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tv   American Morning  CNN  September 17, 2009 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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implicate yale clark. the police took him in to custody. the police scheduled to hold a press conference. we will be covering that live. >> the fbi searching an apartment and home in suburban colorado. they are looking for evidence of a terrorist plot with links to al qaeda. the afghan national at the center of the investigation is denying he had any part of a terror plot. his visit last weekend to new york prompted raids on three queens apartments. we are going to get the latest developments on that story just ahead. the president forging ahead on health care. today taking his aim to college students. she hoping to seize any momentum after the unveiling of the long-awaited health plan. so far people to right and left don't seem to like the so-called bipartisan plan that has come out senate. what's the president saying about it? we are live at the white house this morning. we begin with news of a possible break in the investigation of the murder of yale graduate student annie le.
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we are keeping a close watch on developments out of new haven, connecticut, now because police are expected to hold a news conference in less than an hour. there are reports this morning of a possible dna match that could tie the yale lab technician, raymond clark, to annie le's death. mary snowe is covering the story. as we said in an hour we expect to hear more details. what do you know now? >> reporter: expected that it will be a big announcement. this was a news conference called overnight. the police chief here in new haven had been saying that they were looking for any dna match in order to make an arrest. this after raymond clark, 24-year-old yale technician, was taken into custody and had samples taken from him, search warrants were executed at his home. and we do know that a police department at a nearby town near
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his home had confirmed they were helping assist the new haven police department in surveillance of a person of interest. and it is believed that raymond clark is in a hotel. he has been under surveillance and even though he hadn't binochely named a suspect. the police chief here said that the police knew where he was at all times. his car was impounded yesterday. more evidence was taken from his home. the connecticut state police had expedited the dna evidence that they were analyzing in this case. obviously became a priority. the police have been in anticipation of brief thing morning and new conference called. we are work our sources trying to match that -- those reports about a dna match. >> mary snow for us this morning. we will check in with you throughout the show as we get more developments. this hastily called news conference announced in the middle of the night set to take
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place in less than an hour. developments on the fbi's investigation of terror plot. agents wearing hazardous materials, suits, raided a suburban denver home of an afghan national with suspected ties to al qaeda. the visit to new york over the 9/11 weekend triggered monday's raids in queens. the story seems to have gone from new york cross-country now. >> this investigation did start in denver and took federal agents to new york. the end point or just a stopping point along the way is still an open question. with some new york city residents on edge, an investigation into a possible terror strike ongoing this morning. fbi agents searched the denver home of an afghan man that traveled across the country and is 24-year-old az nazi. this is fbi director robert mueller answering questions on
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capitol hill about monday's predawn raid on two apartments in queens, new york. >> you assure new yorkers and the american public that the situation is under sufficient control and there is no imminent danger that they are safe? >> i can say i do not believe there is imminent danger from that particular investigation. >> so far no one has been arrested. cnn affiliate ksa in denver says he went to new york to resolve an issue related to a vending cart issue and denies he has any ties to terrorism. >> i think the main thing he wants to understand is that he had absolutely nothing to do with this. he loves this country and living here. that's why he brought his family here. >> reporter: zazi was stopped by police before crossing the george washington bridge for what he was told a random drug stop. later his rental car was towed for alleged parking violations. the police asked if they could search the car and examine a
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laptop while it was impounded. zazi agreed. zazi's return visit to new york prompted fbi agents to raid the two homes of people he contacted. one of the men questioned by agents spoke to us on a condition we not use his name. while not close he's known za zi for seven years. he ran into him at a queens monthsk and agreed to let him stay at his place for the night. he can't turn away a fellow pashtun. he did not see zazi leave the next day. there are several events that put new york on heightened security. the president's visit to wall street and, of course, the upcoming united nations general assembly when world leaders will gather next week. once it got to new york, things really began to quickly -- move quickly. >> we treeappreciate that. the make or break battle on health care back on center stage. president p obama hits the road to make his case for revamping
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health care. today's audience will be college students and many of whom don't have insurance. the ones in the audience. the president's campaign to win support coming on the heels of the long-awaited and one and only health care reform proposal that was aiming for bipartisan support. suzanne malveaux was the only reporter live at the white house this early. let's start with the plan. we heard about it, of course, over the past several weeks. chairman of the senate finance committee, max baucus. and his bipartisan gang of six that was supposed to be working to ham they are out. what's the white house say about this it this morning? >> a lot of what you see in the proposal very much reflected. sheer what we saw from the president and what he actually said he wanted in his own plan. the obama plan, if you will, when he went before congress this last week. to the white house, they are satisfied with this. you are taking a look. you see plan that doesn't add to the deficit. it is less than $900 billion over ten years. that's a mark, a figure the president had actually noted himself. this is something that mandates all people have health care coverage and insurance.
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that's a -- from when the president was campaigning, slam his opponent hillary clinton for that. but he has since turned around -- come around to that. the other thing is that it provides consumer protection. so insurance companies can't drop people who are very sick. they can't deny them coverage because of pre-existing conditions. the one thing this doesn't have that the president did want he had preferred was what we have all been talking about, public option, the government-run alternative insurance plan to provide a xeg of private companies and said it -- instead a co-op owned by the collective -- by the people that are a part of that plan. so that is a bit different. the white house, too, the president disappointed you don't see the kind of bipartisanship that he had hoped for. this is something he ran on change but also ran on bridging the differences, the gaps, the republicans and democrats. doesn't look like that will happen. >> was this the one shot? was this the -- seemed to be the move that had the best chance?
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what happens now is that the president is still out there on the road and still trying to sell this. was this the biggest chance to get anything done? >> it really is the biggest chance. this is not over. far from over. what we are going to see is a lot of obama in the next couple of days. we are talking about five talk shows. sunday shows he will go and do one-on-one interviews with. including our state of the union. he will have a huge rally today at a college campus and then is even going to hit late night dave letterman to bring a little spin, comedy as well pushing for health care reform. so he's really going to be in campaign mode, if you will, to try to solve this thing. >> that's what it feels like, i'm sure. campaign mode again. all right. >> campaign mode. >> suzanne malveaux for us. thanks. >> sure. >> going to see a lot of obama. lot of people complaining we don't see him enough. just kidding.
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. a few of the stories we are keeping an eye on. one developing in afghanistan. car bomb exploded in a residential area near kabul. at least two international soldiers killed and 38 others wounded. in northern california, more bones found on the property belonging to nancy and phillip garrido as well as the property next door, police say they cannot tell at this time if the fragments are human. the garridos are accused of kidnapping jaycee dugard when she was 11. keeping her in a makeshift compound in their backyard for 18 years. authorities have been searching the area for evidence to link the couple to at least two other child abduction cases. sometimes do you something sxwrong you get your privileges taken away. well, that's what happened to the governor of south carolina. we are learning with more fallout over mark sanford and his admitted long-distance extramarital affair. federal documents coming out shortly after he confessed to having a mistress in argentina, the department of homeland security yanked the governor's
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security clearance. the action was taken according to documents because of concerns about his, quote, lack of candor and trustworthiness. officials reportedly reinstated sanford's clearance a week later. >> there you go. community organizing group a.c.o.r.n. under fire after the undercover tapes came out. employees helping people posing as a pimp and prostitute and giving them advice on how they can get away with doing it. now the group who is behind the videos also being the subject of questions themselves. our jessica yellin is digging into this deeper and will join us after the break. (woman) dear cat.
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meineke. coldplay for you this morning. welcome back to the most news in the morning. the obama administration expected to announce this morning that it is scrapping many elements of u.s. missile defense shield in europe originally proposed for president bush when he took office president obama promised he would study the plan defense system. he joined michael mulen yesterday and said they were close to the end of a seven-month review. if you had to pay more for your coke or popesy would you drink it less? that's apparently the thing behind a proposal to battle obesity. a group of nutrition and economic experts say that a penny per ounce tax could help soda drinkers cut two pounds a year. they say the idea much like a
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cigarette tax would cut consumption while raising government revenues. more than 30 states charge sales tax on soft zblings how did that red bull treated you this morning? >> stop it. also, something people think it is important you are allowed to carry a gun on amtrak. will the senate approving a measure allowing amtrak passengers to carry licensed handguns in their checked bags? legislation said amtrak would lose federal subsidies if it prohibits passengers from bringing their guns onboard under security restrictions similar to those imposed on airlines. opponents claim that it is too costly for amtrak to ensure checked firearms would not be stolen or misused. a.c.o.r.n. feeling the heat. employees caught on hidden camera appearing to advise a couple posing as a pimp and prostitute about how to lie about their profession to get housing help. a.c.o.r.n. getting increased scrutiny from congress and even the fbi and the group itself has ordered an internal
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investigation and review of its practices. but these undercover videos are also raising many questions, including who is behind them. jessica gellen has that part of the story. >> two self-described filmmakers have made big news with their undercover a.c.o.r.n. videos. they raised lots of questions about more than just what's on those tapes. these are the hidden camera videos that triggered a firestorm over grass routes activist group a.c.o.r.n. behind the videos, two 20-something. hannah guiles seen here posing as a prostitute and james o'keefe pretending to be her pim. >> anna giles and i continued our investigation. >> reporter: the two are conservative filmmakers. according to her web biography, giles is the daughter of conservative writing doug giles. now an internet sensation, she appeared on fox news. >> as i sat there i was like i cannot believe they are actually falling for this and not necessarily falling for it but
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what can we get them to say next. >> reporter: o'keefe says he is a filmmaker dedicated to exposing corruption the mainstream media ignores. here he is in his pimp outfit on fox news. >> the future of investigative journal itsm and future of political activism. >> reporter: the two have gotten results. since these videos were posted the u.s. senate has voted to cut off some of a.c.o.r.n.'s funding and media outlets from "the washington times" to jon stewart are asking -- >> where were the real reporters on this story? investigative media, give me camera three. where the hell were you? >> it is not the first time agenda driven activists made headlines with hidden camera reports. animal rights group peta makes them tall time. political campaigns have driven news with videos like this. rememb that remark considered racially offensive by some took down an incumbent senator.
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experts say reporters are wise to be cautious about posing as fake characters using hidden cameras to get a story. >> you have to weigh again how important the information is and how important the story is to society, the community, and is there any other way to get at it. i think it does raise questions of fairness and credibility of the media. >> the video makers turned down our request for an interview through their sponsor. conservative commentator. he tells tuesday new two made the videos out of a sense of idealism and righteousness and tells us that they have more videos coming. t.j., kiran. >> jessica yellin for us this morning. christine romans joining news a moment. talking about your health and money as we talk about whether or not any health care plan will come out of congress this sessi session. fueling an exhilarating adventure. each entree is bursting with high-quality protein...
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>> christine romans. >> money money money ♪ >> good morning. >> i don't have any money, money, money. >> we have health care reform package of some kind. >> okay. this is the baucus proposal. we have been poring over it. summaries were 200-some pages. we are trying to figure out what this means for your family budget. what are the changes to you. like the other proposals if you already have health care coverage through your company that doesn't change, nothing changes for you. all of this is slated to begin in 2013. so it wouldn't start immediately if, of course, this is adopted as planned, et cetera, et cetera. that whole bag of caveats. we are going to go through what we have and tell what you it means for your money. first of all, you would be required to buy insurance if you don't have insurance. health care insurance. or you would be fined. really want to make sure they cover as many people as they possibly can. what do those fines, penalties for not having insurance look
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like? if you are a family of four and you are make being $66,000 a year, the fine for you is $3,800 a year. if you are an individual making above $32,000 a year, the fine is $950 a year. okay. if you are a family of four making below $66,000 a year, the fine for not buying insurance is $1,500. if you are an individual making below that -- that should be below $32,000, the fine is $750. you can see sort of where you sit for your situation what the fines would be for not buying insurance. now, this program would also -- this proposal would also expand medicaid eligibility. it expands a government-run health care program that we already have and so -- if your income for a family of four is $30,000 or individual is $14,000, you would be eligible for medicaid. there are a lot of other differences here, including the fact that there would be a
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state-run insurance option. you would go to the state-run insurance option if you didn't get insurance through your company and go to the state-run insurance option and able to buy insurance and depending on how much money you make, it is a sliding scale. depending on how much money you make and how much your family brings in, there would be subsidies, government subsidies, to help you pay your premiums, pay for your drug co-pays and other co-pays. depending on where you are on the income scale, that's how it is going to fit for you. >> are people -- families in a position they are trying to balance out -- is it going to cost me more to pay for the insurance or the fine? i mean, one thing say we are going to cover everybody but essentially i'm going to penalize if you don't get yours. >> the hope is the subsidies and premiums and state exchanges, the idea here is that the fine would offset what you would -- you should go and buy the insurance for anyway. there will be a fine line to walk and it is changing. >> there's also -- you said if you have us current -- a current plan you would like, it wouldn't change. there are some that say that's not the case. senator rockefeller has been
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heart or this plan and said because of the plan to what tax, so-called cadillac plans. meaning plans that offer a lot of -- >> some concern your premiums will rise. there are some people that say the biggest winners for health care reform and including the baucus plan are people that do not have health insurance now and people who have a pre-existing condition and can't get health insurance. the real winners here are the people who can't go out and buy insurance because they have something their family who has a illne illness. that would go away. and if you don't have any insurance at all and you are uncovered, the state plans that -- state exchange would have to have four levels insurance, bronze, silver, gold, platinum. all of them would cover preventative care and 100% covered under all of the plans. also, prenatal care and all the other things would be the baseline. the idea here is to get people covered at least those -- those baselines. you are right. i mean, when you start looking to the other groups who are included in this, there will be changes for people.
