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tv   Outside Source Special  BBC News  July 7, 2022 7:00pm-10:01pm BST

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i'm ros atkins, i'm live with you from downing street. borisjohnson has been forced out by his own party — he'll stand aside as leader and as prime minister once his successor is chosen. after a string of further government resignations first thing this morning, he made the announcement in downing street surrounded by family and colleagues. i want you to know how sad i am to be giving up the bestjob in the world. but them's the breaks. mrjohnson made clear he'd wanted to stay in office — but was left with no choice but to go.
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as but to go. we have seen at westminster, the herd as we have seen at westminster, the herd instinct is powerful. when the herd instinct is powerful. when the herd moves, it moves. and, my friends, in politics, no one is remotely indispensable. mew friends, in politics, no one is remotely indispensable. new cabinet ministers have _ remotely indispensable. new cabinet ministers have been _ remotely indispensable. new cabinet ministers have been appointed - remotely indispensable. new cabinet ministers have been appointed to - ministers have been appointed to those who had resigned in the last couple of days. mrjohnson says any major decisions will be left for the next government. but the opposition and a growing number within his own party — think he should leave number 10 now. thank you forjoining me here in downing street on bbc news. i will be here for the next three hours. if you have questions about what is playing out in uk politics, i think we all do, send them my way. you can do that via twitter and if i cannot help out, i will be speaking to
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people who definitely can. borisjohnson will stand down as prime minister and leader of the conservative leader in time. the question is when. have a listen closely to what the prime minister said, at the podium outside downing street, earlier today. it is clearly now of the will of the parliamentary conservative party that there should be a new leader of that party and therefore a new prime minister, and i've agreed with sir graham brady, the chairman of our backbench mps that the process of choosing that new leader should begin now and the timetable will be announced next week. and i've today appointed a cabinet to serve, as i will, until a new leader is in place. so let's be clear. borisjohnson is not stepping down now, as leader of the conservatives or the country. it is the process he has kick—started with a timetable that will be confirmed next week, monday, we
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think. borisjohnson wants to remain prime minister until the autumn when a successor would take over. but that timetable is already under pressure. james duddridge mp is one of his closest aides — and was in no ten when borisjohnson resigned. he will not be there by the conservative party conference, we will have a new leader. to a degree, it's not a matter for the prime minister, it's a matterfor the party chairman, in coordination with the 1922 committee and sir graham brady. speaking informally to colleagues, i won't speak for them, you can get them here, they're wanting a faster process, particularly on the parliamentary side because this is the penultimate week of parliament. it's important that we talk with potential leadership candidates, people talk about the future and what we've got wrong, how we want to reposition ourselves and that really needs to happen whilst we're here physically in the building, talking to one another face—to—face.
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so, if the question this time yesterday when i was talking to you word mrjohnson go? the question now is how long will this process to replace him take and who will replace him take and who will replace him? we will get into the candidates a little later, those we know about but let's stick to the timetable for now. the former conservative prime ministerjohn major has said it would be "unwise" for borisjohnson to stay in office until the autumn. sirjohn wrote a letter to the chairman of the 1922 committee of backbench conservative mps, and warns that mrjohnson would continue to have "the power to make decisions which will affect the lives of those within all four nations of the united kingdom and further afield" despite losing the support of his mps and ministers. he outlines two possible solutions. either the deputy prime minister should take over on an �*acting basis�* or "the 1922 committee should arrange for the new leader of the party to be elected solely by mps, with the winner being installed as prime minister, and then endorsed by party members".
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so in effect, cancelling the vote by the tory party members, and shortening the whole process. because what normally happens in a series of votes, the conservative mps were told the candidates down to two and then those two contest with the party members deciding the winner. sirjohn is saying neither of these options are ideal but is suggesting one of them. many of borisjohnson�*s mps were quick to say he should go without delay. listen to this. might it not be in everybody�*s interest to speed up the transition as much as we possibly can? it will not be tenable for him to continue as a caretaker if he cannot fill the ministerial appointments he needs to. what's happened is ministers have seen, well, they've referred - to a lack of honesty and integrity and we clearly can't have that. l it's much better the pm goes now than dragging on to the privileges committee for potentially finding that he'd knowingly misled - the house, because that. would have been a disaster. this is not really sustainable till the autumn, given the extent of the lack of confidence that the parliamentary party's expressed.
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but, you know, so it's not really for the prime minister to set that timetable, to be honest. this is not about individual promotion, it's not about individual personalities, it's about restoring confidence fast in our system of government and that is urgent and it can't be delayed for two orthree months — it needs to start tonight. i was saying to those of you watching, if you have questions, send them my way. one person said, what is all that shouting in the background? there is the gates of downing street who clearly has a lot of energy and is keen to make themselves heard. i am afraid i don't know who they are. let's look at the key dates. the 1922 committee will elect a new executive on monday. should mps want to put pressure on borisjohnson, the committee could then decide to change the rules to allow for another confidence vote sooner than the one—year timescale that the current rules allow. the next key date —
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parliament ends for the summer two weeks today — on thursday 21stjuly. the conservative party conference begins 2nd october in birmingham — but as we're hearing a successor could be in place well before that. even some of mrjohnson�*s allies are saying they think september is realistic. there are other conservative mps — plenty of them on the bbc today — who say borisjohnson should get his way on this and remain as prime minister for several months more until a successor is chosen. have a listen. i think he should stay. this has been a very disruptive period and i think more disruption would not be welcome — both for those people running businesses and in the country and for their wider national security situation in europe. there are no ideal outcomes but it has been the case in the past that where a prime minister steps down, they stay in office pending the election of a successor. so i think that's the only viable option now. i do think that the pm should stay
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on and we should govern the wayl we need to because, as you can imagine, we still need to pass. policy, pass laws and it's important that we have a cabinet in position. and we have ministers there to be able to deliver on that. _ the leadership election and process should happen i think as quickly as it reasonably can. we've got to make sure we make the right choice but we should do it as quickly as we're reasonably able to. there's a big difference between being a prime minister, he was only talking a few weeks ago about serving until the 2030s, versus just acting in a caretaker capacity for a short period of time, not introducing new policy. the opposition labour party is following this closely. its leader keir starmer is calling for boris johnson to go immediately. he needs to go, he can't cling on in this way. his own party have finally concluded that he's unfit to be prime minister. they can't now inflict him on the country for the next few months. it's obvious he's unfit to be prime minister, that's been blindingly obvious
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for a very, very long time. and if they don't get rid of him, then labour will step up — in the national interest — and bring a vote of no confidence, because we can't go on with this prime minister clinging on for months and months to come. so perhaps unsurprisingly, keir starmer being very clear that he doesn't think borisjohnson can stay on for a couple of months or more whilst the process plays out. and that threat that labour might call a parliamentary confidence vote could be interesting. that's a vote in which mps from all parties decide whether they want the government to continue. the institute for government says... but if the motion was put forward by labour, it would require a significant rebellion from conservative mps. bearin bear in mind borisjohnson has a sizeable majority. it's not clear that many
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of them want a general election any time soon. let's speak to shadow secretary of state for foreign, commonwealth and development affaris, david lammy. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. thank you, great to join you. do thank you very much for your time. thank you, great to join you. thank you, great to 'oin you. do you think that this _ thank you, great to join you. do you think that this matter _ thank you, great to join you. do you think that this matter should - thank you, great to join you. do you think that this matter should be - thank you, great to join you. do you think that this matter should be put| think that this matter should be put to the house of commons, if boris johnson doesn't agree to go immediately? i johnson doesn't agree to go immediately?— johnson doesn't agree to go immediately? johnson doesn't agree to go immediatel ? ~ ., ., immediately? i think we are in a constitutionally _ immediately? i think we are in a constitutionally very _ immediately? i think we are in a constitutionally very different. constitutionally very different position to when david cameron and theresa may recently stepped down as prime minister. there there was a profound sense of policy difference and it was felt they couldn't take the country forward. on this occasion, we've got a situation of no confidence in borisjohnson because his integrity, his credibility, his rule breaking has led to a situation in which his own party, backbenchers and ministers have lost confidence in him. hold on
