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tv   CNN Newsroom With Ana Cabrera  CNN  January 30, 2021 2:00pm-3:00pm PST

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thanks for staying with me. you're live in the cnn newsroom.
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i'm ana cabrera in new york. right now the u.s. republican party is in disarray. they have no control over the white house. no majority in the house or the senate. something just happened today that is forcing republicans, old school and new school, to pick a side. it was a reported phone call between former president donald trump and republican congresswoman from georgia marjorie taylor greene. she's the new and controversial lawmaker who is already facing calls to be thrown out of congress. today, greene claims to have the support of the former president. she says it was a great call. the problem for republicans or at least one of the problems is is the timing here. donald trump is about to go on trial again in the u.s. senate accused of inciting a violent mob to attack the u.s. capitol. the congresswoman greene factor is sharply dividing republicans. when only party unity will save donald trump and his legacy from a conviction.
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greene's boss, kevin mccarthy, has nothing very solid for republicans to anchor on to. one day he says, yes, donald trump bears responsibility for the mob attack on the capitol, but another day, he's in mar-a-lago for this smiling photo op with trump. planned a house leadership meeting for tuesday and since cancelled that. spokesperson said he's traveling that day, he just doesn't want to discuss congresswoman marjorie taylor greene. suzanne malveaux on capitol hill. fill us in on what we're hearing from the congresswoman greene and other republicans today. >> reporter: it's a very public feud that spilled out via twitter and there's a time of reckoning and the republicans have to choose which side they're on, whether it is a pro trump party or if they would like to distance themselves from trump and essentially, congresswoman greene now has
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defactor kind of moved into that role, if you will, as somebody who is throwing the flames on the fire here in a twitter storm. so what we do know is that house leader kevin mccarthy, he had a visit with trump at mar-a-lago, just days ago. they both emerged saying they have to take back the house and the senate. the republicans do. and that trump saying he is now more popular than ever, that his endorsement more valuable than ever. mccarthy framing it in terms of rejecting the democratic agenda calling it a radical agenda, but simply wrapping himself into trump's praise and affection, if you will. that is the same thing that now we see from representative greene who tweeted out that she had this great phone call, she's 100% loyal to the president and that she'll never apologize, never back down. what we're seeing here are moderate republicans, conservative republicans. those like senator mitt romney coming forward, slamming her and
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greene essentially doubling down, if you will. mitt romney saying lies of a feather flock together. marjorie taylor greene's nonsense and the big lie of a stolen election. she comes back saying republican, in quotes, mind you, senator mitt romney obviously cares nothing about the people's number one concern. please grow a pair or a spine. what we do expect to hear from other republicans, potentially like the response representative steve scalise gave, saying he is against this type of political violent rhetoric from both sides. ana? >> suzanne malveaux, thank you for your reporting. in the meantime, we have new developments, new charges stemming from the capitol attack. two members of the far-right group proud boys have been slapped with conspiracy charges in connection to their alleged participation in the capitol insurrection. these arrests are the first to specifically accuse members of
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known for its anti-semitic views in the attack that gets more gruesome, more scary the more we learn and see. cnn obtained new video from the body cam of a police officer who was in the middle of this violent mob. cnn's tom foreman has more and we want to warn you, the images you are about to see are disturbing. >> reporter: this is what police saw as they furiously tried to fight off the mob on this body cam footage released by the u.s. attorney's office. and this is what they heard as a man shouted for help near a woman who was down. >> reporter: prosecutors say among them was michael foy, wielding a hockey stick in this video as the brutal hand to hand
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fighting rages. charged with assaulting a law officer, obstructing law enforcement, entering a restricted building and more. other angles, better sense of how huge it was as it sounded police. in this video, dragging one the stairs where he was beaten with a flag pole but few images captured the raw fury quite like this body cam. the crowd was so intense, some first responders say even though they knew police and rioters were being injured, could not safely access patients due to the crowd activity. and that woman being trampled on the stairs while calls for help went unanswered, "new york times" identified her as 34-year-old rosanne boyland who
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later died. we have seen dozens and dozens of video of the calamitous day, many of which now being introduced as evidence against rioters, but this one stands out for the sheer up close in your face brutality and violence of a supposed political march gone mad. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >> really is chilling to watch those images. those people violently smashed their way into the u.s. capitol were not all motivated purely by misinformed political outrage. among the trump supporters and qanon followers and people who continue to believe that the presidential election was somehow stolen was a sizable number of active hate groups and extremists brandishing their membership. someone even carried a confederate flag into the capitol. the symbols and slogans of racist white supremacists and extreme far-right anti-government groups were all
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on full display during that disgraceful riot on january 6th. i want to talk to christian p piclini, former neo-nazi skinhead and speaks out against hate and extremism and new book "breaking hate: confronting culture of extremism." thank you for being here. i appreciate it. greene has come under scrutiny for remarks that indicated support for the execution of politicians, comments that have raised doubts about mass school shootings, other comments at times that have been anti-semitic and islam phobic. does it embolden extremists to see the degree to which former president trump accepts her, the see her in a position of power, a member of congress and to see the degree to which he fully endorses the conspiracies that led to that deadly insurrection?