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>> figure out a way to pay for it and how to do it good but remember, all of this is fluid. horse trading. they will be fight being this behind closed doors for god knows how long. we don't know what it will look like in the end. this most recent proposal key democrat outlined really close to the president's plan, what it will look like for your wallet. >> okay. thanks. >> stay with us. the story probably going to be our breaking story this morning out of yale about the murder of student there actually found, body found, on her wedding day. there she is, annie le. well, coming up this morning, a press conference from police at 7:00. we are told -- reports are out that possibly -- a dna match and an arrest could be made but how is there an arrest when police to this point have not even said they had a suspect? i'm going to get to this case with attorney paul cowan after the break. an eleven sixteenths wrench over here? here you go.
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welcome back to the most news of the morning. 28 minutes past the hour. pick a policy and there is likely to be a czar reporting to the white house. special advisers. they are nothing new. many presidents have had them. the problem for many in congress is that these people are virtually unknown to lawmakers and to you. that could change. lisa sylvester is digging deeper on that. >> reporter: there are about 30 so-called czars watching over everything from afghanistan to the economy. some lawmakers complain these adviser have bypassed the senate confirmation process. and answering only to the president and can't be forced to testify before congress. >> this formation of a shadow cabinet that, in fact, more than
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twice the size of the real cabinet is a danger to the very question of who is advising the president and on what basis. >> reporter: representative frank wolf says the czars have not been put through full security screenings unlike cabinet members who have had to go through a lengthy vetting process. >> the fbi said they do a background check but it is the same background check they would do for an intern at the white house. they do not do a security clearance. >> reporter: jones stepped down after controversial statements he made surfaced. the president obama's car czar, stephen ratner, without explanation, resigned amid reports the new york attorney general was investigating an very many company linked to him. the white house defended itself saying the practice of appointing czars is nothing new. >> positions that date back at least to many, many administrations where there may be policy coordination between
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many different departments in order to make governmental responses more efficient. >> reporter: the democratic national committee followed up saying, quote, most telling of the credibility of the attacks is that they come from the same republican party that didn't utter a peep about the 47 documented czars in the bush administration. but it is not just republicans bothered by the czars. this week democratic senator russ feingold, who chairs the senate constitution subcommittee, asked the white house to disclose more information. who are the individuals? what are their responsibilities? and whether and how these positions are consistent with the appointments of the constitution. lawmakers con to press the issue introducing legislation to withhold funding from czars calling for congressional hearings and the resolution of disapproval introduced in the house of representatives. kiran, t.j.? >> lisa sylvester. 30 minutes past the hour and a look at the top stories this morning. president obama's pushing
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forward on health reform and taking it on the road and online. in fact in a few hours he heads to the university of maryland. go terps. his audience, college students because many young adults don't have health insurance. the president's rally will be shown on facebook for students nationwide to watch. >> for the first time since taking office, president obama's going to award the medal of hon score it is going to a soldier in afghanistan. the ceremony pays tribute to monty, 30-year-old massachusetts native killed in action in 2006. sacrificing his life to save some of his comrades. the trial of a louisville high school football coach could go to the jury today. jason stinson charged with reckless homicide in the death of one of his players, 15-year-old max gilpin. prosecutors allege his brutally practice in august in the heat last year is what led to the death. we are expecting to hear a half hour from police in connecticut on a break in the yale murder case. reports say there is a dna match
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and an arrest could be coming. the lab technician, raymond clark, is the one that they essentially called a person of interest in the strangulation death of grad student annie le. paul cowell joining us here now. we have questions for you. first and foremost, never said they had a suspect we see them walking out with a guy in handcuffs. what was the point of this whole spectacle? why not call him a suspect? why put him in handcuffs? >> very strange case. this has been a very public investigation. usually the police are quiet about these things. the investigation takes place behind closed doors. yet, here he is paraded publicly in handcuffs. very, very strange. i mean, think think he has been more than a, quote, person of interest since the beginning of this investigation. i think he's really been a suspect. it looks like police must have been very close to thinking that they were going to keep him in custody permanently and that's why he had the handcuffs on and something about the investigation didn't pan out at that point and they had to release him. >> they must be missing
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something major. if they can go to the point of the video we saw there of putting him in the handcuffs and seems as if he height be the only person we know of, they have been looking at, so something big must be missing from their investigation p. >> well, i think from what i read about the case, they had narrowed it to him on a circumstantial basis because bear in mind there are security cards that allow entry and exit from certain rooms in this lab, this rodent lab, at yale. and my suspicion is that they probably had narrowed it to only a couple of people who had access to the area where the body was found. and they were looking for one additional thing, a dna link, that would take him permanently as the suspect and i think probably we are going to find that today. >> they have been telling us now that they know where he is at all times. there are only a couple of ways to interpret this. sounds like they are saying we are just -- hang out until we come arrest you. it is like an arrest -- you are on standby to be arrest. >> it is becoming a real spectacle. there are press reports this morning he's holed up in a hotel and the hotel is surrounded by
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the police and i presume there's going to be some sort of camera coverage scene when they swoop in. you don't see that very off nen a murder case. this is quite a spectacle. >> what ris rik they running here if they -- if they feel this strongly this is their guy, they believe possibly they have a murderer that they just let walk out of the door, got out into the public. i mean, how -- tricky sit for the police and aensly then somebody they think murdered some one out there back into the public? >> well, you know, in the end, i think they will be okay. what the police have done here apparently is because of a weakness in their case, they didn't make an arrest. but they did. the only thing they can do under the circumstances and that is put him under 24-hour surveillance so that he won't commit any other crimes while they are developing a last piece of evidence. so i think it is going to be hard to criticize the police if they have been watching him continuously and they are waiting for the lab to come through with that piece of dna evidence that links him. if it does link him, they swoop in for the arrest. the public has been protected
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and i think ultimately the police will be exonerated in terms of how the investigation was conducted. >> remind our viewers the gentleman we are talking about is the lab technician, raymond clark. he's the one that we just saw in handcuffs in the video. our mary snow reporting to us police are telling her that, in fact, there will be an arrest soon but not saying who they might be arresting. again, police are telling our mary snow that there will be an arrest soon. that might be the news we get at this 7:00 press conference but not saying who they might arrest. again, wane to reiterate here the video is of the person of interest, raymond clark, they collected dna from. had in handcuffs but never under arrest, under surveillance. but police are now saying there will be an arrest but not saying who it will be. hopefully we will get that information in a couple of minutes. one more question out of posture, the case there. four men under arrest. a woman accuses them of rape. now she has gone back on her story saying that is not true. it was actually consensual.
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this whole situation. these four men. we have seen their faces on tv and they have been arrested. the names have been out there opinion in cases like this, and this one in particular, do the four young men have any recourse now? besides filinging a false police report, are there any other charges she could possibly face? >> this is a horror story for the men because their reputations have now been permanently smeared with respect to the public. and in terms of their rights to sue, they clearly can sue her for making the false claim against them for defamation and a variety of other causes of action. whether she has any money that they could collect because you can only sue for money damages in a civil case is another matter. the question is could they sue the police for having made the arrest in the first place. i would say it is going to be difficult to sue the police because the police will say we relied on what the rape allege -- alleged rape victim told us and made the arrest. in terms of what will happen to this young woman who made this false complaint, she could face criminal charges herself.
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there are a variety of statutes in new york available for filing a false complaint. i will tell you that law enforcement authorities a lot of times don't make arrests in this situation because they want to encourage people who make false complaints to recant quickly so that injustice like this is not perpetuated. >> we appreciate you and all these stories. you may be sticking around with us. we may hear more about the yale case. we appreciate having you here. >> thanks. >> thanks so much. t.j. just said moments ago police are saying now that they expect to make an arrest shortly in the killing of that university -- yale university grad student, annie le. keep it here. as soon as we get the latest developments we will bring you those details. we expect a press conference in 20 minutes. we will have that live as well. we are going take a quick break. we are going to be talking about the afghan war strategy perception versus reality when it comes to making decisions about sending more troops. 37 minutes after the hour. i'm lindy.
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welcome back to the most news of the morning. appears the white house is holding off on any move to send more troops to afghanistan. president obama making those decisions saying making those decisions will be, quote, a very deliberate process.
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his top military adviser had suggested a troop increase would be needed to fight a deepening insurgency in afghanistan. but support for the war is lagging here at home. barbara starr taking a closer look at the reality of what combat is like in afghanistan. >> president obama's make it clear he will take his time in deciding whether to send more troops to afghanistan but top military officials are expre expressing their concerns. troops on patrol talked with afghanistans about building a medical clinic. this is the type of action u.s. commanders want. hoping afghan -- helping afghans so they don't turn to the taliban. but the combat reality, senior u.s. officers increasingly believe urgent change is needed. >> if i could change one thing today with what's happening in the south of afghanistan would be more troops, more afghan troops. >> reporter: in an exclusive interview with cnn, general
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james conway, marine corps come dapt, spells out how more troops would be use. >> lots of places we believe we can put the taliban on the run, disrupting the supply lines, his money source which in large part is drugs. >> reporter: robert mullen now says even more u.s. troops may be needed. >> what will happen in that two, three-year periods in terms of the security environment. >> if we are just training? >> yes. >> as public support for the war continues to slip, conway says the public isn't seeing the full picture. >> i think that the country needs to understand better perhaps what's taking place. >> members of congress have now been briefed about the new strategy assessment and so-called metrics. the standards for judging any success in this war.
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>> lot of big challenges in deciding that. barbara starr. we want to share with you a beautiful picture. everyone in the studio said ahh look at that. >> it went away so fast. the sunrise. >> makes you want to live in new york. >> don't up want to live here? >> there's sun in atlanta, too. >> yes. we have sun in atlanta. we will get a shot of the atlanta sunrise in a bit. we will be talking about weather with our rob marciano. fall is supposed to be the season coming up. someplaces are going straight to winter. they are in the 20s. (announcer) now l'oreal's age perfect serum, our first for menopausal skin. it rebuilds skin substance to treat sagging and boost luminosity. age perfect serum by l'oreal. ♪ bicycle, what are we waiting for? the flowers are blooming. the air is sweet. and zyrtec® starts... relieving my allergies... 2 hours faster than claritin®. my worst symptoms feel better,
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♪ most news in the morning. we are 46 minutes past the hour. it is time to fast forward through the stories that will be making news later today. the massachusetts senate is scheduled to consider the late ted kennedy's final wish which would be allowing governor patrick to temporarily fill his senate seat until a special election is held in january. right now state republican lawmakers vowing to delay a vote on that bill. this afternoon at 3:00 eastern, the international space station will be flexing its robotic arm for the first time grabbing a cargo carrier as it passes by the you post. the japanese capsule is carrying five tons of equipment all to be used for the space station. also today, lesson plans across the country will focus on the constitution. it was 222 years ago today, 1787, the historic document was
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signed in philadelphia and there are a number of festivities planned in cities from coast to coast. you know, you are here in new york, maybe you can get to one of those constitution parties if you have time. >> tell me where they are happening today. nothing like a good constitution party. rob marciano, let's turn to him in atlanta. good morning to you. we use the extreme weather graphic just now so that means we have something extreme to tell us about. >> we have been using that a lot lately. extreme. good to see you. we have sun in atlanta but not a lot of sun in atlanta the past couple of days across the southeast. get to that in a second. chilly temperatures across the northeast. caribou, temperatures went from 29 to 30. frost and freeze warnings advisories up for parts of northern new hampshire and maine. and not all of this will get down to the south. new york right now, you are at 57. so not too shabby. certainly a bit of a nip in the air across parts of northern new england. meanwhile, lot of warmth across parts of montana and wyoming.
