Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 20, 2021 1:00am-2:00am PDT

1:00 am
rely on the experts at 1800petmeds for the same medications as the vet, but for less with fast free shipping. visit petmeds.com today. ♪ hello and welcome to our viewers joining us here in the united states and all around the world, you are watching "cnn newsroom" and i'm rosemary church. just ahead -- >> the u.s. is bracing for a highly-anticipated court verdict as the fate of derek chauvin is now in the hands of 12 jurors. why the judge has already told the defense they may have grounds for an appeal. half of all american adults have already received at least one covid vaccine dose and now
1:01 am
everyone over 16 in the u.s. can get one. and former u.s. vice president walter mondale is being remembered as a dogged politician. he passed away at the age of 93 and now many tributes are pouring in. ♪ >> our top story, jurors in former police officer derek chauvin's murder trial spent four hours deliberating but did not reach a verdict on monday. they will resume deliberations in minneapolis later today as the nation waits on edge. chauvin who is white is accused of killing george floyd, a black man, with excessive and unreasonable force by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes. floyd's death was caught in chilling video, it sparked
1:02 am
protests across the u.s. and around the world and calls for police reform and racial justice. while the jury deliberates over the landmark case, minneapolis and other u.s. cities are bracing for the possibility that a not guilty verdict could bring anger and unrest to the streets. the national guard has even been deployed in parts of downtown minneapolis as a precaution. cnn's sara sidner has more on the dramatic moments in court before jurors were handed the case. and a warning, per report contains images some will find disturbing. >> members of the jury i instruct you as follows, it is your duty to decide the questions of fact in this case. >> reporter: after 27 days of trial from jury selection to closing arguments 45 witnesses and dozens of pieces of evidence the murder trial against former minneapolis police officer derek chauvin in the death of george floyd is finally in the hands of a jury. >> use your common sense. believe your eyes. >> reporter: chauvin who is
1:03 am
charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and one count of manslaughter has pleaded not guilty. >> that force for 9 minutes and 29 seconds that killed george floyd. he betrayed the badge and everything it stood for. >> i submit to you that the state has failed to meet its burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt. >> reporter: the defense side to sow doubt about whether chauvin's knee on floyd's neck was the primary factor in his death. >> you can't come in and say george floyd on one hand george floyd died of asphyxiation but he has a 98% oxygen level. his blood is oxygenated. >> reporter: the prosecution reminded the jury of the expert medical testimony they had heard from the stand. >> is that common sense or is that nonsense? not enough oxygen could get to the lungs and that's what killed george floyd. >> reporter: over and over again they replayed the video of floyd
1:04 am
taking his last breaths. >> somebody is telling you they can't breathe and you keep doing it, you're doing it on purpose. >> reporter: last week chauvin pleaded the fifth which is a defendant's right to avoid self-incrimination. his defense attorney instead spoke for him. >> the 9 minutes and 29 seconds ignores the previous 16 minutes and 59 seconds. it completely disregards it. it tries to reframe the issue of what a reasonable police officer would do. >> reporter: after weeks of laying out the case arguing that a heart condition, drug use, carbon monoxide from the squad car's exhaust and potentially stress-induced excited delirium all could have contributed to floyd's death, the defense implored the jury that there is enough reasonable doubt to acquit. >> he would observe the white foam around mr. floyd's mouth. he would consider the possibility that this person was
1:05 am
under the -- was under the influence of something. >> this is not the trial of george floyd. he is not on trial. he didn't get a trial when he was alive and he is not on trial here. >> reporter: before the jury began deliberations some of the last words they heard was this rebuttal from the prosecution. >> you were told that mr. floyd died because his heart was too big and the truth of the matter is that the reason george floyd is dead is because mr. chauvin's heart was too small. >> reporter: the jury got the case about 4:15 minneapolis time and deliberated until 8:00 p.m. they will continue to deliberate tuesday. sara sidner, cnn, minneapolis. the judge in the trial has said comments by congresswoman maxine waters could be grounds for appealing a verdict. the california representative was in brooklyn center at protests over the killing of
1:06 am
daunte wright and here is what she said. >> i hope that we are going to get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty. and if we don't we cannot go away. we have to stay on the street and we've got to get more active, we've got to get more confrontational, we've got to make sure that they -- that they know that we mean business. >> those comments by the house democrat caused an outcry among republicans who accused of waters of inciting violence. here is what the judge had to say. >> i'm aware of the media reports, i'm aware that congresswoman waters was talking specifically about this trial and about the unacceptability of anything less than a murder conviction. i wish elected officials would stop talk about this case, especially in a manner that is disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch and our function. >> well, as the country waits for a verdict in the trial, some
