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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 11, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 8pm... an amber extreme heat warning comes into force across large parts of the country for the the official declaration of a drought appears inevitable. last au . ust in drought appears inevitable. last august in the — drought appears inevitable. last august in the first week, we attended 42 fires in london. this yearfor the attended 42 fires in london. this year for the first week in august, we have attended 340, so an eightfold increase. last month was one of the worst for waiting times in a and e in england and response times for ambulances were much longer than the target time. 0ur hospitals are full, as a consequence, our emergency apartments are full and we are
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unable to off—load patiently much out of ambulances. a meeting in downing st with energy bosses, but it provides no solution yet for households struggling with soaring bills. the police watchdog says forces in england and wales are failing victims of bulgaries, robberies and theft with too few suspects being charged. go! the crisis of local swimming pools, the bbc finds more than 60 have closed across the uk in the past three years. good evening and welcome to bbc news. an amber extreme heat warning has come into force in
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some parts of the uk to last four days, as temperatures are forecast to hit 37 degrees celsius in some areas. although temperatures are unlikely to reach last month's 40 degree high, this heatwave is much more prolonged and some temperatures could get close to local or regional records. there's concern about wildfires, pressure on water supplies, and transport problems. it's also expected that a drought will be officially declared tomorrow. sarah campbell reports. earlier today in west sussex, one of two fires which destroyed acres of crops. absolutely nothing you can do. it'sjust on fire. in east london, this grassland fire was believed to have been caused by a discarded bottle. last august, in the first week, we attended 42 grassland fires in london.
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this year, for the first week in august, we have attended 340, so an eightfold increase, so that gives you the terms of the pressure being put on fire service up and down the uk. i have never seen this in my 23—year career in the fire service. more savanna grassland than a park in west london and keeping the manager here awake at night — the possibility of fire. and you can see why. even in these conditions, people are having disposable barbecues? yes, this is the evidence we are finding, this is a good example, big scorched area. look how dry it is everywhere, and someone has decided to cook their food in such a tinder—dry area. it's not great at all. to help prevent fires here and elsewhere, some supermarkets have temporarily banned the sale of disposable barbecues. it's not quite as hot as it was on those record—breaking days injuly, but the colour of the grass here in richmond park tells the story of the summer. very little rain and day
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after day of heat. and the same is true across large swathes of the country. in hampshire, at the boom town festival, people are having to find ways to keep cool. plenty of water, we will refill bottles at the station. lots of water. and some shade, if there is any. we should have a paddling pool. but now we have got a gazebo, it should be easier to keep cool. in wales, bathers have been finding respite in the waters off barry island. i think i would have melted a long time ago. i would have been a pool- on the floor if i hadn't have been in and out the sea all the time. it's notjust humans who need help to stay cool, fish in this river near surrey have had to be moved into deeper, shadier waters, as have crayfish in shropshire. with the temperatures set to last over the weekend, the message is enjoy the sun responsibly. sarah campbell, bbc news.
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let's talk to rob thompson, professor of meteorology at the university of reading. good to have you with us. you are worried about what will follow this heatwave in terms of flash flooding? the heatwave has been very hot and dry, and we are talking about all 2022. milestone in the south of england with how much water you would expect to have. we have this heatwave now, but we had that other heatwave, and in the last month or so it has been hotter than is normal. so we have hot weather, we have lots of drought, the ground is absolutely parched. if you put water on it now, it doesn't absorb income itjust on it now, it doesn't absorb income it just floats off the top. on it now, it doesn't absorb income itjust floats off the top. and that means we have a danger that if we get heavy rain rather than light, drizzly rain, we will have flash flooding. the water can't get into the noncommittal run of and that could potentially be a serious
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problem. could potentially be a serious roblem. , , could potentially be a serious roblem., , ,, could potentially be a serious roblem. , ,, ., could potentially be a serious roblem. , , , ., ., could potentially be a serious roblem. , ,, ., ., .,, problem. just spell out what flash floodin: problem. just spell out what flash flooding would _ problem. just spell out what flash flooding would mean, _ problem. just spell out what flash flooding would mean, because . flooding would mean, because obviously we are talking at the moment about the problem of the heatwave and drought. some people would say we need lots of rain, but flash flooding could be really destructive. i flash flooding could be really destructive.— flash flooding could be really destructive. ~ ., , destructive. i think we need to be careful what _ destructive. i think we need to be careful what we _ destructive. i think we need to be careful what we wish _ destructive. i think we need to be careful what we wish for. - destructive. i think we need to be | careful what we wish for. we don't need lots of rain, we need a little bit of rain to soak the ground, then we can have more rain. if we get lots of rain now, what you will have as a build—up of water that will sit on the surface, will not be able to get in, sit on the surface, run down hills and that willjust mean lots of water on the surface all at once. and we see regularly in the summer when a thunderstorm is hit, we see these flash floods under bridges and someone, they fill with water. that could become a really serious problem. it won'tjust happen in smaller, essentially everywhere has become like urban concrete because water won't be able to get in. qm. water won't be able to get in. 0k, rob thompson. — water won't be able to get in. 0k, rob thompson, thank you so much. from the university of reading. we
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will take you to the usa and washington, the attorney general merrick garland is giving a statement from the justice department. it is his first public statement since federal agents searched president donald trump's home at mara largo. mil searched president donald trump's home at mara largo. all americans are entitled — home at mara largo. all americans are entitled to _ home at mara largo. all americans are entitled to the _ home at mara largo. all americans are entitled to the evenhanded - are entitled to the evenhanded application of the law, to due process of the law and to the presumption of innocence. much of our work has been conducted out of the public eye by necessity. we do that to protect the constitutional rights of all americans and to protect the integrity of our investigations. federal law long—standing the party rules and our ethical obligations prevent me from providing further details as to the basis of the search at this time. there are however certain points i want you to know. first, i personally approved