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temperatures there have been in the 80s and 90s in some places. the big weather story has really been across parts of the south. that stubborn area of low pressure just does not want to leave. as a matter of fact, last couple of days, backed up, back into texas. still rotating around is the moisture. really all we can hope for is for this really to rain itself out and until it does that, we are looking at some of these numbers for rainfall tallies. mena, arkansas, 8.36. a lot of rainfall there. and just a little bit of visual for you. outside of little rock seeing flooding rains. stay cool up there t.j. shouldn't be all that bad as far as temperatures for you guys. if you are taking a trip to, say, portland or augusta, maine, dress warmly. >> i have never seen you do a weather cast with so much of my home state in it. unfortunately for the wrong reasons. the flooding. put a lot of arkansas in it. >> that's where the news is,
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pal. >> rarely. >> you are going to love this next one, rob. we are going to show you after the break. so cute. father and daughter going to the ball game together. and we will show you what happens after a foul ball hits the stands. let's take a look. some people like to pretend... a flood could never happen to them... and that their homeowners insurance... protects them. it doesn't.
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good morning again. welcome back to the most news of the morning. everybody's dream. at a baseball game. you catch a ball. foul ball. home run. that dream finally came true the other night for a philadelphia
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phillies fan. he has been watching his beloved phillies since he was a little guy, 3 years old. >> well, he is 32 now and is a dad. he wanted to share his major league love with his little daughter and here is what happened. after that foul ball grab and that has the whole country talking. here is jeanne moos. >> reporter: it was a foul ball catch that reft folks in anything but a foul mood. no, it wasn't steve's catch at the philadelphia washington game that had them laughing. it was his 3-year-old daughter's right on. she threw baghdady's sufficient near, heartwarming hug is what hggers. one of those moments that votes this from women and from men -- >> what are you doing? >> she was doing what emily was used to doing, catching and throwing a nerf ball with dad. the post catch hug.
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>> my husband would have had a fit but he recovered very nicely. >> reporter: the hug turned the 32-year-old project manager into a paragon of parenting. what a prince. absolute hero. dad of the year. best dad ever. i want to meet this dad. he's already married. that's his wife with their younger daughter at the game. they told us he hugged emily when she looked as if she thought she had done something wrong by tossing away the ball. >> classic. >> reporter: the phillies sent someone up to the stands to give dad and daughter a ball to replace the one that emily threw back. when an online curmudgeon suggested dad should have tossed her after the ball, the next person responded do us all a favor and don't reproduce. let us reproduce the slow motion replay and watch steve's face as he realizes the beloved foul may be gone. fairest of all is still in his
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arms. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> he is a great dad. how adorable. >> she just -- she does not hesitate at all. it was a reaction. thanks. >> he should be proud of her. he taught her to throw. >> good arm on the little one. >> the phillies -- a nice move on their part. they brought another ball up to him. he will certainly remember that. still ahead, we are following the latest news out of new haven, connecticut, this morning. just about ten minutes we expect to a press conference from police. they are talking about the murder of annie le. yale grad student. and we have been getting report -- reporting looks like an arrest will happen shortly. we are going to get more details on this. developing and breaking as we speak.
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good morning. welcome back to the most news of
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the morning. talking about the make or break battle over health care reform. it is back on center stage. in just a few hours, the president hits the road to make his case for revamping health care. today's audience, college students. many of them don't have insurance out there these days. the president's campaign to win support coming off the heels of the long-awaited and one and only health care reform proposal that at least aims to provide bipartisan support. suzanne malveaux working her sources at the white house. your source is up this early? she is there for us. let's start -- >> there are some people that e-mailed me back at this hour. >> okay. >> not a lot. >> that's all right. at least some of those sources are up. let's talk initially here about this plan. this is supposed to be the one that has bipartisan is pot. this is the one everybody has been waiting on. the fifth out there. is this the one the white house can get behind as well? >> this certainly the closest one. a lot of what is in this proposal is reflective of what we heard from the president say before congress.
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the house satisfied with what they are seeing here. one of the things it does, doesn't increase to the deficit. less than $900 billion over ten years. the president said it was going to be the cost of his plan is also one that mandates, requires people to get health insurance or face a fine. that's a flip, t.j., when he was a candidate, he slammed hillary clinton for mandating health care coverage. he's since come around to that. that position. the other thing it does provides consumer protection so that insurance companies can't drop various people from their coverage. they cap deny you if you have a pre-existing condition, that type of thing. one thing it disnot have that the white house and president really did want and prefer was that public option, the government-run insurance program that would offer some sort of competition to the private sector insurance companies. that's going to be done through a co-op, something that is collectively owned by the people part of that co-op. so that's different. the other disappointing thing,
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obviously, from the president, he ran as a candidate of change but also somebody will bring everybody together and clearly this is not a bipartisan bill at this point. we don't see any republicans sort of signing on to this. there's democrats having problem was this. >> all right. when are we going to hear from the president? seems like he is not out there enough on this thing, suzanne. of course i'm teasing. hope people can sense the sarcasm. he's really, really getting out there this weekend. >> we are going to see him at rally. he will be at a huge rally in maryland. college park today. you are going to see him -- five networks on sunday shows overing the weekend. he will be on -- dave letterman doing comedy. you name it, t.j. all the forums across the board. this president is trying to sell this plan to get it through. >> suzanne malveaux, working her sources, waking her sources up this morning. as always good to see you. see you again soon 37 representative anthony weiner who says that this new health
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care legislation is doa in the house at least. that's at 7:30 eastern on "american morning." hello once again. thank you for being with us on this thursday, september 17th. almost 7:00 on the nose here in new york city. i'm kiran chetry along with t.j. great to have you this morning. >> good morning. >> meanwhile, top stories we are breaking down in the next 15 minutes. a press conference set to start any minimum in the case of the strangled yale student found dead on her wedding day. police now tell us an arrest is imminent. we will have that press conference for you the second it starts. >> looking at the investigation into a possible terror strike. moving west this morning. fbi searching a home in denver. they say it belongs to an afghan man that made trips to new york. we will have the latest on the pre-draw raid. a.c.o.r.n. in more trouble. attention of the fbi after a string of hidden camera tapes appear to show staffers giving advice to a couple posing as a pimp and prostitute. what's next? who are the people behind those videos. we are going to get answers for you later in the hour.
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you about first, top story. waiting for new details on the murder of grad student annie le. police now tell us an arrest is imminent. new haven police are about to start a press conference. live pictures. reports say that there is a dna match. it is unclear, though, whether this evidence points to 24-year-old raymond clark. he's the person of interest in this case. he was a researcher, a tech that worked in that lab. clark was released after submitting dna samples. looking right now at new video and pictures of the hotel where he spent the nature under police surveillance. about ten miles from his home. police say that le, who was just 24 years old, was strangled. then found her body hidden behind a wall panel in a lab basement on sunday. that would have been her wedding day. our mary snow is following the latest on this investigation. she is live in new haven this morning. we have seen the developments move fairly quickly. they went through 700 hours of surveillance tapes.
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they collected lots and lots of evidence from the scene and now say an arrest is imminent. >> that is the word this morning from the new haven police department. which is also now saying that it is delaying a bit this press conference supposed to start at 7:00 and may be delayed by as much as an hour at this point. the new haven police department told us earlier this morning that it was seeking an arrest warrant. as you mentioned, the person of interest that -- as described by the new haven police department, raymond clark, 24-year-old yale technician, had been under surveillance. the new haven police department said that even though he was not officially labeled a suspect, that they knew where -- his where did abouts at all times and knew there was another local police department who was also saying they were assisting in surveillance. what -- the police department has been saying is that it had been collecting dna samples. that process had been expedited by the connecticut state police.
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whether or not those reports about dna match, all the new haven police department say this morning is that the spokesman said they didn't know, could not confirm those reports pp but he did say an arrest was imminent. police say that while raymond clark was named as a person of interest, he's the only person of interest that they had executed a search warrant. he was taken into custody two days ago for about five hours. as dna samples were taken from him and his home was searched. also, his car was impounded to gather more evidence. kiran? >> mary snow standing by for us. again, looks like the police department saying they now moved to the press conference. it will be delayed possibly as long as an hour. again, we have a live picture up and as soon as they come to the podium we will bring it to you live. an arrest in this case is imminent. >> another developing story we are keeping an eye on here. feds shifting the focus of a trirt investigation after raids in new york rattled the borough
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of queens. his lawyer turned over writings, fingerprints, dna samples. deborah feyerick following this story. >> it started in denver, came to new york, went back to denver. federal agents are looking to see whether new york is the end point or maybe just a stopping point along the way and if so, are there going to be more raids. all of it an open question. with some new york city residents on edge, an investigation into a possible terror strike ongoing this morning. fbi agents searched the denver home of an afghan man who recently traveled across the country. he is 24-year-old zazi. airport limo driver that moved from new york to denver six months ago. this is fbi director robert mueller answering questions on capitol hill about monday's pre-dawn raid on two apartments in queens, new york. >> did you assure new yorkers
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and the american public that the situation is under sufficient control and there is no imminent danger to their safety? >> i can say i do not believe there is imminent danger from that particular investigation. >> reporter: so far no one has been arrested. an affiliate of cnn spoke to zazi and his lawyer. he went to new york and denied zazi has any ties to terrorism. >> i think the main thing he wants people to understand is that he had absolutely nothing to do with this. he loves this country. he loves living here. that's why he brought his family over here. >> reporter: during the trip, zazi was stopped by police before crossing the george washington bridge for what he was told was a random drug stop. later his rental car was towed for alleged parking violations. police asked if they could search the car and examine a laptop while it was impounded. zazi agreed. zazi's return visit to new york prompted fbi agents to raid the
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two homes of people he contacted. one of the men questioned by agents spoke to us and on the condition we not use his name. the man said while not close he's known zazi for about seven years. he ran into him at a queens mosque and agreed to let him stay at his place for the night. quote, he's pashtun. you can't turn away a fellow pashtun. he did not see zazi leave the next day. several events that have put new york on heightened security. president's visit to wall street, of course, earlier. the upcoming united nations general assembly when world leaders will gather next week. so everybody has been on alert in the city. again, this is part of an ongoing investigation. what happens next, everybody is watching. the danger is escalting something that's in a linear phase, something up to mao. >> this case in denver is one thing. take this in new york, the history -- >> absolutely. >> we will be talking more about this just ahead.
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alarming develop many in the jaycee dugard kidnapping case. investigators say they found bones on the property where sex offender phillip garrido lived with his wife. and the child he allegedly snatched and kept as a prisoner for 18 years. bones were previously discovered on the property next door to which garrido had access. the bones were sent to a lab to determine if they are from a human or an animal. the case against a kentucky high school coach could go to the jury later today. 37 year old david stinson is being charged with reckless homicide. one of his football players collapsed during practice on a hot day, hot summer day. that's when the high school sophomore died three days later. prosecutors claimed that stinson denied him water and forced him to run wind sprints in brutally
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heat. the player's stepmother testified max already wasn't feeling well that day. take a look at chris brown. you can't tell too much that's him from the back there. that's chris brown. he is picking up trash on the side of the road. this is part of his punishment. punish many for beating his ex-girlfriend, singer rihanna. the community service is part of the sentence. the sentence includes five years of probation, 12 months of domestic violence counsel. >> there you go. a.c.o.r.n. responding to uncover videos that were shot at various locations. head of the organization talks to us, weighs in on this undercover investigation that reveals some workers may have been trying to help people commit crimes. jessica yellin joins news 20 minutes. i get congested. my eyes itch.
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where it is going to be cold. where i might need a jacket. showers and 66 today. right now about 57 degrees. american. scandal plagued south carolina governor mark sanford while he had his security clearance temporarily yanked because of the scandal, yanked by the department of homeland security. federal documents show that after the governor's secret trip to argentina to visit his mistress, the government sent him a letter questioning his judgment and trustworthiness. reports say that his security access was taken but restored a week later. also good news at the supermarkets. stores slashing prices on many of your weekly staples. after a year where we have seen food prices go up there has been a sharp decline in prices and triggering lower prices in grocery stores including wheat, corn and milk. call it an upside to the global downturn. where do you think young rich americans live? we just gave it away.