1:07 am
tech companies are taking preemptive action. facebook says it will remove any content about the verdict that violates its community standards. and it's also designated minneapolis a temporary high-risk location. cnn's miguel marquez has more now from the twin cities. >> reporter: so at about the time the jurors got the case in the -- the case against derek chauvin there was a gathering of protesters that grew. i want to show you what's happening down here now. this is downtown minneapolis, i want to let you listen a little bit. people have gathered for several hours, they have marched through the streets demanding equality of justice not just with regard to george floyd and the derek chauvin case, but for americans and people of color everywhere in their dealings with police. they've stopped at that particular place because this barricaded, razor wired building
1:08 am
here, this is the new third precinct for minneapolis. this is the precinct where derek chauvin was placed out of -- this is the precinct that protesters in south minneapolis took over and then burned and they've now moved it up to this area in downtown minneapolis but the state has brought in thousands of national guardsmen, thousands of law enforcement some from outside the area, schools will go to virtual starting on wednesday ahead of this expected verdict and there are concerns that the funeral of daunte wright is scheduled for thursday this week as well. talking to protesters and demonstrators here, their message is pretty simple, if he is not found guilty on all three of those counts it will mean that the american justice system still has a long way to go. back to you. well, minnesota's lawmakers are acutely aware of the possibility of unrest.
1:09 am
the mayors of minneapolis and st. paul spoke with the media on monday about the challenges ahead. >> i mourn george floyd. i mourn daunte wright because they are black men. i mourn them also because they are members of humanity and that's my response back to people saying i know this must be challenging for you. i always say i assume it must be challenging for you as well. this is a time that we have to push forward through and that's why our message for our community is so clear. i'm not asking folks not to be angry, i'm not asking folks to be calm or to be quiet, quite the opposite, i'm asking our community to take the resolve, to take the energy, to take all that we feel right now and channel it directly into constructing not destructing our communities, but constructing a new path forward in st. paul, in minnesota and all throughout our country. to russia now, authorities there have moved alexei navalny to a prison hospital outside moscow. supporters say the opposition
1:10 am
leader's health is failing and he could be near death. navalny went on a hunger strike three weeks ago demanding proper medical care for back pain and numbness in his arms and legs. prison officials say he's in satisfactory condition and they have prescribed a vitamin therapy. we have this just into cnn, the u.s. ambassador to russia says he is returning to washington this week for consultations. for more let's turn to cnn's international diplomatic editor nic robertson, he joins us live. what is the significance of the u.s. ambassador to russia returning to the u.s. at this time? what more are you learning on this? >> reporter: well, john sullivan says he is going back to the united states to washington, d.c. to consult with the new administration who he hasn't consulted with so far face- face-to-face. he also says that it's been over a year since he's been able to see his family and he also adds to that that this will last a
1:11 am
couple of weeks and that he says he will be back before any summit between president putin and president biden. so on the face of it this does seem to be a recalibration of the relationship between the two countries at the moment. i think it's worth stating here that you had russian officials just last week saying that they had recalled their ambassador from washington over the past couple of months with consultations in moscow and they thought it was fit that the united states should do the same thing. so this now coming on the heels of that. it's not clear if the biden administration is taking note of what russian officials have said or indeed that there is, you know, a need for this face-to-face consultation. something that can't be done over the phone. something that they've been unable to do over the past year. but it does seem to indicate a
1:12 am
straining of the situation, diplomatic situation between the two countries right now. >> yeah, because the timing of this is extraordinary, isn't it? i mean, watching what is happening to alexei navalny right now, he's been moved into that hospital, his allies say that he is near death. we don't know for sure, we can't confirm that. then at the same time of course we know that russian troops are on the border with ukraine, that is in a very threatening stance, and at this point the u.s. would have their ambassador to russia return to the united states. it seems extraordinary. >> reporter: it does. 100,000 russian troops on the border of ukraine is what the eu's foreign policy chief has said just in the last few hours. so that's very clearly a huge concern. you would think that you would want to have diplomats in place to talk this through.