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the search warrant in this matter. —— the decision to seek a search warrant. second, the department does not take such a decision likely. where possible, it is a standard practice to seek less intrusive means as an alternative to a search and to narrowly scope any search thatis and to narrowly scope any search that is undertaken. third, let me address recent unfounded attacks on the professionalism of the fbi and justice department and aides of prosecutors. i will not stand by silently when their integrity is unfairly attacked. the men and women of the fbi and thejustice department are dedicated, patriotically public servants. every day, they protect the american people from violent crime, terrorism and other threats to their safety whilst safeguarding our civil rights. they do so at great personal
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sacrifice and risk to themselves. i am honoured to work alongside them. this is all i can say right now. more information will be made available in the appropriate way and at the appropriate time. thank you. thank you all for your question is, that as i said, this is all i can say at this time.— that as i said, this is all i can sa at this time. ~ ~ ., , say at this time. well, the attorney general there _ say at this time. well, the attorney general there merrick _ say at this time. well, the attorney general there merrick garland - say at this time. well, the attorney general there merrick garland not l general there merrick garland not giving a huge amount away about the fbi search of former president donald trump's home of mar—a—lago earlier this week. just saying that he personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant and it was not a decision taken lightly. he said that attacks against the department ofjustice were unfounded but did confirm the fbi search of donald trump's property there at mar—a—lago. we will bring you more
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reaction to that statement from the attorney general in the united states as it comes in. accident and emergency departments in england had one of their worst months ever injuly, according to latest figures from the nhs. record numbers of patients waited more than twelve hours to be admitted. response times for ambulances dealing with emergency cases were also much longer than the target time. injuly in england, 29% of patients had to wait longer than four hours to be treated or assessed in a&e departments — a record high. the figure for a&e delays was a bit lower in scotland but higher in wales and northern ireland, though data is published at different times. and there was a record 6.73 million people in england waiting for non—urgent operations and procedures injune. some are enduring very long and debilitating waits for their treatment, as our health editor, hugh pym reports.
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james is in training for the great north run. he's had his heart valve operation but only after going private. he felt he had to do that after repeated delays in the nhs system, including last—minute postponements. get yourself prepped, you're starving yourself, you wake up the next morning, they shave your chest, get you all gowned up, get you on the bed, and then the nurse turns up and says, "sorry, it's not happening today." then your emotions just go. and the first time that happened was really tough, the second time, not quite as tough because you have kind of done it, and the third time, you expected it anyway. there are people out there a lot worse than me, but it was emotionally very, very difficult. the longest wait for operations — more than two years — have been almost eliminated in england after a new push by hospitals, but the number waiting over one year has carried on rising.
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tackling the backlog is getting harder with intense pressure on hospitals. there are delays in crowded a&e units because it's difficult to find beds, but hospital leaders are worried conditions will get worse. we know it's going to be tough this winter, and it's tough because we've got covid, we know that staff absences come along with covid, we've got fears of an early flu outbreak, and we also know that other respiratory diseases are likely to be rife this winter. that's going to put a huge amount of pressure on. nhs england said it was planning to increase capacity for the winter months and reduce response times. july�*s heatwave might have had an impact — there was a record number of urgent ambulance call—outs — but health leaders know that, whatever the weather, there are huge challenges ahead. hugh pym, bbc news. a meeting between ministers, including borisjohnson and the chancellor nadhim zahawi and bosses from the electricity sector has ended with no solution for people struggling
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with soaring energy bills. the annual charge for a typical household is set to top £4,000 a year from january — that's over double what it is now. our business correspondent, caroline davies, reports. i find it quite degrading to live in this situation. there is little left in dallas' one—bedroom flat. she says to keep paying the bills and a roof over her head, she sold the rest. my flat is empty, so ijust don't know how i can possibly make any more adjustments or changes to try and satisfy this gas bill. in my fridge, just some bottled water... dallas says her gas bill went up a few months ago from £30 to £150. although she is on universal credit and should be eligible for extra government payments to help, she says any help now is too little, too late. it is making me feel very, very anxious all the time. just switching a light on, you know, worrying about where i will be
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in another few months. dallas may be an extreme example, but the expected rise in energy bills will affect households around the country. today, 15 energy companies and organisations met with the prime minister, chancellor and business secretary. while borisjohnson said this winter would be difficult, key decisions will wait until the new prime minister is in place. that won't be until the 5th of september, and consumer groups say decisions are needed now. up untiljust july this year, we have given about 120,000 referrals to foodbanks and crisis support and food banks. so for many people, they cannot wait another day for the government to decide what to do. there are different ideas about what the government can do to give more support in the next few months. one is to cut vat on energy bills, put forward by rishi sunak. that could save a typical household roughly about £190.
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another idea is to temporarily drop green energy levies and that could save £153. the criticism is with energy prices going so high, neither of these do enough. a third idea is to extend the windfall tax, initially introduced by rishi sunak when he was chancellor, and is expected to bring in £5 million. —— expected to bring in £5 billion. but that is controversial in the conservative party. the government has continually emphasised that some helpers already in place with £37 billion for cost of living support. and today's meeting is likely to be one of many between the energy sector and the government. but there are already rumbles of concern, even in the energy sector, that big decisions are on hold while the panic over prices is rising. caroline davies, bbc news. we will find out how that story and the all the other big stories of the day are coming in tomorrow morning's newspaper front day are coming in tomorrow morning's
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newspaperfront pages. me day are coming in tomorrow morning's newspaper front pages. me at 10:30pm and 11:30pm for the papers. rosa prince is the editor of the house magazine and david davies. what do you have in store for us? the hundred continues at the oval this evening. the supercharger made 143-5. last this evening. the supercharger made 143—5. last season's top scorer with a 31 ball half—century. then he fell one short of 50 earlier. we can have a look at the live pictures now. the invincibles chasing down 158 to win.