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a moment--- — have lost confidence in him. hold on a moment... there _ have lost confidence in him. hold on a moment... there are _ have lost confidence in him. hold on a moment... there are whole - a moment... there are whole government _ a moment... there are whole government departments... i a moment... there are whole i government departments... this a moment... there are whole - government departments... this was their situation _ government departments... this was their situation theresa _ government departments... this was their situation theresa may _ government departments... this was their situation theresa may was - government departments... this was their situation theresa may was in, i their situation theresa may was in, she was told by sir graham brady that mps had lost confidence in her. i think there is a real situation now where the labour party may well have to force a vote of no confidence and force members of parliament to demonstrate whether they truly have confidence in this man who has lost all shred of credibility. and let me say this in my capacity as shadow foreign secretary. last summer, we had the breaking, awful situation in afghanistan. there are very serious issues that can arise in a very tough geopolitical environment. we need a serious government to continue to take us forward, with rising inflation and stagnation in our economy. so for all those reasons, this is a time to get serious. i think the conservative party should heed the words of the
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former prime ministerjohn major in indicating that really borisjohnson is not fit to serve a day longer. but as i recall, the labour party was notjust critical of boris johnson during their withdrawal from afghanistan but also of dominic raab. now if the prime minister were to stand down, in the short term the person most people would turn to would be the deputy prime minister while that election of a new leader was going ahead. is that something that you would want?— was going ahead. is that something that you would want? well, we have a first amongst — that you would want? well, we have a first amongst equals _ that you would want? well, we have a first amongst equals situation - that you would want? well, we have a first amongst equals situation in - first amongst equals situation in our constitutional arrangements. so you are right, dominic rav is deputy prime minister. he was incompetent and incapable, he was in crete on holiday and we criticise him for that reason. however, we did not raise personal issues of integrity and probity and rule breaking in relation to dominic raab. but in the end, we as the official opposition have been clear, the british people now need a choice, we are ready for
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a general election, let's get on with it. we have had 12 years of the conservatives. our economy feels busted at this moment for many people up and down the country. let's put this to the people, have a general election, it's myjudgment general election, it's my judgment andindeed general election, it's myjudgment and indeed both the polls, the by—elections and the last council elections demonstrate that labour would be forming the next government and i suspect that's why the conservatives want to stretch this as long as possible.— as long as possible. right now do ou think as long as possible. right now do you think this _ as long as possible. right now do you think this country _ as long as possible. right now do you think this country needs - as long as possible. right now do i you think this country needs another election? theresa may called an early election in 2017, boris johnson called one not long after he took over from theresa may in 2019. do we need another election in 2022? shouldn't we let this term play out? after all, when people vote, they vote for their mps who in turn form a government. if the conservatives have a functioning majority in the house of commons, shouldn't they be able to continued until the end of that term? d0 able to continued until the end of that term?— that term? do we need a prime minister that _ that term? do we need a prime minister that rule _ that term? do we need a prime minister that rule breaks, - that term? do we need a prime minister that rule breaks, thatl that term? do we need a prime l minister that rule breaks, that we can't trust question what do we need
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a prime minister... that can't trust question what do we need a prime minister. . ._ a prime minister... that is a separate _ a prime minister... that is a separate question. - a prime minister... that is a separate question. i'm - a prime minister... that is a l separate question. i'm saying a prime minister... that is a i separate question. i'm saying if a prime minister... that is a - separate question. i'm saying if he was replaced would it not be satisfactory?— was replaced would it not be satisfactory? was replaced would it not be satisfacto ? ~ ., , �* ., satisfactory? met with a kgb agent, that is a situation _ satisfactory? met with a kgb agent, that is a situation before _ satisfactory? met with a kgb agent, that is a situation before us. - that is a situation before us. clearly the country does not need borisjohnson. that is the immediate concern. so for us as an official opposition, what we can do is bring a vote of no confidence, to bring this to a head. not on our own behalf but on behalf of the british people that now want to see the back of borisjohnson. fine people that now want to see the back of boris johnson.— people that now want to see the back of boris johnson. one more question, i 'ust want of boris johnson. one more question, ijust want to — of boris johnson. one more question, i just want to understand _ of boris johnson. one more question, i just want to understand the - i just want to understand the position of labour. i know you want borisjohnson gone immediately but is your preferred option the deputy prime minister takes over temporarily? or is your preferred option that borisjohnson stands down and there is a general election?— down and there is a general election? ., ., , election? our favourite is the second but — election? our favourite is the second but we _ election? our favourite is the second but we will— election? our favourite is the second but we will live - election? our favourite is the second but we will live with l election? our favourite is the l second but we will live with the first as long as borisjohnson has gone. first as long as boris johnson has one. first as long as boris johnson has tone. ., , ., ~' first as long as boris johnson has tone. ., , ., 4' ,., first as long as boris johnson has tone. ., , ., 4' y., , gone. david lammy, thank you very much forjoining _ gone. david lammy, thank you very much forjoining us _ gone. david lammy, thank you very much forjoining us live _ gone. david lammy, thank you very much forjoining us live on - gone. david lammy, thank you very much forjoining us live on bbc - much forjoining us live on bbc
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news. you arejoining us here as we can disown you our coverage of boris johnson announcing he will step down as leader of the conservative party. there is ongoing coverage on the bbc live page, full of information. as i was arriving to get ready for this broadcast an hour or so ago, just as i was approaching the gates of downing street, heading in the other direction was nigel faraj. former leader of the uk independence party and — along with borisjohnson — one of the main proponents of brexit. he was here in his capacity of contributing to gb news and he was a key proponent of brexit, not always aligned with borisjohnson but they both wanted brexit and this is what i asked him when he came out of the gate. inevitable. it had to happen. confidence had collapsed. notjust in westminster but actually over half of the conservative voters had had enough. something had to happen. for him, on a personal level, it's sad, but it gives the conservative
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party a chance to rethink and reset. and that this isn't just about dishonesty. it isn'tjust about covering up. he was elected as a conservative and governed as a liberal, and that's upset a lot of people in the country. what are you looking for, from the new conservative leader? well, that's up to them, but... you will have views on it. i would like to see somebody who decides that brexit needs to be completed. we've got half a brexit. it's not really working fully. borisjohnson says that he's got brexit done. no, no, no. we've got over the line in terms of leaving. there's a heck of a lot to do. by by the way, as the fallout from boris johnson's statement by the way, as the fallout from borisjohnson's statement earlier continues, i boris johnson's statement earlier continues, i can borisjohnson's statement earlier continues, i can see boris johnson's statement earlier continues, i can see jacob rees—mogg, one ofjohnson's most staunch allies, the minister for brexit opportunities has told channel 4, brexit opportunities has told channellt, rishi brexit opportunities has told channel 4, rishi sunak was not a successful chancellor, he was a high tax chancellor. we can expect the issue of tax to be central as this leadership contest plays out. now
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let's consider how this announcement may be going down around the country. joining me is sirjohn curtice, who's professor of politics at the university of strathclyde. thank you very much forjoining me here on the bbc. how do we go about gauging the impact of boris johnson's announcement today on the politics and the attitudes of people around the country?— around the country? well, i guess there are a _ around the country? well, i guess there are a couple _ around the country? well, i guess there are a couple of _ around the country? well, i guess there are a couple of things - around the country? well, i guess there are a couple of things that l there are a couple of things that come out of the polls so far. one is before the announcement at lunchtime today, what did voters want to happen? in particular, what those who voted for borisjohnson in 2019 want to happen? the truth is we already knew yesterday that a majority of conservative voters thought that boris johnson should majority of conservative voters thought that borisjohnson should go and it is the first time we have had and it is the first time we have had a majority of them saying that and it also indicated even a majority of conservative members, members of the conservative members, members of the conservative party, were of that view. and the polls confirm that