1:13 am
john sullivan the ambassador was called in a couple of times last week to meet with russian officials, once with a foreign policy adviser and another meeting a couple of days later after that ostensibly part of it to discuss it seemed what could be on the agenda in that summit between president putin and president biden. but another concern when we heard this from the u.s. department of defense yesterday, that russia is limiting the movement of naval vessels in the black sea. so there is an escalation in terms of tensions at the moment and this perhaps points to the reason why john sullivan the ambassador is heading back to washington. >> all right. we will keep a very close eye on this news of course. nic robertson bringing us the very latest from london. many thanks. of course, we were talking about alexei navalny's situation. i spoke earlier with the ceo of
1:14 am
hermitage capital management at the head of the global magnitski justice campaign and i asked him how worried vladimir putin should be about the situation with alexei navalny. take a listen. >> president putin is in a -- he is in a terrible situation of his own making. alexei navalny is effectively made him -- to the situation because vladimir putin can't in his own mind, in his own eyes, cannot look weak in front of the russian people because he is afraid of other people like alexei navalny then taking over his power. he can't back down in his own mind and at the same time if he doesn't back down and if alexei navalny comes to die, there will be unbelievable consequences both inside and outside of russia for navalny's death. so putin is really stuck in a terrible place and alexei navalny is probably if things
1:15 am
don't change going to die. >> that is a real concern. i mean, of course, navalny's situation along with the expulsion of russian spies in the czech republic has further ice laced russia, the u.s. is warning of consequences if navalny should die in russian custody. you have said that you are very concerned and you seem to think that that is a likelihood. so what would those consequences be, do you think? >> well, first of all, i should say that there should be consequences now, not after. he's being tortured. they tried to kill him with novichok eight months ago. they arrested him for violating parole because he was in a coma recovering from his novichok poisoning. so there should be consequences now and very serious consequences now, but the policy tool that the west can use is something called the magnitsky
1:16 am
act. it was named after a lawyer who died under similar circumstances, he was sick, they denied him medical attention and tortured him and killed him. the magnitsky act imposes sanctions on human rights violators. >> any adult in the u.s. who wants a covid vaccine can now receive one, but not everyone is willing to sign up for the shot. we will have the latest on that next.
1:17 am
1:18 am
the first person to survive alzheimer's disease is out there. and the alzheimer's association is going to make it happen by funding scientific breakthroughs, advancing public policy, and providing local support to those living with the disease and their caregivers. but we won't get there without you. join the fight with the alzheimer's association.
1:19 am
do you have a life insurance policy you no longer need? now you can sell your policy, even a term policy, for an immediate cash payment. call coventry direct to learn more. we thought we had planned carefully for our retirement. but we quickly realized that we needed a way to supplement our income. our friends sold their policy to help pay for their medical bills and that got me thinking. maybe selling our policy could help with our retirement. i'm skeptical, so i did some research and called coventry direct. they explained life insurance is a valuable asset that can be sold. we learned that we can sell all of our policy or keep part of it with no future payments, who knew? we sold our policy. now we can relax and enjoy our retirement as we had planned. if you have one hundred thousand dollars or more of life insurance you may qualify to sell your policy. don't cancel or let your policy lapse without finding out what it's worth. visit conventrydirect.com to find out if you policy qualifies. or call the number on your screen. coventry direct, redefining insurance.