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the target is 144. 143 without loss as it stands. with the men's match recently completed, the invincibles chasing down 158 to win. it went down to the final few balls. superchargers captain faf du plessis dropped what looked to be a simple catch from tom curran to allow the home side to win by three wickets. eve muirhead says the decision to call time on her career was the toughest of her life. the gb curling skip guided the british women's team to gold at this year's beijing winter olympics. it was her fourth games, having first led the team at vancouver in 2010. but she has today announced her retirement from the sport. i made a decision and i stuck with it. a lot of the time it was, "are you sure you're doing the right thing?" and i knew i was. someone said to me several years back that
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he will know when the time is right when you want to stop. i remember waking up one day and thinking, "you know what? i think it is time." i spoke to my parents and close friends, and it wasn't long before i decided that this was definitely the right time. the busy summer of sport continues, after the world athletics championships and the commonwealth games. it's time for another multi—sport event to take centre stage. the european championships are under way in munich. over the next 11 days, medals will be won across nine different sports. and team gb already have a silver medal in the gymnastics. alice kinsella was on the podium. she picked up two gold medal medals at the recent commonwealth games in birmingham, italy's asia d'amato was the winner. it means a lot because since i have grown up, i have always trimmed of having an all—around medal. to be honest, i didn't expect it today. why? honest, i didn't expect it today. wh ? �* , why? because i was feeling quite tired after the _ why? because i was feeling quite tired after the commonwealth - why? because i was feeling quite - tired after the commonwealth games. but i wasn't really happy with my
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fold first of all. but as i kept going around, i thought i might have a shot. charlotte worthington, britain's reigning world champion in freestyle bmx, is safely through the heats in women's park, thanks to a brilliant second run that saw her qualify top of the group. raheem sterling says he was growing concerned about his lack of football at manchester city, and that was a deciding factor in his decision to sign for chelsea. the 27—year—old has moved back to the capital after spending more than a decade in the north west. despite winning four premier league titles, sterling made the £47.5 million switch because of fears that his career at city could stall. asa as a person, you always strive to achieve stuff, and ijust felt as a person, you always strive to achieve stuff, and i just felt that my time at city was getting limited on playing time for different reasons. and it was not one that i can afford to waste more time, because when i look back in the future i never wanted to look back
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and see a rise and then a decline. so my thing was i needed to keep that and a fresh challenge was to be made. the premier league will have drinks breaks during this weekend's games because of the hot weather across the country. temperatures could be as high ast 37 degrees, with the efl also implementing the break when it goes above 30 at any match. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. i think they will need those water breaks! see you later, thank you very much. we'll go back to the news now to the search warrant at a former president donald trump's home at mar—a—lago. we will get a bit more on that from our washington correspondent gary 0'donoghue, who joins us right now. what more did we learn from the attorney general? what we learnt is that he will seek
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a motion to unseal, in other words make public, the search warrant itself and also what is called property receipt that accompanies it. the search warrant is the document that is presented to the person whose house is being searched. we don't know the detail that will show, although i would be surprised if it doesn't say the reason that they are looking for these documents or items. it may have to specify in connection with what kind of crime they are conducting the search. that will be something of key interest that we will learn something new. we will also learn from the property receipt what was taken. the specificity of thatis what was taken. the specificity of that is not necessarily going to be down to the detail of each individual document, but it might tell us they were x number of laptops, phones, boxes of papers removed from the property. the attorney general says he is seeking to make these things public, partly
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because donald trump has already confirmed that the search took place, but also because of what he called unprecedented public interest surrounding the matter. and he has also clearly believes that the department ofjustice has been attacked unfairly over this by republicans over the past few days, pointing out that they have tried to get these materials by other means beforehand. what we do know is that donald trump had a subpoena earlier on in the spring, and a subpoena is a demand for materials. that clearly did not deliver what they needed and that is why they went for a search warrant. so some background for the department ofjustice —— backing for them who have come under attack. we don't know why they carried out the search, but can you tell us what their speculation is there? what are people saying as to the possible reasons? ~ , , reasons? well, it is definitely in ursuit of reasons? well, it is definitely in pursuit of evidence _ reasons? well, it is definitely in pursuit of evidence relating - reasons? well, it is definitely in pursuit of evidence relating to i reasons? well, it is definitely in pursuit of evidence relating to a| pursuit of evidence relating to a crime, that is what we do know. this
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is not a fishing exercise, you don't get one of these judge— ordered warrants unless you specify the crime you are investigating and give enough evidence to the judge to say that you think evidence relating to that you think evidence relating to that crime, probable cause that it will be found which makes you want to search. the kind of things we are looking at our mishandling of classified documents. we already know the former president had to return 15 boxes to the national archive that he took home, basically, when he left the white house that he should not have done. there are other allegations of the way documents were handled during his presidency. clearly materials about the fbi want. they could be in connection to other investigations they are looking into, but a feeling at the moment is the are probably about the presidential records act, which is this legislation which covers what you have to hand over when you leave office. the other
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thing to note is that when they search these properties, if they are in 0akley, gary, thank you very much indeed. in oakley, gary, thank you very much indeed. , �* ., indeed. gary o'donoghue are | corresponding in washington. most victims of burglary, robbery and theft in england and wales are not getting the justice they deserve, according to a report by the police watchdog. the chief inspector of constabulary says too many offenders remain at liberty, and warns that the public could lose confidence in policing if forces don't improve. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. domestic burglary is one of the most intrusive crimes. people find the idea of someone breaking into their home — as was caught on camera here in dudley — very distressing. but despite the clear pictures, no one was charged with this offence. and that's true in 19 out of 20 cases of burglary, theft and robbery.
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people see these offences happening. they know about them. the neighbours tell them about them. policing to maintain confidence and trust has got to be seen to be doing something about them. and at the moment, with the low charge rates that we are seeing, the public, i'm sure, do not have that perception. physically, where the car was, they were able to creep down the side of the car without triggering the camera. stefan bawson�*s car was brazenly stolen from outside his london home. he was inside the house at the time and knew immediately it had gone. although his camera missed most of the crime, there was one picture for police to work from, and the street was full of cctv and the car had a tracker. that was on february the 14th. i received, two days later, a letter dated the 15th of february. but as this letter shows, the police closed the case within 24 hours without any investigation. they hadn't been round, they hadn't called.