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not new york. not l.a. they are in d.c. new report says the highest concentration of 25 to 34-year-olds making more than $100,000 a year -- i don't know if that's rich these days -- but they are living in the counties surrounding the nation's capital. believed to be jobs, strong education and health care institutions. moderate climate as well. easy access to recreation alpha silts. facilities. we want to bring you up to date in the alleged terror plot that took place starting in denver, moving on to new york city. fbi agents with bomb-sniffing dogs raided the colorado apartment of an afghan national that they allege could be linked to al qaeda and could be linked to a plot to launch a terror attack in new york city. the man at the center of that probe, zazi, given writing, finger print and dna samples. he gave them to federal agents according to his attorney and claims his innocence. joining me now to discuss the
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latest on in terror probe, frances townsend and also robert strang, former fbi employee as well as a former dea special agent and now co-chair as new york legislative terrorism task force. thanks for being with us. robert, let me start with you to get clarity on this situation with zazi. the guy this was questioned and gave these samples to federal agents. he adamantly and repeatedly denied having any involvement in any terrorism, any bomb making but know agents were seizing, removing materials from the queens home where he had visited. what do you think or what are some of the moves right now by the federal agents telling you about where they might be going with this investigation? >> this is a very fluid and dynamic case. this is an international case and a lot of sources of information from wiretaps, from hard drives, you know, from -- seizing from the computers and cell phones. from informants. a lot of information coming in now. but i think what they are looking at he has been the key focus here. for him to deny ever being involved in this to say hi
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nothing to do with this is absolutely crazy. he's the one that started this investigation. he's the one they had under surveillance. he's the one that led them to the apartments in queens where they were able to get a federal search warrant and search those apartments. so clearly, he is a key person involved in this case. co-conspirator, if you will. >> where though goes is still up in the air. we learning the man zazi drove from denver to new york city in a rental car. and they were acting on some information and suspicions as robert just said about this cell of afghan nationals in the new york area associated with the same mosque that might be planning to carry out a terrorism attack in new york. what's your reaction of how this has been handled so far? >> i will tell you, you know, the nypd has one of the most aggressive and competent intelligence organizations in the country. and they have a wide network of informants. i think we -- what we are probably seeing play out is a combination of federal electronic surveillance and based on new york city police department informants.
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they come together and put that together and that leads to their focus on these apartments. here's the problem with the apartment. you know, you find backpacks and maps. while those things are very suspicious to people that work in law enforcementment intelligence, you also worry that if snees are poor afghan immigrants in an apartment who are tourists, they have got -- you can imagine, staying in a house, lot with backpacks and they have to do the forensics. that's probably what's going on now. >> interesting thing, it seems to be downplayed right now by fbi director mueller saying there is no imminent danger from this particular investigation. some are raising the question, wait a minute did law enforcement judgment the gun here? >> i think they probably did go sooner than they wanted to go. given all of the events deborah mentioned, president being in new york, u.n. general assembly, and they fell that they had to go and there was operational activity that they were seeing and didn't fully understand. and rather than wait until something happened, they wanted to interrupt the cell and i think that's why the
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interruption is why the -- hear the director of the fbi say that he doesn't think there is an imminent threat from this case now because they obviously disrupted it and gone over it with their investigation. >> what's this do in terms of the possible cue tore yam standpoint and getting a case together n. >> it is always a balance. to execute the search warrants, when do you bring the case in daylight? this was almost a perfect storm. the president was in town. we had the anniversary of september 11. we had person under surveillance coming to new york. everything was happening at one time. what authorities believe with direct ties perhaps to al qaeda so that this was really a situation where you had to move quickly. you know -- >> how did they get to? is it because he visiteded pakistan and afghanistan reese enrecently? >> nypd is best. they do a terrific job. we get information from afghanistan and pakistan from the military ex-sxerts they, too, execute search warrants. they don't have to do the same kind of due diligence we do to
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get a search warrant. they are seizing hard drives, cell phones. they are giving us information here. so people who are traveling back ask forth from pakistan and afghanistan, back to the united states, we are watching those people. we are looking who they meat with there and here. that's how many of these cases are developed. >> all right. it will be interesting to see where this goes forward. i want to thank both of you for your insight on this. thanks to both of you. >> thank you. right now we are going to take a quick break and come back with much more, including, of course, latest. er with waiting for a news conference, press conference by new haven police on the yale university murder of the grad student. there is a live look now. it has been pushed back. they say an arrest is imminent. you know, the guys who do a super job. introducing the superguarantee. go to superpages.com to find a business with the superguarantee. we're so confident in these super businesses we stand behind their services. you'll get the job done right or we'll step in and help to make it right. sign up for free at superpages.com
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the new superguarantee making the good guys easy to find.
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christine roman. producer making fun of me here about the youtube. anybody? >> please. is that -- >> i don't know that song.
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>> we will be hearingis and t.j. is like -- >> other really good band called the rolling stones. >> i heard of them. >> sometime i will let you listen to their music. >> we were having a good conversation about this housing market. the debate about how much do you need to give folks to entice them to get them to buy these things. clunkers, houses. >> i know. >> tax credit. people have until -- the -- >> that's right. very popular $8,000 tax credit for people first tooem time home buyers. people that don't own a home now. income restrictions, you have to -- couple had a to make $150,000 or less or $75 thousand or less for an individual. it has been used for $1.2 million home purchases. there on are people who have been enticed by this and by lower home prices and low mortgage rates. they have gotten out there and they have -- helped maybe stabilize the housing market. there is a push by some lawmakers to extend this home buyer tax credit. how would you like that? don't let this sunset.
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extend and it push it through. maybe into another year to try to help stabilize the housing market. there are some people that don't like the idea. look, you have to pay for this. and we -- it is not free money. you have to pay for this and maybe the housing market should be allowed to settle out and find, you know, find its base. value of your homes, show you quickly an opinion research poll. poll showing that people -- how they think about their home price as year from now. 35% think the home price lbs higher. 44% think it will be the same. 22% think it is going to be lower. interesting. we will see if -- >> optimism. >> we will see if this idea of more money taking away the income restrictions, make it $15,000 in a tax credit to buy a home. there are people in congress we are talking about that. >> and time for romans numeral. a number we bring you every day on our program. numeral that's driving a story about your money. what it s it? >> 31. 31%. it is down 31%.
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>> number of people buying a new home? >> gosh. >> year to year? >> it is -- this number is the decline from peak to trough in the average home price. my theory is that people are driven much more about home prices and mortgage rates than government cash. because if you and your neighborhood -- i mean, they are down by a third and mortgage rates in the low 5%, over the course of the 30-year mortgage, you know, you might be able to afford a house again for the first time in a long time. 30 3 1%. average price of a home decline. >> thanks, christine. >> thank you. still ahead, a.c.o.r.n. responds. we are going to speak to the head of the community organizing grou group. jessica yellin. 23 minutes after the hour.
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26 minutes past the hour. welcome back to the most news of the morning opinion nonprofit group a.c.o.r.n. under fire this morning and head of the fbi is signaling his agency could launch an investigation after a staffers in three states and d.c. were caught on hidden camera giving advice to a couple posing as a pimp and prostitute. a.c.o.r.n., supposed to help people in some of the country's poorest neighborhoods get how bigs, putting a hiring freeze in place. will launch its own independent review of the programs. a.c.o.r.n.'s ceo talked with rick sanchez last night. rick was filling for campbell brown. >> how do you explain what americans have seen on some of these videotapes? somebody advising, you know, alleged pimps and prostitutes, people describing themselves as pimps and prostitutes to set up brothels, how do you explain that? >> this would curl anyone's
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hair. it was outrageous. it was indefensible. be that as it may, i will not tolerate unprofessional -- not meeting our standards. >> people -- so the people have been fired. people we see on the tapes have been fired. >> yes. listen, rick, i have over 700 employees. and you know, this is a handful of folks. i immediately took swift action. and i said you know what, we are going to look at this, we are going to make a review from top to bottom, and so that this thing never happens again. we worked too hard to have some trumped up thing like this happen. >> now, that was the response from a.c.o.r.n.'s head there. but where did the tapes come from? who shot them? and why? why until the hidden camera videos released was the story so far off the radar? our jessica yellin has that side of the story for us this morning. >> two self-described filmmakers
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made big news with their undercover a.c.o.r.n. videos. now they raised lots lots of questions about more than just what's on the tapes. these are the hidden camera videos that triggered a firestorm over grassroots activist group a.c.o.r.n. behind the videos, two 20-something. hannah giles seen here posing as a prostitute and james o'keefe, pretending to be her pimp. >> anna giles and i continued our investigation of a.c.o.r.n. >> the two are conservative filmmakers. according to her web biography, giles is the daughter of doug giles. now internet sensation, she appeared on fox news. >> as i sat there, i was like can i not believe they are actually falling for this. not necessarily falling for it but what can we get them to say next. >> reporter: o'keefe says he is a filmmaker dedicated to exposing corruption he believes the mainstream media ignores. he is in his pimp outfit on fox news. >> it is the future of investigative journalism and it is the future of political
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activism. >> reporter: the two have gotten results. since these videos were posted, the u.s. senate has voted to cut off some of a.c.o.r.n.'s funding. and media outlets from "the washington times" to jon stuart are asking -- >> where were the real reporters on this story? investigative immediate yeah, give me camera three. where the hell were you? >> it is not the first time agenda driven activists made headlines with hidden camera reports. the animal rights groups, peta, makes them tall time. political campaigns have driven news with videos like this. remember makaka. >> whatever its name is. >> reporter: the remark considered racially offensive by some took down an ink couple bent senator. experts and investigative journalism say reporters are wise to be cautious about posing as fake characters using hidden cameras to get a story. >> really have to weigh, again, how important the information is and how important the story is to society and to the community
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and is there any other way to get at it. i think it does raise questions of fairness and credibility of the media. >> the video makers turned down our request for an interview through their sponsor. conservative commenter. the two made the videos out the sense of idealism and righteousness and tell us they have more videos coming. >> jessica yellin, thanks so much. half past the hour. we check our top stories. vice president joe biden pushing iraqi leaders this morning. met with prime minister al maliki and stressed the importance of setting political differences aside to stabilize the oil-rich nation's economy. stage three of his unannounced trip to baghdad, "the new york times" also reported that the heavily fortified green zone where the vice president is staying was hit by rocket attacks late last night. one reportedly landed on the edge of the american embassy compound a mile from the building where the two leaders met. wounding several people. breaking hours ago. the u.s. reportedly scrap plans for a missile defense shield in
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poland. the polish ministry of defense adds this is catastrophic for poland. the u.s. officials won't confirm that it is on the shelf just yet. police in new haven, connectic connecticut, say an arrest in the murder of annie le could happen at any moment. reporters say there is a dna match. it is still unclear whether the evidence points to the so-called person of interest, raymond clark. yale lab tech who was questioned and then released by police. the coroner's office also says annie le was strangled. to death. the debate over health care. we have two chambers of congress made up of two parties trying to agree on one reform bill. good luck. chairman of the senate finance committee released a plan that could appeal to enough democrats and republicans to pass but it does not include the government backed insurance. that so-called public option. in the house, several democrats
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who say that's essentially a deal breaker and one of those is our next guest, congressman anthony williams. democrat. good morning to you, sir. thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. good morning. >> highly anticipated bill coming out of the senate finance commity and we have seen it but from what you have seen and what you know now, after all that work, is this thing in the how essentially dead on arrival? >> unfortunately, it is. i mean, i commend my colleagues in the senate for moving the process forward but didn't really make much progress in terms of trying to figure out a way to hold down costs for health care. you know, whether you are a fiscal conservative concerned about the idea that we need to get this under control which is something we all should be, someone that's concerned about having choice and competition in the marketplace, the baucus mark does not accomplish either of those things. that's problematic. >> congressman, you said you appreciate them moving the process forward. so i guess -- dead on arrival. how far did we even come? did we make any progress with this bill? >> well, it is a necessary box we had to check. had the committees at the house
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and senate do and it five committees in the house and senate and closer than we have ever been. since we passed medicare 44 years ago. but unfortunately the -- the senate bill is probably going to have to be approved a great deal if not just put aside and start with the house bill. you know, the president said he wants a public option and american people say they want an option. and frankly common sense dictates it. i think it has to be plan. >> you talk about the public option. the p wants. he said that joint session that -- aside from some of the other theatrics, there was news the president made in there in saying the driving idea behind reform has been to end insurance company abuses and make coverage available for those without it. the public option is only a means to that end and we should remain open to other ideas that accomplish our ultimate goals. you say the president is behind it but he doesn't seem to be behind it in the way you are which means it has to be in there or no deal. >> let's not -- that's not true. i think basically the president is saying the same thing. earlier in that speech he explained why the public option
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is so necessary. look, maybe there is some other tool to keep down costs. it is not in the baucus bill. we say to insurance companies, here is another 30 million customers. but they don't do anything to make it so that they cost -- cost of that insurance starts coming down so we can afford and it taxpayer isn't bankrupted. that's the problem here. it is fairly easy to provide someone with coverage or give them a subsidy to buy it. the subsidies still aren't high enough. unless we contain the cost it will continue bankrupting our system. >> you mentioned there that you don't think that's what the president was saying or laid out the need for public opening. yes, he says he wants it. but i think a lot of people would agree it has been clear he has backed off and does not have the same stance have you at least which is the public option must be in the bill. you think and you the president see eye to eye? >> i think so. the president did say in the speech he wants the public option and american people have said that, too. he said something that, frankly, i abrie with. if there is another tool to contain costs and competition, he's open to it. for example in the senate bill, they have something called the
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cost which allows them to do it state by state. it doesn't do it. so unless someone has a better idea, they want to put on the able, there's no alternative now to the public opening. let me make it clear for 200 million americans, including and you me, we won't be eligible to go into the public option anyway. it is for a small sliver of the population. >> all right. i want to make sure i'm clear. does not sound like the co-op, the way it is in his bill. you think it could be improved in some way and get onboard with the co-op plan? >> there hasn't been a co-op in the country worked the way -- you need something big and muscular to compete with the insurance companies. if we are saying you can only do them by state and those co-ops can't join together and negotiate for prices around the country, you are basically not going to have a big enough -- to do it. co-sop a nice idea except it won't accomplish what we need, true competition. >> last thing. yes or no. bipartisanship even matter to you on this bill? you would like it but okay going ahead without it? >> you put it right. as a means to an end. not an end of itself.