1:20 am
welcome back, everyone. all americans 16 and older can now receive a covid vaccine. the u.s. surgeon general says getting everyone vaccinated is key to ending this pandemic. while the rate of vaccinations has picked up there are parts of the country where the supply is greater than the demand. cnn's alexandra field has the details. >> it is your turn to get vaccinated. no matter where you live. >> reporter: all 50 states now offering shots to everyone 16 or
1:21 am
older and a major milestone met, half of all adults have received at least one dose of a vaccine, a quarter of the u.s. population is fully vaccinated. >> the lack of supply, the shortage of locations, the confusing rules are all in the past. >> reporter: but vaccine hesitancy is not. the u.s. still averaging more than 3 million shots in arms every day, but the white house is turning its attention with a big media blitz to communities less willing to turn out. >> for months i've been telling americans to get vaccinated when it's your turn. well, it's your turn now. >> the sooner we get more people vaccinated the better off we're going to be. >> reporter: in mercer county, ohio, they're suddenly struggling to fill appointments at a drive through vaccination site. >> as the age groups dropped to, you know, 16 and above, it's really dropped off. >> we are not the only county that's seeing that is correct especially in rural areas, we're seeing that across the state. >> reporter: in louisiana some pharmacies are reporting
1:22 am
troubling signs of a drop in interest while new covid cases remain high. nationwide new daily cases plateauing again just under 70,000. >> getting a vaccine will help protect you. it will help protect others and it will help us end this pandemic. >> reporter: perhaps hindering confidence in some cases, delays in issuing new guidance over whether to resume use of the single-dose johnson & johnson shot. >> i hope that we don't see anything extended beyond friday. we need to get friday some decision one way or the other. >> reporter: the vaccine paused amid concerns over rare and severe blood clots involving six women out of about 7 million people who had been given the shot. for those who are already fully vaccinated questions now mounting over when life really can return to normal. >> why do people who have been vaccinated received two doses still need to wear masks outside? in the u.s. while we vaccinated many people we are also still
1:23 am
struggling with very high levels of ongoing new daily cases. that's why we've got to still wear our masks, still got to keep distance, avoid close indoor gatherings. >> reporter: you heard dr. fauci say we could see new guidance on whether or not to resume the use of the johnson & johnson vaccine in the next few days. the u.s. surgeon general is saying there could perhaps be a recommendation to bring back the vaccine with restrictions based on age or gender. in new york alexandra field, cnn. the european medicines agency will rule later today on the safety of the johnson & johnson covid vaccine. it's been put on hold as we heard in the u.s. and europe over concerns of rare but severe blood clots. let's get the latest from melissa bell, she joins us live from paris. good to see you. what's expected from this ruling in terms of possible restrictions or warnings for the future use of the j&j vaccine in europe? >> reporter: well, it was just the day after the deliveries of
1:24 am
the johnson & johnson the long awaited johnson & johnson vaccine had begun here in europe that that announcement came that it was being suspended. so it is all eyes very much on the mea today to see whether it will recommend as it did with the astrazeneca after its investigation into those issues with the very rare examples of unusual blood clots that the johnson & johnson can be used in the u and that, in fact, it does believe the european medicines agency that the benefits outweigh the risks perhaps suggesting as it did with astrazeneca that a warning be put on that explains those rare incidences of issues that some patients have had. clearly this is a vaccine that many countries are hoping to be able to roll out as quickly as possible. there were 400 million doses ordered by the european commission to begin with. what we've seen in these last few weeks because of those issues of deliveries to do with astrazeneca the european commission really looking towards pfizer for its future contracts and ongoing negotiations, but clearly those 400 million doses of the johnson
1:25 am
& johnson are doses that european union desperately needs as it tries to ramp up its vaccine rollout. >> many thanks to our melissa bell joining us live from paris. u.s. president biden says it is a national embarrassment, america's epidemic of gun violence. we will look at the rising toll and the gun lobby's grip on congress. why do nearly one million bubusinesses choose stamps.com to mail and ship? no more trips to the post office no more paying full price for postage and great rates from usps and ups mail letters ship packages anytime anywhere for less a lot less get our special tv offer a 4-week trial plus postage and a digital scale
1:26 am
go to stamps.com/save and never go to the post office again
1:27 am
1:28 am
so you're a small business, a 4-week trial plus postage and a digital or a big one. you were thriving, but then... oh. ah. okay. plan, pivot. how do you bounce back? you don't, you bounce forward, with serious and reliable internet. powered by the largest gig speed network in america. but is it secure? sure it's secure. and even if the power goes down, your connection doesn't. so how do i do this? you don't do this. we do this, together. bounce forward, with comcast business. two men arrested in the u.s. capitol riot likely won't face homicide charges in the death of a police officer who died a day later. we get the latest now from cnn's