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they think he was right to resign they think he was right to resign the steps of even amongst those who voted for the conservatives in 2019, this is a welcome announcement. the second question, on which we have the first little piece of evidence but it is early days, is what impact, if any, but it is early days, is what impact, ifany, have but it is early days, is what impact, if any, have the events of the last 48 hours in which we have seen resignation after resignation and minister after minister admit they have had doubts about boris johnson for a while and have now decided that he should go, what's been the impact of what some people would call chaos? we have had one poll today, the conservatives down to 31%. that is as bad as it was during the height of the partygate scandal in the middle ofjanuary, though no worse than that. so early days yet to know whether or not this has pushed conservative support even lower than what it has been in the course of the last six months but it is certainly on that first
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indication not terribly good and undermines the potential problem facing whoever becomes the next conservative leader. —— margaret underlines the potential problem. i was alluding to the fact tax will be one of the issues that dominate this leadership contest. i'm sure the form brexit takes in the coming years will be another one, perhaps immigration will also be a factor. when those leadership contenders are considering what tory voters want, what can you tell them and tell us about the priorities for likely conservative voters at the moment? well, it remains... it still is the case that conservative voters are less keen than labour voters on spending more on taxes and therefore spending more on taxes and therefore spending more on public services. but we should however remember it has been the case from before the advent of covid that the public have reacted against the austerity of
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much of the 2010s. so we are talking about conservative voters but we are also talking about the public in general, where three fifths of voters thinking public spending should go up and taxation should go up should go up and taxation should go up as a result. that is the first consideration because of the second consideration because of the second consideration is about what should happen to brexit, particularly the arguments here is should we indeed now be using the fact that we have negotiated a hard brexit in order to move away from the european union as far as migration is a concern? i think one has to say that the record is much more mixed, even among those who voted leave. ask them whether or not we should stop the regulations, which actually we've done on mobile data roaming when people are abroad. people say we should keep the regulations like that. do people think we should be scrapping the eu regulations on what happens if a phone... if a regulations on what happens if a phone... ifa plane regulations on what happens if a phone... if a plane gets cancelled in barcelona and you are stuck
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because of that cancellation, people don't think you should get rid of that. the mood on regulation is perhaps rather more subtle than many conservative politicians seem to realise. if voters think that a regulation is actually good for consumers they tend to back it, even if you tell them that it's the european union regulation. so i think that the conservative party needs to be aware that there perhaps isn't the mood for the bonfire regulations on the scale and at least as a principal in the way that some conservative politicians seem to think, voters seem to judge the merits of any changes of regulation on the basis of the merit of the change rather than on the fact that it simply takes us further away from the european union. sir it simply takes us further away from the european union.— the european union. sirjohn, invaluable _ the european union. sirjohn, invaluable as _ the european union. sirjohn, invaluable as ever. _ the european union. sirjohn, invaluable as ever. thank- the european union. sirjohn, invaluable as ever. thank you j the european union. sirjohn, i invaluable as ever. thank you for joining us on bbc news. here is some detailfrom a reporterfor joining us on bbc news. here is some detail from a reporter for bloomberg uk, who has found out about some
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conversations happening here in downing street after mrjohnson's statement. he said borisjohnson told his staff he acted like a japanese soldier in the world war hiding in the woods. mrjensen joked he had acted like these japanese soldiers before realising on thursday morning that he had to go. this was darren dani apparently in a conversation at 4pm with his team in downing street, so a few hours after he announced he was stepping down. according to two people present who spoke on the condition of anonymity. but mrjohnson stilljoking with his staff even though he had decided to go. the process of selecting a new conservative leader effectively begins now and the timetable will be decided by the leadership of the 1922 committee. we have talked a lot about it this way can they represent backbench conservative mps. the rules — as they stand today — are that any candidate needs the support of eight conservative
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mps to take part at all. some in the party say that bar should be raised — one saying a "wacky races" contest with lots of candidates should be avoided. the candidates then get whittled down to two over several rounds of voting just amongst conservative mps. only then does the wider membership of the conservative party get to have its say — and in a final run—off to decide the winner. before that process begin, two big conservative names have already said they won't be running. the deputy prime minister dominic raab and michael gove who was sacked just under 24 hours ago by borisjohnson, he is saying he won't be running for mrjohnson to resign yesterday and as i was mentioning was sacked in return. now this is who is running. the first person to throw their hat into the ring is the uk's attorney
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general. i into the ring is the uk's attorney general. . , , , ., ., general. i am putting myself forward because i believe _ general. i am putting myself forward because i believe that _ general. i am putting myself forward because i believe that their - general. i am putting myself forward because i believe that their 2019 i because i believe that their 2019 manifesto is fit for purpose, is... presents a bold and inspiring vision of our country. i want to deliver on the promises contained in that manifesto. the promises contained in that manifesto-— the promises contained in that manifesto. ~ ., manifesto. next, the mp for high combe manifesto. next, the mp for high wycombe steve _ manifesto. next, the mp for high wycombe steve baker, _ manifesto. next, the mp for high wycombe steve baker, a - manifesto. next, the mp for high wycombe steve baker, a leading| wycombe steve baker, a leading brexit air. he has also gone on to the record outlining his leadership ambitions. �* , �* , ., _ ambitions. because i'm seriously considering _ ambitions. because i'm seriously considering standing _ ambitions. because i'm seriously considering standing because i considering standing because conservative home members consistently put me in the top ten so i should respect them and that seriously. b. so i should respect them and that seriousl . �* , ., , so i should respect them and that seriousl . �* , ., seriously. a number of boris johnson and that former _ seriously. a number of boris johnson and that former and _ seriously. a number of boris johnson and that former and current - seriously. a number of boris johnson and that former and current cabinetl and that former and current cabinet members are tipped as potential successors. former chancellor of the exchequer rishi sunak is one. that mirror was reported he is setting up a temporary office. the bbc has not confirmed that. former health secretary sajid javid is also a contender. they both resigned on tuesday and escalated the process of borisjohnson being kicked out. they
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paved the way for a stream of ministerial resignations, as you will have been following. sajid javid previously bid for the leadership in 2019 i made it to the finalfour before he leadership in 2019 i made it to the final four before he dropped out and supported mrjohnson, who of course went on to win. earlier today our correspondence nick eardley reported sajid javid seriously considering running to be leader and if he becomes leader, he will be prime minister. rishi sunak once seen as a definite future conservative leader, the last few months have been rocky for his reputation, dented by his wife's tax affairs in his resignation this week seems to have reenergised his leadership hopes. on tuesday evening he was replaced by nadhim zahawi, who by wednesday evening was already calling on mr johnson to quit privately. by thursday morning, he was doing it publicly as well. he is seen as another contender for the top job.
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one mp worked with nadhim zahawi at the department for education and here she is and whether she would support him to be the next prime minister. he support him to be the next prime minister. , ., ., ., ., minister. he is a great man and somebody _ minister. he is a great man and somebody i _ minister. he is a great man and somebody i have _ minister. he is a great man and somebody i have worked i minister. he is a great man and somebody i have worked very, l minister. he is a great man and i somebody i have worked very, very closely read, got very keen priorities and is an all—round good quy- priorities and is an all—round good guy. but obviously there are a lot of conversations going on at the moment, a lot of phone calls, so my decision hasn't been made. but i do think nadhim zahawi is a very good man and were put the interests of the country first. this is a long list of contenders, let's continue the stop transport minister grant shapps we are told is considering his own leadership bid, according to the pa news agency. bearin according to the pa news agency. bear in mind last night he was part of that delegation of cabinet ministers who came to number 10 and advised borisjohnson that he should stand down. next we should talk about foreign secretary liz truss. she has been on a work trip to bali for a g20 foreign ministers meeting. she has cut that trip short. she is also considered a contender although hasn't indicated if she would stand.