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it is clear my colleagues -- republican colleagues decided they would rather not help with this process and i understand that. it is our job to get i didn't. >> representative anthony weiner, again, democrat from new york. we will be talking to you plenty throughout what's looking like it is going to be an extended health care debate. first we heard where the president was speaking now, "you lie." joe wilson is responding to some of the charges out there like from former president jimmy carter that they -- had a racial tinge to it.
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all right. good morning, everybody.
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about 20 minutes to the top of the hour. welcome back to the most news of the morning. a few things we are following. first, the senate approve ad measure that would allow amtrak passengers to carry the licensed handguns in checked bags on the train. amtrak would be lose subsidies if it doesn't allow passengers to bring guns on boards. one opponent said the adjustment be woe so expensive the railroad could shut down. the 2016 olympics will they wind newspaper chicago? if the president gets his way they will. he staged a homecoming style olympic rally. it took place at the white house yesterday. saying the whole country is rooting for his hometown of chicago to land the 26 20 16 summer games. chicago is in a tight race with rio de janeiro, madrid and tokyo. looks like they were doing tie kwan doughdough.
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they choose a host city in just two weeks. >> she could be influential. that could help which i out a lot. new proposal to battle obesity. and it is calling for a tax of -- penny per ounce on that soda pop. group of nutrition economic experts say if you pay more for that coke or pepsi and cut back and lose two pounds a year. the idea, much like the cigarette tax works cut consumption while raising government revenues more than 30 states already charge sales tax on soft drinks. jimmy carter is speaking out again and backing up his claim racism is behind a lot of the opposition to president obama in the town hall debates. he said that protesters that compare obama tow, quote, animal or the reincarnation of adolf hitler are part of a radical fringe element. president carter said race is behind the "you lie" outburst from congressman wilson.
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>> congressman, if you were sitting right across from former president jimmy carter, you would have no response to him about him calling you a racist? >> i would say that mr. president, let's discuss health insurance reform. let's discuss the issues before us. and i -- with respect to the president and -- i would just tell him, hey, you need to get focused on the issue. >> this debate hit our hotline. a lot of you divided over whether or not race is a factor in the protest against the president. here is a bit of what you are saying. >> jimmy carter, 30 years ago. how is he relevant now? >> i agree with jimmy carter. finally somebody had the nerve to step up and say the truth. >> i think all this talk of racism of obama is ridiculous. shows the left wing seeks in terms of identity while the
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right wing seems in terps of ideas. >> the things they are carrying around. it is just sick. >> president carter hit it right on the head. there are a lot of people it here that feel a black man cannot run this country. >> we want to know what you think about all of this. you can leave a message on our show. you can post comment on our blog. address cnn.com/amfix. on there you can also link up with twitter and many other places. we want to hear what you have to say. we will try to get as many opinions out there. >> lot of ponce this. this is one you have in the newsrooms and your friends are calling you about. i'm getting text messages about. everybody is part of this debate. appreciate it. keep them coming. rob marciano coming up next. that's all you need to say. boy: is that your new car? uh...yeah. boy: cool. thanks.
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i knew i wanted the new subaru legacy. i went back and forth on the hood scoop. but i'm glad i went for it. the all-new subaru legacy. feel the love. as the decades have past, the promise of medicare has always been there. and aarp has fought to guarantee none of the benefits you earned were ever taken away. today we're continuing that fight by protecting your freedom to choose the doctors and treatments you need. and to have your tax dollars go towards your care-- not insurance company subsidies. you've done your work. and we'll keep doing ours. learn more at aarp.org.
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♪ lot of changes in arkansas over the past couple of weeks. >> they are trying to get me a picture out of my home state of ark. it does not look like that in little rock. >> upper west side of manhattan this morning. we take a look at the weather for new york. chilly. feels like fall. in fact, right now it is only -- >> what? >> let's ask the expert. >> it felt like -- >> can i phone a friend?
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rob marciano, what will it be like for us? feels like fall this morning. >> you have clouds and it is cool. clouds aren't helping to warm things up. doing research on arkansas this morning. i will get t.j.'s inside knowledge in just a second. flood watches out for this area. also, cool. yes, definitely cool air across parts of the northeast today. that's the other big story. one to two inches of additional rainfall on top of what you already received across parts of southern and central arkansas. one point yesterday, about half the state was under a flood warning. right now, though, things are beginning to wind down. this low is backed up and rotating moisture. as far as what kind of moisture you were seeing in parts of arkansas, there you go. mountain state park seeing treacherous flooding there. shut down. fairly regularly. not nearly as what they have seen the past couple of days. all right. check out numbers. this is just from yesterday. north little rock got over three inches. and nashville, tennessee, actually getting in the act of 1.75 inches.
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let's give you an idea of the expanse of this thing. stretching now tall way to atlanta coastline. as this spreads out, it does get a little bit weaker and hope reply by tomorrow, next day, begin to rain itself out. all right. going on across parts of maine. 28 degrees right now in caribou. chilly. new york city, you are at 57. little bit warmer there. if could you ask your colleague next to you where -- if he has ever been to toad, over ninch inches of rainfall the last 84 hours. >> it is around central part of arkansas. they have a festival every year. right around conway. yes, i have been there. >> we don't really want to know what the toadsuck festival is about. >> some people would pay good money to go to that thing. listen, it is going to be 66 for high here in new york. okay. time to get up here, rob. get your butt up here and start picking apples. >> all right. i like that. yeah. maybe do a little -- leaf viewing as well. >> do a little what?
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>> leaf peeping. >> leaf what? >> leaf peeping. apple picking. >> we don't have anyone else walking off the set. all right. meanwhile, it is fashion week. alina cho disappeared for an entire week every year. our resident fashionista. she is back looking great and will show us the highlights of what they are wearing this fall. 478 minutes after the hour.
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♪ welcome back to the most news in the morning. 50 minutes past the hour. we're talking about fashion and street chic and it's fashion week here in new york. and if you're into that, you're probably a "sex and the city" fan. our alina cho is here to answer that. we've missed you. >> i don't know what you're talking about. disappeared for a week. i've been here, working hard. good morning.
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you know, there's no denying, kiran, that fashion does play a leading role in "sex and the city," the shoes, the clothes, the bags. it seems whatever the characters wear suddenly became major fashion trends. and it doesn't happen by accident. the creative genius working behind the scenes, dressing the characters, she's a celebrity herself. patricia field. >> reporter: if carrie, charlotte, samantha, are the fab four, patricia field is the fifth girl. the flame-haired iconic costume designer for "sex and the city." >> reporter: can you explain what the experience of working with hatfield is like? >> you're in the hands of a master. >> reporter: the woman who some fashion insiders say is single handedly responsible for starting countless fashion trends. the it bag, accessories, or shoes. >> hello, lover. >> reporter: no matter how quirky. >> you look --
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>> why, thank you. >> reporter: how crazy the look, if someone on "sex and the city" wears it, it else. i caught up with hatfield on the movie set of "sex and the city" 2, the sequel, in production right now. what inspires you? >> if it tells me some story, if it communicates something to me and it looks good, i go with it. >> reporter: it could be anything. field is inspired by what she sees on the runway. >> good luck to the two of you. >> reporter: on the street. even fans. >> pat is the crystal ball. she's magic. a crystal ball with red hair. >> reporter: but her real talent is putting it all together. >> pat loves clothes and she's not afraid to mix the high and the low, something very expensive with like a $2 belt. >> reporter: she has the eye. >> pat is a great editor.
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she can capture what happens in the world. and the world follows. so do designers who flock to her hoping pat will choose them and put them on the map. basically, anything your heart desires is yours. >> well, 95%. there are a few fussy ones. >> reporter: and there's no denying, "sex and the city" has made pat too. the paparazzi, the fans can't get enough. >> i don't know what they do with these photographs. >> reporter: they frame them and hang them up on the wall. "sex and the city" has also given pat a lot of opportunities. she's the costume designer for "ugly betty," the tv show, has a deal with payless shoe, and was even nominated for costume design for her work on the movie "the devil wears prada." but her real talent, she's unfayed, she's daring and she's inspired women everywhere around
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the world to be more daring in their fashion choices and she says that's really, really great. >> but at the end of the day, what looks great on carrie lkar miranda, i would never be caught dead wearing. but it looks great on them. thank you. you can check out some of the behind the scenes pictures, these exclusive pictures from the set of "sex and the city" 2. they're all at cnn.com/am fiction. so, what's the problem? these are hot. we're shipping 'em everywhere.
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but we can't predict our shipping costs. dallas. detroit. different rates. well with us, it's the same flat rate. same flat rate. boston. boise? same flat rate. alabama. alaska? with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. dude's good. dude's real good. dudes. priority mail flat rate boxes only from the postal service. a simpler way to ship. and i'm joni. we've been best friends since we were two. we've always been alike. we even both have osteoporosis. but we're active. especially when we vacation. so when i heard about reclast, the only once-a-year iv osteoporosis treatment, i called joni. my doctor said reclast helps restrengthen our bones to help make them resistant to fracture. and reclast is approved to help protect from fracture in more places: hip, spine, even other bones. (announcer) you should never take reclast if you're on zometa, have low blood calcium, kidney problems. or you're pregnant, plan to become pregnant or nursing.
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take calcium and vitamin d daily. tell your doctor if you develop severe muscle, bone or joint pain or if you have dental problems, as rarely, jaw problems have been reported. the most common side effects include flu-like symptoms, fever, muscle or joint pain and headache. nothing strengthens you like an old friendship. but when it comes to our bones, we both look to reclast. you've gotta ask your doctor! or call 1-866-51-reclast. year-long protection for on-the-go women. welcome back to the most news in the morning. it appears the white house holding off on any move to send more troops to afghanistan. president obama says making those decisions will be, quote, very deliberate process. we know support for the war is lagging here at home. and our barbara starr live at the pentagon now to give us a look at the reality of what combat is really like there in afghanistan. barbara, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning to
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you, t.j. for every u.s. service member on the ground, combat in that war zone gets tougher by the day. more troops may well be on the way because, t.j., we have now learned that general stanley mcchrystal has made a decision on how many more troops he thinks he needs in the war zone, even if president obama's not ready to approve anything just yet, commanders are getting concerned. troops on patrol talk with afghans about building a medical clinic. this is the type of action u.s. commanders want. helping afghans so they don't turn to the taliban. but the combat reality, senior u.s. officers increasingly believe urgent change is needed. >> if i could change one thing today with what's happening in the south of afghanistan, it would be more troops. but more afghan troops. >> reporter: in an exclusive interview with cnn, general james conway, marine core commandant, spells out how more troops might be used.
