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tv   Sean Spicer Radical Nation  CSPAN  November 21, 2021 8:00am-8:41am EST

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>> the nation's most
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effective grassroots organization.we represent over 2 million activists and 20,000 sentinels who are excited every day for our freedom the local, state and national level . this is why we were so interested in our dad's new book which outlines the fight that all americans currently face in opposing the biden regime. the book highlights able grassroots agenda for defending america, securing our freedom and ensuring policy leaders put america first. sean spicer is the man you all probably don't needan introduction to . you know him but we got to know sean i think for really the first time as the first press secretary to present from but you all i'm sure can test you fell in love with
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him on during his escapades on dancing with the stars. today sean is busy posting a new show on newsmax called spicer and company talking with the president and working with activists across the country he's found time for this new fantastic book which we will discuss today. the book is called "radical nation" , joe biden and kamala harris dangerous plan for america. join me in welcoming sean spicer. [applause] so this is heritage. >> it looks beautiful it's a beautiful day in washington and we're glad to have this conversation . this is an absolutely fantastic and timely book. i had the pleasure of being able to read it and i have a sneak copy before us here
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today and all you get to take home a copy as well though i want to start there with your thinking into the book. obviously you've written a few booksbefore, this is your third . and this is well timed with everything that we're seeing in washington, the biden regime and it's a very dangerouslegislative agenda so what led you to write this book. what was your thinking behind it . >> right after it was clear joe biden was going to become president in january, two manic switches the publishing division knew we needed a book out right away and we were in a unique experience because of our past position at the white house to do this we said if we can do it quick we can take a look at these people and what do you think is important that people need to know? at the time i said we will look at the people filling these key positions and the policies they're talking about pursuing and the idea
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is it could franklybe a warning . when you write a book you sometimes don't know the environment that's going to take place when it publishes. i think god was like here you go because this is a clear landing strip. so much of what i write about is literally happening right now is voting rights, the economy, or in policy. so many of the things we were looking at in terms of the people that were going to be managing this administration. policies in those areas for the policies themselves needed to get written about because i don't think ... and this isn't an insult on the american people but there's two chapters on the media and what is happening right now is if you wake up any morning and watch the today show and read the washington post it's like have you ever seen the lego movie ? everything is great . and they call afghanistan a
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success and people said the other day the economy is a huge success. if you don't know any difference, if that's where you're getting your news from and you're going to work or dropping the kids off your living your life your life okay. you don't realize there is actually this entire plan taking place in front of our eyes that is changing the fabric and structure of our economy and the best part is you can go sean, your partisan, that's what you think. one, joe biden told us he was going to be the most progressive president ever. three fridays ago today he said we passed 1.2 and 3.5 pieces of legislation we will transform the structure and nature of the economy . his words. who asked for that western mark i don't remember that coming out during the campaign. the structure and nature of our economy, what's wrong with it? i didn't realize we had a
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huge problem but we need to understand that's what's going on and if we don't wake up and i hate to say this because i think a lot of folks on the right talk about the fact that biden is not in charge and he's not doing this but we're minimizing the problem.the problem is whoever's in charge, i don't care but they're going in the direction i don't want to go and i don't think people realize once we had there that once governments as its tentacles and things it never lets go . >> you talk about this a lot in the book and you dig deep into how biden basically became who he is and a lot of the advice he's taken and i want to read a part of this. you're referencing i think an incredibly pivotal moment in the biden administration at the beginning. you got together with these liberal historians and youput everybody in the room. there were no conservatives there, not that we aren't available . but he didn't invite them so you write and i'm going to read this for everybody . according to the reports go biden seems to be taking his
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place in history and that's why he seemshell-bent on accomplishing big things in a hurry . michael broke the story about the meeting called the discussion about how big is to be and how fast is too fast to jam through a once-in-a-lifetime historic change to america? this meeting outline for the history books marker of the big go big mentality that pervades the state. historians told biden what you wanted to hear. forget bipartisanship and playing by the rules. now is the time to bold and anything that stands inyour way including such bipartisan niceties as the filibuster . he would go on to say that historians lean in, they say go big and nothings tying this together.they confirm joe biden urging him to spend big and expand the power of
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government beyond what we saw with fdr. and joe biden loves the growing narrative that he's bolder and bigger thinking that sbr and president obama. >> exactly. but think about it. everything that he says he gets it. time is limited and i think they get this unlike a lot of previous administrations. they have a window and they know that you have to get as much done as quick as possible. last night he was asked you consider removing the filibuster for certain things and he said yes for voting rights and potentially for other things. he gets it. at some point they're just going to do it especially if they realize they're going to lose the house which they will and the few weeks leading up to it is going to be a flurry. they're going to get as much done as possible. i will give him credit as a politician for that.