1:29 am
jessica snyder. >> reporter: after more than three months of mystery the d.c. medical examiner announcing that capitol police officer brian sicknick died of natural causes specifically that he suffered two strokes. this is significant because over the past 100 plus days since january 6 there has been much speculation about how officer sicknick died. capitol police initially announced that he died due to injuries on duty that day and officials said that they were pursuing a federal murder investigation. in february the investigation stalled because the exact cause of sicknick's death was undetermined. in the meantime two men have been charged with assaulting officer sicknick and two other officers with chemical spray and that led to the question of whether the chemical spray could have been the cause of sicknick's death but the medical examiner now saying there is no evidence that officer sicknick had an allergic reaction to the chemical spray, that's according to the "washington post," and that means it is all but assured
1:30 am
that the justice department will not be able to pursue homicide charges related to sicknick's death. of course, there are still looming questions here, the medical examiner has not said if officer sicknick had any preexisting conditions or what exactly may have caused the strokes that resulted in his death one day after the capitol attack. we know that he collapsed in an office later that night, died at the hospital on january 7th, but now at least one of the medical mysteries has been answered. officer sicknick's death was from natural causes, two strokes, and not because of the actions of any of the people who stormed the capitol on january 6th. capitol police are responding to this saying that they accept the findings but that they still consider officer sicknick's death in the line of duty and they say he died courageously defending congress and the capitol. jessica schneider, cnn, washington. the united states is reeling from multiple deadly shootings in the last few days and if you
1:31 am
include the past month there have been at least 50 mass shootings reported nationwide. it's an all too common tragedy here. cnn's brian todd reports on america's gun violence epidemic. >> the first light is in honor of matthew r. alexander. >> reporter: delivering even more disturbing news in the wake of the mass shooting in their city, indianapolis police announced that the 19-year-old man who fatally shot eight people at a fedex facility before killing himself had purchased the two assault rifles that he used legally in july and september of last year. that despite the suspect's mother raising concerns to police about his mental state just a few months earlier and authorities confiscating a shotgun from him. the indianapolis police chief told the "new york times" authorities had not tagged the suspect under the state's so-called red flag law which temporarily bans people who are found by a judge to be too dangerous from possessing a firearm. >> it lets me know that there is
1:32 am
a lapse somewhere in the double-check system with regards to red flags. so if you have an individual who has already had their guns confiscated, you know, there needs to be maybe a separate section within the statistical data that these people are now housed so that they can be readily identified and not get lost in the crowd, if you will. >> reporter: this comes as the nation convulses from more gun violence over the weekend, including a seven-year-old girl shot multiple times and killed in the drive through lane of a mcdonald's in chicago on sunday. three killed, three wounded during a shooting at a bar in kenosha, wisconsin. one person killed and five others including a 12-year-old wounded by gunfire on saturday as they attended a vigil for a shooting victim in columbus, ohio. six people injured when someone opened fire at a 12-year-old's birthday party at a new orleans
1:33 am
suburb. all told at least nine dead and several wounded just in weekend violence in six states. since the atlanta area spa shootings on march 16th, there have been at least 50 mass shootings reported in the united states. >> when you see people getting killed, i mean, in this last month it's just been horrifying what's happened. how can you say that's not a public health issue? >> reporter: what also has health professionals and public officials worried is the idea of americans simply accepting this kind of mass gun violence. >> we must guard against resignation or even despair. the assumption that this is simply how it must be and that we might as well set used to it. >> reporter: president biden has in recent weeks announced some executive actions on gun control, including a measure to eliminate kits that people can buy to build untraceable guns at home. the president also wants to ban assault-style weapons and high
1:34 am
capacity magazines and establish stricter background checks for gun purchases, but despite all the mass shootings just since president biden has been in office there's little appetite among republicans and even some moderate democrats in congress to pass stricter gun control laws. brian todd, cnn, washington. two young children who were dropped over a border wall between the u.s. and mexico have been reunited with their family. video of the incident got a lot of attention last month. the girls just three and five years old were lowered over the wall by smugglers and dropped on to u.s. soil. officials in ecuador had said the girls were in good health. they spent almost three weeks in the custody of u.s. authorities. their parents live in new york but it's unclear which family members took the girls in. a champion of liberal policies in the u.s. has died. coming up, the achievement and legacy of former vice president walter mondale. frank is a fan of fast. he's a fast talker.
