive authority on immigration issues needs to remain in place, madam speaker. a responsible president would notice what is going on at the southern border and use his authority to step in for the sake of national security. it is naive to believe there aren't bad actors who want to hurt americans actively trying to exploit this ongoing crisis. president biden needs to use his executive authority to stolve the immigration and national security -- to solve the ilgrakes and national security crisis his administration has created. if he's not physically or mentally capable of doing this, he should step down. thank you. i yield the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield one minute to the
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distinguished speaker of the house. the speaker pro tempore: the speaker of the house is recognized. the speaker: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the distinguished chairman for yielding and his leadership. what a busy time for the judiciary committee for bringing two bills to the floor today. and all the work that went into it and your leadership, mr. chairman. mr. chairman, here we are under the gaze of our patriot, george washington, right there in this chamber. 230 years ago our patriot, george washington, who watches over us in this chamber, famously wrote to the hebrew congregation of newport, rhode island, in that letter he made a promise that would be our nation's guide for centuries to come. he wrote, quote, all possess liberty of conscience. it is now no more thanp spoken off as if by the indulgence of
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one class of people that another enjoy the exercise of their inherent national -- natural rights. he went on to say, happily the government of the united states, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution, no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens. today by passing the no ban act, the house is upholding that fundamental promise. to bigotry, no sanction. by taking action to ensure that no president or administration can ever again abuse its authority by waging discrimination on the basis of religion. thank you to chair judy chu, our sponsor of this legislation, and a national champion and-n combating discrimination and
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xenophobia who has helped lead the congress' response to recent -- anti-aapi attacks. the no ban act strengthens the immigration and nationality act to prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion. and it restores the separation of powers by limiting overly broad executive action to ensure future religious bans. which are fundamentally un-american. as justice sotomayor wrote echoing president washington in her dissent in the shameful trump vs. hawaii supreme court case upholding the last administration's muslim ban, she wrote, the united states of america is a nation built upon the promise of religious liberty. our founders honored that core promise by vetting the principle of religious neutrality in the first amendment. the court's decision to uphold
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the muslim ban fails to safeguard that fundamental principle. i just wanted to just mention this, when this happened four years ago and the president came and did his muslim ban legislation, we had a hearing. it wasn't an official hearing because we weren't in the majority. and the majority wasn't interested in having a hearing. we had a hearing. about it. and what we saw in that hearing was to see leaders of the security commute saying, if this stays in place it's going to hurt our national security because we will not be able to make promises -- keep promise that is we made to those who helped us in afghanistan and iraq. we won't be able to because many of them are muslim. it a thousand diplomats from the
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state department signed -- highly unusual, signed on to their opposition for what this did to us diplomatically in the world. our men and women in uniform spoke rank and file men and women spoke directly to the problem this would create. the danger it created and people testing our word when we asked them to help us and that we will help keep them safe. you heard me quote, again and again, in that same hearing, because many of the people who come here for asylum and refugee status because of religious persecution, where they are from, the association of evangelicals testified the following, the united states refugee resettlement program is the crown jewel of american
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humanitarianism. they were speaking in terms of religious refugees. again, we cannot alou any president to abuse the power of -- allow any president to abuse the power of his or her office in this regard. if i may, madam speaker, i'd like to also address another piece of legislation, thanking mr. chairman, that you are bringing to the floor, the access to counsel act protecting the civil liberties of those who face prolonged detention as they seek legal entry into the united states. some of them little children. this is a commonsense step to close a serious and dangerous gap in our immigration law that too often prevents the vulnerable from accessing not only legal counsel but also medical attention or contact with their families. i'm always proud to salute representative jya paul, the
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sponsor of this act and the champion for the dignity and rights of all newcomers to our nation, in fact everyone in our nation. thank you, congresswoman jayapal. passage of these billsle it the no ban bill and the access to counsel bill, should not be controversial. . face-based organizations, business groups and civil rights organizations support the no ban act. and many more support the access to counsel act. these are bills that are about honoring our nation's promise that as president washington said, we will give to bigotry no sanction. to persecution, no assistance. with that i urge a strong vote for both of these bills, honoring the vision of our
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founders and the aspirations of so many people in our country. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. arrington. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for two minutes. mr. arrington: i thank my friend from ohio. madam speaker, i'm from the great state of texas, and there is nothing great about the crisis at our border. it is unprecedented. it is unmitigated. it is ever-escalating. and it is absolutely, absolutely self-inflicted and avoidable. and because of the actions of our commander in chief, whose first job is to protect the american people and the
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irresponsible and reckless unilateral actions, we've got chaos at our southern border and the american people are suffering for it. the people, vulnerable people being abused by the cartels are suffering for it. endless lists of tragedies because of what's happening and what's coming out of the white house. and the answer, the solution in the midst of this crisis and disaster, like we've never seen from my democrat colleagues, is to offer legislation to grant mass amnesty and citizenship, more green lights, more incentives, more welcome mats to continue to violate our sovereignty and to break our laws. not to be detained and deported but to be released and rewarded. cutting in line. they don't get a lawyer paid for
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by the taxpayers. i can't believe this is happening in our great country. i can't believe our democrat colleagues are pouring gasoline and inflaming the situation with more of these no ban acts, tying the president to do his job to prevent high-risk folks from coming to the u.s. giving legal counsel, giving navigators, people who can help aid and abet the exploitation of our laws. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. jordan: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has an additional minute. mr. arrington: madam speaker, it makes no sense at all. in fact, madam speaker, it's insulting. we care about people. this country does more for the immigrant than any in the world. we welcome those who want to make america their home. those god-fearing freedom-loving families. they got to respect our sovereignty. they got to respect the safety and security of the american
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people. they have to respect our laws. and i'm waiting for the democrats to respect the laws of this land. i -- on this issue, i'm waiting. this is it spit -- this is spitting in the face of these families and communities that are terrified. ranchers are terrified to leave their families in their homes. and this is -- this is the answer, this is what you got? shameful. it is shameful. i'm embarrassed. and, yes, i encourage my colleagues to vote no on the no ban act. and i thank you for the time and thank you, mr. ranking member, for the opportunity. god bless america. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentleman from virginia, mr. beyer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for two minutes. mr. beyer: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i'd like to again by -- begin by correcting the
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understanding, i think, from the gentleman from kentucky who tried to align president obama's temporary suspension of the visa waiver program with donald trump's complete suspension of visas. it's one of the only two u.s. ambassadors to serve in this chamber at the moment, i presided of counsels lahr of -- consular of affairs. visa waivers is without going through a background check. this is not what president trump did. he suspended visas entirely. i don't believe there is a single muslim country south of the rio grande in the southern hemisphere. then presidential candidate donald trump argued for a complete and total muslim ban. remember, he didn't specify specific countries. he said no muslims. i quickly introduced a bill, a freedom of religion act, to prohibit discrimination in this
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country on religion. and i rushed to dulles airport. i never thought such an openly bigoted policy would take effect. billions of people around the world were stunned by this destruction of the american ideal as a beacon of freedom. my bill then became part of judy chu's very thoughtful no ban act i'm proud to champion. as reckless and thoughtful -- cruel the muslim ban is, this bill will make sure a future president can't use racism or religious discrimination as a basis for keeping individuals from entering the united states. we can prevent the muslim ban from happening again. with that, madam speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. thank you, madam speaker. i yield three minutes to the
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gentleman from ohio, dr. wenstrup. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. wenstrup: well, thank you. madam speaker, there's an ongoing crisis at the border. president biden himself has admitted it. despite his political staff's best efforts to avoid acknowledging the truth, he's admitted it. i served as a doctor in private practice for more than 26 years. i served on our board of health in cincinnati. i served in a combat support hospital in iraq where we provided outstanding care to thousands of detainees. i've seen quite a few crisis situations in my life. two weeks ago, i led a group of health care experts and national security experts to the border. what we saw was a very difficult situation. it's a humanitarian crisis. it is a national security crisis, but it's also a national health security crisis. our group visited h.h.s.'s donna processing center.
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which per covid guidelines, is supposed to house 250 individuals. that day it had 3,500. earlier that week it housed 5,000. the sites we visited it seen cases of lice, scabies, meningitis, chicken pox, flu of unknown origin and covid-19. what really struck out is we're only testing symptomatic individuals for covid-19. we learned through this pandemic to know better, to know this is not an effective way to stop covid from spreading among the camp or fueling surges across our nation. worse, we're releasing people into our nation without ever having tested them for covid. you don't have to be a doctor to know that that's dangerous. and that's why i offer this motion to recommit today and delay this legislation until every migrant released by customs and border protection produces a negative covid test.
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before boarding a u.s. domestic flight. if international travelers are required to show proof of a negative covid-19 test before they can come into the united states from a foreign country, why are we making an exception for this surge of migrants? american citizens are banned from the u.s. without a covid test. but not non-u.s. citizens? that's bizarre. we risk all the progress we have made in this country to contain this virus by allowing this vulnerability to go unaddressed. madam speaker, if we adopt the motion to recommit, we will instruct the committee on the judiciary to consider my amendment to h.r. 1333, to require that migrants released by customs and border protection show proof of a negative covid test before they are allowed to board a plane. i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of the amendment in the record immediately prior to the vote on the motion to
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recommit. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wenstrup: and with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlelady from illinois, ms. schakowsky. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized. ms. schakowsky: and i thank the gentleman for yielding and you, madam chair. i just want to express my incredible gratitude, first of all, to congresswoman judy chu for her tireless leadership on this issue and to the muslim community in my district for their tireless work and advocacy on this issue. i remember the day well when president trump issued this muslim ban right at the beginning of his administration. i remember running out to the airport immediately to the international terminal.
