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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 28, 2022 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines: "get a spine" — the message from britain's biggest trade union to the labour party over standing up for working people struggling with the cost of living crisis. merseyside police have issued an online video appealing for help catching the person who shot dead nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel inside her home last week. she won't celebrate her wedding. she won't have children of her own. if you've got information and you're withholding it, you're protecting the killers. pakistan warns millions more people are likely to be caught up in unprecedented flooding that's already claimed more than a thousand lives. countdown to blast—off — as the launch of nasa's artemis 1 moon mission approaches.
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why record breaking hot and dry weather this summer has seen more exotic plants growing in the uk. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejonathan walker deputy political editor, sunday express and ali miraj, columnist at the the article. thank you both for staying with us. the i says liz truss faces growing calls to help more people with the cost of living if she becomes prime minister. nearly half of conservative voters believe the energy industry
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should be nationalised to help cut bills, according to the times. it's as the mirror claims spiralling energy costs are increasing pressures on schools and hospitals, which could face big cuts to pay rocketing bills. whilst the telegraph leads on comments from borisjohnson to not give up on green energy during the crisis. an exclusive in the guardian — reporting that black and asian people in england have to wait longer for cancer diagnosis than white people, impacting survival rates. the daily mail says more than 13,500 nhs hospital beds are taken by patients who are fit to be discharged. and the daily star reports in its own way on the head of the environment agency, saying people need to be "less squeamish" about drinking water recycled from sewage treatment plants. so let's begin... the times says half of tory voters want energy to be renationalised, a poll finds. jonathan, took us through the findings? the
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poll finds. jonathan, took us through the findings? the times is re ”ortin through the findings? the times is reporting that _ through the findings? the times is reporting that nearly _ through the findings? the times is reporting that nearly half - through the findings? the times is reporting that nearly half of - reporting that nearly half of conservative voters want britain's energy industry to be renationalised. it was nationalised by the last conservative government, margaret thatcher's government. the times saying there is particular support for this in some the red wall seats in the north and perhaps the midlands. people who voted conservative probably for the first time in the last general election. this goes to show that there is a real sense the current energy system we have in this country isn't working. something has gone wrong. it also shows incidentally that conservative voters are a bit more left—wing than the conservative party on economic issues, not so much on social issues, but on some economic issues. whether or not energy renationalisation would reduce our bills is debatable,
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because it is debatable whether this is what is causing the increase at the moment. but a lot of people would say these companies are making huge profits, so at least we could find a way of ensuring that those profits won't all go to shareholders, but are being used to reduce our bills. {iii shareholders, but are being used to reduce our bills.— reduce our bills. of course, it was maruaret reduce our bills. of course, it was margaret thatcher, _ reduce our bills. of course, it was margaret thatcher, ali, _ reduce our bills. of course, it was margaret thatcher, ali, who - margaret thatcher, ali, who privatised a lot of the energy industry. we remember british gas being sold off. i remember that clearly with the tell sid advert. but times change and people are really worried about how they are going to make ends meet this winter. i'm surprised you remember, i think you are _ i'm surprised you remember, i think you are far— i'm surprised you remember, i think you are far too young! the point is, the reason — you are far too young! the point is, the reason why these things were privatised — the reason why these things were privatised was because there was a huge _ privatised was because there was a huge amount of capital expenditure required _ huge amount of capital expenditure required to keep these energy distribution networks and gas distribution networks and gas distribution networks and gas distribution networks invested. that money _ distribution networks invested. that money comes from the private sector,