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they, as far as i know, they hadn't done a, kind of, site visit without me being aware. i think it's unlikely that they would have done that without at least knocking on the door. so i'm not sure on what basis they could have said that they'd investigated all potential leads. eli posen had a similar experience. he and a colleague came across three men trying to steal the catalytic converter from a car. but when they challenged the thieves, they were attacked with crowbars. they dialled 999. they said they'll send some police straight away and they'll come back for more information. and that was the last we heard. um, they sent a letter a few days in the post, three days later that due to lack of evidence they're closing the case. the inspectorate of constabulary says the low charge rate is unacceptable, leaving most victims of burglary, theft and robbery without justice. they say it's vital that the police performance improves, otherwise
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forces will lose the confidence of the public. daniel sandford, bbc news. more than 30 people have been injured in an accident on a roller—coaster at a legoland theme park in germany. the incident reportedly took place on the fire dragon ride at the leisure resort, which is located in bavaria in south germany. according to german media, the injuries were caused by one roller—coaster train braking heavily and another train colliding with it. 0ur correspondent tim muffettjoins me now. what more can you tell us? information coming through this evening, what we do know so far is that roller—coaster trains collided, this took place at legoland in bavaria. the ride is called the fire breathing dragon which can travel at 18 mph. and the children up as young as six can go on it if a company by
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an adult. so far, we understand what i'm 30 people have been injured, at least one person seriously injured. some reports about two people been seriously injured. according to german media, three had were deployed to the scene and officials are currently unclear as to be precise because of the accident. as you say, it is thought that one roller—coaster train brakes heavily. the bavarian red cross which was involved in the emergency response said that 15 people were transferred to hospital following the crash and that the ride —— a ryder truck on the right was released by the fire men. more than 30 people it would have seen have been injured in this incident. have seen have been in'ured in this incident. . ~ have seen have been in'ured in this incident. ., ,, , ., , have seen have been in'ured in this incident. . ~' , ., , . incident. tim, thank you very much indeed. incident. tim, thank you very much indeed- we — incident. tim, thank you very much indeed. we will— incident. tim, thank you very much indeed. we will have _ incident. tim, thank you very much indeed. we will have more - incident. tim, thank you very much indeed. we will have more on - incident. tim, thank you very much indeed. we will have more on that| indeed. we will have more on that throughout the evening. tim muffett reporting. we will be back with more after a look at the weather now with the latest forecast with elizabeth
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rick teeny. hello there. the heatwave continues for the rest of this week. there is a met office amber weather warning in force, the second highest level of alert, for extreme heat. it's valid until the end of the day on sunday for much of england, as far north as manchester, leeds and sheffield and into eastern areas of wales. on friday, already, a warmer start to the day. it's not hot everywhere. cooler and cloudier for the northwest of scotland. there could be some cloud, too, lapping onshore for north sea—facing coasts. certainly a cooler day for eastern scotland, but temperatures elsewhere rising to the low 30s. maybe 34, 35 celsius for parts of the midlands and towards the west of london. now, overnight on friday, very uncomfortable for sleeping but also clear skies around. temperatures may not drop below the high teens in celsius for many, and then on saturday, the heat continues to build. away from these eastern—facing coasts, there will be lots of blue sky, strong sunshine. temperatures could get as high in some spots as 37 degrees.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. in amber extreme heat warning comes in force across large parts of the country for the next four days. the official declaration of drought appears to be inevitable. they have been wildfires around london and more warnings elsewhere. last month's was one of the worst for waiting times for amd and england. and response times for ambulances were much longer than the target time. a meeting in downing street with the energy bosses no solution as yet for households who are struggling with soaring bills. the police watchdog says forces in england and wales are feeling victims of burglaries, robberies and thefts with too feud suspects being charged. and the crisis in our local
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swimming pools. the bbc finds that more than 60 have close in the last three years. let's talk about the wildfires sweeping across southwest france and enforced more than 10,000 people from their homes and scorched 62 km2. zombie fires, last month's blazes reigniting because of record temperatures and drought. france has sustained nearly six times more fire damage in 2022 than it has in any year since 2006. over 570 square kilometres have gone up in flames. the gironde wildfire is one of many that have broken out across europe this summer, triggered by heatwaves that have baked the continent and brought record temperatures.
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0ur climate editor reports. a cloak of fire shrouding south—west france. a landscape of beauty turned to horror. as flames tear through the gironde, destroying almost 7000 hectares fanned by winds, searing heat and france's worst drought on record. a tranquil village last week, a ghost town this one, with 10,000 people evacuated. firefighters and planes have come from across europe to help france manage a nightmare that keeps recurring. translation: we must continue, more than ever to fight _ against climate change and we must continue to adapt to it. we will begin a debate on new climate change plan this autumn. elsewhere in europe, fires rage. in spain, this is one of a dozen regions battling them. in portugal, flames have destroyed more than 10,000 hectares of forests. scarring the night sky.
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how quickly our earth is drying up. this was france a year ago. and now, lush land has turned to waste land, forests and fields are barren. paris might be looking delightful in the sunshine, but we are facing a serious situation. crops across europe are dying, worsening the food crisis linked to the war in ukraine. extreme droughts and heat waves that were more freaky events are becoming common and progressively worse. france's fourth successive heatwave is being lapped up by sun, ——some but despite the pleasure, they know the pain is deepening. this summer has taught us that this is happening and it is happening now. these temperatures are extreme and if people don't have, it will get worse. because we are a new generation, we have to live on this planet. it is going really bad. we are a little worried about our future.