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and shortly after i got there, there ended up being literally thousands of people who had gathered at the shame on the united states of america. the people who came that day all had some documentation. they had visas. first, even, people with green cards were being held and oppressed. who are we? who are we as the united states of america? and i know that the president finally -- this president, president biden has said, no muslim ban. but we want to make it the law of the land so no other president can do such a thing. that based on religion, based on religion that people would be banned from the united states of america. i want to tell you, i take this personally as a jew myself. you know, i am a first
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generation american. neither of my parents was born in this country. they were able to immigrate to the united states. but i also remember the story of our history as jews. when the st. louis boat that came to protect people from annihilation was turned away from the american shores, who was told to go back to where it came from, and many of those people then perished in the holocaust. who are we? this bill is about who we are. and i urge a yes vote. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: madam speaker, we reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlelady from michigan, mrs. dingell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from michigan is recognized. for two minutes.
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mrs. dingell: madam speaker, i rise today in strong support of h.r. 1333, the no ban act. this legislation prohibits discrimination based on religion and limits the executive branch's ability to issue further travel bans. i stand here today during arab american heritage month. a time to celebrate the diversity of our country and remind ourselves that our country is stronger for it. my district is home to the largest arab american population in the united states. arab americans are an integral part of michigan's identity and have made enormous contributions to our society. many of my constituents fled war and violence to seek a safer life. have done it legally. and many of their families still
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experience this suffering every day. the former president's muslim ban kept these families separated. it inspired fear. it perpetuated hate. and as the speaker so eloquently stated, national security experts have made it clear that it has not made us less safe, not more safe. i believe that every one of us in this chamber loves our country and that it's a priority for all of us to keep this nation safe. i would argue that the actions by the previous administration did not. the president called for a total ban on all muslims entering this country. we must work together against terrorism, both foreign and domestic. we need to worry about what we witnessed in our own chamber on
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january 6. but this bill will not allow people to be targeted because of their religion, again. we must work together to restore the faith and trust of the international communities targeted by the administration -- previous administration. i urge people to support this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the gentleman from ohio. . mr. jordan: we reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: we are prepared to close if the other side is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, there is a crisis at the border. the president even said so. there is chaos at the border. the crisis and the chaos have been created by policies of this administration. we were down at the border two weeks ago. every agent we talked to, every single border patrol agent we talked to said the crisis has been created by policy changes made by the biden administration. specifically three. they announced to the world they weren't going to deport anybody.
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moratorium on deportation. they announced to the world they weren't going to finish the wall. and most importantly they got rid of the remain in mexico policy. what did we have in march, the highest number of illegal immigrants coming into our nation since they have been keeping records. it is definitely a crisis. definitely chaos. what did the democrats do? what did the democrats do? last month they passed two bills, they give amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants. you can't make this stuff up. and then today, today they are going to pass a piece of legislation that takes power away from the commander in chief, takes power away from the individual who was on the ballot and elected, and gives it to the un-elected secretary of state and secretary of homeland security. you would think if they were going to take power away from the president, they would at least give it to the vice president. after all she's the one that's been put in charge of this thing.
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they don't even do that. they don't even do that. the answer's real simple. what we should be focused on. reinstating the policies that worked. in fact, again, when we were down there two weeks ago -- by the way we invited the democrats to go with us. they said no. when we were down there two weeks ago, every border patrol agent said reinstate the policies that were working and we don't have the problem. we don't have the crisis. no, we couldn't do something that common sense. couldn't do something that simple, that basic. they come with this legislation. reinstate the policies that work. don't take power away from the individual who was elected by the american people, the commander in chief, don't implement the crazy policies. do the things that work. but, no, that's not what we are going to do. after this bill's done, they are going to say, by the way, bring in the lawyers. give access to counsel to people coming into our country. it makes absolutely no sense. one of the speakers earlier said out of many one. that is so true about this
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country. but is it too much to ask to have the many who come into this country do it legally? and have policies in place that makes sense? is that too much to ask? i think most taxpayers, most americans think that makes good common sense. this bill does not. i hope we vote it down. i hope we go back to the policies that work. with that, madam speaker, we yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, let me say that i agree with some of what i heard from the republicans. they said there is a lot of nonsense spoken on the floor today. indeed there was. everything they have said about this bill is nonsense. they have said there was no muslim ban. everybody knows there was a muslim ban. the president said he was going to impose a muslim ban. and then he did. when nydia velazquez and i went
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to kennedy airport, when jan shascow i ask went to the airport in chicago, when other people went to the airport, what did we find? we found muslims being kept out of the country. people with perfectly valid visas, perfectly valid green cards. people whose relatives were waiting for them here. because they had perfectly valid entry certificates were being kept out of the country. and they couldn't even speak to their lawyers. that's the next bill we'll be considering on the floor in the next few minutes. that's what we found. and that has been in effect for a long time. and it's un-american. it's unconstitutional. it's against the efforts of this country. as the speaker said, i think it was the speaker who said it, the motto of the country's e pluribus une yum. from many one.
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this muslim ban denies that. this says e pluribus, i don't know the latin for a few. that's immoral. madam speaker, we must pass this bill. more than 400 organizations and industry leaders support this bill. they include muslim advocates, the aclu, airbnb. the hebrew immigrant aid society. yes, the hebrew immigrant aid society, why? because they remember its futile efforts when jews were turned away from this country to go back to the holocaust. when the st. louis was turned back to go back to the holocaust. when the state department deliberately wouldn't even use the quota, the quota was 150,000 they kept it down to 6,000. because of the anti-semitism from some officials in the state department. and the hebrew immigrant aid
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society, which was formed to aid jewish immigrants, but has long since broaden its mission to aid immigrants from any country, knows what happened and doesn't want to see it happen again. that's why they are supporting this bill. the service employees international union, because some of their members were born abroad, the national immigration law center, moveon, and united we dream. members on both sides of the aisle should agree that no president, republican or democratic, should be permitted to usurp the powers of the legislative branch enshrined in the constitution. the separation of powers is fundamental to our democratic republic and must be protected. for all these reasons that's why passage of h.r. 1333 is so vital. i urge my colleagues to vote in support of this bill. i yield back the balance of my time. le the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution
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330, the previous question is ordered on the bill as amended. the question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. third reading. the clerk: a bill to transfer and limit executive branch authority to suspend or restrict the entry of a class of alien. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i have a the motion to reconsider to recommit at the desk. sort the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: mr. wenstrup of ohio moves to recommit the bill h.r. 1333 to the committee on the judiciary. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause b of rule 19, the previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit. the question is on the motion. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes -- the noes have it. the motion is not agreed to.
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the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. wenstrup: i request the yeas and nays, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 3-s of house resolution 8, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler, seek recognition? mr.ed in letter: madam speaker, pursuant to house resolution 330, i call up h.r. 1573, the access to counsel act of 2021, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number
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8, h.r. 1573, a bill to clarify the rights of all persons who are held or detained at a port of entry or any detention facility overseen by the united states custom and border protection or u.s. immigration and customs enforcement. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 330, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on the judiciary printed in the bill is adopted and the bill as amended is considered as read. the bill as amended shall be debatable for one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on judiciary or the respective designees. the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler, and the gentleman from ohio, mr. jordan, each will control 30 minutes. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material on h.r. 1573. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i yield myself three minutes.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is now recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, h.r. 1573, the access to counsel act of 2021 is an important bill that will ensure that individuals who seek to lawfully enter the united states can contact a family member or advisor if they are held for an extended period at a port of entry. last september the judiciary committee and the foreign affairs committee held a hearing to explore president trump's muslim ban, and the chaos that unfolded at airports across the country when it was first announced. i can personally attest to that chaos based on my experience at j.f.k. airport immediately after the ban was implemented. refugees, individuals with valid visas, even lawful permanent residents were detained four hours and prevented from speaking with attorneys. some even had their phones taken away and were unable to call their family. although the issue grabbed the headlines then, it is unfortunately a problem that occurs daily. due to the complex it of u.s.
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immigration law, and the fact intensive nature of questions regarding admissibility, it is not uncommon for some people to spend hours undergoing inspection by u.s. customs and border protection or c.b.p. during this time individuals are often prevented from communicating with those on the outside. if the individual's lucky enough to have a lawyer, c.b.p. will often refuse to speak with them, even if they can provide critical information or correct a legal error. moreover, serious consequences can result from being refused admission. some have argued this bill would require c.b.p. to expend significant resources. but i believe they fundamentally misunderstand the substance of the bill. to be clear, h.r. 1573 does not provide a right to counsel. nor does it impose any obligation on the federal government to build any additional space to accommodate counsel or hire new staff. nor to pay for counsel. the bill simply ensures that no one who presents themselves at a port of entry with valid travel
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documents is completely cut off from the world during the inspection process. it allows those seeking admission, including u.s. citizens, to communicate with counsel and other parties if they are subjected to secondary inspection that lasts longer than one hour. the bill specifically contemplates that this could be accomplished tell phonically. it is absurd to claim the providers these individuals with the opportunity to call their families or an attorney and potentially receive their assistance during the inspection process will consume significant c.b.p. resources. i would like to extend a special thanks to my colleague, representative jayapal for her leadership on this issue and championing this bill. i encourage my colleagues to support it and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield 3 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from california, the
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ranking member on the immigration subcommittee, mr. mcclintock. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mcclintock: thank you, madam speaker. we are way beyond any question of whether we face a border crisis. the question now is whether we have a border at all. when i put that very question directly to the president of the border patrol, his answer was an emphatic no, we do not. by abandoning the border wall, rescinding the remain in mexico policy, and obstructing enforcement of court ordered deportations, president biden has produced a mass illegal migration of historic proportions, preying most tragically on young children and making the mexican crime cartels billions of dollars. the only border security measure he hasn't pulled down is the ability of the c.b.p. to stop illicit activity at our official points of entry, where large volumes of narcotics and other contra ban must pass. judiciary republicans recently visited our facility at hidalgo
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crossing where thousands of cars and trucks passing through the port of entry must be inspected daily to protect our country from high volume cartel smuggling. our officers are experts at spotting suspicious traffic hidden among the high volume of legal crossings without unduly delaying honest commerce and passage. to do this they wave the suspicious traffic to secondary inspections where they can locate and stop contra ban that's often ingeniously hidden. this has been a tremendous inconvenience to the cartels. we saw millions of dollars of methamphetamines and other deadly drugs, as well as infected fruits and vegetables heading to american markets, recently seized at these secondary inspections. but h.r. 1573 would grind legitimate trade and travel to a halt by providing that anyone
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refer to secondary inspection can within an hour consult with an attorney and call other third parties. there are more than 17 million secondary inspections conducted each year that are 328 points of entry. can you imagine the effect of this bill? and it's not limited to attorneys, a smuggler pulled into secondary inspection could warn confederates behind them their hiding places have been discovered, turned back. . the officers told me they're overwhelmed. this bill gives the c.b.p. the hobson choice of curtailing inspections or routinely backing up traffic for hours on end. the inspection itself is not a criminal process. it's a screening process to assure that only legal products enter our country. only when it becomes a criminal matter is there a right to counsel. now, this isn't actually written by the crime cartels.