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most of those names feature in this poll carried out by you gerv, published just before mrjohnson announced his resignation fostered here is what they found. we managed to contact, there _ here is what they found. we managed to contact, there were _ here is what they found. we managed to contact, there were 700 _ to contact, there were 700 conservative party members over night last night. we found ben wallace leads the pack. the pack is very, very condensed. he is up there with 13% of current support among conservative members. just behind him is penny mordaunt on 12%. so a tight race forfirst him is penny mordaunt on 12%. so a tight race for first and second. third places rishi sunak, he has just 10%. third places rishi sunak, he has just10%. he third places rishi sunak, he has just 10%. he has rebounded a little bit since the last time we asked this question and his resignation has got him more favour with the party and the public that at the crucial thing we have been able to do is we were also able to do head—to—heads. to simulate that eventual run—off that they will be put to in front of the membership when they are whittled down by the mps. what we found is ben wallace beats all other candidates we put into those run—off simulations by
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huge margins, we're talking 20% victories over rishi sunak, liz truss and jeremy hunt. he is in a very strong position right now with the party membership. we very strong position right now with the party membership.— very strong position right now with the party membership. we are going to talk about — the party membership. we are going to talk about that _ the party membership. we are going to talk about that in _ the party membership. we are going to talk about that in just _ the party membership. we are going to talk about that in just a _ the party membership. we are going to talk about that in just a moment. | to talk about that in just a moment. they will quickly mention rafael nadal is confirming he is withdrawing from wimbledon with injury. nick kyrios we'll make it through. rafael nadal out of wimbledon with an injury. we were talking about ben wallace, the defence secretary. he was the most popular with conservative party members in that poll. he hasn't announced whether he will run yet but he had this to say about the next leader.— but he had this to say about the next leader. , ~ , ., , next leader. this prime minister was the first prime _ next leader. this prime minister was the first prime minister— next leader. this prime minister was the first prime minister in _ next leader. this prime minister was the first prime minister in a - the first prime minister in a generation to actually reverse taking money out of defence and putting it into investment. the record £24 billion has gone into defence over a four year period and thatis defence over a four year period and that is the first time in most
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people' generation of a proper return to investment. until then, from 1991 when i was serving, chancellor after chancellor took a dividend. they take dill kept taking it when the world got more dangerous. i will look to the next prime minister to make sure they continue to invest in our defence. now as he has been the last couple of nights, rob watson is with me in downing street fostered good evening. downing street fostered good evenina. ,., ., ., �* evening. good evening. ifi don't see the 24 _ evening. good evening. ifi don't see the 24 hours, _ evening. good evening. ifi don't see the 24 hours, everything i see the 24 hours, everything changes. what will happen this time? it feels a bit like that, doesn't it? talk to me about ben wallace, he is clearly going down well at the moment with conservative party members about what is his reputation with the conservative party and he's because that is the first hurdle they might have to clear? iie because that is the first hurdle they might have to clear? he is --oular they might have to clear? he is popular and _ they might have to clear? he is popular and they _ they might have to clear? he is popular and they reckon - they might have to clear? he is popular and they reckon he i they might have to clear? he is popular and they reckon he is l they might have to clear? he: 3 popular and they reckon he is having a good war and everyone has to be careful about using that phrase but everyone says he has handled the issue of ukraine well, he is popular with fellow mps. i think he has been very lucky and never holding one of
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those government posts that tend to make a very unpopular when you are either cutting people's money or asking for more. i am pretty sure that he voted remain, he campaigned for that in 2016, so whether that might be a problem for some of those in the party given the conservatives are now out and out pro brexit party, might be a bit of an issue. and the fact he hasn't held any of the other really, really high posts. it is interesting that some people are calling for the threshold of eight mps to be pushed up because people are concerned aboutjust how wide this field is? you cannot help thinking that, even with that, you think about it, 350 odd conservative mps, i'm sure they will be able to whittle it down to two, whether they have to face six, seven, eight, nine candidates, and what is fascinating about the races help open it is. i have spoken to lots of conservative mps trying to nail them down who's going to be the
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next prime minister and they can't tell you. next prime minister and they can't tell ou. �* , . ., next prime minister and they can't tell ou. �*, . ., ., tell you. let's reflect on what boris johnson _ tell you. let's reflect on what boris johnson said. _ tell you. let's reflect on what boris johnson said. in - tell you. let's reflect on what boris johnson said. in so i tell you. let's reflect on what l boris johnson said. in so many tell you. let's reflect on what - boris johnson said. in so many words borisjohnson said. in so many words he was pointing out, look how successful i was as leader of your party, getting us there is majority in the house of commons, he didn't say so but it felt like he was pointing out that anyone following him might struggle to match that. that is the point he has been making all along. the point he was trying to make in these last couple of days to make in these last couple of days to say to conservative ministers, i'm the one who won this massive election, celebrity turned politician, none of you do that. and if you look at the history of recent elections, he has got a point. he won a brexit referendum persuading people to turn out and vote who never voted, and persuaded people who haven't voted conservative or rarely voted to vote for him in 2019, so absolutely his successor is going to have a challenge, but the justification the conservative party has by getting rid of him is that he had become that most toxic and weird
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thing in politics, and unpopular populist. me thing in politics, and unpopular --oulist. ~ ., ,, populist. we will leave you there for a moment. _ populist. we will leave you there for a moment. we _ populist. we will leave you there for a moment. we will _ populist. we will leave you there for a moment. we will be - populist. we will leave you there for a moment. we will be talking populist. we will leave you there i for a moment. we will be talking to you through the evening. joining me is laura heseltine, the former deputy prime minister. —— lord heseltine. would you like boris johnson to go straightaway? why are you not persuaded by those who argue that he should remain in office just as his predecessors have done when they knew that they were departing �*s they knew that they were departing 's because of the lack of trust in boris is precisely _ 's because of the lack of trust in boris is precisely that. - 's because of the lack of trust in boris is precisely that. lack i 's because of the lack of trust in boris is precisely that. lack of l boris is precisely that. lack of trust. so, leaving him in a position where he can use the power of the premiership to suit his own causes and his own interests is a very dangerous thing to do, and it will
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merely perpetuate the uncertainty. much more sensible is to adopt rules which speed up the process, and to put in place the deputy prime minister, who has said he does not intend to stand, so he is perfectly reasonably placed to do that. but it is noticeable _ reasonably placed to do that. but it is noticeable that _ reasonably placed to do that. but it is noticeable that all— reasonably placed to do that. but it is noticeable that all of— reasonably placed to do that. but it is noticeable that all of those i is noticeable that all of those cabinet ministers who we know yesterday went to speak to boris johnson to say look, it is time for you to go, are not coming out today and saying, it is time for you to go now. ., ., ., a .,, ., and saying, it is time for you to go now. ., ., ., ., , ., ., now. you have asked me i opinion and i am aaivin now. you have asked me i opinion and i am giving it — now. you have asked me i opinion and i am giving it to _ now. you have asked me i opinion and i am giving it to you. _ now. you have asked me i opinion and i am giving it to you. i _ now. you have asked me i opinion and i am giving it to you. i agree _ now. you have asked me i opinion and i am giving it to you. i agree with i i am giving it to you. i agree with whatjohn major has been saying as well. what john ma'or has been saying as well. �* ., _ what john ma'or has been saying as well. �* ., , . well. but he would say such as the situation that _ well. but he would say such as the situation that it _ well. but he would say such as the situation that it is _ well. but he would say such as the situation that it is better— well. but he would say such as the situation that it is better for i well. but he would say such as the situation that it is better for mps l situation that it is better for mps to work this out quickly. i situation that it is better for mps to work this out quickly.- to work this out quickly. i agree with that as _ to work this out quickly. i agree with that as well, _ to work this out quickly. i agree with that as well, because i i to work this out quickly. i agree | with that as well, because i think what has happened, if you have this process of going to the membership
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of the tory party, you get a very slanted electorate, a rather more extreme electric band the bulk of the tory vote, and an even more extreme electric than the centre ground of british politics where elections, by and large, are one. you have been critical of boris johnson's character, leadership and signature policy, brexit. what are your expectations of a new conservative leader? shirley even though he is departing the party is now within his mould and that signature policy and commitment to a particular type of euroscepticism isn't going to suddenly change. that isn't going to suddenly change. that is the judgment that the party has got to make. i understand the argument that, in the red seats, talking about bureaucrats and foreigners and immigrants and all of that has a certain attraction, —— the red wall seats. but i think that
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has been blown because what they are really interested in the standards of living and they know perfectly well that the economy is in a mess. but what you have to do is balance the south of england where we have seen three devastating by—election losses and a part of the reason for thatis losses and a part of the reason for that is precisely brexit, and so, if the tory party want to reposition themselves to win from the centre ground, they have got to stop this ridiculous idea of the right—wing of europe as a lot of bureaucrats impeding our progress. i’m impeding our progress. i'm interested _ impeding our progress. i'm interested that you think the tiverton by—election result is connected to brexit. isn't it not the case that difficulties playing out are connected to borisjohnson and his character, and if he departs the stage, perhaps, the conservative party can maintain its policy approach and still flourish in the south of england? you approach and still flourish in the south of england?— south of england? you miss the oint. south of england? you miss the point- brexit — south of england? you miss the point. brexit was _
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south of england? you miss the point. brexit was based - south of england? you miss the point. brexit was based on i south of england? you miss the point. brexit was based on a i south of england? you miss the i point. brexit was based on a pack of lies. from that moment on, we have seen this duplicity as a central characteristic of his government. so you cannot separate the bits off. you either want integrity and truth or you are prepared to put up with something less, and people have come to a view that they don't want to do that so the new leader has got to command respect, truth and integrity, and if you start beating the nationalist, xenophobic drum of brexit you will never succeed in getting that. brexit you will never succeed in getting that-— brexit you will never succeed in getting that. brexit you will never succeed in ttettin that. ., ., ., getting that. you are saying that it was built on _ getting that. you are saying that it was built on a _ getting that. you are saying that it was built on a pack _ getting that. you are saying that it was built on a pack of _ getting that. you are saying that it was built on a pack of lies - getting that. you are saying that it was built on a pack of lies and i was built on a pack of lies and there was an element of xenophobia but we saw in 2019 when boris johnson said he would get brexit done he won a sizeable majority in the house of commons. haven't you got to respect that they can serve the party tapped into a desire in this country to leave the european union, a desire that hasn't gone away? union, a desire that hasn't gone awa ? �* . . union, a desire that hasn't gone awa?�* ., ., ~ ., union, a desire that hasn't gone awa ? �* ., ., ~' ., , union, a desire that hasn't gone awa? ._, away? i'm afraid i know why people voted for brexit. _ away? i'm afraid i know why people voted for brexit. they _ away? i'm afraid i know why people voted for brexit. they were - away? i'm afraid i know why people voted for brexit. they were told i voted for brexit. they were told that we would get our country back.