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>> i think there's lots of places that we believe we can put the taliban on the run, as well as disrupting logistics and supply runs, his money source, which is drugs. >> reporter: admiral michael mullen now says even more u.s. troops may be needed. >> what will happen in that two or three-year period, do you think, in terms of the security environment while we're training? >> if it's -- if we're just training? >> yes. >> i think the security environment will continue to deteriorate. >> reporter: as public support for the war continues to slip, conway says the public isn't seeing the full picture. >> so i'm an optimist. i think that, one, the country needs to understand better what's taking place. >> reporter: so how many more troops, actually, t.j.? well, i can tell you, we've spoken this morning to a senior u.s. military official very close to general mccrystal who says he would not wave us off the notion 30,000 to 40,000 additional troops may be requested by general mcchrystal.
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here's the interesting wrinkle today, t.j. that request is done, but general mcchrystal has not sent it to washington. this official says general mcchrystal's been told to wait until that request is asked for. t.j.? >> and before we let you go, barbara, afghanistan has some unique channllenges, but also unique environment, unique terrain. and the army possibly testing out some new camouflage specifically for forces there? >> yeah, you know, maybe making a bit of their own fashion statement about afghanistan. don't want to be too flip about it, but yesterday we got a chance to have a look at some new camouflage uniforms -- here you see them -- that the army is testing for afghanistan, hoping these kinds of patterns and colors make the troops blend in better. but beyond making a fashion statement, perhaps, one says with a smile, the real news here, t.j., this is another sign that u.s. troops may be settling in for the long haul in this war for years to come, t.j..
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>> all right. and a fashion week for the army as well, i guess, in some ways. barbara starr for us this morning, thank you so much. stay here to cnn this afternoon until 4:00 eastern time. afghan president hamid karzai joining wolf blitzer in the situation room. you do want to see that. meanwhile, the top of the hour here on this "american morning." i'm t.j. holmes sitting in for john roberts this morning on this thursday, september 17th. >> good to have you with us, t.j. and on the morning agenda, these are the big stories we'll be breaking down for you in the next 15 minutes. we are awaiting any moment now a press conference on the case of the yale grad student who was found dead on her wedding day. there's a live look from new haven, connecticut. police now say an arrest is imminent. we will have that for you the second it starts. also, the search for evidence of an al qaeda terror plot moving across the country this morning, specifically to colorado. the fbi searching the home of an afghan national who's at the center of their investigation. his visit to new york over the
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9/11 weekend prompted raids on three apartments here. we're live with the latest developments. also, president obama fired up about health care and hoping to seize on any momentum after the unveiling of the long-awaited health plan from the senate. so far, though, those on the right and left don't seem to like the plan, so what went wrong and will the plan's critics in both parties come around? first, though, our top story. we're awaiting new details on the murder of yale graduate student annie le. new haven police now tell us that an arrest is imminent and police are holding a press conference. it's set to take place any minute now. right now, it's still unclear whether evidence points to lab technician raymond clark. he was only called a person of interest in this case, but has been under police surveillance. he worked in the building where le's body was found. our mary snow has been following this story from the very beginning and join us live in new haven, connecticut. what are you hearing now, as you had heard, we thought this press conference was going to take place at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. it's been pushed back. they say possibly as long as an hour and now we're past that mark as well.
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>> reporter: yeah, kiran, it's unclear why that delay happened. as you mentioned, though, the police have been saying that they have been keeping raymond clark under police surveillance, even though he was not in custody. we do know that overnight, police have been surrounding an area, about 30 miles away from new haven through the night. police have been also saying -- the police chief said what this investigation is really hinging on is dna and they expedited dna analysis, have been working 24 hours around the clock. raymond clark was taken into custody tuesday night and held for about five hours. he was taken into custody to get dna evidence. police also executed four search warrants and part of that was getting evidence from his home and also seized his car. police say that they had been waiting for any kind of dna match before they moved further. and while they only described him as a person of interest, they said one distinction that
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they did make was that he was the only person of interest where they had sought search warrants and they sought four of them. >> police, when asked about what relationship he might have had with annie le, the graduate student who was murdered, they would only say that they worked in the same building today. he is a lab technician and she was a researcher. her body, of course, found on sunday. the medical examiner saying yesterday that the cause of death was strangulation. the medical examiner, though, did not make that full report available and would not have anything else to say about how she was killed. kiran? >> all right. mary snow for us and we'll continue to check in with you again. we'll go to new haven as soon as they give us word that the press conference is beginning. also developing this morning, more bones found on the california property belonging to nancy and phillip garrido as well as the property next door. police say they can't tell at this point if the bones are human. the garridos are accused of kidnapping jaycee dugard when she was 11 and keeping her in a makeshift compound in their
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backyard for some 18 years. authorities have been searching for evidence that could link the couple to at least two other child abductions. and another story developing this morning, the fbi shifting the focus of a terrorism investigation after raids earlier this week in new york. >> yeah. agents raided the suburban denver home of an afghan national who is at the center of this investigation. he's believed to have ties to al qaeda. deb feyerick is following this story for us this morning. and it's a little complicated. i think that, as you said, this was part of an ongoing investigation and then because of what happened and the timing and that it was in new york city, things took a turn. >> that's exactly right. and as one of the guests earlier said, really it was a perfect storm. this investigation did start in denver, it took federal agents to new york. but whether new york is the end point or a stopping point along the way with more raids to come is an open question. >> reporter: with some new york city residents on edge, an investigation into a possible terror strike ongoing this morning. fbi agents searched the denver
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home of an afghan man who recently traveled across the country. he's 24-year-old naijbullah zazi, an airport limo driver who moved from new york to denver six months ago. this as fbi director robert mueller answered questions on capitol hill about monday's predawn raid on two apartments in queens, new york. >> could you assure new yorkers and the american public that the situation is under sufficient control and there is no imminent danger to their safety? >> i can say that i do not believe there's imminent danger from that particular investigation. >> reporter: so far, no one has been arrested. cnn affiliate kusa in denver spoke to zazi and his lawyer. he says zazi went to new york to resolve an issue related to a vending cart business and denied that zazi has any ties to terrorism. >> i think the main thing he wants people to understand is that he had absolutely nothing to do with this. he loves this country. he loves living here. that's why he brought his family over here.
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>> reporter: during the trip, zazi was stopped by police before crossing the george washington bridge, for what he was told was a random drug stop. later, he has rental car was towed for alleged parking violations. police asked if they could search the car and examine a laptop while it was impounded. zazi agreed. zazi's return visit to new york prompted fbi agents to raid the two homes of people he contacted. one of the men questioned by agents spoke to us on condition we not use his name. the man said, while not close, he has known zazi for about seven years. he ran into him at a queens mosque and agreed to let him stay at his place for the night. he said, quote, he's pashtun, you can't turn away a fellow pashtun, said the acquaintance, who did not see zazi leave the next day. >> and there are several events that have put new york on heightened security. the 9/11 visit and a recent visit by president obama to wall street and the upcoming united states general assembly where world leaders will gather next
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week. as you said, take one set of facts, put it in the midwest, move it to new york, and it takes on a whole another light. >> that's what we saw happened here. deb feyerick, appreciate you this morning. other stories new we're keeping an eye on, folk singer mary traverse, dead. they were best known for their hit "puff the magic dragon." she died wednesday in connecticut. actor burt reynolds has checked into a drug rehab clinic. a short statement released doesn't say when or where reynolds checked himself in, but it does say that he became reliant on prescription pain pills after recently having back surgery. and r&b singer chris brown working it out. picking up trash on the side of the road at police horse stables in virginia. this is part of his punishment for beating his ex-girlfriend, singer rihanna. the community service is part of a sentence that also includes five years of probation and 12
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months of domestic violence counseling. well, it was the big hope in washington, it was supposed to be the bipartisan bill that would make it through the senate and hopefully find a way to reconcile in the house. however, you have people on the right and left, senators saying they can't support it. so what happens now? we're going to be talking with two independent analysts, john avalon and jennifer donohue about where we go from here. max baucus laying out his plan and immediately the critics pouncing. all day or all night. it's called tums dual action, and it's the longest lasting tums ever. tums dual action works two ways to relieve heartburn: like all tums, it goes to work in seconds. plus, tums dual action has an effective acid reducer that works for hours, all day or all night, to keep heartburn from coming back. rely on tums dual action for fast, long-lasting relief of heartburn. brand power. helping you buy better. ♪ today ♪ must have been one of the strangest days ♪
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everyone may face the same uncertainty. ♪ some would say that you won't find ♪ protecting yourself, however, requires good decisions. find strength and stability with mass mutual, a company owned by its policyholders. ask your advisor or visit massmutual.com. welcome to the now network. right now five coworkers are working from the road using a mifi-- a mobile hotspot that provides up to five shared wi-fi connections. two are downloading the final final revised final presentation.
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- one just got an email. - woman: what?! hmph. it's being revised again. the copilot is on mapquest. and tom is streaming meeting psych-up music - from meltedmetal.com. - ( heavy metal music playing ) that's happening now with the new mifi from sprint-- z) the mobile hotspot that fits in your pocket. sprint. the now network. deaf, hard-of-hearin÷l and people with speech disabilities access www.sprintrelay.com. right now. a look at the white house this morning. washington, d.c., it's cloudy, it's 65 degrees. a little bit later, a few showers in the forecast. and it's not getting much warmer. up to a high of only 68 today in the nation's capital. welcome back to the most news in the morning. president obama is keeping up his renewed push for health care reform today. he's hoping to build on the momentum after the unveiling of senator max baucus' plan. so far the $856 billion proposal is not enjoying much support from either side of the aisle.
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here's just a quick look at what this bill would mandate. insurance for all americans. it would create health care co-ops, but not have a public option. it would create tax credits to help low and middle income families buy insurance. it also puts new restrictions on insurance companies. and people cannot be denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions. joining me to talk about it, jennifer donohue and also john avalon, columnist and daily beast blogger and author of "independent nation." thanks to both of you for being with us. let me just talk about what this bill was. it was the bill that people seemed to be waiting for. they expected it to be the most moderate bill, the one that involved republicans, and now you have people from the gang of six, others in the senate saying, i can't sign on to this, on both sides of the aisle. so what's going on, john? >> it's part of being a centrist. liberals think you're conservative, and conservatives think you're liberal and frequently anger people on both sides. that's the state the baucus bill is in right now.
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but this is a road map for health care reform. senator olympia snowe said she may be open to this. and the idea that the president pushed in this speech, that people in congress agree on 80% of the health care bill, the big 20% is the public option. well, public option is not part of max baucus' bill. this is a good start towards build something that looks like a consensus bill. and if it doesn't attract bipartisan support, that says as much about the poisonous tone in washington as it does this bill. >> but you have people like even senator rockefeller, a democrat out of west virginia saying what this basically boils down to is some of my constituents, the coal miners are going to be paying for more health care. that's why he can't support it. you have a democrat saying that. and where does that leave this bill? >> the biggest problem that senator baucus and president obama have is the democrats, actually. it's the sort of liberal wing of the party doesn't like what's in this bill. they don't like the lack of a public option. they don't think it goes far
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enough. they don't like that it's not really the mandate they feel the public wants. i think what we see right now is this sort of leverage game. it's like a tennis match where we had an advantage from the white house, when everybody wanted health care, and then republicans thought they were getting traction on being the party of no and opposing anything that came forward over the summer with the bitter partisan debate and the town hall meetings, i think a lot of people in the middle, the centrists that john is talking about became sort of turned off and now, really, we're going into a phase where the question of how it's going to be paid for is going to rule the day. and i think the devil's in the details on all of this, as it's gotten more specific, it's gotten more controversial. and the republicans seem to have decided that saying no is a good strategy. >> a couple of the things when you talk about some of some of the details. one is fines for people. if you make a certain amount of money and donate want to get insurance, you're going to be
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fined for it. it's not going to be worth your while to not get insurance. how is that going to go over from some independents who say, listen, i may want to decide for himself. >> the number one item for moat independents is the growth of government. so the individual mandates, that mitt romney tried out in massachusetts could be a real problem. it matter what is the threshold is. one of the real debates right now is if some folks who are making three times the poverty rate, $66,000 a year could be fined as much as $3,800, that's a big chunk of change. i think you're going to see in committee, that number get reduced. it's not as much of a burden. remember, politics in america is determined by moderates and the middle class at the end of the day. it's very important that this bill is being seen as friendly to the middle class voters and just middle class americans when are feeling such a squeeze right now in today's economy. >> go ahead, jennifer. >> you know, i would have to say, while i agree that politics are determined by the people in the middle, the people voting on it are the people in the left and right. and so far, the people on the right are getting more play and
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more of a play book for 2010 out of saying no and being an opposition party than they are out of considering real health reform legislation. >> jennifer, the interesting thing, though, where they're getting a lot of pushback right now, we talked to congressman anthony weiner, he said, without a public option, it's not worth our time, not worth the money, it's not going to save money in the long run and it's not going to make sense. they're getting a lot of pushback, actually, from liberal democrats. >> absolutely. the white house can't win right now. day go right, they get hit by the right, they go left, they get hit by the left for not going far enough. but i'll tell you, sitting in massachusetts this morning that front page of the "boston globe" is, health insurance coverage going up, rates going up. people paying more. the reality is this has to be paid for. and what we have to see now is the details. will the public accept, and that's moderates, democrats, republicans, the cost measures and how to pay for it. that's much more important than whether there's a public option in terms of how it's going to affect both parties in 2010. and that's all each side is
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looking at in how to get this moved forward. >> and there's no question, given the menu of options, this is the more fiscally responsible option. the nonprofit co-op plan that puts up in the marketplace would cost the government $6 billion as opposed to $500 billion and up for the public option. when folks on the far left of the democratic party who have made the case very explicitly, they want a public option because they see it as a step towards single payer, that is precisely what folks in the moderate majority of americans do not want. that is a source of a lot of the anger we've seen at the town halls. this is -- if you look at president obama, his numbers are hurting most when it comes to concerns about the deficit and health care. those two issues are intertwined. that's why this bill is a step in the right direction. >> john, it's a step in the right direction, but is there really any way to pay for a bill like this without touching the deficit or increasing taxes? do you genuinely think that's realistic and plausible? >> the cbo actually scored this bill and said it would reduce the deficit over ten years by $49 billion. >> over ten. >> a step in the right direction. >> and that's really what anybody can hope for, is it's
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going to take a decade from where we are right now with the deficit. so that's also one of the big concerns. we're going to see how much the president's push, he's out there, going out there all day today, going to be on all the shows, will be talking about this. we'll see whether that makes a dent in some of the public opinion about it. john avalon, great to talk to you, jennifer donohue, thanks to you as well. we also know that you guys have a lot of questions about health care reform, helping you sort fact from fiction and putting all the answers online so go to cnn.com/healthcare. and this sunday, president obama sits down with our own john king on "state of the union." it's a can't-miss interview airing at 9:00 a.m. eastern right here on cnn. t.j.? coming up in just a bit, kiran is going to be interviewing four men who will be wearing more makeup than she is. you can probably guess who i'm talking about here, kiss celebrating 35 years. they'll be here with us. they'll be live. i'm ed whitacre, the new chairman of general motors.