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>> yeah, ana, these conspiracy theories that both trump and marjorie taylor greene are putting forth are some of the same kind of dangerous conspiracy theories that drove me 30 years ago when i was a member of a neo-nazi group. what we saw at the capitol was a mixture of militia groups, neo-nazi, conspiracy theorists, far-right thugs like the proud boys but also saw likely what were just normal conservatives and republicans. i want to ask them, and really look around at these rallies and the forums they participate in and see who they're standing next to and if they're standing next to white supremacists and neo-nazis and conspiracy theorists, they're likely on the wrong side of history and need to reassess where they are and even more dangerous when people in power like former president trump and representative greene who are talking about the same conspiracy theorists about
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birtherism and qanon, all these things not just dangerous to talk about but we've seen the results of that type of dangerous rhetoric and some of the violence that we've seen. >> i want to know your thoughts when you were watching the assault on the u.s. capitol and what you see the new videos that we're still seeing like the one we showed today. were you surprised to see white supremacists, proud boys, other racist groups represented there? i guess you wouldn't necessarily think presidential election fraud is something that stirs up neo-nazis. >> i wasn't surprised, i was angry. not only people like me but others for many years have been talking about this problem and that we've had this threat that exists in the united states, and for that same amount of time, people have been ignored and in certain cases, that information, we haven't taken this threat seriously and here we are now. and not only do we have americans who want to hurt other
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americans, we have people in power who are em boldening these people to commit these types of acts and if we think that we saw everything there on the steps of the capitol, that was just the tip of the iceberg. every violent extremist who wants to do harm was not there, but what that did was activate a lot of folks. >> i want to share with our viewers some of the piece you wrote for "the independent." quote, no one is born with hate in their heart. i have found this to be more powerful than any weapons can forge and in the cold clammy hands of insurrectionists. acting like green signal lights, stalled in lane, where to direct blame for grievances, insecurities, sometimes in violent and irrational ways, instead of working to resolve their obstacles in a positive or constructive manner. what sparked them into action?
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what was the green traffic light? >> four years of propaganda and then positions of people in power, through those positions, them directing that. 30 years ago when i was a neonazi skinhead for the time i was 14 to the time i was 23, we didn't have that person of power. we found that information in dark alleys, on the fringe, in the backs of magazines and passing pamphlets. when the internet came out, it gave a lot of power to influencers within that movement to spread hate to the mainstream. which was part of the concerted effort because in the '80s and '90s, there was an effort to infiltrate law enforcement and the military, to find people within those groups who had what i call potholes in life that we could fill with hate. that they could then direct at other people. there was a lot of that happening in the last four years of the trump administration.
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what i do, the disengagement work i do is just a band-aid because we clean up after the fact. what we need is a national strategy kind of like we're doing with the pandemic. we need to treat the sick, quote unquote sick like i do but inoculate the population and it's our systemic and institutional racism creating a breeding ground for this to exist generation after generation. >> if it's not on a big structural level that starts at the top, in the role of government, what should somebody tell their uncle who maybe has gone astray and followed these conspiracy theories and believes, was at the capitol and believes what they were doing was in some way righteous or for a just cause, how do you break through to a family member who has taken that path? >> we're not born to hate. it's something we learn.
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i talk to people they hit potholes in life. the traumas, grievances, even privilege to suffer from identity, and then to the detour, the movlements are very loud. what we need to do is listen for the potholes and repair them and prevent people from going down the path. if people exist there already, try to bring them back with a new sense of identity, community and purpose. this isn't just about people. our nation, our society right now is in a real struggle for identity, community and purpose and we've got a lot of historical potholes that have gone unfilled. >> can you reason with people who have that mindset? like when you were part of this neo-nazi group? would you listen to somebody who's trying to just reason with you and say, these are the facts and i care about you? >> well, i think the caring part, yeah, absolutely.