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he understands he has to cement his legacy. fdr isstill fdr. he went big and bold and we have all these government programs because of it . the only way you become the talking point in the future is if people start going do you know what biden did? he's got to get all this stuff done. 1.2 trillion, 3.5 trillion, he gets it. he wants people to be talking about him ad infinitum as remember what biden did and replace the talk of the new deal with remember when biden passed build back better? that's going to be the new talking point on the left and if he gets the fact that barack obama may have been the first black president but he will be the most progressive president and he wants to cement that. i don't think it's alarmist to suggest that at his age he is probably a one term president.
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and i think he recognizes that and anybody with eyes and ears and a pulse gets that. he's going to do as much as he can as quickly as he can. >> the impact of this will be profound. >> absolutely. i think one of the things that i like to say is you have to understand what i call the big y? why are they doing all ofthis ? the thing is it in isolation you can explain one or two things and say it's because of this or that. and it's not. they all tied together. everything is about maintaining permanent political power . if you have power and its permanent then you can continue to pass your policies in that item. what do you need to do? one is you need to maintain power in those key areas so you pack the court, too, you make dc a state in puerto rico a state so you get potentially forpermanent democratic senators .
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dc votes 5 to 95 on a goodday for democrats . it's a given. you will have to democrats and considering the history of the senate it would be hard to start overcoming not just to but for so that gives you that. guaranteed you never lose a super majority and what do you also do? you need new voters so you let people come in through the southern voter and make them eligible for citizenship . do things like they're doing in vermont where you are now allowing noncitizens to vote in local elections and give them driver's licenses so if you have a drivers license and you can folk who is going to check to make sure you can't vote in a federal election? no one so you ensure that you're always going to have the votes and you've always got the institutions in control. . >> we've seen that with $5.5 trillion reconciliation
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infrastructure package that would affect all of the policies that you warned about in this book entitled the grave. there's a process agenda with the filibuster. additional states. there's a political agenda of course, they want to continue towin elections . but there's also the cancel agenda and you talk about this in your book . agenda to cancel conservatives in every aspect of life. in the media, they're going after newsmax. in the mainstream press they're going after families and parents now because they're standing up against critical race theory. what's the deal with cancel culture and this cancel agenda. >> it's time to the first two things. liberals are afraid of conservatives because our agenda and our policies make sense . and the second that you expose that, they win. they win and we lose so what
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do we do? they have to cancel us, they don't want your voice is heard so they call you a misogynist . anytime that you challenge anything you're a bad person. and igot to be honest as someone who's got with my fair share.it doesn't feel great . and it takes a pretty thick skin. i'll give you a sillyexample. i was out with a bunch of guys couple of weeks ago . and they were telling me this story out in last county virginia where a bunch of parents were getting involved in their school . and one of the women works at verizon. so she was arguing against a lot of the changes that they were making saying she didn't think that they made sense or whatever so what do they do? they called verizon, they called hr and said you're a publicly traded company and we want to let you know this woman has been engaged in racist behavior and you know, should that come up in the workforce we just want to
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make sure you documented it. that she's been doing this in her private life. her racist actions were speaking out about changes to the that the school board wanted to make what they want to make sure it was documented in hr because you know, so what do you think hr does? i never, maybe i should call her boss. see what's going on immediately, what's the reaction? i'm going to stop talking about this, i'm not going to back down, once people in front of their house who and who want their number listed online. they cancel you. they shame you. if you speak out against it and it takes a lot, i get it. i wouldn't want that for my family or friends. i know my family, i wouldn't wish it on anybody. but they get the game which is i'm going to silence you, shut you up and then again, you can't get the facts out, you canpresent an alternative . you brought it up, they're trying to get iris a letter
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to at&t, verizon and all of these cable carriers and said slain when you're carrying newsmax . what? what do you mean explain. first of all because we have to, viewers, thank you. we, what's going on in america where if you offer an alternative view, you can have msnbc on but no one cares west and it's amazing to me but that's the idea is to getrid of any dissenting voices . and i say this in an audience that's particularly young today, it's not easy but you've got to do it because if you don't fight back and get your voice out there, they win. and i don't want to jump ahead but there's a chapter in the book that deals with this about how to get involved and understand and fight back and they make it difficult for folks to do it but i believe and i digress but in every argument, if you dissected, we win, they lose