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and in _ money comes from the private sector, and in the _ money comes from the private sector, and in the private sector, investors are allowed — and in the private sector, investors are allowed to earn a regulated return — are allowed to earn a regulated return because these are monopolistic businesses and customers don't have alternatives to these _ customers don't have alternatives to these networks. those are regulated by ofgern _ these networks. those are regulated by ofgem. that is the idea behind the system. so unless the government wants— the system. so unless the government wants to _ the system. so unless the government wants to plough in billions of its own money into these things, you do have to _ own money into these things, you do have to spend capital expenditure not only— have to spend capital expenditure not only on the expansion of the network. — not only on the expansion of the network, but also maintenance and greening _ network, but also maintenance and greening of it as well. there has to be a review — greening of it as well. there has to be a review. the ft are talking about — be a review. the ft are talking about how _ be a review. the ft are talking about how the system needs to be reviewed — about how the system needs to be reviewed. it is not working as it should — reviewed. it is not working as it should. that is an interesting point to make _ should. that is an interesting point to make. but there is no free lunch here _ to make. but there is no free lunch here if_ to make. but there is no free lunch here if we — to make. but there is no free lunch here. if we want these things nationalised, we are talking about the government taking on a lot more debt to _
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the government taking on a lot more debt to finance these things. private — debt to finance these things. private investors need a regulated return _ private investors need a regulated return it — private investors need a regulated return. it should obviously be capped. — return. it should obviously be capped, and that is the job of the regulaton — capped, and that is the job of the regulator. if the argument is that the regulator is not doing the job properly. — the regulator is not doing the job properly, then the remit of the regulator— properly, then the remit of the regulator needs to be looked again by the _ regulator needs to be looked again by the government. if we want to renationalised, that we require huge capitat— renationalised, that we require huge capital expenditure by the taxpayers. capital expenditure by the taxnayers-_ capital expenditure by the taxa ers. ., ., , , taxpayers. one of the arguments is that renationalising _ taxpayers. one of the arguments is that renationalising would - taxpayers. one of the arguments is that renationalising would be - taxpayers. one of the arguments is that renationalising would be a - taxpayers. one of the arguments is| that renationalising would be a heck of a lot cheaper than having to subsidise people's energy bills. but martine, let's be clear. jonathan hinted _ martine, let's be clear. jonathan hinted at— martine, let's be clear. jonathan hinted at this. the reason we are in the situation — hinted at this. the reason we are in the situation we are in is not because _ the situation we are in is not because the system wasn't working perfectly— because the system wasn't working perfectly before. it's because we are in_ perfectly before. it's because we are in an — perfectly before. it's because we are in an economic war at the moment with russia _ are in an economic war at the moment with russia. there is a war going on in ukraine — with russia. there is a war going on in ukraine. russia has reduced gas exports _ in ukraine. russia has reduced gas exports by— in ukraine. russia has reduced gas exports by nord stream one to europe — exports by nord stream one to europe. it's going to have a massive impact _ europe. it's going to have a massive impact. nadhim zahawi was saying he feels russia is using gas and energy as a weapon of war. what did we
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think— as a weapon of war. what did we think was— as a weapon of war. what did we think was going to happen, that putin— think was going to happen, that putin was— think was going to happen, that putin was going to let us impose sanctions? — putin was going to let us impose sanctions? get real. the reason we are in_ sanctions? get real. the reason we are in this — sanctions? get real. the reason we are in this situation is because of supporting — are in this situation is because of supporting ukraine. that's fine. but we should _ supporting ukraine. that's fine. but we should be open about the public about— we should be open about the public about the _ we should be open about the public about the consequences.— about the consequences. jonathan, the daily mirror _ about the consequences. jonathan, the daily mirror says _ about the consequences. jonathan, the daily mirror says schools - about the consequences. jonathan, the daily mirror says schools and i the daily mirror says schools and nhs bills emergency. this is all related to stop it is notjust businesses and homes that will be more expensive to heat. schools and hospitals too? more expensive to heat. schools and hospitais too?— hospitals too? yes, a lot of the focus has _ hospitals too? yes, a lot of the focus has been _ hospitals too? yes, a lot of the focus has been on _ hospitals too? yes, a lot of the focus has been on the - hospitals too? yes, a lot of the focus has been on the impact l hospitals too? yes, a lot of the l focus has been on the impact on households and people like you and me what will happen to our bills. and to some extent on small businesses, but the mirror raises an important point, which is that essential public services also have to pay their gas and electricity bills and they are going to need a bailout too, presumably. the mirror highlights one nhs trust which has its bills have risen by £20 million.