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france is taking the heat of what we are doing to our world. the postcard beauty may look stuck in time, but the planet is changing and there is fear of what is to come. let's get more one of our main stories this evening. ministers including the prime minister boris johnson have been holding a meeting with energy firms for rising energy costs. i've been talking to dale van ssoois costs. i've been talking to dale van ssoo is in central france. he is the owner of the electricity company ego atrocity. i began by asking him what the british government should be doing now to try to ease the dramatic energy price rises for ordinary households which are imminent. ordinary households which are imminent-— ordinary households which are imminent. , , ., , ., imminent. they should be doing something- _ imminent. they should be doing something- i— imminent. they should be doing something. i know— imminent. they should be doing something. i know that - imminent. they should be doing something. i know that recently| something. i know that recently knocked for hundred pounds off air for nietzsche bills to help out. but that's been overtaken by the recent
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increase in bills of £1200 so it's just been towards. that policy has already roadkill. 0ur government men are beyond the gate if you look was happening in europe the price rises in your book 4% if you look at britain at 300% now. by april it will be 500. clearly our government are doing enough. d0 will be 500. clearly our government are doing enough.— are doing enough. do you think this is a crisis that's _ are doing enough. do you think this is a crisis that's going _ are doing enough. do you think this is a crisis that's going to _ are doing enough. do you think this is a crisis that's going to last - are doing enough. do you think this is a crisis that's going to last for - is a crisis that's going to last for months or potentially for years? is there something were going to have to get used to? this there something were going to have to get used to?— to get used to? this is our second winter already. _ to get used to? this is our second winter already. i _ to get used to? this is our second winter already. i think _ to get used to? this is our second winter already. i think there - to get used to? this is our second winter already. i think there are l winter already. i think there are more winters to come. we have systemic issues a lack of gas storage for example, the big problem which is within the governments power to change right now is that we allow global commodity markets to set the price that we pay ourselves for our own nortje gas was up half of all the gas we use in our country comes from the north sea and we are paying five times more for it now that we did last year. we shouldn't allow that to happen, we should price it. that would take away half
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of the problem we are currently facing. of the problem we are currently facina. ~ . ., ~ ., of the problem we are currently facin. . ., ., ~' ., facing. we are talking to you in france that _ facing. we are talking to you in france that you _ facing. we are talking to you in france that you mentioned - facing. we are talking to you in i france that you mentioned other european countries going through at the moment. talk to us a bit about how other countries are dealing with this country, france for example. it's a question of using public money to take away the incredible price rise for the people simply can't afford. if you look at the pandemic which was only very recently we spent for hundred billion to get the country through the pandemic, protecting people jobs, incomes, we need one tenth of that to get through this winter. the government needs to find this money, it's public money and they can use it's public money and they can use it to take away this problem of high energy bills. it to take away this problem of high energy bills-— energy bills. that's what's happening _ energy bills. that's what's happening in _ energy bills. that's what's happening in europe. - energy bills. that's what's happening in europe. you| energy bills. that's what's i happening in europe. you are energy bills. that's what's _ happening in europe. you are seeing this as a crisis like the pandemic in other words?— in other words? yes. people are conna in other words? yes. people are gonna die _ in other words? yes. people are gonna die this — in other words? yes. people are gonna die this winter _ in other words? yes. people are gonna die this winter for - in other words? yes. people are gonna die this winter for sure. l gonna die this winter for sure. people administrable to eight struggle, suffer, there can have both also. you can overstress about this is can be. energy prices have tripled over the past months there are quite unaffordable for people 12
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months ago. are quite unaffordable for people 12 months ago-— months ago. they are unaffordable now. we months ago. they are unaffordable now- we are _ months ago. they are unaffordable now. we are talking _ months ago. they are unaffordable now. we are talking in _ months ago. they are unaffordable now. we are talking in terms - now. we are talking in terms of customers, you're the owner and an energy company. how is it for companies like yours? it’s energy company. how is it for companies like yours? it's pretty tric . companies like yours? it's pretty tricky- we _ companies like yours? it's pretty tricky- we are — companies like yours? it's pretty tricky. we are going into - companies like yours? it's prettyj tricky. we are going into another winter of great uncertainty. i think it's going to be worse than last winter because last winter was a... energy crisis but we didn't have the invasion of ukraine, documented the winter. this winter it's very clear that's going to cause a new level of problems we have just not seen before. these spikes and prices that are going to cause a real problem. sometimes there can be ten or 20 times higher they were the day before in the end day trading that we all have to do.— we all have to do. you've talked about what _ we all have to do. you've talked about what government - we all have to do. you've talked about what government should l we all have to do. you've talked l about what government should be doing. what about companies like your own? what can you be doing to help the customers? titer? your own? what can you be doing to help the customers?— help the customers? very little, actuall . help the customers? very little, actually. because _
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help the customers? very little, actually. because within - help the customers? very little, actually. because within the - help the customers? very little, - actually. because within the system we work government allows north sea gas for example to be priced badly high creating windfall profits in the north sea. they haven't tackled up the north sea. they haven't tackled up properly, which they could do. they are not doing anything so we are stuck in a system where we've got to bite madly price energy ends sell it on a bad price with up the best we can do is when our prices go up best we can do is when our prices go up if you are going to pay her bills please leave us because you can save 5% if you go somewhere else with that that's what i would rather our customers do. i've been saying that now for two years, probably. dale vance talking _ now for two years, probably. dale vance talking to _ now for two years, probably. dale vance talking to me _ now for two years, probably. dale vance talking to me from france. the owner of the electricity company. police have named a man who are died after a series of shootings. he was 47—year—old john mckinnon. a man and a woman are being treated in hospital on the mainland. police scotland say that a 39—year—old man has been charged. german police say