1:35 am
a fast walker. thanks, gary. and for unexpected heartburn... frank is a fan of pepcid. it works in minutes. nexium 24 hour and prilosec otc can take one to four days to fully work. pepcid. strong relief for fans of fast. the first person to survive alzheimer's disease can take one to four days to fully work. is out there. and the alzheimer's association is going to make it happen by funding scientific breakthroughs, advancing public policy, and providing local support
1:36 am
to those living with the disease and their caregivers. but we won't get there without you. join the fight with the alzheimer's association. so you're a small business, or a big one. you were thriving, but then... oh.
1:37 am
ah. okay. plan, pivot. how do you bounce back? you don't, you bounce forward, with serious and reliable internet. powered by the largest gig speed network in america. but is it secure? sure it's secure. and even if the power goes down, your connection doesn't. so how do i do this? you don't do this. we do this, together. bounce forward, with comcast business.
1:38 am
walter mondale a former u.s. vice president under jimmy carter died on monday. he was an unapologetic believer in liberal politics and activist government. in the days before his death at the age of 93 he told his staff he knew they would keep up what he called the good fight. wolf bliter reports on mondale's legacy. >> known all his life as fritz, walter monday detail was born in soun minnesota in 1928, the son of a minister and music teacher. >> they taught thee to work hard, to care for others torques love our country and to cherish our faith. >> from the beginning walter mondale was a steadfast supporter of social justice. by the time he graduated from
1:39 am
the university of minnesota law school he was deeply involved in the democratic farmer labor party, minnesota's own wing of the democratic party. as a dfl liberal and disciple of hubert humphrey he was appointed minnesota's attorney general in 1960. four years later he was named to the u.s. senate to fill the vacancy left when humphrey was elected lyndon johnson's vice president. in 1976 jimmy carter pulled him from the senate to be his vice presidential running mate when carter and mondale lost the election in 1980 mondale was down but not out. >> the nominee of the democratic party walter mondale. >> for years later he won the democratic presidential nomination and made history, picking the first woman ever to run on a presidential ticket, former new york congresswoman geraldine merferraro. they were defeated by the 1984
1:40 am
reagan landslide. >> he has won. we are all americans. he is our president and we honor him tonight. >> mondale and ferraro only managed to win his home state and the district of columbia. mondale stayed off the national radar until president clinton named him u.s. ambassador to japan. always one to consider politics an honor and duty, mondale answered the call to serve again in 2002. he was asked to run for his old senate seat in place of senator paul wellstone who had been killed in a plane crash less than two weeks before election day. >> this has been one of the most unbelievable moments in minnesota history. >> mondale narrowly lost the race but he never lost his earnest love for social justice. he went back to practicing law and teaching at the university of minnesota, a hall at the law school bears his name. as does the intramural hockey team the fighting mondales.
1:41 am
he may have fought doggedly for what he believed in but supporters described him as such a nice man. >> we kept the faith, we stayed the source, we fought the good fight and every one of us should feel good about that. >> and may he rest in peace. coming up, a wright brothers moment on the red planet. nasa's ingenuity helicopter takes flight on mars. how they did it and what's next when we come back.
1:42 am
hi. i'm wolfgang puck when i started my online store wolfgang puck home i knew there would be a lot of orders to fill and i wanted them to ship out fast that's why i chose shipstation shipstation helps manage orders reduce shipping costs and print out shipping labels it's my secret ingredient shipstation the number 1 choice of online sellers and wolfgang puck go to shipstation.com/tv and get 2 months free do you have a life insurance policy you no longer need? now you can sell your policy, even a term policy, for an immediate cash payment. call coventry direct to learn more. we thought we had planned carefully for our retirement. but we quickly realized that we needed a way to supplement our income. our friends sold their policy to help pay for their medical bills and that got me thinking. maybe selling our policy could help with our retirement. i'm skeptical, so i did some research and called coventry direct. they explained life insurance is a valuable asset that can be sold. we learned
1:43 am
that we can sell all of our policy or keep part of it with no future payments, who knew? we sold our policy. now we can relax and enjoy our retirement as we had planned. if you have one hundred thousand dollars or more of life insurance you may qualify to sell your policy. don't cancel or let your policy lapse without finding out what it's worth. visit conventrydirect.com to find out if you policy qualifies. or call the number on your screen. coventry direct, redefining insurance.