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good morning, everybody. good morning, new york. 58 degrees. a little cloudy, a little gloomy today. expecting a little rain, possibly, a high of 66 degrees. that, folks, new york, is not where the rich, young americans are living. you might think, maybe, that a lot are living there, but apparently not the highest concentration. they are actually, where? d.c. >> d.c. >> i was going to say atlanta. >> no, we're broke down there. there's a new report that says the highest concentration of 25
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to 34-year-olds making more than $100,000 -- christine, that's not rich these days, is it? >> rich in most the country. >> living in counties around the nation's capital. that's the highest concentration. the appeal of washington is believed to be jobs, strong education, health care institutions, and a moderate climate and easy access to recreational -- >> it's where the money is. >> d.c. is expensive to live in. >> it is. it is. but a lot of people say the center of the american economy has shifted to wall street to washington. and some would say that's not necessarily a good thing. but that's the way it is. >> government is growing and there's always going to be some government jobs. >> and a lot of lobbying jobs. where there's money to be passed out, people making money trying to influence the debate. >> we're talking to you this morning. we're talking about houses before. >> now we're talking about our ride. >> talks about cars. and i swear, i did not tailor this for kiran at all, who drives a -- >> i get made fun of because i have a mini van, i have a
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chrysler town and country, yes i do, and i absolutely love it. >> let me just say this. >> you can haul around -- >> the american automakers are trying to figure out how to get your money. the how to get you to buy new cars, how to upgrade, keep moving, because cash for clunkers is over. we're hearing that chrysler is leasing vehicles again. after it filed for bankruptcy, it hasn't been leasing. it's now back in the leasing business with gmac. effective today, you'll be able to lease a 2010 model year chrysler, jeep, and dodge. their having special leasing rates available on the chrysler town and country and the dodge caravan. and there are no-interest loans or rebates on some 2009 cars for chrysler and some cashback of about $3,000, some incentives there on 2010 models. now, remember, after cash for clunkers is over, you know, there's a lot of concern that people are going to sit back and they're not going to be out there buying new cars in droves. and of course, out of coming out of bankruptcy, this is something that american automakers absolutely need. the fiat ceo, fiat took over
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chrysler and they say that chrysler's condition was way worse than they thought and they're revamping their business plan for november. there's still a lot of challenges ahead for ford and gm -- i'm sorry, for gm and chrysler. ford did not file bankruptcy. so we'll wait and see post-clunkers what the landscape's going to look like for these automakers. but i think you can expect to see some incentives. 60-day money back guarantee for gm. it's still a buyer's market if you've got the money and confidence. >> if you have the money and confidence to drive a minivan, t.j., now's the time to act. >> i have neither the money, nor the confidence. >> nor the taste. >> people are expecting deals. they're expecting cash for the house, expecting cash for the cars. >> it's true. and some would say you need demand to come back at a normal level not to have these incentives to spur demand, but people are a little nervous and
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justifiably nervous with their money so takes something to get people to open their wallet. >> christine romans, appreciate it as always. >> we'll take a quick break and when we come back we'll take a look at this issue of attacks on the president. is it legitimate policy concerns or is there an element of racism? blueprint is free and only for chase customers. it lets you choose what purchases you want to pay in full to avoid interest...with full pay. and those you split... you decide how to pay over time. if having a plan matters. chase what matters. create your own blueprint at chase.com/blueprint. sfx: coin drop, can shaking
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so switch to regions and start saving. plus, get a business financial review through a regions cashcor analysis. it's how business gets into the rhythm of saving. regions - it's time to expect more. it's 26 minutes past the hour right now. welcome back to the most news in the morning. former president jimmy carter is backing up his statement that racism is fueling some of the protests and anger directed at president obama. here's what he had to say to students at emory university in atlanta.
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>> when a radical fringe element of demonstrators and others begin to attack the president of the united states of america as an animal or as a reincarnation of adolf hitler or when they wave signs in the air that said we should have buried obama with kennedy, those kind of things are beyond the grounds of the way presidents have ever been accepted. even with people who disagree. >> republicans are blasting former president carter, calling on the white house to fire back as well. the rnc chairman michael steele, who is the first black man to serve as head of the rnc says that too many democrats are playing the race card. >> then you have rush limbaugh and some of the other conservatives saying that it's whites who are being persecuted. so is this explosive debate over race, policy, or a little bit of both? our senior political
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correspondent candy crowley breaks it down. >> reporter: race and politics is a combustible combo and it explodes into headlines when an ex-president lights the fuse, as jimmy carter did on abc. >> an overwhelming portion of the intensely demonstrated animosity towards president b barack obama is based on the fact that he is a black man. >> reporter: there is a tiny part of this argument that is not an argument. >> we can't deny that race has an impact on our society. >> sorry about that. we'll get back to candy crowley in just a moment. here's the new haven police department holding a press conference about the murder of yale grad student, annie le. >> good morning. i apologize for the delay this morning. with me today is chief jim pedrotty from the new york pd, special agent in charge of the fbi in connecticut, kim merts, and the commissioner of the connecticut state police, john
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dandaher. they each have a short statement after i read my statement. about 20 minutes ago, an arrest warrant was signed. bond has been set at $3 million. a few minutes ago, raymond jay clark iii, 24 years of age in middleton, connecticut, was arrested at a motel in connecticut. annie le was reported missing on september 8th and a missing person investigation was started by yale pd with the assistance of the fbi, connecticut state police, and new haven pd. on saturday the 12th, connecticut state police secured the building at 12 amistad street in order to conduct a thorough forensic review of that building. the afternoon of the 12th, the new haven assumed the lead in this case. close to 300 items have been seized this in investigation and detectives have worked around the clock on this case. based upon numerous interviews, forensic evidence, and
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information learned from reviewing video surveillance, detectives have secured the arrest warrant for clark. this arrest warrant has been sealed. so no further information can be released in order to comply with this court order. annie le was a young woman with unlimited potential. her loss will be deeply felt by her family, friends, and the community. i think it's important to note this is not about urban crime, it's not about university crime, it's not about domestic crime, but an issue of workplace violence, which has become a growing concern around the country. you know, i want to -- i can't thank enough the connecticut state police, the fbi, and yale pd. this was about as smooth an operation among four agencies as i've seen in my 39 years. every agency offered everything they could bring forward and have progressively pursued this investigation to what we believe is a successful conclusion. so i would first like to invite
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the commissioner. >> thank you, chief. on behalf of the department of public safety, we certainly want to extend our profound sympathies to the family of annie le, her fiance, to everyone that was affected by this tragedy. i echo what the chief said that this was an extraordinary cooperative effort involving four law enforcement agencies. as the chief said, people worked around the clock. that was not an idle statement. that was literal truth with regard to all agencies. for our part, for the department of public safety, our major crime squads and our forensic scientists have performed extraordinary work, as have all the agencies involved. our commitment, our promise is that we will continue to provide all support necessary to new haven pd. we will do what is necessary to bring this case to an
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appropriate conclusion. that is our obligation and our commitment to annie le, to her family. >> jim? >> thank you, chief. i would like to knowledge the dedication and professionalism of the employees of the new haven police department, the yale university police department, the connecticut state police, and fbi who have worked tirelessly throughout this investigation. i would also like to acknowledge the assistance provided in the case by the fbi's polygraph unit and behaifrl analysis unit. lastly, it is important to recognize lieutenant lisa dadio and the members of the new haven police department's major crimes unit. i have been able to witness firsthand what a talented team chief lewis has and they have been working around the clock to ensure the individual responsible for the murder of annie le is brought to justice.
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>> good morning. i'm proud of the contribution of the men and women of the yale police department for their work on this case. the yale community is grateful for the collaborative efforts of the new haven police, the state police, and the fbi. and for their tireless devotion over the last eight days to the difficult task of finding annie and determining who is responsible for this horrible crime. the yale police department and the yale security department pledge to do everything they can to support the state's attorney in his prosecution of this case. and we are eager to focus our
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attention on the day-to-day activities of serving the faculty, staff, and students of yale as we do our part to keep our city safe. thank you. >> i know this doesn't make your job any easier, but i cannot answer any questions about anything that's in the document that's been sealed by the court. if there's other questions, i'll try to answer them as long as you stay away from that area. >> can you tell us where the suspect goes now and will he be arraigned today? >> he will be brought to one union station here today. we're expecting him to be arraigned today or tomorrow? >> depends on -- >> within the next 24 hours. may not make it today. but he's on his way here to the station. >> chief, what was his demeanor when he was arrested? can you tell us a little bit about how the arrest went down? >> there were no issues with the arrest. it constituent smoothly. >> can you tell us if it was a dna match?