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they are serious concerns for the welfare of a four—year—old boy believed to be in turkey. 0fficers believed to be in turkey. officers are appealing for urgent help in finding george tapley wells. he is thought to have travelled on the 29th ofjune with his mother. police say they are likely to have spent time in turkey with a four—year—olds father nigel wells. the boy was last signed in the marina area of natalia. thejury signed in the marina area of natalia. the jury hearing the case against the former manchester ryan giggs has been shown police party can footage of his ex—girlfriend claiming he had hit her once before. mr giggs' defence barrister accused kate greville of �*prolifically�* lying to the police. the 48—year—old former footballer is accused of using controlling and coercive behaviour and assaulting ms greville. he denies all the charges. our sports news correspondent, laura scott, was at manchester crown court. the body cam footage that was played
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in court was from the that brian gigs allegedly assaulted her and her sister. telling police she had split her lit by him headbutting her. he denies he also claims he is head and head butted her before. since his days at her had it been all over the place. she was asked why she had chosen to spend lockdown with the former footballer at he was that she claims a serial and violent accuser. she said he could be very charming and was a shame she got back to him describing that. as a living hell. a depiction challenged by the defence. she admitted that in late 2020 she had lied to mr grigg and a tasking field she had cancer cells and had her contraceptive coil removed without her knowing. it was a lead she did this and had regular unprotected six with them afterwards because she wanted to get pregnant. it was put to her that it wouldn't make sense to have a baby with someone who she considered to be a
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violent, coercive individual. she responded it wouldn't make sense at all, that wasn't what the plan was. a man who is allegedly belonged to an islamic state cell nicknamed the beatles because of its members english absences in in court on terrorism charges. 38 number arrested yesterday at luton airport. he's always denied being part of the group which killed hostages in syria. 0ur correspondent was at west minister magistrate court. the court here heard today that he is facing three charges. he has alleged those allegations lead to 2013 and 2014. he is accused of asking for and receiving money for terrorist purposes including requesting his wife send funds to him in syria. and he is also co—used of possessing a firearm. he didn't indicate how he would plead today, he's been
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remanded in custody to appear at the old bailey next month and he has spent more than seven years in a prison in turkey for being a member of the islamic state group. the defence secretary says the uk will send more weapons to ukraine to help it defend itself against russia's invasion for that mr wallace made the announcement at the copenhagen conference for northern european defence allies of ukraine. , ., �* ukraine. president putin would've ambled ukraine. president putin would've gambled that _ ukraine. president putin would've gambled that come _ ukraine. president putin would've gambled that come august, - ukraine. president putin would've gambled that come august, a - ukraine. president putin would've gambled that come august, a few months it would all get bored of the conflict in the international community would have gone up in different directions. well, today is proof of the opposite. we have come out of this meeting with more pledges of finance, more pledges of trading and more of military aid. all design to help ukraine win to help ukraine stand up for its sovereignty and indeed to ensure that president putin and his ambitions fail in ukraine as they
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rightly should. i think it's incredibly important to understand that the fighting is still going on it is still seeing the loss of life of both innocent civilians and indeed military personnel of ukrainian armed forces. all of whom are fighting bravely on a day—to—day basis. but it is also the case that russia are starting to fail in many areas. they have failed so far and areas. they have failed so far and are unlikely to ever succeed in occupying ukraine, their invasion has faltered and constantly being re—modified to the extent they are really only focusing in parts of the south and in the ease along come a long way away from their three days so—called, special operation, three days are over 150 days and nearly six months end. with huge significant losses of both equipment andindeed significant losses of both equipment and indeed russian personnel. ben wallace, the _ and indeed russian personnel. ben wallace, the defence secretary. new research by the bbc is discovered
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more than one and six local authorities across the uk has lost at least one public swimming pool in last three years. some have closed permanently others are shut temporarily because of staffing, funding or repair problems such as shortages of chlorine. in some towns, there's no public pool at all. emily unia reports. learning life saving skills on the beach. great in fine weather, but in winter, the water's too cold. and falmouth now has no public swimming pool. we're surrounded by water. we should, you know, it's really critical in cornwall that kids can learn to swim, because a, obviously in terms of future lifeguards, but, b, just having the confidence and knowing what to do in the water is so critical. i was tiny when i started swimming. and it used to be my favourite place to go for swimming. so it means a lot to me to have a swimming pool nearby. it's quite a shame because it's- quite a big part of our community. and for people who can't swim i in the ocean, because of maybe
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the waves, it's quite sad. if you're not safe in the water, maybe you could drown. do you like swimming? yeah. now you can't go. this group of disabled swimmers are making do with other activities, but they miss the falmouth pool. and alternatives are too far away or too expensive. well, it's good exercise, like, jumping around in the pool. i think it's a shame, i really do. i know how much it meant to them. i know. you know, the staff as well would come back and say, "oh, they had a brilliant time today. "so—and—so, you wouldn't believe what he's done, what she's done." and itjust became part of what we did. and i don't think they should lose it. this is falmouth's ships and castles leisure centre. it closed permanently in march, and it's not the only example. the bbc asked all the councils across the uk how many sites offering public swimming there were in march 2019, and how
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many there were in march this year. more than one in six local authorities had lost a pool. some were shut permanently, some temporarily. overall, 56 local authorities in the uk lost access to at least one public pool since 2019. it's a familiar story around the country, from eastleigh and portsmouth, to the wirral to runcorn. i remember meeting parents who'd lost children and... devastating. absolutely heartbreaking. former 0lympian greg whyte, like many involved in swimming, is shocked. the closure of swimming pools is an absolute health and welfare disaster. one person drowns every 20 hours in the uk, so actually learning to swim, which is just one element of swimming pools, is absolutely fundamental. and of course the removal of swimming will reduce physical activity in an already poorly active population. the government said it's provided