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it's certainly entirely in their interest and service. it speaks volumes about the attitudes of the democrats on the security of our border, the safety of our citizens, and the sovereignty of our nation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i now yield three minutes to the chairwoman of the immigration subcommittee, ms. lofgren. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. lofgren: madam speaker, i urge adoption of this bill. it allows individuals who have obviously valid travel documents to contact a member of their family or counsel if they're held for an extended period of time at a u.s. port of entry. it has nothing to do with the inspection of contraband. it has nothing to do with providing a lawyer at a government expense. that's prohibited. it has nothing to do with delaying the inspection. it's only if it's practical for
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the c.b.p. to allow this to occur. you know, the immigration laws are very complex. in fact, intensive. and for some people who are in secondary inspection for hours, providing a piece of information to the c.b.p. can clear things up. i'll give you an example of a researcher coming in with a valid visa, and the c.b.p. wonders about that research. is it true? being able to understand that the president of the university, where the student is heading to, can assure the c.b.p. about the research would clear the matter up. this bill does nothing to alter the existing authority of the c.b.p. to alter, to deny entry, or to issue an expedited removal
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order. it just allows individuals to communicate with their american family, with their employer, with their counsel to help provide information. there are many red herrings that have been offered about this bill. it's really about expediting a process that is impeded oftentimes because of lack of information. these are individuals who are coming legally. it does not apply to people who are coming between ports of entry. the lack of communication can cause harm to american families. somebody who's coming to marry their american fiance can be turned away. somebody that's coming to work for a u.s. employer who needs their expertise could be turned away. somebody who is coming to continue their ground making medical research could
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erroneously be turned away. it's important that information be made available to the c.b.p., and the way to do that is to make sure that individuals who are lawfully attempting to enter the united states with an apparently valid visa at a port of entry that has been held for secondary inspection have an opportunity to communicate with their american family or with their american boss or even a lawyer to get information that the c.b.p. can then consider. and if they are not persuaded as valid, they can still turn that individual around. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. lofgren: i think the opposition is a bit overwrought. it's a modest but important measure. i yield back. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i yield the gentlelady as much time as she may consume. ms. lofgren: thank you, mr. chairman. i would be -- i was actually surprised by some of the things
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and the rhetoric that's been offered in opposition to what is really just a commonsense, modest measure that will allow for communication for people who are -- have legal visas who have been held in secondary so the confusion can be cleared up. and it's important, not just to the people trying to enter, but it's important to americans who are waiting for them, their families, their employers, their teachers. so with that, mr. chairman, i urge approval of this bill, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is now recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. roy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. roy: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the gentleman from ohio for yielding. 185 years ago today in san jacinto, texas, the great state
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of texas won its independence from mexico. general sam houston launched a surprise attack against santa anna and routed their forces and ultimately was able to negotiate with santa anna for his freedom the treaty that resulted in the founding of the republic of texas. as a proud texan, i'm sitting here 185 years later recognizing that my state, the state that i'm proud to represent, is under siege. it is under constant siege on a daily basis by dangerous cartels. but worse than being under siege by dangerous cartels, it's under siege by a democrat president who refuses to do its constitutional duty to secure the border of the united states. that is the fact. that this president, obligated under the constitution, literally refuses to carry out and exercise his constitutional duty to defend our borders, our
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borders in texas where our communities are under siege, where our schools are overrun, where our hospitals are being inundated, where our ranches are having people cross them, where dangerous narcotics, fentanyl, pouring into our communities. that is what is happening to my state of texas. this, the 185th anniversary of the battle at san jacinto. one has to wonder whether the agreement that texas made when entering this union remains worth it when the state of texas is suggesting -- the state of texas under siege by an administration that refuses to defend our border. that is a question that we texans are continuing to wrestle with. because it is the duty of this president and the duty of the federal government to secure the borders. and when i look at texans, who
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have lost loved ones at the hands of people here illegally, when i look at families who have families destroyed by fentanyl and dangerous narcotics, when i look at trafficking of human beings into the sex trade in the state of texas where stash houses are being run by cartels, and then i watch as my democratic colleagues want to put up every roadblock to security and launch every single way possible to prop up cartels, prop up the ability of our border to be exploited and refuse to actually do the job necessary to secure the border. it is incumbent upon this body to speak with one voice that we are going to defend the borders of the united states and do our duty under the constitution while states are feeling the brunt every single day in very real terms. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: members
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are reminded to refrain from engaging in personalities toward the president. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i yield myself one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. nadler: i'm going to have a lot more to say about this bill a little later. but i have to respond to one point. that the gentleman just made. he said he was concerned -- he was considering whether the agreement to enter the union was valid, was worth it. he's not the first to consider that. john calhoun considered it. others considered it. and they tried it. the result was the civil war. so i certainly hope that no one is thinking of that again. i yield back. i reserve, rather. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: thank you, mr. speaker. i would yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. cawthorn. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. cawthorn: i thank the gentleman from ohio. and mr. speaker, i rise today because i feel that too many on the left are comfortable of lies and half truths. let me tell you one thing. i'm sick of it. my constituents are sick of it. and the american people are sick of it. my colleagues just said that president trump instituted a muslim ban. if my colleagues had read executive order 13769 instead of their liberal talking points, they would know that is simply not true. president trump's ban impacted seven specifically countries. your statements are patently false and prohibitedly misleading. the crisis at our southern border represents a serious risk to our national security of the united states, and the sanctity of the rule of law. reports from law enforcement officers fighting to stem the overwhelming tide of illegal immigration into our country emphasizes the lack of resources and misapplication of funds by the federal government.
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yet, today, we are being asked to vote on a bill that would do nothing to fix the weaknesses at our border, but instead, when misallocate our resources away from our border patrol agents. this bill would spend $825 million to provide taxpayer-funded legal assistance to individuals crossing our border. because my colleagues on the left believe the best way to fix any problem is just to send in more lawyers. this legislation would significantly hamper law enforcement's ability to effectively screen potentially dangerous individuals who have been flagged by other agencies for advanced screening due to their criminal record or status as a person of interest for national security purposes. we should be empowering law enforcement, not reining in their effectiveness. screening passengers that enter our country for -- is a normal part of securing the u.s. ports of entry and expectation for all who want to enter the united
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states. granting a lawyer to anyone who warrants a secondary screening is like demanding a lawyer every time your bag is checked going through t.s.a. this bill does nothing to enhance our border security. and furthermore, hampers their ability to carry out their mission. i strongly urge my colleagues to vote no on h.r. 1573, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: i now yield as much time as she may consume, the sponsor of the bill, representative jayapal of washington. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for -- as much time as she may consume. ms. jayapal: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman, on helping bring this bill to the floor. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of my bill, the access to counsel act. access to counsel act. it's the access to counsel act. i don't know if my friends on the other side have heard that. i'm not sure how access to
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counsel helps empower cartels. i'm not sure if my colleagues on the other side have read the bill. this does not fund counsel. it actually doesn't give a right to counsel. we could debate that in another bill. this gives access to counsel. it brings us one step closer to upholding our country's principles of due process and fairness by ensuring that individuals with lawful status have the right to call a lawyer and receive assistance if they are detained at ports of entry or in airports. so why did this bill come about? the access to counsel act was the very first bill i introduced as a member of congress in 2017 in response to donald trump's muslim ban. on the day that donald trump announced that ban, i rushed to my local airport in seattle. what i encountered and what we saw at airports across the nation was a sham of our democracy. people from seven
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muslim-majority countries, all with legal authorization to be from the united states -- to be in the united states, suddenly found themselves held for upwards of 30 hours, deported, and in some cases pressured to sign papers giving up their legal status without even the ability to call an attorney or a family member. i then reintroduced, again, the access to counsel act, in my second term of january, 2020, after customs and border protection targeted iranian americans at ports of entry. as many as 200 iranian americans were held in secondary screening in blaine, washington. nega and her two children were detained for nearly six hours, despite being u.s. citizens, despite having preclearance for expedited processing at the border that is specifically for
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approved low-risk travelers. she recalls her small children begging her not to speak farsi in fear of being detained. at such a young age, her children, u.s. citizens, already recognize they were being profiled and unjustly held because of their heritage. . of course, when we raise that in the moment, they said we're not doing that. well, it took over a year and suing the government in order to access documents from customs and border protection for us to find out that the total number of people held was 227 people, half of half of those people were legal u.s. resident, half of them, and
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the rest have legal paperwork to come into the country. why were they held? they were held because of their iranian heritage or ties to the middle east. later, we also found out that there was no attempt from border patrol to figure out why they were there or whether they should be there or to even comply with the law that says your country of origin cannot be the sole purpose that you are held. so you want to talk about wasting border patrol resources, let's talk about the fact that 227 people, half of whom were u.s. citizens and legal permanent resident, the rest with valid visas, were held in a border patrol station in blaine, washington, for almost 12 hours and unable to leave. that's called detention. nouff now -- you've now turned the border patrol station into detention facilities. that's not what we're supposed
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to do. why is it so difficult to just say, yes, a phone call is permissible? and that's what this bill is trying to do. throughout the last administration we saw dozens of iranian students with valid visas, having their visas revoked or deported upon arrival to the united states simply because of their country of origin. the access to counsel act would ensure that people who have already been vetted and granted lawful status have a meaningful opportunity to call an attorney. have a meaningful opportunity to call a relative. or other interested party like a member of congress when they get held for more than an hour in secondary inspection. this is a commonsense measure, mr. speaker, to make certain that our nation treats those arriving to our country, whether it's green card old -- holders who have made their home here's in the united states or visa holders working, studying or traveling to the united states, or u.s. citizens who happen to
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have been identified with a different country of origin for some reason, let's make sure we treat everybody with dignity and respect. i am so proud to be passing the access to counsel act today, alongside the no ban act, to put an end to some of the most cruel and discriminatory policies adopted by the previous administration and to make sure that they never happen again. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from ohio. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this legislation requires individuals entering at ports of entry, tens of millions of them, to get a lawyer. yet democrats tell us this isn't going to cost the taxpayers anything. this is some kind of miracle. you've got a mandate for tens of millions of americans -- of people in our country and it's not going to cost any money.