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well, self—evidently, it hasn't done that. we were told that there would be a considerable boost to our economy. the economy is now shown to be the least effective in europe except for russia. we were told that there would be no border on the rsc and actually we have got trouble in the irish sea. we were told that we would be able to unite the united kingdom and we have actually now got sinn fein the largest party in northern ireland and the scottish nationalists asking for a second referendum so the whole thing is collapsing like a pack of cards. lord heseltine, we will leave it there, and your analysis of the state of the country would be contested by borisjohnson and his supporters who would deny that some of the circumstances you are describing are not directly connected to brexit, although some certainly are. thank you forjoining us, lord heseltine. let's turn away from politics for a little while. rafael nadal has withdrawn from
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wimbledon after failing to recover from that abdominal injury. here he is speaking a few minutes ago. this is speaking a few minutes ago. as ou is speaking a few minutes ago. is you can is speaking a few minutes ago. ss you can imagine, is speaking a few minutes ago. sis you can imagine, i have had to pull that from the tournament, so is everybody saw yesterday, i had been suffering with a pain in the abdominal, and i was not ok yesterday, so, yeah, that is confirmed. i have a tear in the muscle in the abdominal. so the complication is too great because even during that i was thinking the whole day about the position to make, but, ithink whole day about the position to make, but, i think it is, yeah, whole day about the position to make, but, ithink it is, yeah, i think it does not make sense, and i believe all my career to keep going, so very tough circumstances and that
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one. it is obvious that, if i keep going the danger is going to be worse and worse. raid going the danger is going to be worse and worse.— going the danger is going to be worse and worse. rafa nadal is out. nick kyrgios — worse and worse. rafa nadal is out. nick kyrgios is _ worse and worse. rafa nadal is out. nick kyrgios is into _ worse and worse. rafa nadal is out. nick kyrgios is into the _ worse and worse. rafa nadal is out. nick kyrgios is into the men's i worse and worse. rafa nadal is out. nick kyrgios is into the men's final. nick kyrgios is into the men's final at wimbledon. sky news chief political correspondentjohn craig says that borisjohnson's pps says he will continue as an mp after leaving downing street. there had been some speculation that once the prime minister was no longer prime minister he might not want to be a backbench mp, but for the moment, james dandridge, one of his closest allies, is saying he will continue on the backbenches. joining me now is the conservative mp sir bob neill, chair of the commonsjustice committee. thank you forjoining me on bbc news. my committee. thank you for “oining me on sac news.— on bbc news. my pleasure. i'll start with the same _ on bbc news. my pleasure. i'll start with the same question _ on bbc news. my pleasure. i'll start with the same question i'm - on bbc news. my pleasure. i'll start with the same question i'm asking l with the same question i'm asking most guests, when do you think boris johnson should go? as soon as
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possible. i would have preferred that he had gone today and that we had an interim prime minister step in. constitutionally unusual but in fact dominic raab the deputy pm is not standing as a candidate so he would not have any skin in the game, and i still think it would be perfectly plausible for him to become prime minister, just an acting prime minister, on the understanding that it was on a caretaker basis. the damage that has been done isn't going to go away whilst boris is in downing street. so that is my preferred option. if that cannot be achieved, we should certainly greatly accelerate the process that is initially being talked about. i think the 1922 committee chair sir graham brady understands that but i think we should have the talent amongst conservative mps which whittles the numbers down next week, and at the finish next week, get the ballot papers out to members, most of them are on e—mail nowadays, straightaway, i don't see why that could not be turned around within
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another three weeks. you could not be turned around within another three weeks.— another three weeks. you think it could be turned _ another three weeks. you think it could be turned around _ another three weeks. you think it could be turned around within i another three weeks. you think it l could be turned around within three weeks. parliament heading towards its summer recess. if you are in such a rush why wouldn't the 1922 committee get on with it right now, select the new committee, open applications and get the whole thing running? i applications and get the whole thing runnina ? ., ., , ,, running? i would do the process tomorrow _ running? i would do the process tomorrow but _ running? i would do the process tomorrow but parliament - running? i would do the process tomorrow but parliament is - running? i would do the process tomorrow but parliament is not| tomorrow but parliament is not sitting, parliament will be sitting on monday, they are doing it as quick as i possibly can, and the executive can meet that day and make the arrangements for the ballots that day, so it can be done very quickly. but i think that is only fair. i am quickly. but i think that is only fair. iam not quickly. but i think that is only fair. i am not sure that our process works well when the party is in government as is oppose the opposition but it is what it is at the moment so i think we should complete the process and that means the agreement of the board of the party, the voluntary representatives, but the amount of damage that has been done, i'm sorry
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to say, to the party's visic —— standing is such that we have to press the reset button straightaway, and because it is about the prime minister's character and personality, that means you have got to change the character in number ten as soon as you possibly can. you raised the prime _ ten as soon as you possibly can. you raised the prime minister's personality. let's talk about that. when you are watching him standing in the street behind me earlier, letting it be known that he would stand down, i wonder what your reflections were on the fact that your party chose to back him and put him into power, chose to make him the person who was their public face, given that the issues, the christians around his trustworthiness are not remotely new. , ., , trustworthiness are not remotely new. , ., ., new. -- the christians around. -- the questions. _ new. -- the christians around. -- the questions. i— new. -- the christians around. -- the questions. i had _ new. -- the christians around. -- the questions. i had worked - new. -- the christians around. -- the questions. i had worked with | new. -- the christians around. -- . the questions. i had worked with him when he was mayor of london and he was very popular. and by a country
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mile, there was a prospect of having our most effective electoral performer as opposed tojeremy corbyn getting into number ten downing st, that was a no—brainer as far as i'm concerned. borisjohnson has got real talent as a campaigner and communicator but, unfortunately, having hoped as one sometimes does that people mature into the job, that people mature into the job, that didn't prove to be the case. we gave him the benefit of the doubt. some of us have unfortunately been proved wrong. i some of us have unfortunately been proved wrong-— some of us have unfortunately been proved wrong. i wonder if you regret aaivin him proved wrong. i wonder if you regret giving him the _ proved wrong. i wonder if you regret giving him the benefit _ proved wrong. i wonder if you regret giving him the benefit of _ proved wrong. i wonder if you regret giving him the benefit of the - proved wrong. i wonder if you regret giving him the benefit of the doubt. | giving him the benefit of the doubt. he lost hisjob giving him the benefit of the doubt. he lost his job at the times after he falsified a court in a story, he was sacked by michael howard the then conservative leader for lying to michael howard about his private life whilst he was negotiating the brexit deal, he made a number of statements which have proved not to be true to stop you will know about the statements with partygate that prove not to be true, the statement about chris pincher which turned out not to be true. this was a pattern and the conservative party could
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have chosen someone else to take on jeremy corbyn. louie have chosen someone else to take on jeremy corbyn-— jeremy corbyn. we will have to reflect that. _ jeremy corbyn. we will have to reflect that, i _ jeremy corbyn. we will have to reflect that, i equally - jeremy corbyn. we will have to l reflect that, i equally understand that we have also had theresa may's attempt to leave the eu which i wholly supported made unviable by the action of thejeremy corbyn led opposition and some of the actions of my colleagues made things worse, although they may have had good intentions, borisjohnson was identify strongly with a campaign which he had won, and i could see the admin for someone from that side that they were entitled to be able to take the job on and try to get brexit done. and there were many successes. we cannot say that the whole of his time in office was a failure. it wasn't. i am whole of his time in office was a failure. it wasn't. iam not whole of his time in office was a failure. it wasn't. i am not sure that we got the best outcome for brexit but we did leave —— lead to the commitments, and there was a good job with the vaccine run out and he has done an excellentjob in ukraine. and he has done an excellent “0b in
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ukraine. ~ ., , ,, and he has done an excellent “0b in ukraine. ~ ., , . ., . and he has done an excellent “0b in ukraine. ., . ., ukraine. who is your choice to re - lace ukraine. who is your choice to replace him? _ ukraine. who is your choice to replace him? i— ukraine. who is your choice to replace him? i haven't - ukraine. who is your choice to replace him? i haven't come l ukraine. who is your choice to | replace him? i haven't come to ukraine. who is your choice to i replace him? i haven't come to a choice but _ replace him? i haven't come to a choice but coming _ replace him? i haven't come to a choice but coming back- replace him? i haven't come to a choice but coming back to - replace him? i haven't come to a choice but coming back to my - replace him? i haven't come to a - choice but coming back to my earlier point, we have to have someone who has a different tone and style. we have got to have someone who is straight with the british public, over the next couple of years until the next general election, we will have to take some tough economic choices as a country. people are hurting financially already with unprecedented levels of inflation and taxation and for a conservative government and public borrowing, we have got to do something about that. and to do that, you have got to be absolutely upfront with people to stop it was that sort of obfuscation that many of us found, over the last few months, from boris that had become unacceptable and it has be someone who is not so much interested in rhetoricalflourishes. i think the public have moved on from that now. and they are not fighting the last war around brexit. that is done, we are out and we are going to make it a new relationship