1:44 am
1:45 am
rely on the experts at 1800petmeds for the same medications as the vet, but for less with fast free shipping. visit petmeds.com today. european football is in turmoil after 12 of its most popular clubs signed up for a break away league which threatens to gut the champions league. in the coming days officials could decide what penalties the super league founder should face. they are among the richest and most powerful clubs in the world. the head of european football's governing body calls their defection shameless and he was interviewed by cnn contributor darren lewis who is in london and joins me now live.
1:46 am
uefa's president wasn't only furious about the announcement. he felt betrayed. what all did he tell you? >> he set out to me that this is a fight for the future of football as we know it to prevent a cartel with rich men with zero accountability setting up their own private members club and feasting off the fortunes they believe they can rake in. his answeringer is directed at the people running the clubs, not the clubs themselves, in particular a chap called andrea igneli the chairman of juventus. he says that he and the manchester united chief executive had given him assurance that is they would back his plans to reform the champions league in its previous form, now 32 clubs going to be able to take part. only for igneli to refuse to take his calls and switch his phone off once details of this controversial super league came
1:47 am
out at the weekend. have a listen to what he had to say. >> on saturday i heard rumors about some super league announcement, i called igneli, he says it's a lie, this is not true, don't believe it, and then he says i will call you in one hour and he doesn't pick up the phone anymore. he even turned it off. and then i felt that something might happen next day. so we were quite surprised but also the other 235 clubs are quite surprised because their chairman approved something and then ran away and he's still hiding probably somewhere. i don't know where he is. >> i understand that you are godfather to his child. >> yeah, this is more a personal thing and i don't want to enter into this.
1:48 am
i just want to say that i thought we are also friends, but i was wrong. but for me it's always better to be naive than to lie all the time. i might be naive. >> how confident are you that you -- >> i'm confident we are doing the right thing. because we respect the fans, tradition, football. football community, our society, we will win. in the end we will win. if 12 people meet wand want to take football as a hostage, just to fill their pockets that are already so full that it's hard to put anything in, they can't win. long term they can't win. we will win and i'm very proud of the football community, of society, of the media even which is sometimes rare of politicians
1:49 am
who reacted in a fantastic way, prime minister of great britain, president of france, many prime ministers around europe, european commission, european parliament, the reaction of all the society is unanimous. we are united and it's very good because if a way it's good that this happened. now we know who is who and we have to clear this situation once and for all. >> i saw you used the word snake. explain what you mean in that context. >> i don't know if it was too emotional expression, but snake means that you don't know that it's hiding somewhere and then it bites when you don't expect it. so we didn't know -- you know, and it's very hard to believe that somebody looks into your eyes 20 times and says everything is fine, it's all a
1:50 am
lie, knowing that he's lying. it's really hard to understand. i was surprised. i said before that, you know, i was a criminal lawyer for years and i have met many tricky people that i have represented but i have never seen something like that. ethics doesn't exist in this group. >> there are lots of cynics out there, mr. president, people who think the game was never pure. why would you see yourself as a better person to run football than a florentine or perez or the people in charge of the european super league? >> look, i don't think it's about me or florentine or perez. i'm a football administrator and i have to know all the time that football is about football players and about fans not about me. but, you know the first between
1:51 am
uefa and this -- it's hard for me to call it super league because it's all but super. uefa redistributes 86% to 89% of all the money back to the grassroots, to the youth football, to women's football. we have a great foundation for children that helps all around the world. we build -- around the world to help children. we are developing football. we are not a profit organization. i'm fighting here, but my situation would not change. with this so-called self-proclaimed super league it's all about money, profits, taking money, not sharing with anyone and they don't know anything about solidarity. they are shameless. >> rosemary, what happens next? well, you may have heard us talking about a chap called florentine perez, the president of the spanish champions real
1:52 am