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that is just one trust, there are hundreds of them on various types across the country. they can only find that money by making savings on the services they provide in some way. so it shows the huge challenge facing the next prime minister when they come into office.— they come into office. unless they are auoin they come into office. unless they are going to _ they come into office. unless they are going to give _ they come into office. unless they are going to give a _ they come into office. unless they are going to give a hand-out, - they come into office. unless they are going to give a hand-out, ali, | are going to give a hand—out, ali, which doesn't sound it from this paper. which doesn't sound it from this -a er. ~ , , which doesn't sound it from this “aer,. ,, ., ,�* paper. well, liz truss doesn't believe in _ paper. well, liz truss doesn't believe in hand-outs, - paper. well, liz truss doesn't believe in hand-outs, but- paper. well, liz truss doesn't believe in hand-outs, but she paper. well, liz truss doesn't i believe in hand-outs, but she is paper. well, liz truss doesn't - believe in hand-outs, but she is to believe in hand—outs, but she is to -ive believe in hand—outs, but she is to give some — believe in hand—outs, but she is to give some because simply cutting national— give some because simply cutting national insurance and green levies is not _ national insurance and green levies is not going to cut it. she is now thinking — is not going to cut it. she is now thinking about potentially reducing that by— thinking about potentially reducing that by 5% and increasing income tax thresholds _ that by 5% and increasing income tax thresholds. but asjonathan that by 5% and increasing income tax thresholds. but as jonathan says, schools _ thresholds. but as jonathan says, schools and hospitals are not covered — schools and hospitals are not covered by the energy cap. you're looking _ covered by the energy cap. you're looking at— covered by the energy cap. you're looking at schools potentially looking — looking at schools potentially looking at schools potentially looking at increases of up to 300%. that will— looking at increases of up to 300%. that will mean front line services, teaching _ that will mean front line services, teaching assistants etc need to be cut back — teaching assistants etc need to be cut back. kids have already suffered after two _
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cut back. kids have already suffered after two years of covid. even the exams _ after two years of covid. even the exams are — after two years of covid. even the exams are not back to where they were _ exams are not back to where they were it _ exams are not back to where they were it has — exams are not back to where they were. it has been complete upheaval. the nhs _ were. it has been complete upheaval. the nhs is _ were. it has been complete upheaval. the nhs is on its knees. it has always— the nhs is on its knees. it has always got— the nhs is on its knees. it has always got a winter crisis and it is facing _ always got a winter crisis and it is facing the — always got a winter crisis and it is facing the worst crisis in its history _ facing the worst crisis in its histo . ., ., , , history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali, and history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali. and here — history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali, and here it _ history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali, and here it is _ history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali, and here it is in _ history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali, and here it is in the _ history. you mentioned bed blocking, ali, and here it is in the daily- ali, and here it is in the daily mail — hospitals hit by £5.5 million a day bed crisis. this is connected to social care, that people got anywhere to go so they have to be keptin anywhere to go so they have to be kept in hospital?— kept in hospital? that's right. the entire 1-5% _ kept in hospital? that's right. the entire 1.5% increase _ kept in hospital? that's right. the entire 1.5% increase in _ kept in hospital? that's right. the entire 1.596 increase in national. entire 1.5% increase in national insurance — entire 1.5% increase in national insurance was designed to tackle the social— insurance was designed to tackle the social care _ insurance was designed to tackle the social care issue. in the short term, _ social care issue. in the short term, it — social care issue. in the short term, it was going to be diverted to the nhs _ term, it was going to be diverted to the nhs because there is a 6.7 million — the nhs because there is a 6.7 million waiting list to deal with. but yes, — million waiting list to deal with. but yes, there is bed blocking going on because — but yes, there is bed blocking going on because there aren't enough people — on because there aren't enough people to — on because there aren't enough people to be looked after in social care _ people to be looked after in social care so _ people to be looked after in social care. so you have this bed blocking occurring _ care. so you have this bed blocking occurring costing 5.5 million a day. you have _ occurring costing 5.5 million a day. you have got ambulances in some areas _ you have got ambulances in some areas being backed up the 12 hours waiting _