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so they're afraid of the facts and the logic behind conservative principles and ideas. >> they refuse to debate us on the facts. >> so what they say is you support trump. it's allabout style. how can you support this? what about the facts, what about the policy ? i want to give you my favorite example in the book and obviously i'm accessed with this because it's easy. the framers decided the district of columbia where we are now should be separate. they didn't want to see the government in any state so in 1790 apart from virginia and created a 10 square mile district which we are in right now and in 1835 they gave back part of virginia to virginia because it wasn't being used and i happen to live there now. so the democrats come along and say district of columbia should be a state. we should allow people to vote. i'm for voting rights.
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that sounds great but let me think of a different solution. why don't we give back part of maryland to maryland if it's not being used? because it's already a state and access. there areagainst that . why? why wouldn't you just give back to maryland which is maryland which by the way is the same thing we did to virginia and you keep this enclave from about here to the white house, carved that out with afederal district . thatseems to make the most sense but again what's the real motive ? it's about getting two senators and if we don't scratch the surface of the arguments we miss the real motive at hand . >> it's amazing the way the left works because they almost convince you. we've been talking about that that imperative action. they almost convince you it's sad telling you it's water
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and that's a huge problem for generations, younger than me that doesn't even know what freedom is. we're all here as conservatives talking about preserving freedom and protecting your freedom for people that are in their 20s, those that are just getting their first job, graduating from college, coming out of the pandemic by eight-year-old son being forced to wear a mask in school. this is the world he knows. this is what he knows so what advice do you have for us to think through how do we first define freedom. the next generation and in an effort to protect it to even get to the role of preserving it and having it down through generations to generations. >> the first thing is to kind of talk about what your delving into which is to explain that having a free exchange of ideas is what the country is all about. it's ironic that the left, the group that talks about themselves being the tolerance inclusive group is the least tolerant . i don't have a problem with
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msnbc. i have a problem with rachel maddow, i think that's awesome. i love the idea there's dissenting voices. i love to flip the channel. there. much of it is the same with my family but i think that's healthy. i it makes me a stronger conservative when i can listen to what they sayso i think the easiest thing is to go back to logic andfacts . why should we hear both sides ? i think you should hear crazy people as you go okay, that is crazy. now i know why were doing what we're doing but you should realize that there's dissenting opinion that there are a spectrum of opinions. that's what makes this debate healthy. we should encourageit . especially at college campuses. the funny part about college that's one of the reasons you're there is to get exposed to ideas and different views and yet it's like no, here is what we will listen tocomrades ? i think what i would say is that you push people to say no, but that was in let's
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talk about it and then secondly i think it's a get involved. understand that the tools there whether it's inherited inherited action, i grew up in the 90s when campaigns were like the heritage issue. it was my bible because it had facts and figures in it and it's all available online now. so when you want to talk about healthcare and tax policy you can debate with facts because the left wants to talk about theories and feelings. i want to talk about facts. what's going to make yourlife better ? it's going to make your business grow, all that kind of stuff and if we make fact-based wewin more . >> the book spends a lot of time presidential warning about what is to come and one of the things worth about is our american institutions being westernized against us and in particular all out assault on all us, average
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americans and particularly parents and one of the unique phenomenons that have happened around the country as a grassroots organization we been able to be on the road to watch isall of these parents coming out of the woodwork getting involved , having the facts, going to the microphone and being brave enough tostand up . all those things parents may not have been conservative voters before. probably not. they may be new to the full so what can we do to bridge the gap right now between where we want to go with a conservative america first policy agenda and channeling that energy is so palpable for parents right now? >> one of the beauties is that we have more tools than ever before. when i was growing up we had newspapers and you can write letters to the editor ineight days, maybe one would get through but that was it .>> does anybody know what newspapers are anymore?