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i've never seen a government mandate that didn't cost something. this is amazing i remember my days in the state legislature, unfunded mandates that local governments were concerned about mandates if the state this may be the biggest mandate we have ever seen. but somehow, somehow this is not going to cost our agents who are busting their tail working night and tai right now with this cry sthoins border, it's not going to cost them anything, in time, in effort, in the taxpayers, i think the american people are smarter than that mr. speaker, i would yield three minutes to the gentleman from arizona, mr. biggs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. biggs: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the gentleman. when i hear that, oh, this bill is simply trying to give a phone call, why didn't it say that? why didn't it say that in the bill? it didn't say that. it talked about access to an attorney. i am an attorney. i did court appointed attorney work. i did all the time. i tell you what, this may not give you a court appointed
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attorney but what it does is you open it up. if you think that doesn't consume resources, i just wonder, have you ever been to a port of entry? have you watched people coming through? have you watched the secondary inspection process? this is going to bog down your poferts entry and it's going to lead to litigation. that is a trial lawyer's blessing. trial lawyer's dream. i can tell you that that's because that's what's going to happen. there's going to be abuses, not abuses, there'll be mistakes made. and even if there are no mistakes made there's going to be lawsuits. this is not designed to facilitate border ingress and egress. this is not designed to help commercial travelers. or commercial traffic. this is going to bog our system down. all the while you say this is not going to be a problem, it will redirect and redeploy border patrol agents, customs
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agents, to deal with this. that means it's going to really slow things down. you know what that means in that means that all the people coming between the borders are going to have an even wider open field. in february, over 101,000 aliens were encountered. in march, over 172,000 aliens were encountered at the border. the numbers -- the number is going up. it's not going down. it's going up. you know why? because the policies of this administration draw people in they've done absolutely nothing to slow this down. you know what the number one most important thing would be, how about the president of the united states of america stand up and say, no. we will send you back. our border is closed. if you want to come in, come in legally through the ports of entry.
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how about doing that? he has not done that. and that's why you see people showing up with biden campaign t-shirts on the border. that's why the mexican president said, this is biden's border crisis. that's why the el salvador president expressed the same. that's why border patrol agents also understand, and this is why ranchers and people in my district and those who live on the border, that's why they'll say, this is biden's problem. he created it. he inserted a solution and created a crisis. and our -- the person he's tapped to lead the efforts to address this surge at the border has been all over the place, just hasn't been at the border. mr. jordan: i yield the gentleman 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. biggs: thank you. this individual has not been to the border once. but this solutions are not a mystery. president biden has to stand up and make a statement. got to continue construction of the wall. reinstate the m.p.p. program. reinstate the 12 international agreements that were in place that were slowing this down. that would have stopped it. the last thing is, move the asylum courts down to the boarder to deal with current asylum cases. i thank the gentleman and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i yield six minutes to the distinguished gentlelady from texas, ms. contradiction lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman from new york for his leadership. i thank the gentlelady from the state of washington for her grand and superb and astute leadership on understanding the bill of rights. i have watched this debate and i have seen people go to the
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microphone and talk about, on the left. i didn't know the constitution was on the left or the right. i thought the constitution was a document that our founding fathers started with the language to form a more perfect union. and in the list of the bill of rights, citizen or noncitizen can have access to due possess. just because of the basic foundation of this nation. then far moment i'm going to pause but i rise to support enthusiastically the access to counsel act, h.r. 1573, but let me pause as a resident and citizen of border state, oh how interesting it is for the interpretation of those one-time visitors. what about those of us who have been at the border over and over and over and over again.
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what about those of us who stood in the dark of night and saw a 2-year-old come over or a baby? that was not what we wanted. but people fleeing persecution have always sought to come to the place where the statue of liberty stands in the harbor and as far as i know she is not gone. there is an office of refugee resettlement. we have been a refuge for refugees. but i can tell you the last four years, i saw things i had never seen in my life. never in my life. do i feed to remind you of the children who died? in our custody. i don't blame those border patrol or others, they are my neighbors, but i blame the policies of the previous administration that did not care
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. and simply left them to their own devices, which was a crowded , unsanitized place. metallic blankets. not able to move. because their idea was, move 'em out. make it so horrible that short of losing their life they'll leave. and what about the m.p.p. program? i went to mexico and saw desperate people in the streets. they had no place to live. they were being taken advantage of. i don't fault mexico that in essence made an agreement, maybe intimidated by the last administration, didn't know what else to do. but the m.p.p. program subject peemed to very dangerous conditions. so besides the biden
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administration's policy of a closed border, sending people back that are single adults, but for the ports of entry, obviously, and as well those families, still giving them the opportunity to apply for asylum which was literally cut off. domestic abuse persons couldn't apply for asylum under the last administration. i'd rather stand with president biden and vice president harris who are strategically trying to work on behalf of the american people. but they have not left their compassion and humanity at the front door of the white house. so this legislation is absolutely in compliance with the constitution. because what it says is that you have access to counsel. we don't pay for it. you have legal entry documents. it is only when you're in
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secondary detention. this only takes place, so that little ali i mentioned earlier, coming from egypt with the appropriate documents would have been able to call his father. or his uncle that was here. in houston, texas. is that not simple humanity? simple kindness? is that recognizing the dignity of all people? what about this new york city design gallery holder, detained at an airport because of this ridiculous process. of course it was in 2017, the last administration, juan garcia masceda, founder of new york design gallery, a decades-long permanent resident. i don't know how he got detained at the john f. kennedy international airport, not only
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was he detained he was sent back to his native argentina with no opportunity to contact anyone, ahead of his gallery's show hater that day. he tchailed experience dehumanizing and degrading. he had his documents, and detailed his 36-hour detainment and return to buenos aires. we already know i was getting ready to speak on the no ban act, nigeria was added to the list. there are doctors, lawyer, teachers an businesspersons who have served from nigeria in this nation. so i believe this is a right-thinking bill. the access to counsel act of 2021. i rise to support this legislation. and i oppose all of those who think that the constitution -- the speaker pro tempore: the jerusalem's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: support the bill h.r. 1573. thank you.
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yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentlelady from the great state of texas, ms. van dine. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. >> i recently visited the border in my home state of texas. the biden administration has been violent and in denial of any crisis as we have seen record numbers of apprehensions, drug crossings into the u.s. and no answer for the humanitarian crisis of 20,000 unaccompanied minors. president biden ms. van duyne: we have seen the vice president go all over the country but not at the border. the democrats have been silence, not questioning once her dealing
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with the humanitarian crisis. today we're debating spending nearly $1 billion to give, quote, access to counsel, to foreign citizens when there is not even -- they are not even subject to a criminal investigation. that's something we don't afford our own citizens. my republican colleagues and i continue to expose the crisis on the border, having seen firsthand the horrific situation. yet, the democrats' solution is to hire attorneys, forcing border patrol to hire personnel. this legislation does nothing to address the hundreds of thousands of people surging our borders at record numbers. the girls and the boys whether are being -- who are being sexually assaulted and the thousands of pounds of drugs and weapons pouring into our country. if the vice president actually went down there, agents could show her the miles of unprotected border that have been pulled off and instead are acting as babysitters. she might be able to understand
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the policies put in place under the previous administration actually worked. we should be focused on securing our border and letting our agents do their jobs. the lack of compassion, the lack of humanity that we've seen under the biden administration is appalling. the gentlelady from washington said we should treat everyone with dignity and respect. have you seen the conditions that are down at the border right now? it is the exact opposite of dignity and the respect. and these words mean nothing if we refuse to follow them with action. the legislation in front of us does nothing to stop the border -- the biden border crisis, and it's just another attempt to pry or fiez the -- prioritize the interests of aliens ahead of the american people. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i yield six minutes to the distinguished gentleman from rhode island, mr. cicilline. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from rhode island is recognized for six minutes. mr. cicilline: i thank the chairman for yielding.