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that, i would have listened to but the reasoning, you can't argue logically against somebody who's arguing illogically, which is why i say we really need to listen for those potholes and start to repair the things that motivate people to go in that direction and that also inevitably pulls them back because they have more of a foundation under them and more of a way to search for that sense of community in positive ways. >> trying to cut it off before it gets extreme. i hear you. >> it's an ideological debate. >> thank you so much for sharing all of that. >> thank you, ana. >> join fareed zakaria for an in-depth look at american political hatred. how did it get so bad? this fareed zakaria special, the divided states of america. what is tearing us apart, airs tomorrow night at 9:00 here on cnn. we are j.c. ust learning from t cdc 29.5 million covid vaccine doses have been administered in the u.s. that's just a fraction still of the mass vaccination effort that
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is desperately needed. up next, i'll talk to a doctor on the front lines of the covid fight who is also taking part in the clinical trials for a brand-new vaccine that could be a game changer. you're live in the cnn newsroom. what if you could have the perspective to see more? at morgan stanley, a global collective of thought leaders offers investors a broader view. ♪ we see companies protecting the bottom line by putting people first. we see a bright future, still hungry for the ingenuity of those ready for the next challenge. today, we are translating decades of experience into strategies for the road ahead. we are morgan stanley.
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with 5% cash back on travel purchased through chase from freedom unlimited, you can now earn even more. book that hotel kim, because you are worth it. i am worth it. now earn 5% on travel purchased through chase and so much more. chase. make more of what's yours. california is one of the state's hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. more than 40,000 people have now died from covid there. second only to new york. but officials in los angeles county, the state's largest population are moving to reopen outdoor dining at 50% capacity. cnn's paul vercammen is joining us now. how is it that the state can report more than 600 covid deaths so far today alone and simultaneously take steps towards relaxing restrictions? >> reporter: well, what they were monitoring, ana, was the icu capacity and they say future forecasts are for way more icu beds to open up.
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therefore, in california, where 1.8 million people employed in the food services business opened up tables, 8 feet apart. no one allowed to be from different households or so they say. disturbing some of the restaurant owners, not allowing tvs outside and that's just ahead of the super bowl. >> this place is pretty historic in sherman oaks neighborhood in los angeles where i met my then fiance. we got engaged here. so it was pretty important to me to see that this personal landmark of mine survives. i think a lot of people have similar experiences in that way and in this historic town also. >> reporter: and that was one of the restaurant goers here, all 15 tables are now filled but what the owner of this place was telling us, she does worry about not being able to have televisions out before the big game coming up on sunday. >> if you put people out of safe
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spaces for super bowl, you're putting them literally in danger and into homes and house parties which will take place. so please have some common sense. let us use the tvs. give us the chance to keep people safe and give them a little bit of community because that's what people need right now. and i don't know what else to do other than get on my knees and just pray or beg. let's use some common sense here. >> reporter: while pineapple hill opened, a lot not opening. one of them just down the street, tradition rich, at first the owner was dancing along to the mac re nah in celebration but when the rules came out, she said one thing that super concerns her is the notion of asking people point-blank, are you from the same household? she said she's had pushback of customers cussing her out
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because she's getting into their business. a tough debate. social distancing and safety versus reopening these businesses in a tourism oriented state. >> it is a tough debate all around the country, i believe and such a challenging situation. thank you, paul vercammen. just in. cdc reporting 29.5 million doses of either the pfizer or moderna vaccine have now been administered in the u.s. this accounts for 59% of the total doses distributed so far. next week though, johnson & johnson will seek fda emergency use authorization for its vaccine and if approved, this could seriously boost our supply. i want to bring in cnn medical analyst dr. lena wen, professor at george washington university and a volunteer in the johnson & johnson clinical trial. dr. wen, i know you don't know whether you received a placebo or the actual vaccine of johnson & johnson but when you hear this report. the news that johnson &