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£1 billion of public money to ensure the survival of the grassroots, professional sport and leisure sectors. and there is sometimes hope. so this is it. this is our 25 metre training pool. wadebridge pool was threatened with closure, but the community are about to take it over. it's absolutely amazing. i'm really, really excited that it's genuinely going to be a centre that helps the whole community. it's a success story campaigners across the country would love to repeat. emily unia, bbc news in wadebridge in cornwall. let's talk to jamaican swimmer, michael gunning, who represented great britain before switching to jamaica in 2016, and has recently announced his retirement. very good to have you with us. i think we probably all knew there were fewer swimming pools around the country but this really reveals the extent of it. it
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country but this really reveals the extent of it— extent of it. it really does. it's heartbreaking. _ extent of it. it really does. it's heartbreaking. i— extent of it. it really does. it's heartbreaking. i think- extent of it. it really does. it's l heartbreaking. i think swimming extent of it. it really does. it's - heartbreaking. i think swimming is more thanjust a heartbreaking. i think swimming is more than just a sport, it's a life skill. they really can save your life. wejust skill. they really can save your life. we just had the commonwealth gave us, all those amazing swimmers performing so well. unfortunately, those games really invite somebody people to take it out but they don't have the access and it makes it so hard. i have the access and it makes it so hard. , , ,.,, have the access and it makes it so hard. , �*, ., , hard. i suppose there's two things. it's the hard. i suppose there's two things. it's the sport _ hard. i suppose there's two things. it's the sport of _ hard. i suppose there's two things. it's the sport of swimming - hard. i suppose there's two things. it's the sport of swimming which i hard. i suppose there's two things. it's the sport of swimming which is| it's the sport of swimming which is going to suffer but as you say, it's a bit like first aid. you've got to be able to swim. you might need to save somebody�*s life, you might need to save your own life. it's also a great, fun way to exercise. definitely. for mental health especially, swimming has help me, to help many different athletes combat so much, it's more thanjust swimming for one—sided bull to the otherfor swimming for one—sided bull to the other for that swimming for one—sided bull to the otherfor that is swimming for one—sided bull to the other for that is that element, family, community and so heartbreaking. d0 family, community and so heartbreaking.— family, community and so heartbreakinu. , ., heartbreaking. do you understand the reasons that — heartbreaking. do you understand the reasons that are _ heartbreaking. do you understand the reasons that are being _ heartbreaking. do you understand the reasons that are being given? - reasons that are being given? shortage of staff and so on, of these excuses or do you think the
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valid reasons?— valid reasons? don't think they're valid reasons? don't think they're valid reasons. _ valid reasons? don't think they're valid reasons. i— valid reasons? don't think they're valid reasons. i think— valid reasons? don't think they're valid reasons. i think swimming l valid reasons? don't think they're | valid reasons. i think swimming is valid reasons. ithink swimming is so rewarding. 0bviously adam pd, so many successful swimmers just really helped us going through, it's always good to be a sc uses —— peaty. with us pulling together with me adam peaty, where release supporting the campaign speedo just trying to get more people to swim put up one of four children are without being able to swim in that statistic is shocking. if we take away the swimming pools around the community is just swimming pools around the community isjust going to swimming pools around the community is just going to get worse. yes. isjust going to get worse. yes. that's the _ isjust going to get worse. yes. that's the point. _ isjust going to get worse. yes. that's the point. as _ isjust going to get worse. yes. that's the point. as you - isjust going to get worse. yes. that's the point. as you say, i isjust going to get worse. yes. that's the point. as you say, you've got these amazing swimmers who are providing the inspiration for a younger generation of swimmers. if facilities you are not there that inspiration is gone to waste. yes definitely- _ inspiration is gone to waste. jazz definitely. trying to inspiration is gone to waste. 123 definitely. trying to inspire more people to take it up and i think unfortunately those minority groups really struggle to have access
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anyway. let alone without the pools closing down. if anything we are not asking to build more pools, were not asking to build more pools, were not asking to build more pools, were not asking to do that we are just asking to keep the pools open so that more swimmers can have access to water. just tell us a bit about yourself. you are recently retired. it's too soon to retire is in a? i’m you are recently retired. it's too soon to retire is in a?— you are recently retired. it's too soon to retire is in a? i'm 28 and i'm soon to retire is in a? i'm 28 and i'm really ready _ soon to retire is in a? i'm 28 and i'm really ready for _ soon to retire is in a? i'm 28 and i'm really ready for the - soon to retire is in a? i'm 28 and i'm really ready for the next - soon to retire is in a? i'm 28 and i'm really ready for the next for. i'm really ready for the next for that i said when i retire i want to help the sport of swimming, get more people in the water to swim. i'm currently in the cayman islands human oceans wins with the community. it's great to see just how rewarding it is common for people to learn to swim and notjust children, adults as well. trying that skill for the first time. 0bviously, that skill for the first time. obviously, in the uk with got all these pools and am so passionate to try and get more people in there and enjoy it. ultimately, it puts a smile on peoples face. so enjoy it. ultimately, it puts a smile on peoples face. so sad to see that coal. smile on peoples face. so sad to see that goal. indeed. _ smile on peoples face. so sad to see that goal. indeed. thank _ smile on peoples face. so sad to see that goal. indeed. thank you - smile on peoples face. so sad to see that goal. indeed. thank you very i that goal. indeed. thank you very much for setting out the case for more pools. very good to talk to
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you. enjoy your retirement. not sure it's going to be a real retirement but thanks for being with us. the two candidates taking part in their sixth hustings addressing members of the tory party liz truss the front runner at the moment said that growth is essential in dealing with the current economic crisis. mr; with the current economic crisis. my tax cuts with the current economic crisis. iji tax cuts and with the current economic crisis. m tax cuts and by the with the current economic crisis. m1 tax cuts and by the way, one with the current economic crisis. m1' tax cuts and by the way, one of with the current economic crisis. m1 tax cuts and by the way, one of them is it a tax cut is not raising the tax. so i support not raising corporation tax at the same level as france was up those tax changes will cost £30 billion. that is affordable, within our current budget, we will still be able to pay debt down after three years. but i'm afraid to say, the plans of raising taxes are likely to a recession. and with a recession it will be harder