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madam speaker, i want to start with responding to a complete misrepresentation of what this bill does. we've heard our friends on the other side of the aisle say that this bill requires that counsel be appointed to individuals. and they even go so far as to assign a number to it, $800 million. that simply is not true. and at first, i thought maybe it was an honest mistake, but it's being repeated. so now i know it's an affirmative misrepresentation. what the bill does -- and i invite my colleagues to look at the language of the bill. go to page 3. line 11. sorry, line 17. an individual has a meaningful opportunity to counsel and the interested party. they're required to have a meaningful opportunity to consult with counsel. there's no requirement in the
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bill that counsel be provided, paid for, and so that claim is just not true. no matter how many times it gets repeated by our republican colleagues, they are making it up. it's not in the bill. i rise in support of h.r. 1573, the access to counsel act. our country says every person is entitled to due process and an meaningful opportunity to be heard. the ability to consult with legal counsel is critical to both of these principles, and for some it's a matter of life and death. in the context of immigration, access to counsel can be the difference being able to remaining safely in the united states or detained or deported back to a war zone. these -- there are decisions that are often made away from courts. for example, customs and border protection have the power to remove individuals from the united states without a hearing based on statements made during an initial screening. nothing in this bill changes
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that. questioning by immigration and customs enforcement can lead to arrest, detention, initial of removal proceedings and removal all done without access to counsel. the time -- the time can be avoided entirely if counsel is able to sit in during questioning. h.r. 1573 confirms the right to counsel attaches -- the right to access counsel attaches at the time of holding or detention and requires c.b.p. or i.c.e. to provide people detained and questioned with the ability to make a call and notify an attorney of their detention. doesn't make c.b.p. or i.c.e. provide counsel. it doesn't require them to fund attorneys. or create any obligation for the government to pay for counsel. it simply opens the door to
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meaningful access to counsel for those who have an attorney ready to assist. it ensures people suggested to -- subjected to prolonged inspection are able to communicate with and receive assistance from counsel or other individuals who can facilitate the inspection process. this is a commonsense proposal that really does ensure the system work effectively, particularly for u.s. citizens. i want to applaud the sponsor of this bill, congresswoman jayapal, for her extraordinary leadership. i thank the gentleman for bringing this from the committee to the floor. this is something everyone should support. i ask my colleagues to support h.r. 1573. and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. before yielding to the gentleman from virginia, i'd ask unanimous consent that we enter into the record -- the gentleman said it wouldn't cost anything. this is straight from the congressional budget office. $825 million over the next five years is going to cost -- this
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is based on c.b.p., the custom and border telling -- what the costs will incur. right there it is. he can say it is not there but c.b.o. says it is. i ask unanimous consent, madam speaker. with that i yield two minutes -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. jordan: two minutes to the gentleman from virginia, mr. cline. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for two minutes. mr. cline: i thank the gentleman for his time. madam speaker, our nation is in a crisis. we're facing a real crisis at our southern border. as i speak, hundreds of migrants are crossing into the united states right now because the biden administration has made it clear to the world that the border is open. and the rule of law will not be upheld. and now, instead of working on solutions to address the ongoing border crisis, the majority's brought forward legislation that will cripple our nation's screening process for individuals entering at u.s. ports of entry. currently, a right to counsel does exist but it only occurs once a screening turns from
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questions on the admissiblity of goods to ---ed a missibility of goods ---ed a missablity. prior to the pandemic, customs and border protection processed more than one million daily at various ports of entry. c.b.p. regularly conducts over 17 million secondary inspections each year. not more efficient with this legislation. this legislation would severely limit c.b.p.'s ability to ensure thorough inspections of all travelers. not only those referred to secondary inspection, creating unnecessary delays and significant impacts on daily operations. this bill misuses taxpayer dollars, puts the interest of foreign citizens above the interests of the american citizens. and i urge my colleagues to oppose it. i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has yielded back. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i'd yield two minutes to the gentleman from virginia, mr. good. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for two minutes. mr. good: thank you, madam speaker, and ranking member jordan. we must establish an america-first immigration policy. however, the democrats are doing the opposite with illegal aliens first, foreign nations first, and future democrat voters first. law-abiding american citizens are clearly last on the list of priorities if they even make the list at all. they're giving illegal aliens free health care, free ex-gentleman, free social -- free education, free social services, even free lodging. today, it's more the same.
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with the continued effort to facilitate illegal entry in our country. now, they want to provide attorneys for illegal aliens and further restrict our ability to refuse entry to those who wish us harm. come one, come all. is it confusion and incompetence on the part of democrats? do they not know the threat to our country? do they not understand? is it worse and they know exactly what they're doing and they don't care about the consequences? why else would they let organize crime profit off the suffering of those illegally crossing into our border? why else would they stop building the trump wall? why would they reinstate catch and release and offer amnesty to illegal aliens? why else would they stop m.p.p. and title 42 restrictions? the democrats are destroying our country, and you need to look no further than our own border. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: i yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlelady
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from illinois, ms. schakowsky. how much time do we have left? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has eight minutes remaining. mr. nadler: thank you. i yield the gentlelady two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. ms. schakowsky: thank you, madam chair. i rise today in support of the access to counsel act. thousands of immigrants lawfully come to our country, come to our ports of entry daily. they come in order to reunite with families, in order to receive lifesaving medical help, in order to pursue their educational dreams. they come because they are allowed to come, and they come for really good purposes. and when they arrive, all too
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often they are subjected to grueling inspections and relentless questioning by our custom and border patrol agents, and often they have no help to turn to. so h.r. 1573 will ensure that these individuals can communicate with a family member, an attorney, or other party who can help them to navigate what's going on at the port of entry, and if they are held over an hour. this is important. wher' -- we're not saying there shouldn't be any inspections whatsoever, that there shouldn't be any questioning. but sometimes people have been held for up to 30 hours. it's not right. without any access to help. so this critical to ensuring that immigrants are treated
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fairly and with dignity. and i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the access to counsel act and support due process for all. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you. i yield two minutes to the gentleman from colorado, mr. buck. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado is recognized for two minutes. mr. buck: thank you, madam speaker. there's a humanitarian crisis on our southern border. every day, more migrants surge towards the border and overwhelm the dedicated men and women of the customs and border protection. c.b.p. is facing the most dramatic increase in detentions and illegal crossings in 15 years. this is articulated and caused by the biden administration. he revoked the remain in mexico
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policy and safe country agreement. he stopped building the wall. he tapped vice president kamala harris to respond to this humanitarian crisis almost a month ago. she still hasn't visited the border, but she's had time to stop in a chicago bakery and grab a slice of cake for her plane ride home. the vice president's message to the american community is being overrun with illegal immigrants is apparently, let them eat cake. while the president rolls out the welcome mat to illegal immigrants pouring our overboarder. my colleagues across the -- over the border. my colleagues across the aisle want to fund counsel to illegal immigrants and defund the police. they don't care if the american people are protected, but they want to make sure that those in the local bar association get paid to represent criminals flooding into our country. democrats don't have time to fix our broken illegal -- our broken immigration system, but they have time to visit minnesota and incite riots. disturbing the current -- during
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the current crisis, illegal immigrants are being housed in convention centers and hotels across the country. my liberal colleagues, trying to address the homeless problem with americans rather than placing immigrants in hotels. the c.b.p. announced the arrest of one on the terrorism watch list as they tried to cross the southern border. if this bill was enacted, they would have paid for their lawyers to help terroristings stay in this country -- terrorists stay in this country. this will not let our apparatus from working. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves his time. the gentleman from ohio. mr. nadler: madam speaker, can i inquire about the time we have left? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 9 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. jordan: great. i yield two minutes to -- the speaker pro tempore: and the gentleman from new york has six minutes.