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i have a bunch of newspapers and my kids go where do those come from? there can. but i think one of the things that you have the ability, but i love just tweeting out literally on facts of the day or something. i think will. there are videos and whether it's tick-tock or snapshots. there's so many tools at your disposal now to get involved and just lay back south and issues in a way that is not necessarily confrontational but like i was walking down pennsylvania avenue this morning on the house side. there's a big thing from the petersons to about the national debt and i started tweeting out the national debt now is $28 trillion . every single american owes $89,000 now. so i was like that would be just a fact. once you realize that, when you talk about this sending this is before wespend another $5 trillion you although 90 grams .
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every person. and one when interest rates go back up which they will support the fact we're going to be screwed because i think explaining to people what is going on it just again we don't have to persuade in the same way that they do because we can just say you realize you own this much money you're going to open another 5 trillion, what are you getting for it. i'm really interested in watching this town hall with fiberglass night . no guilt. how many times did he say that? with the no joke. my dad used to say joy, no joke but he's sitting there so i gather all of the big companies and i saidstart operating 24 seven . they will come to work right now for eighthours if you want them to work 24 seven . first the first eight hours under control and worry about the other 16. the problem is everyone's like that's a great idea. they can't get people to work for eight hours a day there answer is to make them work
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24. two additional ships. hello. we don't have for drivers because they're getting paid to stay at home.we're not getting people to make goods to ship them, go to a restaurant now or anything anywhere. they got science .and their answers are to make people work more. today? but it defies common sense. and i think that's the beauty of what we have going right now. if we can walk up to somebody and say let me get this straight. the administration solution is to tell people who are working to work more. i had d in economics and i know that's bad. >> what does president from the book? >> if you flip it, he endorsed it right on the back . he said it's an ata all the way and i appreciate that. i would sayand honey , this is meant to complement in
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case the president is listening. give the president a lot of credit for what he did in his office and i've got to be honest, for one thing, did more thananything else was bring common sense . i told a bunch of stories and i remember one day were sitting in the roosevelt room right after he was trying to do this executive order on the keystone xl pipeline and he stops in the middle and says hey jessica, going to use us steel for this and he just stops. what do you mean, we're doing all this and not using us steel? stop, we're not doing this until you guys renew this thing because were going to make sure we use us steel. why are we doing all this stuff and not making sure we use us products? there are some challenges in doing that and he understood. we work through, source material that we had but the point is it took common sense
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to say why are we making america? i was a trade partner under bush for the last three years and we were told unfortunately nafta as a sign trade agreement and we have to enforce so there's nothing we can do. okay. try came in and said i don't care. it's abad deal for our workers . why are wisconsin dairy farmers getting screwed? what is our technological development getting screwed? we're going to tear it up and redo it and everyone says you can't do that, that's not how it's supposed to work and he saidi don't care . why would we have done that? why were we in a deal with our trading partners to the north and south on a deal that screwed our own workers. in 1990 it was a different world, i get why notmodernize it . and he had yet the mentality on in washington is you can't
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touch it, he said look. brought common sense to so many issues. what arewe going to china and letting them walk all over us ? all these things and i think part of it is we need more commonsense brought to the debate .that's what i think more than anything when i talked to him about it he recognized and appreciated that we need to get back to understanding what worked and what didn't. the problem frankly with the last election beyond all the irregularities was it was style versus substance. every time i talked to a person that was either a democrat voting for biden or a prospective republican they said i just don't like his tweets. okay, tweets don't hurt you. i'm sorry snowflake. it's not how it works. please don't make you better, policies do and i think we're seeing the consequences of that now. >> i think also trump taught us how to fight.