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johnson's vaccine is 85% effective at preventing severe disease, what's your reaction? >> i think it's very promising, ana, and that's the top line that we should be caring about. whether this vaccine or any vaccine prevents severe disease. because people don't really care if they get the sniffles or a sore throat. they care if they get sick enough they end up in the hospital on a ventilator and succumbing to covid-19 and what the results of the johnson & johnson study shows thus far is that they have those who receive the vaccine not hospitalized or dying. that's significant. >> how would you rate this one dose on the pandemic? >> it's huge because it is one dose. that simplifies the logistics substantially and also because this is a vaccine that could be stored at normal refrigerator
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temperatures and they can deliver this vaccine. >> when we talk about efficacy, we talk about keeping people from getting sick from the virus. but is it clear yet if any of these vaccines prevent someone from actually contracting the virus and transmitting it? >> that's the question we don't yet know the answer to. this is a question that's being studied but i think right now, we just don't know and that's the reason why for people who have received the vaccine, we still ask that they take additional precautions because we know that they're protected from getting severe effects from covid-19, but we don't want them to continue to be carriers to infect others around them. >> i heard from a lot of viewers asking, when will the lowest priority group or anyone who wants a vaccine be able to get one. what's your best sense? >> i hope that it's going to be, at some point in the spring. right now, demand for the vaccine far outstrips supply. i think having johnson & johnson
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coming online will make a big difference and astrazeneca, novavax but we need to do everything we can and the federal government needs to do everything it can to increase supply while at the same time helping states and local health departments to increase that distribution because that is the name of the game here. especially with the variants much more contagious and could become dominant even by march. we really need to get vaccines into arms as quickly as we possibly can. >> what about children under the age of 16? will kids eventually need to get vaccinated? >> yes, they will. and those studies are still ongoing. kids are not just little adults, and so you do have to do studies separately on children and right now, the studies are being done on older children in their teens and then younger children and then toddlers and babies. so it's going to take some time. i'm hopeful by the summer, ideally at least by the fall, we can get our kids vaccinated because that will be really important for getting them back in school safely too.
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>> the emergence of the variant. the new variants that are more transmissible, that's a growing concern, which is another reason for the increased speed of vaccinations being so important. there's already some data showing the currently authorized vaccines aren't as effective against the variant from south africa. so do you know how long it could take to modify a vaccine and will people need booster shots? >> yeah, the mrna vaccine, the pfizer and moderna, it's believed the modification could be really fast. we're talking about 6 weeks or so to get a booster shot potentially developed and that may be something that's needed in time. that's something we're used to, getting a flu vaccine every year, to getting a tetanus booster from time to time. and that may be something that's on the horizon, but i would just emphasize to everyone, if you have the opportunity to get a vaccine now, get it now. get some level of protection into you right now because that's going to be so important with the pandemic raging all across the country and that's also what's going to help all of us from having these variants
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spread and take over. >> absolutely. dr. lena wen, thank you so much. great information. thank you very much. >> thank you, ana. is there any way 17 republicans will vote with all the democrats to convict trump at his upcoming impeachment trial? try to read the tea leaves. time for cross examine with ellie honig next. award-winning customer satisfaction... insanely great value. choose. all. three. ready when you are. it was 1961 when nellie young lost her devoted husband. without him, things were tough. her last option was to sell her home,
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a little more than a week to go now before the start of trump's second impeachment trial and we're learning the former president is beefing up his legal team. he's now added three new lawyers bringing the total number to
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five. it's time for cross examine with cnn legal analyst and former federal and state prosecutor elie honig here to answer your questions this hour. one viewer asks, given this week's vote by 45 republican senators about the constitutionality of trying a former president, any chance the senate convicts former president trump? >> yeah, ana, so look. it was a big vote this week, but it's important to understand what it was and what it was not. senator rand paul made a motion. he said let's debate and vote on the constitutional question of whether we can try a former president. those 45 senators, all republicans, said yes. let's consider this now. the other 55, 50 democrats plus five republicans said we're not going to debate this now. doing what we call tabling. is that an indicator of where these 45 republicans stand? absolutely, it strongly stands they do not want to convict donald trump but does it mean it's over? not necessarily. it's possible some of those 45 wanted to debate the