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mr. jordan: thank you, madam speaker. i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. gohmert. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for two minutes. . mr. gohmert: thank you, madam speaker. i know it seems compassionate to those who support this bill to say, we want to give this young child, whose parents sent them up by themselves, give them a lawyer, help them out. but the consequences of it for those of us who have spent a lot of time on the border are clear. it means if you make this law, that the representatives of the drug cartels, which are often gang members, they can tell the parents, look, i know it's a tough decision, whether to send your child alone, this little 3, 5, 8-year-old child, up by themselves, but the good news is
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that there are people in congress that have fought for and have gotten you hired a lawyer at the border for your child. so you know, with the drug cartels, the truth is, this child will likely be an indentured servant for many year, either drug trade, sex traffic, but they're going to be owned by the drug cartel as far as what they get to do in their freedom. this is not something we should be doing, adding more to lure more unaccompanied children up to our border. we're already in crisis mode and as all of the border patrol i talk to over the years explained, they're basically working now for the drug cartels. and as they've said, we're the logistics for the drug cartels. the cartels send them up, get them to the border and then we
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ship them wherever the cartels want us to send them. this is not compassionate as it may seem. this is going to damage millions of people. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expire. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan:: thank you, i yield one minute and a half to the gentleman, mr. van true. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. van drew: i rise in opposition to this bill. in the midst of an unprecedented, an ongoing border crisis, as c.b.p. struggles to keep up, democrats focus on a bill that will not only be expensive but will continue to hamper and slow down our hard working women an men with the c.b.p. almost a billion taxpayer dollars, almost a billion
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taxpayer dollars, provided for by the hard working men and women in america, both legal imgrants and others, literally to provide access to legal representation to noncitizens. i guess they would call it noncitizen human infrastructure. but really, it's just another payday for lawyers. america is struggling. our borders are struggling. our neighbors are struggling. we all want to help. but let's help america. let's love america. let's take care of our american people. oppose this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new york is recognized. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. jordan: thank you, i yield a minute and a half to the gentlelady from new york, ms. mall yo tau kiss. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentlelady is recognized for a minute and a half. ms. mall yo tau kiss: -- ms. maliotakis: my mother came to this country as a refugee. when she came to to this country there was a process, there was order. i visited the border a couple of weeks ago an there was disorder and chaos. it's shocking that this body refuses to take any action, that the vice president after 28 days of being appointed to oversee this issue refuses to go to the border and see what i saw, hear what i heard. you need to have a discussion with the customs and board brother text before take anything action on legislation. they will tell you that they are being overrun by the cartels and the smugglers who are taking over the border and making half a billion dollars a month doing it. and what -- the action we're seeing here today will do nothing to help the 9-year-old girl we saw in this facility who
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was gang raped on her journey here. how come nobody cares or has the compassion to do anything about those individuals who are being exploited by the smugglers in cartels? that's what we should be discussing here today. to go into one of these facilities and see these children, sleeping on top of each other, capacity of 250 and they have 4,000 people jammed in there, no covid testing, nobody cares about the public health crisis that's creating. you have a humanitarian crisis, a public health crisis and on top of it a national security crisis. thousands of criminals being caught at the border and nobody is doing a damn thing about it. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: thank you. the gentlelady from new york is exactly right. when will the democrats take it serious? when will the president go to the board her when will the vice
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president go to the border? the person who is supposed to be in charge of this, dealing with this crisis? when will the press be able to enter the holding facilities and actually show the american people how bad it is, what ms. maliotakis just described. when will secretary mayorkas come before the committee? we we asked him to come and tell us how he's dealing with the crisis. when will the democrats take this seriously? we do. we've been down there we asked them to go, they wouldn't go with us. the american people understand what's going on, how bad it is. i just hope the democrats will deal with it sometime soon. with that, madam speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, mr. rice. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. >> h.r. 1573 provides access to
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counsel but there are over 328 ports of entry to the united states. those field executives if this is enacted, would in fact be handling over 17 million people who might seek assistance. in the upcoming motion to recommit, we will offer that in fact the claim by this bill that there'll be no cost for attorneys' fees is in fact likely to not be true. last week, the congressional office, budget office, estimated it would cost $828 million to implement this legislation if enacted. and that would be without the right to free counsel. we need to ensure that these costs aren't even higher. the democrats have stated that h.r. 73 will not require the american people to pay for attorneys access during this
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administrative stop. again, madam speaker, this is an administrative procedure. if nor any reason somebody is charged with a crime they do get access to counsel, this is for those 17 million people who will go through secretary and -- secondly ry and likely be allowed to move forward. however you need to look no further in this act than the comprehensive immigration reform bill of the u.s. citizens act for evidence the democrats want us to pay for counsel to foreign nations. this bill specifically removes the current prohibition on government paid counsel yet in the markup, mymy colleagues insisted that this had no right to counsel. if you want more evidence than this, the american people deserve an assurance in this bill. we will ask that this bill -- the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman's time has expired. mr. issa: that we add that prohibition. mr. jordan: i yield the gentleman 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. sy issa: thank you. madam speaker, in the language of the motion to recommit, h.r. 1573, no one will doubt that congress either does or does not have the intent to make sure that the voters and our tax payers are protected. i urge my colleagues to support the motion to recommit. madam speaker, if we adopt the motion to recommit, we will instruct the committee on the judiciary to consider my amendment to h.r. 1573 to ensure no taxpayer -- can i have an additional 15? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize for an additional 15 second. mr. jordan: i yield whatever we've got left. mr. issa: to ensure no taxpayer funds are wrused to pay for attorneys under the bill.
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i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of the amendment in the record immediately prior to the vote on the motion to recommit, and with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from -- mr. nadler: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the request to enter will be granted. now the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: madam speaker, for all the reasons we have stated here in the last half-hour, we urge a no to -- a no vote on this legislation. we yield back the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i yield myself the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for the remainder of his time. mr. nadler: madam speaker, i've heard of a lot of nonsense on
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this floor. i've heard of a lot of fiction on this floor. today. but not everything the republicans have said is fiction. they said, for instance, there's a crisis at the border. indeed there is a crisis at the border. the crisis at the border started under president trump. it's continued under president biden. same crisis. the difference is, president trump tried to deal with the crisis in the cruelest payway possible by tear big bys away from their parents. by tearing families apart. and by doing so, so incompetently, i assume it was incompetence, maybe it was malevolence, i don't know, they didn't even get records so they could figure out how to -- so people today can figure out how to reunite these families. the crisis continues. but at least we're dealing with
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it. we're trying to deal with it in a humane way. it's also interesting the fictions we have heard about this bill. this bill will cost money. this bill gives people the right to an attorney. and the federal government will have to pay for that attorney. not true. not true. i suspect my republican colleagues have lost the ability to read a bill somehow. the bill is very clear. the bill simply says that if someone with valid documents, valid documents, no litigation as to whether they're valid or not, they've got to be valid in the first place. a u.s. citizen. a green cardholder. someone with a visa, a valid veesasm that's all we're talking about. the bill simply says that those
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people, if detained at a border spri point, for a period of time for longer than an hour, have the right to make a phone call, phone call doesn't cost the government anything. they have the right to make a phone call. to who? whoever they want. a family member. perhaps an attorney. a friend. whoever they want. experience tells us that when people can make a phone call to an attorney in such a situation, because the i.n.a., the immigration and naturalization act, it can often straighten things out. that saves the government money. because they don't have to litigate. it saves the government money. this bill will not cost the government any money. it'll save it money. it'll also help people who must
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be helped. people who have a valid, again, i stress, only people who have a valid document to enter the united states and for some reason are detained at the border. and how long does this last? eight hours at most. that's what the bill says. eight hours. this bill is limited to a measure that members on both sides of the aisle, everybody, should embrace. as i said before, this is not a bill about a rights to counsel. it's simply a bill about fair process. it ensures that individuals seeking to enter the united states with facialy valid documents, facialy -- facially valid documents, a visa, a green card, including u.s. citizens who may have a passport, are given an opportunity to call somebody, a family member, counsel, another
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interested party, whoever they want, if they're subject to prolonged inspection. admissibility decisions by cuss tum -- customs and border inspection can have life-altering consequences. this bill will ensure that c.b.p. has the relevant facts prior to making decisions. the relevant facts and facts that don't cost the c.b.p. anything to get. because, well, they do actually. the cost of a phone call. i take it back. it would cost the c.b.p. the cost of a phone call because -- although not necessarily. because the person may have a cell phone on him. so it won't even cost the telephone. i urge my colleagues to support -- to vote in support of the access to counsel act. it makes sense. it hurts nobody. it imposes no duty on the
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government. it imposes no cost on the government. but it does mean that people will not unnecessarily get caught up in bureaucracy. i urge my colleagues to vote in support of the access to counsel act and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. pursuant to house resolution 330, the previous question is ordered on the bill, as amended. the question is on engrossment and third reading of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. third reading. the clerk: a bill to clarify the rights of all persons who are held or detained at a port of entry or at any dential facility overseen by the u.s. customs and border protection or u.s. immigration and customs enforcement.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i have a motion to recommit at the desk. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: mr. issa of california moves to recommit the bill, h.r. 1573, to the committee on the judiciary. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 19, the previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit. the question is on the motion. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the noes have it. mr. issa: madam speaker, i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 3-s of house resolution 8, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed.
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the house will resume proceedings on postponed questions at a later time. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: madam speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2630, the extending temporary emergency scheduling of fentanyl analogues act, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 2630, a bill to amend the temporary re-authorization and study of the emergency scheduling of fentanyl analogues act to extend until september, 2021, a temporary order for fentanyl-related substances.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentlewoman from washington, mrs. rodgers, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent at that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 2630. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pallone: i rise in support of the extending temporary emergency scheduling of fentanyl analogues act. as we continue to combat the covid-19 pandemic, we are also facing a tragic growing trend of overdose deaths across this country. we have lost nearly one million americans since the beginning of the nation's drug epidemic. these americans are sons, daughters, mothers, fathers, neighbors, co-workers, and members of our communities.
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and now data tells us that the covid-19 pandemic increased isolation and related economic hardships over the past year may be hampering efforts to turn the tide. last week, madam speaker, the centers for disease control and prevention released its most recent data finding that from august, 2021, -- 2019, to august, 2020, there were 88,000 overdose deaths reported. that's the highest ever recorded in a 12-month period. this most recent data represents a worsening crisis driven primarily by synthetic opioids such as elicitly manufactured fentanyl. this drug is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than more feeb -- morphine. although fentanyl itself is often used for medical purposes, use of elicitly manufactured fentanyl has increased in recent years, including co-use with cocaine and methamphetamines and as little as two milligrams can cause a lethal overdose. congress has recognized this
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unprecedented threat and acted in strong bipartisan fashion to combat it with resources to communities around the country. we've passed major pieces of legislation like the comprehensive addiction and recovery act, the 21st century curious act, and the support for -- cures act, and the support for patients and communities act. at the end of last year in the final omnibus bill, we included over $4 billion to increase mental health and substance use services and support and recognizing the worsening trends early this year, we passed the american rescue plan last month that provided an additional $4 billion in resources. this critical funding will be used to enhance mental health and substance use disorder services supported by the substance use and mental health services administration, the health resources and service administration, and the indian health service -- but while this critical assistance is on the way, unfortunately due to the disturbing rates of overdose and substance use, more work is clearly needed. and the biden administration is
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asking congress to extend a temporary tool we provided last congress so that agency experts can come together to examine the facts and come up with an effective long-term solution. that tool is the authority to temporarily classify fentanyl-related substances as schedule one substances under the controlled substances act. ensuring fentanyl-related substances remains scheduled will remain an important deterrent to traffickers, manufacturers and those distributing the substance. during an energy and commerce committee hearing last week, the white house office of national drug control policy's acting director testified on the importance of this extension. acting director labell highlighted ongoing discussions with the department of health and human services, the department of justice, and the drug enforcement administration, and she testified that an extension of this temporary authority would allow executive branch agencies time to convene and present a long-term solution to this
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ever-changing drug environment that balances the risk of elicit fentanyl with the need to ensure appropriate enforcement. the biden administration is taking this drug epidemic seriously and has delivered a thoughtful, thorough set of drug policy priorities. and i ask my colleagues to join me in giving these agency experts time to produce a thoughtful, thorough solution to this scourge of overdose deaths. i urge my colleagues to support this measure and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from washington is recognized. mrs. rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. i'm disappointed that we're kicking the can down the road on a short-term extension of the scheduling order to keep dangerous fentanyl out of schedule one. while i will vote in favor of this bill today, because allowing this life-saving order to expire sun acceptable, this short-term extension from the democratic majority fails to meet the gravity of the
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situation facing our communities, our border, and our country. they've had two years to come to the table and work with us on a permanent solution to combat fentanyl and fentanyl analogues and they -- and the dangers they pose to americans. if they don't act, these dangerous drugs being smuggled across our southern boarder would effectively become street legal. we need a permanent solution to save lives. save the lives of people in despair and to protect our communities we need democrats in the house and the senate to wake up and take it seriously. nearly all states are seeing a spike in synthetic opioid detects, with the -- deaths, with the 10 western states, more than a 98% increase. this pandemic has made it worse. in my home state of washington, the fentanyl positivity rate has increased 236%.