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>> you brought this up a minute ago. you have to understand the country is worth taking and if you don'tfight, they win . it's worth it so many levels. if i can it was funny. a couple weeks ago it was two or three maybe now i got an email on a wednesday morning and he said president trump in 2019 had a point at the board of visitors to the naval academy. i got an email and it said thank you for your service, president biden would like your resignation by 6 pm today or you'll be terminated and i will back no . and then we sued him. and is not easy, but there's 11 people that were on the board of west point, the naval academy of the air force academy and two of them i self, we put our name on a lawsuit. it's not great going up against, but it's the right
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thing to do. my term ends in a month. i might have been to one more meeting. but it's important to set the precedent and the easy thing is to say that's a bummer. the hard thing is to say i'm willing to put my name on a lawsuit and sue the president of the united states but it's about whether or not a future president can do this. and i think if we're willing to go out there and say that we believe what makes this country great is worth fighting for in each little way show up at a school board meeting, run for office. engage online with people, put facts out there but it's our country to save. >> there's a lot we can fight on right now. the fight to make it easier to vote, the election integrity issue is obviously front and center across the country. the left has used it to smear
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every single one of us that once safe and secure elections. we talked about critical race theory and the role of school boards and parents and the demanding the civility in our schools and not allow them to be indoctrinated is obviously we've got this billion-dollar bending behemoth that's comingtowards us. where do you see , the next fight. the next clip, what's the next one for conservatives. >> is an interesting question because there's how i would answer this i believe if republicans out of their way we will get the house of representatives. the question is will they lead. what will they fight for. being an in power for the sake of in power is not worth fighting for. i mean, that's great i'm sure you get a better driver stationary and things like that but at the end of the day i think that there's a lot worth waiting for that youjust mentioned . and i think that the republican leaders need to say if you give us the honor and opportunity to leave again we will fight for you.
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we will fight for this country. it's not easy. but i'll tell you, there is so much going on in government why are we not looking and finding. there should be more of a value of our tax dollars. how much money is being wasted. why are we just, the you stop and say has any centers within the $3.5trillion bill ? that should be the first question. where spending all thismoney, do you even know what's in . >> and think about this, they just started to negotiate the price to . tell us what number you can limit it. what do you want first and then tell me how much it costs. not how much are you willing to blow up our future generations money. and by the way, was getting lost in all of this, you know whose financing,china . think about this, we went through a pandemic that they sent us then we turned around and said to me by our drums from you.
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i think that's literally like going to the guy who robbed your house and saying give me alone . >> ... do you think that's what they're going to do? i'm getting screwed. you're costing me more money. i should come home. again it defies logic. >> you spend a lot of time in here outlining everything we have to fight on, talk about here today. you dance around the things we need to do. it's very clear here in currently passionate about this. we are to be there. we have to be the man in the arena, show up, have the facts on our side, take us into. what if we get canceled? what about the center in georgia who lost his job?
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what do you do then? what's next? >> well again the easy thing is to give up. the hard thing is to stay in the arena you just mentioned. but if you look generally speaking i think the people who stay in the rain and fight eventually win. it may not be easy. it may not be quick. we live in a society that wants instant gratification and wants to look at your tweets and say how many retweets and likes to i get? sometimes it takes a while. it's like a video you put up and go i got 15 news that three days it's 100. some things take a while to percolate but be willing to stay in the arena to engage. when they cancel you as i said over and over again they win when you give up. so stay in. go to a different platform. trump just announce his own platform. there's better, parler. they are losing the ability to do that. they control the ecosystem for so long.