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areas being backed up the 12 hours waiting to — areas being backed up the 12 hours waiting to get people into hospital. it is waiting to get people into hospital. it is all— waiting to get people into hospital. it is all interconnected, jonathan, and very hard to unpick in a hurry? that's right. and of course, the national insurance increase, which a lot of people feel has contributed to the cost of living crisis, although i have to say that rishi sunak would point out, the former chancellor, that he has dealt with some of these issues. but that increase was designed to help the nhs, but but also to deal with the crisis in social care. now there seems to be a concern and that that increase should be rolled back or stopped entirely. the trouble is that as a society, we are having to pay for these things and we need to pay for these things and we need to pay for these things and we need to pay for these things to improve capacity in social care. but we don't want to increase taxes. at the
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moment, there seems to be a consensus that we need to either reduce taxes or spend lots of money giving people hand—outs. so i'm sorry to say this country seems to be in a very poor position at the moment. , ., , ., ,., be in a very poor position at the moment. , ., , ., ., , moment. yes, it does, on so many fronts. jonathan _ moment. yes, it does, on so many fronts. jonathan again, _ moment. yes, it does, on so many fronts. jonathan again, the - moment. yes, it does, on so many fronts. jonathan again, the times i fronts. jonathan again, the times says liz truss will declare china an official threat for the first time. quite a significant moment, but why now? it’s quite a significant moment, but why now? �* , ., ., , ., now? it's hard to believe that under georae now? it's hard to believe that under george osborne _ now? it's hard to believe that under george osborne and _ now? it's hard to believe that under george osborne and david - now? it's hard to believe that under| george osborne and david cameron, now? it's hard to believe that under- george osborne and david cameron, we were talking about this country having a golden era of trading deals with china. a lot of things happen. there is concern about china's human rights record and its treatment of some of its citizens. there is also tension over hong kong and i believe china isn't keeping its promise to retain a one nation, two systems arrangements. and also taiwan fears
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that china is looking at taking military action, although one might argue that the us has been almost deliberately provocative and i think it has to recognise that. but this is actually linked to russia. what happened with russia invading ukraine has made people nervous and there are fears that this might involve china trying something similar with taiwan. i don't entirely agree with this. i think china is probably not a direct threat to us the way russia is a threat to us the way russia is a threat to us the way russia is a threat to europe. figs threat to us the way russia is a threat to europe.— threat to europe. as jonathan alluded to. — threat to europe. as jonathan alluded to, ali, _ threat to europe. as jonathan alluded to, ali, quite - threat to europe. as jonathan alluded to, ali, quite a - threat to europe. as jonathan alluded to, ali, quite a lot - threat to europe. as jonathan alluded to, ali, quite a lot of| alluded to, ali, quite a lot of high—level diplomatic trips were made to taiwan which really did rankle with beijing. i made to taiwan which really did rankle with beijing.— made to taiwan which really did rankle with beijing. rankle with bei'ing. i think we have lost our rankle with beijing. i think we have lost our marbles _ rankle with beijing. i think we have lost our marbles in _ rankle with beijing. i think we have lost our marbles in the _ rankle with beijing. i think we have lost our marbles in the west, - lost our marbles in the west, frankly — lost our marbles in the west, frankly i_ lost our marbles in the west, frankly. i am a realist in foreign policy — frankly. i am a realist in foreign policy. during the cold war, we had concepts— policy. during the cold war, we had concepts like the balance of power,
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spheres _ concepts like the balance of power, spheres of— concepts like the balance of power, spheres of influence. basically, not sticking _ spheres of influence. basically, not sticking your tongue out in your position's— sticking your tongue out in your position's back yard. it is ridiculous. that nancy pelosi visit wasjust_ ridiculous. that nancy pelosi visit wasjust nuts, in my view. highly irresponsible, and led to live firing — irresponsible, and led to live firing rounds going on for four days after— firing rounds going on for four days after she _ firing rounds going on for four days after she left. firing rounds going on for four days after she left-— after she left. what should the us and the uk _ after she left. what should the us and the uk be _ after she left. what should the us and the uk be doing, _ after she left. what should the us and the uk be doing, then? - after she left. what should the us and the uk be doing, then? well, | after she left. what should the us i and