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236%. more than any other state in the country. my community lost two teernls recently from -- teenagers recently from suspected fentanyl-related deaths. they had their whole lives in front of them. you know, just a few milligrams of fentanyl, just -- what can fit on the ear of abraham lincoln on our penny, pretty small amount, is lethal. fentanyl analogues are oftentimes more potent and over 1,000 of them have been created over the years to mimic fentanyl's opioid effects and outsmart the law. with classwide scheduling any dangerous variant of fentanyl is controlled under schedule one. according to the d.e.a., right now there's 27 new fentanyl-related substances that have been encountered and immediately controlled under the classwide scheduling order. all of those substances are many times more potent than heroin and pose serious health
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and safety risks. one recently encountered substance was approximately eight times more potent than fentanyl. in addition to the ongoing, unprecedented humanitarian crisis at the border, fentanyl and other dangerous opioids are also pouring across our border -- poring across our border at an ever-increasing rate. the border patrol reported a -- a 233% increase in fentanyl seizures as the southern border. just in the last year. if the classwide scheduling of fentanyl-related substances is allowed to expire, drug traffickers will be further emboldened to smuggle this poison into our communities. the trump administration also worked hard to make the chinese communist party accountable for the fentanyl analogues that were being manufactured in china. forcing them to crack down on it. if we let this expire and do not make it permanent, we will be sending a clear message to the c.c.p. that it's ok for them to ease up and let this
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illicit industry continue to grow. moving forward, we must work with the d.e.a. and other agencies to make this scheduling permanent. just like mr. latta's fight fentanyl act, while making reforms to improve scientific research on these substances. i'm glad that the majority is agreeing with us that we cannot let it expire. i am gratefuly disappointed that it's only a few month -- gravely disappointed that it's only a to you months. this will buy us far -- only a few months. this will buy us far more time. the seven-month extension that was requested by the biden administration. so if this five-month extension is signed into larbgs i call on democrats and -- into law, i call on democrats and republicans to begin working immediately on a longer term solution. we stand ready to immediately begin the bipartisan work necessary to get a permanent fix signed into law. and i'm committed to working over the next five months to solve this issue once and for all and not just settle on a short-term extension. i urge a yes vote on this temporary extension and i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: vote reserves. the gentleman from new jersey -- the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i'd like to yield now such time as he may consume to the sponsor of this legislation, the gentleman from new hampshire, mr. pappas. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new hampshire is recognized for such time as he may use. . mr. pappas: i rise today and urge swift passage of h.r. 2630. this legislation will save american lives by getting deadly fentanyl analogs off our streets and allowing law enforcement to bring drug trafficers to justice. the c.d.c. reports there were more than 50,000 deaths involving all synthetic opioids in the 12-month period ending in july, 2020. 50,000 deaths in 12 months. the addiction crisis has worsened as a result of this pandemic and this is mot the time to let regulations lapse or
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to back away from our commitment to get people the help they need. my state of new hampshire, like so many, has been hit incredibly hard by fentanyl and its chemical analogs. chemical versions of fentanyl are ever changing and we know that traffickers intentionally make small variations in substances, knowing that the scheduling process may take months in order to place these deadly drugs on schedule one where they belong. this means traffickers are often one step ahead of law enforcement. this legislation helps prevent that by ensuring all fentanyl analogs are categorized as schedule 1. the d.e.a. first issued a temporary order in february of 2018 and congress wisely passed legislation extending that through may 6. my act would extend the order and again ensure that constantly changing chemical versions of fentanyl, often smuggled in from mexico and china, are labeled as schedule 1. the bill will prevent our
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communities from being flooded with synthetic opioids and ensure those trafficking them will be held accountable without delay. people are in a fight for their lives right now. our country continues to be ravaged by addiction. to let down our gourd at this moment would cast unmistakable harm to our fam is will -- families and communities. i'm hopeful we'll see swift bipartisan action in congress to grant this extension. i urge passage of this bill and yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. >> thank you, madam speaker, i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from kentucky, the lead republican for the republicans on the health subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today very concerned about the deadly threat of fentanyl and fentanyl analogs. last week the energy and commerce committee held a hearing on this exact issue. here's the facts. more than 88,000 overdose deaths
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were reported by the c.d.c. in a 12-month period ending in august of 2020. this is a record for highest number of overdose deaths ever recorded in a year. in 2018, synthetic opioids which includes these dangerous were involved in 744 deaths in just kentucky. i learned from a sub tunes use health care provider that almost all patients have some sort of fentanyl in their system. many patients are not aware of it themselves. just last month, a 2-year-old in kentucky died from exposure to fentanyl. therefore i support a permanent solution of scheduling fentanyl analogs. last week some of my colleague, we had witnesses try to argue that a long-term solution for banning fentanyl is a social justice issue. one witness shared, it is being argued that fentanyl class scheduling is unnecessary because of the low number of prosecutions to date. eight. however, eight mandatory minimum
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sentences in three years, four of them members of the cartel, prove that prosecutors are not going after low-level users. witnesses also argued the scheduling of fentanyl analog, the decrease of new fentanyl analogs coming to the country was 90%. if someone is being unjustly prosecuted for fentanyl analogs that should be addressed. however, not scheduling fentanyl analogs when a witness testified drops 90% being imported will be deadly for americans since fentanyl and its analogs are responsible for thousands of deaths each year. madam chair, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. -- mr. pallone: i may have another member to speak but not right now. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from washington is recognized.
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>> thank you, madam speaker. pleased to yield to the gentleman from tampa, florida, the leader on the energy and commerce committee, mr. bilirakis. two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize -- is recognized for two minutes. mr. bilirakis: thank you, madam speaker, thank you, madam chair, appreciate it very much. the united states remains in the grip of an overdose pandemic, unfortunately. i rise in support of the extending temporary emergency scheduling of fentanyl analogs act. three years ago, madam speaker, d.e.a. temporarily scheduled fentanyl analogs as controlled substances to crack down on china and drug traffickers smuggling fentanyl across the southern border. last year, congress passed a temporary extension that continued to criminalize fentanyl analogs until may 6 of this year. previously drug traffickers could slightly change the molecules in the drug so the formula was not technically
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considered fentanyl and was not prohibited. though it was still potent, leading to a lethal game of whack-a-mole. locally we have seen that fentanyl has been a major problem weven the scheduling ban in place. pascal county in my district has had 48 people die, madam speaker, from overdoses since january of this year. and many communities throughout the country are experiencing the same overdose increases as the pandemic has only exacerbated the mental health and addiction crisis in our country. if this scheduling ban expires, madam speaker, we expect far more fentanyl to flood our streets and many more lives to be tragically lost. we cannot allow this to happen. i urge my colleagues to join us in extending this current ban and to work together in a bipartisan manner on a permanent
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solution, must be a priority, a permanent solution to this scourge. thank you very much, madam speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. loan: i yield three minutes to the -- mr. pallone: i yield three minutes to the gentlewoman from texas, ms. slee shea la jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for three minutes. ms. jackson lee: let me thank the chairman of the energy and commerce committee for a constant diligence he has and the landscape of health care and energy, consumer issues and certainly as a member of the judiciary committee we are looking forward to working with this committee on a very important matter. so i want to acknowledge the work of the energy and commerce committee and indicate that
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isn't it sad that we have not been able to find common ground to work on this issue. i'm very concerned that what we are now doing, we probably would need more time for our committees to work together. i am concerned that we might be extending the trump administration's temporary class emergency scheduling of fentanyl, a substance that all of us are vigorously opposed. i think the chairman is well aware of my long-standing concern on criminalizing substance abuse instead of preventing and treating it. i know that our two committees have a common perspective and
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agreement on that. but i have seen failed policies in my own neighborhood that have disproportionately impacted communities of color. for instance, in the 1980's, congress adopted a harsh mandatory minimum sentences for crack cocaine offenses and putting many in unjust and lengthy terms of imprisonment. so i simply want to indicate an acknowledgment of fentanyl and its impact that it has had. and i want to acknowledge the importance of us working together. but i also want to put on the record my concern with the d.e.a.'s temporary order that would group all fentanyl related substances under a class wide ban.