madrid, also the chairman of the super league. he has been talking about players not being banned from uefa competitions. cheferin is saying he will meet today, he is a lawyer himself, will meet with other lawyers to see if that can happen so players competing in the super league would not be able to play uefa competitions. it's going to be even more dramatic. watch this space. >> absolutely. he is angry, the fans are angry. we will see what happens as you say we will watch the space. darren lewis, many thanks. incredible interview there. well, it was a dream come true for nasa engineers, the ingenuity helicopter rose above the martian surface monday and flew. it was short and sweet, but nasa will raise the bar in ingenuity's next flight. they fully expect the little guy to crash out there but as michael holmes shows us right now they are thrilled. >> we can now say that human beings have flown a recovery
1:53 am
craft on another planet. >> reporter: it's the little helicopter with a very big mission. nasa's mini chopper named ingenuity became the first aircraft to achieve powered controlled flight on another planet. >> beyond this first flight over the next coming days we have up to four flights planned and increasingly difficult flights, challenging flights and we are going to continually push all the way to the limit of this craft. >> reporter: a short hop that is the culmination of many hits and misses. ingenuity has so far survived the rugs nights relying on its solar powered batteries to fire up heaters. but an initial spin of its rotors delayed a flight attempt due to problems with the timer. nasa says the helicopter successfully completed the test swinging its blades at 2,400
1:54 am
revolutions her minute, the speed it needs to take off. scientists saying having a bird's eye view of the terrain could revolutionize the way we study new planets. >> what the ingenuity team has done is given us the third dimension so that we can make the combination of driving on the surface and doing reconnaissance on inaccessible places for a rover. >> reporter: flying on the red planted presented challenges because of the low gravity of mars and an atmosphere 1% of earth. nasa engineering sent along a good luck charm. attached is a piece of material from the wing of the wright brothers flier. michael holmes, cnn. >> joining into he now is josh ravage ingenuity's mechanical
1:55 am
engineering lead at jet propulsion laboratory and joins me now. >> thanks so much for having me. >> first of all, congratulations. how does it feel to make history complete the first helicopter flight on mars? >> thank you so much. you know, i don't know if i've fully processed the emotions yet, it's been a long day, maybe tomorrow will be better. i mean, it feels great. the team has been working for years towards this moment and now it's here. so, yeah, i don't know -- i don't know how it can really get too much better. >> indeed. six years in the making it's incr incredible. the world got to see images of this historic flight 180 million miles away captured on camera by the nearby rover showing the nearly 40 second flight. the helicopter hovering about 10 feet or so, around 3 meters then landing and ingenuity's camera captured its own shadow on the surface of mars.
1:56 am
what was the most exciting moment of this history-making event for you? >> well, i mean, besides successfully taking off and landing, actually that shadow was kind of a surprise to us. we flew at midday, it was i think around 12:30 martian time and we were amazed. we haven't seen that shadow in any testing because we test indoors or not at the right time of day. to see that there was shocking and quite stunning in a way. >> and when you look at all of those pictures certainly from the rover when you're looking at the helicopter and you get that expanse of the surface of mars, what are you thinking when you look there and what are you looking for? >> gosh, i don't know. i mean, yeah, it's so vast, it's almost familiar in a way but we different in a way. to see lonely little ingenuity out there by itself, kind of dwarfed by the landscape, it's
1:57 am
amazing. >> certainly is. ingenuity's mechanical engineering lead speaking to me earlier. i'm rosemary church, "early start" is coming up next. have yourselves a wonderful day. introducing the new sleep number 360 smart bed... it's the most comfortable, dually-adjustable, foot-warming, temperature-balancing... proven quality night sleep we've ever made. the new queen sleep number 360 p5 smart bed is only $1,799, plus free premium delivery when you add a base. ends monday. the first person to survive alzheimer's disease is out there. and the alzheimer's association is going to make it happen
1:58 am
by funding scientific breakthroughs, advancing public policy, and providing local support to those living with the disease and their caregivers. but we won't get there without you. join the fight with the alzheimer's association.
1:59 am
so you're a small business, or a big one. you were thriving, but then... oh. ah. okay. plan, pivot. how do you bounce back? you don't, you bounce forward, with serious and reliable internet. powered by the largest gig speed network in america. but is it secure? sure it's secure. and even if the power goes down, your connection doesn't. so how do i do this? you don't do this. we do this, together. bounce forward, with comcast business.
2:00 am
minnesota and the nation await derek chauvin's fate. why the judge says one congresswoman's comments may give chaucvin a shot on appeal. a development in the death of capitol police officer brian sicknick. why it got harder for prosecutors to bring homicide charges. tributes are pouring i

69 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on