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to pay the debt down. i simply don't believe the argument that raising taxes will actually bring in more revenue. i think it's a very damaging thing to dojust revenue. i think it's a very damaging thing to do just as we have difficulties in the global economy. and none of our fellow countries in the g7 are doing this. they are actually cutting taxes at the moment. that was liz truss at the hustings tonight. rishi sunak said if he became britain's next prime minister he would offer help for people struggling with the cost of living. if you support a plan that liz is suggesting what says she doesn't believe _ suggesting what says she doesn't believe in doing that, doesn't believe — believe in doing that, doesn't believe in _ believe in doing that, doesn't believe in providing direct financial support to those groups of people. _ financial support to those groups of people, and that's what she said because — people, and that's what she said because she thinks the tax that is good _ because she thinks the tax that is good help— because she thinks the tax that is good help them, which it is not. we are going _ good help them, which it is not. we are going to— good help them, which it is not. we are going to as a conservative government leave millions of incredibly vulnerable people at the risk of— incredibly vulnerable people at the risk of real destitution. i think that— risk of real destitution. i think that is— risk of real destitution. i think that is a — risk of real destitution. i think that is a moral failure.-
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risk of real destitution. i think that is a moral failure. that is a moralfailure. rishi sunak there. that is a moralfailure. rishi sunak there- our— that is a moralfailure. rishi sunak there. our political— that is a moralfailure. rishi sunak there. our political correspondent| there. our political correspondent has been watching those hustings. the latest hustings in the story leadership race with up from the sound of it tax and the cost of living and energy cost still very much dominating this hustings. definitely. i think that's a fair assessment put up there obviously lots of issues to come up but this is the big issue that notjust this hustings but also at this race to become the next conservative leader, to become the next prime minister. 0n to become the next prime minister. on that liz truss are getting stuck to her guns that her priority was to cut taxes was that she talked about reversing the increasing national insurance and also suspending green levies on peoples energy bills. she was asked what immediate help which he give it as soon a sheet potentially becomes prime minister. that is a question basically asking if she would give direct support hand—outs, whatever you want to call it to people on the lowest incomes and pensioners who would benefit for
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tax cuts a question she sidestepped tonight, not particularly engage directly, it's what she's been doing the past few days but previously she said she doesn't rule it out but she doesn't think that is the best way to help people in this situation. she is adamant that cutting taxes, creating growth in the economy, which he said is one of her priorities for the first 90 days, if she does become prime minister was the way to help people. she also talked about the potential of us sleepwalking or talking ourselves into a recession. so on that she would not go any further than what she had before. she was also asked about windfall taxes, again she rejected that idea and she said that the conservatives shouldn't see profits as a dirty word. she said that windfall taxes and taxes in general could make it less appetising for businesses to invest in the uk and she wanted to steer
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clear of that. in contrast rishi sunak, he was very keen to attack liz truss is plans, he said tax cuts would not help the most vulnerable. as you heard there in that clip said it could lead to destitution if people are now. he says that he will give people support through hand—outs, those the most vulnerable on lower incomes and pensions. he defended tax and corporations saying it was only fair to tax big businesses because they are the large businesses that can handle those taxes. he said it was a compassionate conservative thing to do to help those who are the most vulnerable in society with their energy bills. vulnerable in society with their energy bills-— vulnerable in society with their ener: bills. . , . energy bills. thank you very much for that assessment _ energy bills. thank you very much for that assessment of _ energy bills. thank you very much for that assessment of the - energy bills. thank you very much for that assessment of the latest l for that assessment of the latest hustings in the race to beat the next conservative party leader and the next prime minister. let's pause and look at the weather forecast. hello there. the heatwave is just set to continue
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for the vast majority of us across the uk as we head through the rest of this week. here are some of the temperatures that we've been seeing so far. they will continue to climb, peaking at 37 celsius for some by the time we get to saturday. this is prolonged, sustained heat, hot days and warm nights in between, rather than a short, sharp spike in record—breaking temperatures as we saw back injuly. it's uncomfortable for many, it's dangerous for some, and there is a met office weather warning in place. it's an amber warning, the second highest level of alert for extreme heat, and it's valid until the end of the day on sunday, for most of england, as far north as manchester, leeds and sheffield and also into eastern wales as well. so this is overnight tonight. now, it's not hot everywhere. we've still got weather fronts out towards the northwest of scotland — cooler and cloudier here. some low cloud, too, for eastern coastal areas, perhaps, at times, but for many, clear skies and it's going to feel warmer too. temperatures may not drop below 18 or 19 celsius, particular towards the south coast of wales and towards the south
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of england as well, so an uncomfortable night for sleeping. and this is where the hot air is all coming from, the near continent on an easterly breeze, and that will continue to strengthen throughout the day on friday, perhaps driving some of this cloud out into the north sea onshore towards coastal areas, perhaps limiting the temperatures here somewhat. so, lower temperatures for eastern scotland tomorrow. elsewhere, blue sky and lots of strong sunshine. highs of 34, 35 celsius for parts of the west midlands, through the cotswolds, hampshire, surrey and west london, perhaps, and it's in the same sort of areas that we'll see the highest temperatures again on saturday, possibly peaking at 36 or even 37 celsius. but low pressure is towards the south. our high pressure is gradually going to move its way eastwards, so let's take a look at the outlook for our capital cities over the next few days. we start to introduce a bit more cloud on sunday. it's still very hot towards the south, temperatures in the low 30s, but it will turn cooler, fresher—feeling as we head into the start of next week.
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and there's the chance of seeing some heavy, thundery downpours, too, with that very unstable air. some of those showers could be heavy and slow—moving. welcome rain for areas that have been very dry for a while.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. the us attorney general has confirmed he personally approved a search of donald trump's property and has asked a florida court to make the warrant public. the department filed the motion to make public the warrant and receipt in light of the former president's public confirmation of the search, the surrounding circumstances and the surrounding circumstances and the substantial public interest in this matter. europe is in the grip of the worst drought since the 16th century. the french president says his country has seen nothing like it, with hundreds of firefighter still battling wildfires in the south west of the country. there has been more shelling of europe's biggest nuclear plant, in ukraine.
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the us state department has called for a demiliterized zone to be set

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