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>> that's in the sealed document. >> is there anything you can tell us about what evidence first led you to suspect minimum and what evidence led you to the point that you came up with an arrest warrant? >> the only thing can i tell you, we've reviewed tapes, interviewed about 150 people, but nothing more specific than that. i'm sorry. it's in the document. i can't talk about anything that's in the -- >> you've talked about the polygraph -- >> listening again to the police and the word we are getting, which we thought we were going to get and that we have indeed gotten this morning is that they have in fact arrested the lab technician, raymond clark iii arrested and now being charged with the murder of annie le, the yale student whose body was found on her wedding day, which was this past sunday, but she had been missing for almost a week. her body was found in the wall of that lab, the basement of that building where she had been working. saying some interesting things here. a lot of people wondering about motive, why, was she targeted? the police chief there making an interesting statement, that this was not about domestic violence, this was not a situation of campus violence. call this an episode of
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workplace violence. so who knows what that means. he says the actual arrest warrant has now been sealed, so we're probably not going to get a whole lot more information. but bond set at $3 million. the judge signed an arrest warrant and in fact they had called this man only a person of interest for quite some time. obviously, he was their suspect, but they had got some dna evidence from him and actually let him go, kept him under surveillance, but let him go, kept an eye on him, knew where he was, but he wasn't arrested and sounds like at 8:10, what the officer said, they finally got their guy. >> and we had our cnn producer outside of that hotel or motel area where this happened. julian joins us on the phone with more about what he saw as this arrest went down. >> reporter: hey, kiran. how are you? >> hey there. what did you see this morning? >> we're at the super8 motel and the scene was police waiting outside the motel, moving around, kind of waiting as we were, and then at 8:10, about
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nine police cars came in with sirens on, road was closed, and they went to the back of the motel and a lot of waiting there again. at one point, we saw them take him out in handcuffs. just now, they just pulled away, heading towards what we believe is new haven. >> and we just heard from the police chief there that he said this arrest went down with no problems. and as we had said before, he was named -- clark was called a person of interest all this time, but there was a lot of talk, police were trying to keep this as tightly under wraps as possible, but there was talk that an arrest was imminent this morning. and i guess what they were just waiting for was that arrest warrant to be signed by a judge, right? >> reporter: correct. yeah. this went down with no problem at all. there was a major police presence. you know, we saw him walk out in handcuffs. he was wearing a white shirt. there was no altercation whatsoever and it was pretty quick. >> and i guess we're seeing the first pictures, julian. this is t.j., but we're seeing some of the first pictures this morning of them putting him in
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that vehicle and taking him off. you said that several police cars came in with their lights on and came into the parking lot. what did you understand was the level of surveillance he was under? according to police, they knew edere he was at all times, so i here as well. we're across the street, you know, have been kept away, and at one point, they immediately moved away. there was no one getting in or out of there that shouldn't be there. and there were people in the front area making sure guests were uninvolved in this incident. it was a controlled environment. >> want to remind our viewers, what we're seeing here and what has just happened minutes ago, police in new haven, in connecticut have announced that they have, in fact, arrested someone for the murder of annie le, the grad student at yale who was found on sunday, which was her wedding day, found. her body was found in the build she was last seen entering. surveillance photo showed her going in, but not going out. she had been missing almost up
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to a week. the person of interest they named was that gentleman you see in the picture there. his name is raymond clark. a lab technician that works in that same building. there's his picture. he was only called a person of interest. he was put in handcuffs and questioned, got some dna evidence from him and other things, but then let go. but police did allow him to go, but they had him under tight surveillance at that hotel video you were just seeing and they just picked him up. >> looks like what they were waiting for was that arrest warrant to be signed by the judge, which happened today, according to new haven police. the other interesting thing they talked about, how many items they had seized. from finding out by september 8th by september 12th, they had talked about conducting hundreds of interviews, collecting a lot of forensic evidence, and seizing 13 items, as well as going over 700 hours of surveillance tape from that lab building. the other interesting thing that caught both t.j.'s and mine attention was what the police chief said about what this was. and he said, this arrest warrant's sealed and we're not going to be giving out that much
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information, but this is not a case of campus security, this isn't a case of domestic violence situation, that it's workplace violence. then he went on to say, a growing problem in the united states. >> so he leaves a lot there to be desired as far as questions about a motive, but calling this workplace violence. and there was a lot of speculation, a lot of analyses and law enforcement folks said because of where her body was found, day guessed it essentially had to be someone that worked in that building, maybe familiar with it and it turns out he was a lab technician that worked there. apparently he had to work with her some. this is a building she did a lot of work in and he worked there as well. now, there he is, a person of interest. now, in fact, no doubt just a suspect, but now the person police believe is in fact their guy who did murder annie le. police there say they've had their eye really on raymond clark all along and his lawyer, though, stressing, as he said throughout the investigation, his client has, in fact,
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cooperated with police. and our tom foreman has more about the man police now say has killed annie le. >> reporter: 30 miles from the crime scene, the street where raymond clark lives is buzzing. >> he was decent, you know, his dog was really excited and he was just like, oh, he's really friendly, don't worry, you can pet him. he's really nice. so pretty much he was just known to love his dog and walk around with his dog all the time. >> reporter: and you said he was sort of different in that he wanted to know a lot about the people he was talking to. >> wanted to know their full name, where they're from, stuff like that. >> reporter: clark, who is 24, is not a student at yale, but works there taking care of mice in the medical labs. his fiance and two relatives also work in the labs according to police. but officials will say little about how clark knew annie le. >> they worked in the same building. they passed in the hallways. anything beyond that, i'm not going to talk about. >> reporter: any past troubles for le? >> i'm not going to talk about that issue. >> reporter: any video of clark in the build that day?
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>> i'm not going to talk about what video we have and don't have. >> reporter: an old high school friend remembers clark well. >> he was a nice kid. i mean, he was a jokester, kind of like a class clown. everybody knew him, everybody liked him. >> reporter: for a while, clark lived here, not far from yale, but neighbors here have little to say. this is the house where he used to live, up there on the second floor, we're told. but all of the residents of this build now say that they either moved in after he left or, if they knew him, they did not know him well. they saw him in passing at best. he had a girlfriend and a dog by most accounts. but that's about all they know. >> all right. there was tom foreman for us, just giving us a little bit more detail about who this person is. raymond clark, 24 years old, a lab technician at yale university, now arrested by new haven police. bond set at $3 million. there's video from just about 30 minutes ago of him being taken into custody. again, as t.j. had said, called
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him a person of interest. had him under constant surveillance. now he is in the hands of police. the only person arrested in the murder of annie le, who was a grad student at yale university. >> about a quarter to the top of the hour. we'll continue to follow that breaking news story. so why should you be penalized for talking to someone, just because they're on another network. shouldn't you be able to call any mobile... on any network, at any time? it's a free country. knock yourself out. announcer: introducing the revolutionary. now on the sprint network yoe to call 250 million mobie without worrying about t. only from sprint. the now . deaf, hard of hearie with speech disabilities acc.
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the breaking story is that an arrest has been made this morning in the case of annie le,
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the yale grad student who was murdered. body found on sunday. what you're seeing here is video of the man police have arrested. his name was raymond clark. he was a lab technician that worked at the building where her body was found. the 24-year-old man now is being held on $3 million bond. arrest warrants were signed around 8:10 a.m. and that is when he was picked up. that is the video you are seeing this morning. police say this was a case of workplace violence. those are the words from the police chief there in new haven, that this was a case of workplace violence. don't know how many more details we might get because the arrest warrant has been sealed. but the authorities say they have, in fact, arrested the person that they have come out and called a person of interest. raymond clark, called him a person of interest. put him in cuffs, came in and questioned him, took some dna from him and let him go. but this morning, they have put cuffs on him once again. but this time, he is not just a person of interest, he is their suspect, the one they believe
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did murder annie le. a lot more to come on our breaking story this morning. >> that's right. the only other thing, that clark is now not talking to police according to his attorney. according to his attorney, that he cooperated and gave dna evidence, but according to the police chief, he's invoking his rights and they are not able to question him. we'll find out more details maybe later today. meantime, the economy showing signs of recovery, but americans, unfortunately, still losing jobs. it's definitely a glass half full story, though, because in this "money & main street" report, allan chernoff shows us that a jobless family determined to make 13 weeks of severance pay last a full year and they say they're actually having fun doing it. >> reporter: carmen and chris jogging home from an errand instead of driving. it's one of many cost-saving steps they are taking since the family bread winner was laid off in july from her job. >> at first, instant panic,
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we're going to lose the house tomorrow and living on the street. >> reporter: she decided to turn her loss into an opportunity and spend more time with the family while taking time to find another job she'd love. so they plan to stretch her unemployment checks and her 13-week severance to last a full year, determined not to dig into savings. >> how do you do it? i have the rules posted, actually, at my desk. >> reporter: rules like, live within your means, which they say they've always done. they're also do-it-yourselfers. chris, a stay-at-home dad, who is a woodworker, builds toys for his son, max. >> my dad made it. that's the best. >> reporter: for the first time, she's set up a budget. to stick to it, the family shops only for absolute necessities. the library is now a frequent stop as are other free community resources. >> we've had more fun since i lost my job than ever. >> reporter: having adopted a frugal lifestyle, they say they
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now truly appreciate small luxuries. >> and if you pick just a couple of luxuries like, hershey bars, you really enjoy them. >> reporter: even as they stretch, they still donate 10% of her unemployment check to their church, living only a few doors away from the neighborhood food pantry, they are often reminded of their blessings. >> so i don't have a job right now. we've got a house, we've got food. we have nothing to complain about. >> allan chernoff, cnn. >> all right. well, good luck to them. they're doing their best, trying to stretch that budget. and for more tips on how you can stretch your own budget, trim a little here and there, head to cnn.com/moneyandmainstreet. while you're there, you can test your financial health. plug in your age and your salary and how much you're spending and saving and see how much you score. i haven't done this yet, because you don't really want to depress yourself this early in the
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morning. >> i'm nervous about doing that. tonight, after the fall of lehman brothers and the worldwide financial collapse, our anderson cooper and ali velshi will be telling you how to take control of your own financial future. it's a cnn "money & main street" special tonight on cnn. the man waited his whole life to catch a foul ball, to catch a ball at his beloved phillies game. he finally gets hold of one and he made a mistake. he gave it to his daughter. i've helped somebody. you know, it makes me feel pretty good. we're offering a solution for a customer that maybe has to choose between paying their credit card or putting food on the table. our main objective is to reach out to the customers that are falling behind on their payments.
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a lot of customers are proud and happy that bank of america actually has a solution to help them out. i listen. that's the first thing i do is i listen. you know what, what happened? what put you in this situation? we always want to make sure that we're doing i'll go through some of his monthly expenses, if he has a mortgage payment, if he pays rent. and then i'll use all that information to try and see what kind of a payment he financially can handle. i want to help you. bank of america wants to help you through this difficult time. when they come to you and they say thank you aj, for helping me with this problem, that's where we get our joy from.
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good morning to the shot this morning. >> the what? >> the shot. chicago. >> i thought you said the shah. did you know he was visiting. >> chicago, good morning. you all knew what efs saying. lovely day in chicago. 75 and sunny. beautiful summer town, summer's almost over. >> very nice around this time of year. take a dip in the lake. >> don't do that. >> eat a hot dog. >> okay. rob, good morning to you, sir. please. >> some deep dish pizza. and everybody looked at me like i was crazy when i said apple picking. isn't that what we do up here in the empire state? >> what do you have a mouse in your pocket, the empire state? >> what? >> if you're inviting me up, if you're having an apple picking party, i would love to participate. t.j., hang out, catch the next
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flight and pick some apples. >> 67 in new york, t.j. still rather cool. not necessarily rain cooled as it is across parts of the south. flood watches and warnings still posted for a good chunk of arkansas. the low that we were talking about yesterday, actually backed up into texas and dallas you'll probably see some showers with this, but you kind of see it starting to rain itself out, just a little bit. and that's the good news. so things are beginning to wind down, but another day or two of downpours possible. 77 in atlanta. 76 in dallas. back to you, my apple-picking friends up there in the new york studio. >> that's right. we'll send you some cider. thanks, rob. meanwhile, guys, this is this guy's dream. he's a huge philly's fan, watched the team for years, caught a foul ball and then his 3-year-old got in on the action. now dads across the country are saying, good job, buddy. that's coming up. (announcer) now l'oreal's age perfect serum, our first for menopausal skin.
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it rebuilds skin substance to treat sagging and boost luminosity. age perfect serum by l'oreal. all right. fans dream about it. to catch that foul ball, you catch a ball during a baseball game, dreams finally came true. a beautiful moment for this guy. you can see the big smile on his face, been a phillies fan since he was 3. >> now he's 32 years old and
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daddy tried to share his major league moment with his little girl. it's what happened after he caught the foul ball that has the whole country talking. here's jeanne moos. >> it was a foul ball catch that left folks in anything but a foul mood. no, it wasn't steve's catch at the philadelphia/washington game that had him laughing. it was his 3-year-old's daughter right arm. thousand she threw back daddy's souvenir. a heartwarming hug is what lingers. one of those moments that evokes this from women. >> aww! >> reporter: and from men. >> oh! like, what are you doing. >> reporter: he was doing what emily was used to doing, catching and throwing a nerf ball with dad. but it was the post-toss hug that tugged at most folks. >> my husband would have had a fit. >> reporter: that hugged turned the 32-year-old engineering manager into a paragon of
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parenting. what a prince. absolute hero. dad of the year. best dad ever. i want to meet this dad. >> reporter: yeah, well, he's already married. that's his wife with their younger daughter at the game. steve told us he hugged emily when she looked as if she thought she'd done something wrong by tossing away the ball. >> wow, classic. >> reporter: by the way, the phillies sent someone up to the stands to give dad and daughter a ball to replace the one that emily threw back. >> reporter: when an online curmudgeon suggested dad should have tossed her after the ball, the next person responded, do us all a favor and don't reproduce. but let us reproduce the slow-motion replay and watch steve's face as he realizes

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