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big tech hollywood late-night shows academia government big tech, all big corporate america. they control -- but what happens is in the '90s it was the advent of talk radio and they started to go how do we come around that? then they took over big tech and suddenly republicans and conservatives started think we can use twitter so what did they do? started canceling. our team is gone to build two platforms. we need to be willing to go and migrate. look it's amazing. we launched newsmax to you in half ago. there are probably more people in his room that watched the first episode now were averaging hundreds of thousands a night. people -- we don't do a ton of advertising. it's word-of-mouth people are coming say like the network i like your show. that's because there's alternatives and are losing their grip. that's what, if they don't want you to see anything but what they show you.
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but i'm a big believer in whether it's newsmax the blade heritage we need to support the big team and get out there share stuff, encourage other people to get involved. it is part of our duty as americans to be in this arena. >> america worth fighting for. push back against this potential radical nation. i've got one last question for you. a picture. a mask. oh, my gosh if there was an image to the last year and a half. talked to me about deciding this picture why you chose of what it means for the cover. >> so we went back and forth on a lot of different designs and it's like anything else when you find the right one, and this might come it's my third book, first two just had me on it but even then you go through and you're like whatsit image you want to convey? when we saw that it was like that it. it spoke to us because that is
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everything that is a perfect it's the hypocrisy. it's the double standard. it's the freedom. everything, you try -- looking over her shoulder, looking out kind of like -- >> how are you feeling today? >> how are you feeling today. i love the fact yesterday we covered this last time she walked into her own birthday party and yelled surprise. you can't even do a birthday right. you wonder why the rest of the country screwed up if you get to a birthday surprise right you know you're in trouble. >> wow. thank you for that. thank you to sean spicer. >> thank you to heritage, heritage action. [applause] >> "radical nation" we have free copies are going today that sean spicer disgraces to design for as just a second with refreshments to enjoy what to think of what you for joining us today and for sean for leading the fight.
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>> thank you all for being here. thank you. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> booktv every weekend features leading authors discussing their latest nonfiction books and watch our coverage of the miami book fair featured authors include craig whitlock with his book the afghanistan papers.
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>> and on "after words," farah stockman talks about her book american-made, what happens to people when work disappears, examine have u.s. compass moving overseas has affected the working class in america. >> watch booktv every weekend and find a full schedule in your program guide or watch online anytime at booktv.org. >> stay up-to-date on the latest in publishing with booktv new podcast about books. we look at industry news and trends through insider interviews as well as reporting on the latest nonfiction releases and bestseller list. you can find about books in all of our podcast on c-span now out or whatever you get your podcast is also watch about books online anytime at booktv.org. >> here's a look at some publishing industry news.
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the 72nd annual national book awards were announced during a virtual ceremony this week. issues what is include tonya miles all that she carried for nonfiction and jason motz hell of a book for fiction. music streaming service spotify it's entered the audiobook business. the purchase of the ohio-based company and 325,000 audiobooks to the streaming at which currently has 381 million monthly subscribers. best-selling author wilbur smith has died at the age of 88. he was the author of close to 50 books that serve more than 140 million copies internationally including the novel river god and his 2018 memoir on levered rock. in other news publishers weekly is announce the best books of the year. the top five nonfiction titles are all that she carried, all the frequent troubles of our days, dirty work, a little devil
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in america, and somebody's daughter. according to npd book scan print book sales rose over 17% for the week ending november 6. but people continued bring you new programs and publishing news and you can watch all of our past programs anytime at booktv.org. >> tonight we're going to talk about your book, it feels like a setup, because i'm feeling very -- we got good kleenex here. the kind that doesn't leave particles on your face. >> okay spread hoping we can have an honest conversation and we have to remember there's other people here so it's not like the good girlfriend conversation that we still need to have. >> it's like we don't know these people.

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