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constitutional question, but remain open to the ultimate verdict either way. in fact, that's exactly what senators john thune and rob portman told us publicly. so there's no question, conviction is unlikely but remember, the trial hasn't even started yet. we're still seeing new evidence every day. you showed us that compelling new body camera footage. let's see what happens at the trial. let's see how things play out. >> another viewer asks, in the impeachment trial, can the senators cast their votes confidentially? >> yeah, the senate actually can choose to vote confidentially. but it's exceedingly unlikely they will. generally, the senate gets to set its own rules for the impeachment trial. all they need is a majority vote but it's a specific portion of the constitution that says if the senate wants to do a vote in public, all it takes is one fifth of the senators. 20 out of 100. now, the argument for secret ballots is it minimizes political considerations, enables the senators to vote their own conscience but the
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argument against it, it's too important of a vote. we need transparency and accountability and historically, we've never had a secret ballot on a presidential impeachment. ana, when this is over, i fully expect to see each senator stand up one at a time and announce their verdict guilty or not guilty. >> historically, we've never had it or a president impeached twice or insurrection. let me ask you about president biden now. signed 42 executive orders so far since taking orders ten days ago. some are reversals of mr. trump's executive orders. a lot of them are, in fact. how much legal authority does the new president have to undo the executive actions of a prior president? >> so a lot, but not unlimited. president biden has been busy signing executive orders on everything from immigration to the economy to covid to the environment. now, the supreme court told us that presidents have very broad range to sign executive orders or rescind old ones. the only limit, they cannot be
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is called arbitrary and capricious but there has to be minimal reasonable process of public policy. last week, importantly, a federal court put on hold one of president biden's executive orders on immigration. now that's just temporary. it can and likely will be appealed, but this, we should get used to this happening because let's remember, many of president trump's executive orders were challenged in court. some of them were struck down and we should expect to see more of these legal challenges aimed at president biden's executive orders as well. >> all right. elie honig, good to have you here, my friend and remind our vie viewers to check out at cnn.com/opinion where you can submit your questions. cnn is learning an increasing number of people that took part in january 6th deadly insurrection are retired u.s. s remarkable look at the rioters and the military. that's up next live in the cnn newsroom. les ]
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the sworn oath to protect and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies foreign and domestic, but then came the capitol insurrection. cnn's sara sidner tracked down some former military members accused of taking part in that attack. >> reporter: they have the tactical training, gear and guns to bring the war home. cnn tracked down nine of the military veterans who were charged in the capitol siege. >> oh, it's right there. >> reporter: this guy is one of the most well known. a far-right personality known for spouting extremist views long before january 6th. >> what's going on, this is joe biggs. >> reporter: army veteran and also a leader in the far-right violence prone proud boys. his violent rhetoric got him banned on social media sites. on january 6th in washington,
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dc, it wasn't just rhetoric. prosecutors say he did aid, abet, counsel, command, procure others to unlawfully enter the u.s. capitol by means of destruction of federal property. this is biggs as he helps lead the proud boys to the capitol steps. once there, one of his proud boys, this guy, broke into the capitol. according to court documents, 20 seconds later, biggs is seen inside the building. biggs is charged for an alleged commanding role in the insurrection, a judge ordered he could go home on house arrest. we visited him there. mr. biggs, i'm sara with cnn. all we want to ask you is whether you were on the capitol on january 6th and what you were doing there. i'm sorry? you're calling the police, you said? are you an insurrectionist? you're not an insurrectionist?
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then come talk to me. what are you? i've seen the things you've said over time. they're pretty violent. what were you doing in the capitol on january 6th? if we don't get the f out of here, you're calling the police? also a proud boy, he ran as a republican for state office and lost the vote in 2020. here he is inside the capitol and now accused of violent entry and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds among other charges. saying we just went ahead and stormed the capitol. it's about to get ugly. and also called police f-ing traitors for trying to stop the siege. time after time, our efforts to get comment were met with calls to police. >> no comment. leave.