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and someone who concentrates on the bread and butter issues that confront british families. the cost of living, energy bills are going through the roof, the way inflation is picking up and also, how will we grow the economy so that we pick up growth and greater productivity? that is the way that we can sell the economic place for the country. those are the bread and butter issues. ., ~' , ., those are the bread and butter issues. ., ~ , ., ., those are the bread and butter issues. ., ~' , ., ., , ., those are the bread and butter issues. ., ~ , ., ., , ., , issues. thank you for your time this evenin: , issues. thank you for your time this evening. we — issues. thank you for your time this evening, we appreciate _ issues. thank you for your time this evening, we appreciate it, - issues. thank you for your time this evening, we appreciate it, sir- issues. thank you for your time this evening, we appreciate it, sir bob l evening, we appreciate it, sir bob neill, the conservative mp, listing theissues neill, the conservative mp, listing the issues he wants to see the candidates address, and we will wait to see the policies they suggest to take on some of those challenges, not least the cost of living crisis. we are seeing multiple reports coming in from across westminster that there have been a number of ministerial appointments this evening. we will bring you the details as they come through. it is a reminder that borisjohnson is still in power. he is still prime minister. he is still able to fill some of the roles that have been
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created by resignations in the last 48 towers, and he is making those decisions, he is deciding who assumes some of these powerful roles within the british government. that statement from boris johnson earlier has been covered all around the world. let's have a look at the international reaction to his decision to quit as leader of the conservative party. we will start in the united states. president biden has released a statement that is warm but does not mention boris johnson. it says... a warm statement but there was a name missing, borisjohnson�*s. here are the us brexit shares breaking the news that borisjohnson would be going. the news that boris johnson would be oiiin _ �* ., ~' ,
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the news that boris johnson would be oiiin,�* , , ,, the news that boris johnson would be going. breaking news, stepping down, a shocking reversal _ going. breaking news, stepping down, a shocking reversal from _ going. breaking news, stepping down, a shocking reversal from boris - a shocking reversalfrom boris johnson overnight, expected to resign after three years in office. british prime minister borisjohnson announces_ british prime minister borisjohnson announces he will resign after a series_ announces he will resign after a series of— announces he will resign after a series of scandals that caused dozens— series of scandals that caused dozens of top government officials to abandon him.— dozens of top government officials to abandon him. good morning. this has already — to abandon him. good morning. this has already been _ to abandon him. good morning. this has already been a _ to abandon him. good morning. this has already been a week _ to abandon him. good morning. this has already been a week of - to abandon him. good morning. this has already been a week of high - has already been a week of high political— has already been a week of high political drama _ has already been a week of high political drama here _ has already been a week of high political drama here in - has already been a week of high political drama here in the - has already been a week of high political drama here in the uk. i political drama here in the uk. breaking — political drama here in the uk. breaking news, _ political drama here in the uk. breaking news, after- political drama here in the uk. breaking news, after defying l political drama here in the uk. i breaking news, after defying calls to step down, borisjohnson agrees to step down, borisjohnson agrees to resign. joining me now is ian lee, london correspondent for cbs news. i wonder where you started in trying to explain this to perhaps bemused viewers in the us. this to explain this to perhaps bemused viewers in the us.— to explain this to perhaps bemused viewers in the us. this is something americans have _ viewers in the us. this is something americans have been _ viewers in the us. this is something americans have been following - viewers in the us. this is something l americans have been following pretty closely. we learned about boris johnson back when london hosted the olympics, when he came out onto the world stage and into the living rooms of americans. this is a figure that americans have been following
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fairly closely. especially with his relationship with the former president donald trump. and so, when this news came, americans were very interested to hear what finally brought him down, because we had been following every twist, turn and scandal that has plagued the prime minister, and so americans were very keen to hear what finally brought him to resign in the premiership. in terms of his relationship with joe terms of his relationship withjoe biden, he wasn't mentioned in that statement but there have been some differences in the issue of northern ireland. . , differences in the issue of northern ireland. ., , . , ireland. that is correct. president biden is adamant _ ireland. that is correct. president biden is adamant that _ ireland. that is correct. president biden is adamant that the - ireland. that is correct. president biden is adamant that the good i biden is adamant that the good friday agreement needs to remain in place. that is sacrosanct. it should not be messed with. so there were disagreements between president biden and the prime minister. but, when you are reading that statement by president biden, it shows that the special relationship between the united states and the uk in years.
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it is notjust two men at the top that have this relationship. this is a deep relationship. and so, we saw the president reaffirm that but we also saw him chart where he would like the next prime minister to go with him, and that is ukraine. he mentioned that, as well. this isn't just two men on top. this is a deep relationship, and just to put a point and that the fbi and mi5 came out with a joint statement on china, recently. itjust shows how is important that is between the two countries. ~ , ., important that is between the two countries. ~' , ., , , countries. like you, stay with us if ou can. countries. like you, stay with us if you can- there _ countries. like you, stay with us if you can. there has _ countries. like you, stay with us if you can. there has been _ countries. like you, stay with us if you can. there has been further i you can. there has been further reaction to share, reaction from the eu, as you would expect. michel barnier, the former chief brexit negotiator, has said...
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ireland's prime minister has said... the good friday agreement being referenced a lot. lots of talk of partnership there. something mrjohnson's critics say wasn't a big driving force behind his approach with the eu. he has always said he wanted good relations with the european union. john kampfner is from the think tank chatham house. johnson's approach to diplomacy, particularly with european partners, probably regard some of them is at the series, has been to provoke them as much as possible, to enrage them, to elevate disruption almost into an
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art form, almost to define himself by the animosity between the uk and france as number one and germany as number two. the europeans would like things to improve, and it takes two to tango so it is incumbent on them as much as it is on the brits to begin that process of improvement. they will be relieved rather than jubilant atjohnson's impending departure but at the same time they are going to be incredibly circumspect. they look at the list of conservative candidates, and the policy agenda there, of the growing and not listening spatter of the northern ireland protocol, and if there is going to be improvement it is going to be a really slow burn. borisjohnson will be departing. it is farfrom clear of
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borisjohnson will be departing. it is far from clear of his approach to the eu is going to be. there are lots of people who would like to be a leader who looked very much in line with his approach. one place mr johnson is very popular is ukraine. the uk was the first european country to send arms to help ukraine resist russia's invasion. the ukrainian government remains gratefulfor his the ukrainian government remains grateful for his support. here's president zelensky�*s advisor. translation: thank you, boris johnson, translation: thank you, boris johnson. for— translation: thank you, boris johnson, for understanding - translation: thank you, boris johnson, for understanding the l johnson, for understanding the threat — johnson, for understanding the threat of— johnson, for understanding the threat of the _ johnson, for understanding the threat of the russian _ johnson, for understanding the threat of the russian monsterl johnson, for understanding the i threat of the russian monster and always— threat of the russian monster and atways being — threat of the russian monster and atways being at _ threat of the russian monster and always being at the _ threat of the russian monster and always being at the forefront - threat of the russian monster and always being at the forefront of i always being at the forefront of supportihg _ always being at the forefront of supporting ukraine. _ always being at the forefront of supporting ukraine.— always being at the forefront of supporting ukraine. boris johnson is -o - ular supporting ukraine. boris johnson is popular with — supporting ukraine. boris johnson is popular with many — supporting ukraine. boris johnson is popular with many of— supporting ukraine. boris johnson is popular with many of the _ supporting ukraine. boris johnson is popular with many of the ukrainian i popular with many of the ukrainian people. popular with many of the ukrainian --eole. �* , ., , popular with many of the ukrainian --eole. v ., , ., people. let's invite him to be our own prime _ people. let's invite him to be our own prime minister. _ it is forsure,... it is for sure,... boris it is for sure, . .. boris johnson, welcome _ it is for sure, . .. boris johnson, welcome to _ it is for sure, . .. boris johnson, welcome to ukraine, _ it is for sure, . .. boris johnson, welcome to ukraine, you - it is for sure, . .. boris johnson, welcome to ukraine, you are l it is for sure,... boris johnson, i welcome to ukraine, you are the best _