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what i know we can document is that the recipient, the taker, gets the short end of the criminal justice stick. and that i have concerns. but as we take more time to do this, i want to make sure the traffickers, the cartels, the gangs are put in the eye of the storm where they need to be. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman for yielding, can i get 15 seconds, mr. chairman. >> i yield an additional minute to the gentlewoman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for an additional minute. ms. jackson lee: i thank you. just to put on the record that the data shows there are significant racial disparities in some of the federal cases and mandatory minimum sentences involving fentanyl analogs. i don't want to put words in the mouth of my chairman, chairman
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pallone, but i have heard him speak to these issues and i am grateful for it. i am grateful for your sensitivity and so i wanted to come to the floor knowing the work that has been done but also knowing your understanding and i wanted to just make sure that these communities that cannot speak for themselves clearly are put on the record. i need not say that a trial we just had with the george floyd case and what was trying to be represented, albeit a very tiny or minute or nonexistent amount, and so i want to make sure that we do this right. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: and we get the time to do it. thank you for your leadership. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from washington is recognized.
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>> thank you, madam speaker. i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from georgia, the only pharmacist on our committee and a leader on this issue, mr. buddy carter. the speaker pro tempore: the distinguished gentleman from georgia is recognized for three minutes. mr. carter: i am here today to ask my colleagues across the aisle to set aside this weak bill in support -- and support permanently, permanently, as in forever, scheduling fentanyl and its analogs. we just heard from the honorable lady from texas, we all agree, it is not good, fentanyl is the problem. here we have an opportunity for us to work together to help stem the flow of deadly fentanyl and its analogs into our country. this is an issue that impacts every one of us. every one of us. whether we're republican, democrat, independent, it impacts every one of us in our communities.
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just last week, in my home state of georgia, georgia attorney general announced he's investigating fatal drug overdoses blamed on counterfeit medications, medications laced with fentanyl and its analogs. these individuals brought products they believed to be company ax, oxy coe done. overdoses like this happen every day all over the country. all over the country. yet some of my colleagues want to go soft on fentanyl analogs and let these products become legal in mere weeks temporarily schedule it for a few months until they can craft another weak plan. how can anyone seriously argue that a drug, a drug 50 times more potent than heroin, in which almost always -- and which almost always proves fatal when ingested, should ever be legal. these products are manufactured illegally and they're largely brought into the u.s. through the southern border. every year, u.s. border patrol
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agents intercept enough fentanyl, every year, u.s. agents intercept enough fentanyl and its analogs to kill every single american several times over. in fact, customs and border patrol announced in 2019 they had enough seized fentanyl to kill 800 million people. and that's what they have seized. we don't know what else came across. i visited a border last week to see the crisis firsthand. board pear troll agents are so overwhelmed with the 20-year record high number of imgrans that smugglers and cartels are using this as an opportunity to traffic more fentanyl substances. if the president and vice president would visit the border, they would be able to talk to the agents firsthand and see for themselves how serious the issue is. instead, they've elected to leave our border wide open. we are inviting drug trafficers to bring fentanyl substance into the country and distribute it in our streets. this should not be a partisan issue. fentanyl does not discriminate. it does not.
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the individuals manufacturing and distributing fentanyl and its analogs are criminals and they are getting our neighbors killed. this is not an issue that's going away. it's only getting worse. the c.d.c. reports that there were enough overdoses last year than any single year before. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. carter: i hope we will do that thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i'll continue to reserve. i don't have any other speakers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. mrs. rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. i'm pleased to yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, dr. joyce, great member and leader on the committee. two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. joyce: i thank the gentlelady for yielding. madam speaker, i rise today in
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strong support of h.r. 2630, to extend the temporary emergency scheduling of fentanyl analogues. in the rural pennsylvania communities that i represent, the fentanyl crisis is anything but temporary. every day we experience the ramifications of the opioid epidemic. which has only been exacerbated by the covid-19 pandemic. as the franklin county coroner told me just this week, fentanyl is easy to get and fast to kill. this is true across our entire commonwealth. in my home in blair county, we suffered an 80% increase in overdose deaths in 2020. as i have heard directly from our county coroner, patty ross, there is no question that the widespread availability of illicit fentanyl is a substantial factor in our
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region's drug epidemic. fentanyl already poses a deadly threat to our communities and if we don't act to extend the fentanyl import ban before it expires next month, we will invite massive vulnerabilities in our shared fight against the opioid crisis. in pennsylvania and around the country we need more accountability for those who bring illicit fentanyl into our communities. h.r. 2630 is life-saving legislation that will give law enforcement and the justice system the tools that they need to keep this dangerous illicit drug off of our streets. this temporary fix needs to be the bridge to a permanent solution to protect the american people. we do not have time to waste. by passing this bipartisan legislation, we can protect families, equip those on the front lines, and prevent
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tragedy. for the health and safety of our communities, i urge a yes vote. thank you and i yield. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i continue to reserve, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. mrs. rodgers: thank you, madam chair. i'm pleased to yield to the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. fitzgerald, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin is recognized for two minutes. mr. fitzgerald: thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to express my disappointment with h.r. 2360 -- 2630. what's happening at our southerner border is a crisis and -- southern border is a crisis and it's multiplying a crisis that's plagued this country for many years and that's the opioid epidemic. customs and border patrol agents have seized more than 4,900 pounds of fentanyl during the first five months of fiscal year 2021. already surpassing the total from last year. mexican cartels are
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increasingly responsible for producing the supply of fentanyl into the u.s. market. china, we forget about china, china remains a key source of supply for the chemicals that the mexican cartels are using to produce the fentanyl. all of this being smuggled into the u.s. through our western states. i introduced, along with senator johnson, the act to permanently designate fentanyl as a schedule one drug. closing a loophole in current law that makes it difficult to prosecute crimes involving some synthetic opioids. the g.a.o. report released last week on classwide scheduling of fentanyl-related substances found fewer law enforcement encounters with fentanyl and reduced incentives for cartels to circumvent the law through new and existing fentanyl substances. while i plan to support this bill, i think everybody will, a
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five-month extension is not nearly long enough. i urge democrats to come back to the table to find a solution that will permanently keep fentanyl as a schedule one drug. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: again, i have no additional speakers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. mrs. rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. i'm pleased to yield to the gentlelady from texas, beth van duyne, new member, taking this place by storm. the speaker pro tempore: how many minutes? mrs. rodgers: two minutes would be good. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized for two minutes. ms. van duyne: thank you so much. this issue should have already been taken care of. last week my republican colleagues and i offered an amendment to extend this ban until at least 2022. but it was blocked only to see democrats draft this much weaker bill. it's another game and example of why americans are fed up
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with congress. when house democrats rejected the republican-led amendment banning fentanyl last week, they knew that fentanyl causes a massive blight in our communities across the country. they knew that tens of thousands are left dead from overdoses every year. but refused to support it because of the names on the bill. and now they want to extend the ban of this highly addictive, highly dangerous, deadly drug, but by -- by only five months. last month c.b.p. agents seized 639 pounds of fentanyl, adding to the 2,098 pounds seized this year alone. that represents a 233% increase of drugs being smuggled across the border this year. a direct result of biden's border crisis. vice president harris was appointed as the so-called immigration czar but she spent more time in new hampshire than at the border. and if she were to visit she would see the toll that the influx of my grants is having
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on our border and it's not just the humanitarian crisis. but it's leading -- leaving us vulnerable to increased drug smuggling that is ravaging our streets. she would hear directly from the d.e.a. agents, just like my colleagues and i did. why it is so important to schedule fentanyl as a schedule one drug permanently, not just for five months. five months is not long enough. let's just stop playing politics. and there's no excuse why we're not working toward a permanent ban. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i reserve again. i have no additional speakers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from washington. mrs. rodgers: thank you. we have no further speakers. i'll yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i would urge support for this bipartisan bill and i also yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r.
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2630, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. without objection, the title is amended. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is
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the question on agreeing to the motion to recommit on h.r. 1333 offered by the gentleman from ohio, mr. wenstrup, on which the yeas and nays were ordered. the clerk will redesignate the motion. the clerk: motion to recommit on h.r. 1333, offered by mr. wenstrup of ohio. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on agreeing to the motion to recommit. members will record their votes by electronic device. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? mr. lynch: good afternoon, madam speaker. as the member designated by mrs. trahan of massachusetts, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mrs. trahan will vote no on the motion to recommit h.r. 1333, not ban act. as the member designated by mr. langevin of rhode island, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. langevin will vote no on the motion to recommit, h.r. -- h.r. 1333 as well rbling the no ban act -- as well, the no ban act. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington seek recognition? >> madam speaker, -- ms. delbene: madam speaker, as the member designated by ms. sewell, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. sewell will vote no on the motion to recommit.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: as the member designated by ms. bonnie watson coleman, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mrs. watson coleman will vote no on the motion to recommit. as the member designated by mr. donald payne, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. payne will vote no on the motion to recommit.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from georgia seek recognition? >> madam speaker, as the member designated by mr. go sar of arizona, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. gosar will vote aye. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> madam speaker, as the member designated by ms. meng, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that ms. meng will vote no on the motion to recommit.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? >> as the member designated by representative cardenas, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that representative cardenas will vote nay on the motion to recommit.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> madam speaker, as the member designated by mr. grijalva, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. grijalva will vote no on the motion to recommit.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> madam speaker, as the member designated by ms. barragan, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that ms. barragan will vote no on the motion to recommit. as the member designated by mr. lieu, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. lieu will vote no on the motion to recommit. as the member designated by mr. lowenthal, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. lowenthal will vote no on the motion to recommit.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, as the member designated by congress member costa, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that congress member costa will vote no on the motion to recommit. and madam speaker, as the member designated by congress member napolitano, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that congress member napolitano will vote no on the motion to recommit. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mrs. wilson, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mrs. wilson will vote no on the motion to rere-commit.

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