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this man outside of ryan nichols in longview, texas. he was not there. >> i'm call 9-1-1 right now. i'm going to call the police right now. >> all right. >> i don't have an issue with that. >> reporter: nichols is a former marine who ended up on ellen for his work rescuing dogs. >> i'm owner and president with wholesale universe. i've made millions of dollars on the e-commerce platforms. >> reporter: this is also him in a camo hat at the capitol, on the right side, his texas buddy, alex harkrider, military veterans who ran a non-profit. >> alex here. >> reporter: the fbi said nichols sprayed what is believed to be pepper spray trying to restrain the mob. court documents show he posted this on snapchat. we're in. two people killed already. we need all patriots of this country to rally the f up and fight for our freedom or it's
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gone forever. they are both charged with conspiracy and assault with a deadly weapon on a federal officer. former fbi agent michael german who spent years under cover in domestic extremist groups said he's not surprised so many are former military. many possible reasons for their actions, but one stands out. >> what we've seen too often is that this kind of ideological militancy is allowed to exist in the military. and there isn't enough effort to root it out and to actually paint it as what it is, anti-democratic movement and that's a threat to our security within our security forces. >> reporter: includes an army veteran that was awarded a purple heart. according to court documents, caught wearing gas mask at the capitol saying, yeah, i'm good. just got gassed and fought with
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cops. that i never thought would happen. released on bond to his home. his father briefly talked to us. do you know him, are you his dad? >> yeah. >> reporter: is there anything you want to say on his behalf? >> no. >> reporter: we went to this accused texas veteran's home. he's out on bond too. >> please leave your message for -- >> reporter: larry seen drezing for combat inside the senate chamber. brock is the guy in the green helmet. >> i agree with you, brother, but it's not ours. it belongs to the vice president of the united states. >> reporter: he may have intended to use those to restrain individuals who he saw as enemies, presumably, lawmakers. something brock denied to "the new yorker." 1,000 miles away in woodstock, ohio, two more military veterans faced some of the most serious charges yet, including
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conspiracy. that's army veteran jessica watkins and former marine donovan kroul in front, both dressed for battle in the capitol. the boyfriend knows most. what's he like? >> sober, the best man you could have. >> reporter: what was she doing? >> protect vip members within the trump rally. and then of course, trump said go protest and some people took that to mean more than they should have, probably. >> reporter: he was right there with her and so was thomas wald caldwell of clark county, virginia. three are the first to be indicted on federal charges of conspiracy, obstruction and destruction of government property. caldwell's disdain for congress made clear before they stormed the capitol. >> every single [ bleep ] in there is a traitor. >> that was sara sidner reporting. coming up, it's probably the
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mortar retailer, and a target for short sellers. then something strange happened. >> video game retailer gamestop, it shares up some 15% premarket. >> gamestop is soaring once again. >> the video game retailer gamestop set to continue the head spinning ascent. >> retail traders organizing on reddit had spotted a simple opportunity. they knew that the major institutional funds were predicting gamestop's demise. so using trading apps like robinhood they sod snapped up shares en masse and put hedge funds on the back foot. the results were staggering. the same big investors who bet that gamestop sharps would fall suddenly had to buy the shares, to protect their portfolio and position. on wednesday, the shares more than doubled in a day. the reddit traders celebrated
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their victory. the hedge funds liked their wounds. and suddenly everyone wanted in. >> i just know it's got to be more of a full-time job. and -- it's like catching a falling knife when things go the wrong way. >> just the world was weigh up to this, the trading platforms were forced to act. public interest was surging. and as a result robinhood blocked certain trades. >> you know, we had to make a very difficult decision to protect our customers and our firm. >> retail trade esper from several platforms were blocked from buying shares in gamestop and other companies that were being targeted. a as gamestop shares tumbled, the online trading community was furious. >> the in history of the stock market only the rich guys, the institutional firms, the hedge funds saying hold on we're taking too much money you better protect us in case it goes the other way.
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this seems like the little guy was winning and the rules changed on the fly. >> rob. hood relaxed some of the blocks later. even so where things go from now is anyone's guess. there are calls for congressional hearings. the white house and the s.e.c. say they are monitoring the situation. and yet because this trading is at the very grass roots themania continues. gamestop shares up more than 1,500 percent this year. a partner at one venture capital firm says it's only the beginning. >> this is a fundamental change to the market dynamics. i want not just a bunch of institutional traders. retail traders are forced to be understood in a humble way. >> none of this is a game, of course. the risks are very real and so are the companies caught in the middle. whether its airlines or phone companies or bricks and mortar retailers.
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companies must now deal with a whole different breed of investors that can be having dramatic influences on their share price. richard quest, cnn, new york. that does it for me today. i'm ana cabrera in new york. thanks for spending part of your day with me. pamela brown takes over right after this.
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hi . today's embattled republican congresswoman marjorie taylor greene is touting support from former president trump. >> she needs to quite frankly be expelled. >> the small community of squim washington. and the next question is more the fair has a big question for the mayor. why do you publicly support qanon. >> qanon is a truth movement that encourages you to think

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