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welcome to ukraine, you are the best. welcome to our fast food! russian officials were jubilant about his downfall. the speaker of the russian duma said: maria zakharova, the spokesperson for the russian foreign ministry said: "borisjohnson was hit by a boomerang launched by himself. his comrades—in—arms turned him in." she went on... and the kremlin spokesman, dmitry peskov said "he doesn't like us. we don't like him either." let's go back to ian lee of cbs news. as the biden administration looks at who could take over it is presumably having to familiarise itself with politicians it does not
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know very well.— itself with politicians it does not know very well. this is a domestic issue for the _ know very well. this is a domestic issue for the biden _ know very well. this is a domestic| issue for the biden administration. that is why we did not hear them mention the prime minister in that statement. we have heard previously from the white house that they viewed this as a domestic situation but they will want a partner absolutely moving forward, on a range of issues. not only do you have the war in ukraine, and they want someone who is going to remain on the path with the united states, and the uk has been such an important partner, but they will also want someone who can also confront china, another area where the biden administration has put on a lot of focus. so there are a lot of areas where they want to have that strong leader, and so they are going to be looking for that person. who knows who it is going to be? ian lee from cbs news, thank you. just before we wrap up this hour. sebastien payne of the ft says conservative party grandees intend to install the new uk prime minister
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by early september, according to sebastien's celsius. we will get you more on that story in the coming minutes. —— a heatwave is about to develop across parts of england and wales with temperatures up into the low 30s and a hotspot lasting into the start of next week. as high—pressure moves across us, around that, as we have known for several days, that whether system is bringing cloudy skies, breezy conditions and the chance what little rain at times into parts of scotland and northern ireland. during the night and into friday morning, it is likely we will see further outbreaks of rain in north—west scotland with a few spots into northern ireland at times. there will be some areas are cloud into england and wales but also clear spells asked spider begins. mid to low teens. on friday, any glad that you see in england and wales will clear to allow more sunshine, compared with the day, but
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parts of northern england will cloud over later afternoon into the evening. northern and western scotland and northern ireland, the temperatures close to average for the time of year. it will stay cloudy with the chance of some light rain. temperatures going up in england and wales and the hottest parts of south—east england at 30 degrees. high pressure is moving in across the uk during the weekend. slowly slipping in and indeed during saturday, we will still have cloud running around into western parts of scotland, northern ireland, eastern and southern scotland seeing some sunny spells, with sunshine to come through wales and england on saturday. at this stage temperatures taking a little bit of a step backwards but we're still talking the mid to upper 20s in the areas whilst temperatures hit up again on sunday. we could start with some areas are cloud on sunday. sunshine breaking out more widely in scotland and northern ireland, feeling warmer. stilla and northern ireland, feeling warmer. still a chance of more cloud and breeze and in the western isles
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you're not talking about warmth but likely to be doing so much more through northern ireland and scotland and especially into england and wales, the mid to upper 20s and around 30 in the hottest parts of south—east england. it could be hotter still on monday and tuesday through england and wales, then gradually turning colder in scotland and northern ireland with a weather front moving through with a chance of rain. that cooler air filters further south for midweek, then stays warm across southern areas. after that, some uncertainty but it may well be that some he comes back again later in the week, insert the following weekend. —— into the following weekend. —— into the following weekend.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, i'm live with you from downing street. borisjohnson has been forced out by his own party — he'll stand aside as leader and as prime minister once his successor is chosen. he says that will happen once a successor is chosen. i he says that will happen once a successor is chosen.— he says that will happen once a successor is chosen. i want you to know how — successor is chosen. i want you to know how am _ successor is chosen. i want you to know how am to _ successor is chosen. i want you to know how am to be _ successor is chosen. i want you to know how am to be giving - successor is chosen. i want you to know how am to be giving up - successor is chosen. i want you to know how am to be giving up the l successor is chosen. i want you to - know how am to be giving up the best job in the world. but then as the but thems the breaks. oui’ our herd instinct and when the herd
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moves it moves. and in politics, no one is remotely indispensable. after a string of further government resignations this morning, he made the announcement in downing street surrounded by family and colleagues. the opposition parties in no mood to wait at along with some tory mps, they argue the prime minister should leave number ten nowjust one of the story to bring you away from the politics of wimbledon. rafael nadal has pulled out of wimbledon. he has an abdominal injury — and says doesn't make sense to continue. let's continue our coverage of boris johnson's decision to stand down as
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time, and in the last few minutes. they have been reporting the grandees intend to install a new uk prime minister by early september when they return from their summer break. that is according to mps with knowledge of the plans. we also have this misguided news chief political correspondent is as borisjohnson's pps correspondent is as borisjohnson's pps tells me thatjohnson intends to continue after leaving downing street. and chris mason, his latest report on another day of political upheaval in westminster. there was talk of a constitutional crisis, a prime minister who would not budge and more and more ministers resigning. butjust after nine o'clock, news borisjohnson would resign today. and suddenly packed.
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those arriving from work here capturing the moment too. at lunchtime, a lectern, those normally inside or outside an audience awaits. in a moment that was once personal, politicaland personal, political and constitutional.- personal, political and constitutional. ., , , constitutional. hello, everybody. it is clearly not _ constitutional. hello, everybody. it is clearly not of _ constitutional. hello, everybody. it is clearly not of the _ constitutional. hello, everybody. it is clearly not of the will _ constitutional. hello, everybody. it is clearly not of the will of - constitutional. hello, everybody. it is clearly not of the will of the - is clearly not of the will of the parliamentary conservative party that there should be a new leader and therefore a new prime minister and therefore a new prime minister and so, i want to say to the millions of people who voted for us in 2019, many of whom voted conservative for the first time. thank you for that incredible mandate and the reason i have fought so hard the last few days to continue to deliver that mandate in person was notjust because i wanted to do so but because i felt it was
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myjob, my duty, my obligation to you to continue to do will be you to continue to do will he promised in 2019. he you to continue to do will be promised in 2019. he fought hard and lost in the party _ promised in 2019. he fought hard and lost in the party abandoned _ promised in 2019. he fought hard and lost in the party abandoned him - promised in 2019. he fought hard and lost in the party abandoned him but i lost in the party abandoned him but listen still to his defiance. i tried to persuade my colleagues that it would be eccentric to change governments when we are delivering so much. , ,n, , governments when we are delivering somuch. ,, ., so much. this is boris johnson for us to articulate _ so much. this is boris johnson for us to articulate for _ so much. this is boris johnson for us to articulate for us _ so much. this is boris johnson for us to articulate for us to - so much. this is boris johnson for us to articulate for us to imagine l us to articulate for us to imagine future here was being crushed. the boy who dreamed of being road king ejected. jellinek as we have seen it westminster, the herd instinct is powerful and when the herd moves, it moves. in politics, no one is remotely indispensable. i moves. in politics, no one is remotely indispensable. i know that there'll be people _ remotely indispensable. i know that there'll be people who _ remotely indispensable. i know that there'll be people who are - remotely indispensable. i know that there'll be people who are relievedl there'll be people who are relieved and perhaps quite a few who will also be disappointed and they want you to know how sad i am to be
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giving up the bestjob in the world. but them's the breaks. giving up the best job in the world. but them's the breaks.— but them's the breaks. that's life, mrjohnson — but them's the breaks. that's life, mrjohnson acknowledging. - but them's the breaks. that's life, mrjohnson acknowledging. a - but them's the breaks. that's life, i mrjohnson acknowledging. a painful personal moment and a splash of history unfolding too.— personal moment and a splash of history unfolding too. being prime ministers and _ history unfolding too. being prime ministers and education _ history unfolding too. being prime ministers and education in - history unfolding too. being prime ministers and education in itself. i ministers and education in itself. i've travelled to every part of the united kingdom and in addition to the beauty of our natural world, i found so many people possessed of such boundless british conditionality in so willing to tackle or problems in new way. and evenif tackle or problems in new way. and even if things can sometimes seems dark now, ourfuture even if things can sometimes seems dark now, our future together is golden. thank you all very much. what a moment, a man who won a big majority of the general election just two and a half years ago is going. humiliated by his party but borisjohnson era will soon be over.