the uk be doing, then? well, if china was to — and the uk be doing, then? well, if china was to send _ and the uk be doing, then? well, if china was to send xi _ and the uk be doing, then? well, if china was to send xi to _ and the uk be doing, then? well, if china was to send xi to mexico, - and the uk be doing, then? well, if china was to send xi to mexico, the j china was to send xi to mexico, the us would _ china was to send xi to mexico, the us would have a heart attack, as it did in_ us would have a heart attack, as it did in t9 _ us would have a heart attack, as it did in t9 62 — us would have a heart attack, as it did in 19 62 when the soviets placed did in19 62 when the soviets placed military— did in 19 62 when the soviets placed military build—up in cuba. so let's be sensible — military build—up in cuba. so let's be sensible and realise we are dealing — be sensible and realise we are dealing with great powers here and spheres _ dealing with great powers here and spheres of influence. you can openly say you _ spheres of influence. you can openly say you don't agree with what is happening in hong kong. you condemn what is _ happening in hong kong. you condemn what is happening with the uighurs, but you _ what is happening with the uighurs, but you need a sensible policy towards — but you need a sensible policy towards china based on three things — competition, cooperation and confrontation depending on what issue _ confrontation depending on what issue you — confrontation depending on what issue you are dealing with. and you
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have also— issue you are dealing with. and you have also got to recognise that supply— have also got to recognise that supply chains are very embedded with china _ supply chains are very embedded with china if_ supply chains are very embedded with china if you _ supply chains are very embedded with china. if you want to play hardball with china, — china. if you want to play hardball with china, you had better have an alternative — with china, you had better have an alternative because this is going to make _ alternative because this is going to make the _ alternative because this is going to make the russian situation we have i’ili'it make the russian situation we have right now— make the russian situation we have right now look like a walk in the park _ right now look like a walk in the ark. �* , , park. let's finish with the telegraph- _ park. let's finish with the telegraph. story - park. let's finish with the telegraph. story at - park. let's finish with the telegraph. story at the l park. let's finish with the - telegraph. story at the bottom - telegraph. story at the bottom — nasa maps out travel to mars and beyond. first, ali, we are heading back to the moon for the first time in 50 years, not with apollo, but without artemis, taking off tomorrow at 1333 bst if the weather is good enough. at 1333 bst if the weather is good enou:h. . �* , , at 1333 bst if the weather is good enou:h. . h , ., ., enough. that's right, they are going to establish a _ enough. that's right, they are going to establish a permanent _ enough. that's right, they are going to establish a permanent presence i enough. that's right, they are going i to establish a permanent presence on the moon— to establish a permanent presence on the moon and then go out further to mars _ the moon and then go out further to mars and _ the moon and then go out further to mars and other planets. i thought we had messed up our own planet enough, to be honest. _ had messed up our own planet enough, to be honest, and that we have enough — to be honest, and that we have enough to— to be honest, and that we have enough to deal with here. but such is the _ enough to deal with here. but such is the desire for scientific discovery, which is insatiable, that i discovery, which is insatiable, that i wish _
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discovery, which is insatiable, that i wish them — discovery, which is insatiable, that i wish them the best. but i think we have enough to deal with on earth. a lot of have enough to deal with on earth. lot of people might agree with you. jonathan, though, this is paving the way notjust jonathan, though, this is paving the way not just to jonathan, though, this is paving the way notjust to the moon, but to mars. they idea seems to be from the planetary scientists and astronomers i have interviewed over the last couple of weeks looking ahead to artemis, that they want to try out some projects, some experiments, settlements on the moon, with a view to getting to mars, which of course is months away in travel terms rather than days. i is months away in travel terms rather than days.— rather than days. i think this is wonderful- _ rather than days. i think this is wonderful. i— rather than days. i think this is wonderful. i think— rather than days. i think this is wonderful. i think it _ rather than days. i think this is wonderful. i think it is - rather than days. i think this is i wonderful. i think it is something thatis wonderful. i think it is something that is optimistic and uplifting at a time when we needed. it's going to a time when we needed. it's going to a huge sum of money. presumably, it is the american taxpayer paying for this. so we can watch it on the telly and enjoy. i think the first visit to mars stopped before i

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