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liar! boris johnson era will soon be over. liar! . ' boris johnson era will soon be over. liar! ., , ., �* ., , liar! few are indifferent to boris johnson, liar! few are indifferent to boris johnson. he _ liar! few are indifferent to boris johnson, he provoked _ liar! few are indifferent to boris johnson, he provoked colourfull johnson, he provoked colourful reactions to the near end. ibs, johnson, he provoked colourful reactions to the near end. a great man brought _ reactions to the near end. a great man brought down, _ reactions to the near end. a great man brought down, and _ reactions to the near end. a great man brought down, and slick - reactions to the near end. a great man brought down, and slick and | reactions to the near end. a great - man brought down, and slick and said the moment, — man brought down, and slick and said the moment, thank— man brought down, and slick and said the moment, thank you. _ man brought down, and slick and said the moment, thank you. the- man brought down, and slick and said the moment, thank you.— the moment, thank you. the country will rue this — the moment, thank you. the country will rue this day. _ the moment, thank you. the country will rue this day. to _ the moment, thank you. the country will rue this day. to met _ the moment, thank you. the country will rue this day. to met regret - the moment, thank you. the country will rue this day. to met regret it - will rue this day. to met regret it like they did with thatcher stop by but plenty of others within the conservative party and beyond think boris conservative party and beyond think ltoris johnson _ conservative party and beyond think boris johnson should _ conservative party and beyond think borisjohnson should be standing down this prime minister immediately and notjust as conservative leader. the former prime minister is among them and in a letter he wrote the proposal for the them and in a letter he wrote the proposalfor the prime them and in a letter he wrote the proposal for the prime minister to remain
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suggesting the deputy prime minister can take overfor a minute or a caretaker prime minister could be draughted in. with theresa may fancied? ., ., ~' draughted in. with theresa may fancied? ., , fancied? look, from everything i hear, i fancied? look, from everything i hear. i don't _ fancied? look, from everything i hear, i don't think— fancied? look, from everything i hear, i don't think there's - fancied? look, from everything i hear, i don't think there's going | fancied? look, from everything i i hear, i don't think there's going to be a caretaker prime minister and the sins of— be a caretaker prime minister and the sins of somebody is coming in to that rule _ the sins of somebody is coming in to that rule. �* ., , ., ., , ., that rule. and what is an opposition -a that rule. and what is an opposition party member— that rule. and what is an opposition party member doing _ that rule. and what is an opposition party member doing a _ that rule. and what is an opposition party member doing a day - that rule. and what is an opposition party member doing a day like - that rule. and what is an opposition| party member doing a day like this? one option is to smile, go and watch some tennis at wimbledon. having said this about borisjohnson. he needs to go completely. none of this nonsense _ needs to go completely. none of this nonsense about — needs to go completely. none of this nonsense about clinging _ needs to go completely. none of this nonsense about clinging on _ needs to go completely. none of this nonsense about clinging on for- needs to go completely. none of this nonsense about clinging on for a - needs to go completely. none of this nonsense about clinging on for a few| nonsense about clinging on for a few months _ nonsense about clinging on for a few months he — nonsense about clinging on for a few months he has _ nonsense about clinging on for a few months. he has inflicted _ nonsense about clinging on for a few months. he has inflicted lies, - nonsense about clinging on for a few months. he has inflicted lies, fraudl months. he has inflicted lies, fraud and chaos— months. he has inflicted lies, fraud and chaos in— months. he has inflicted lies, fraud and chaos in the _ months. he has inflicted lies, fraud and chaos in the country— months. he has inflicted lies, fraud and chaos in the country and, - months. he has inflicted lies, fraud and chaos in the country and, you i and chaos in the country and, you know _ and chaos in the country and, you know. we — and chaos in the country and, you know. we are _ and chaos in the country and, you know, we are stuck _ and chaos in the country and, you know, we are stuck with - and chaos in the country and, you know, we are stuck with the - know, we are stuck with the government— know, we are stuck with the government which- know, we are stuck with the government which is - know, we are stuck with the - government which is functioning. there _ government which is functioning. there will— government which is functioning. there will be _ government which is functioning. there will be an _ government which is functioning. there will be an overwhelming i government which is functioning. i there will be an overwhelming and very widespread sense of relief to that boris johnson very widespread sense of relief to that borisjohnson his time as prime minister which probably should have never been allowed to happen in the first place is coming to an end.
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conservative party and mps and stood by them _ conservative party and mps and stood by them for _ conservative party and mps and stood by them for so long and they propped them up _ by them for so long and they propped them up and enabled him to fail to lead our— them up and enabled him to fail to lead our country properly in my heart _ lead our country properly in my heart goes out to the millions of families— heart goes out to the millions of families and pensioners who have not been helped properly because his governments been so incompetent. was ins - ired governments been so incompetent. inspired to governments been so incompetent. —" inspired to connect and downing street, a fourth prime minister in a little over six years. due street, a fourth prime minister in a little over six years.— little over six years. are you going to make a — little over six years. are you going to make a bid _ little over six years. are you going to make a bid for— little over six years. are you going to make a bid for the _ little over six years. are you going to make a bid for the leadership? | to make a bid for the leadership? the former chancellor, and perhaps the former cabinet ministerjeremy hunt too among others. a beauty pageant to leave the country is only just beginning and after the intriguing anguish, plotting and resignations, the leader departs soon. at
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we can speak now to the labour mp, chris bryant, who joins me from the rhondda in south wales. good evening. we spoke with your colleaue good evening. we spoke with your colleague earlier _ good evening. we spoke with your colleague earlier he _ good evening. we spoke with your colleague earlier he said _ good evening. we spoke with your colleague earlier he said mr - good evening. we spoke with your i colleague earlier he said mrjohnson should go immediately. i'm assuming you agree with that. that should go immediately. i'm assuming you agree with that.— you agree with that. that is the tradition in _ you agree with that. that is the tradition in the _ you agree with that. that is the tradition in the british - you agree with that. that is the tradition in the british system i you agree with that. that is the i tradition in the british system that when you've lost the confidence of your party and your premiership is coming to an end, you leave immediately and is a good reason for that which is, if you're just a caretaker, there's lots of things that you cannot do and my work with borisjohnson that you cannot do and my work with boris johnson staying that you cannot do and my work with borisjohnson staying on in downing street is that we know he tries to break rules all the time and it doesn't really admire the rules very much my anxiety as he will try to do things in this period, especially that several weeks even months, that will be further breaches of the rules and will put british security in peril. rules and will put british security in eril. ., ., ,, ,y in peril. you not reissued by the fact that some _
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in peril. you not reissued by the fact that some of _ in peril. you not reissued by the fact that some of the _ in peril. you not reissued by the fact that some of the cabinet. fact that some of the cabinet ministers who told him to go are still sitting around the cabinet table may be perfectly willing to intervene if he does not follow the kinds of actions they are hoping in fear that he should?— fear that he should? they've lost all authority _ fear that he should? they've lost all authority and _ fear that he should? they've lost all authority and integrity - all authority and integrity themselves most sustained him for these months they put him in place for the first place and for months and months and everyone else could read the writing on the wall, where a set of reasons, they decided to stand by him. we should play for every day, all the way through to the end of borisjohnson steinman down extreme, we should play all the clips of every time they have defended him.— clips of every time they have defended him. . . defended him. one challenge the prime minister _ defended him. one challenge the prime minister is _ defended him. one challenge the prime minister is leaving - defended him. one challenge the| prime minister is leaving downing street is on the investigation into whether or not he misled parliament deliberately in connection to party gate? devil i would presume, continue?—
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gate? devil i would presume, continue? can i correct you on something? — continue? can i correct you on something? everyone - continue? can i correct you on something? everyone says - continue? can i correct you on something? everyone says he| something? everyone says he deliberately misled parliament, there is no requirement that he deliberately misled parliament comments that he did mislead parliament. he did not bother to establish the truth and if and when he said that he had multiple insurances, if that was not true and if he did never the proper assurances of any kind whatsoever, all that counts to misleading parliament, knowing the misleading parliament. there is no phrase of deliberately misleading parliament. that will continue of parliament can be committed by a prime minister or an ordinary member of parliament were an x member of parliament. my guess, for what it's worth, i don't know, but my guess is the moment borisjohnson is no longer prime minister he will leave parliament because i suppose you want to make a lot of money and won't have to declare it through this so he'll be very swiftly. so, this is a very
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serious point about what the prime minister can and cannot do. for sake of argument, claimant putting things the uk and therefore the west is more vulnerable over the next few months because of the situation in downing street and he decides to do something foolish either in the balkans, so, for instance, serbia or bosnia, orforthat balkans, so, for instance, serbia or bosnia, or for that matter in the baltics? is a british prime minister was only really a caretaker, able to deploy troops?— deploy troops? their previous examples _ deploy troops? their previous examples of _ deploy troops? their previous examples of prime _ deploy troops? their previous examples of prime ministersl deploy troops? their previous - examples of prime ministers who have been pushed out for one reason or another who have remained in office until the process is taking place at ll would of electricity was while i i.i would of electricity was while i appreciate your prefer to have a labour prime minister than a conservative of the majority and is it appropriate that the prime minister take a little time to work out who they want to replace mr johnson rather than rushing through
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it potentially not giving that decision the attention it deserves. this is a disgrace to the selected prime minister. he's not going because the herd mentality in parliament. there was no contrition in what he said, that there was a terrible speech, completely lacking in self—awareness and he is disgraced. that is why it is of a moral authority to do anything. i much prefer, if necessary, if the conservative party needs to take some time, six or eight weeks to find a new leader, they may be able to do a much quicker but if they're able to do it to six and eight weeks and takes that long, they should have a interim prime minister. i would much prefer keir starmer to be in downing street. and i completely support keir starmer suggested that the conservatives are going to keep borisjohnson in place for months, for instance, so loosely can have a wedding party, which would
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absolutely infuriate i think everybody in the country, then, i think it's right that we have a vote of confidence in the house of commons and if they want to, they can stand by borisjohnson all over again because he corrected their whole party in every single one of them is tainted by this stub thank you very much indeed and mr bryant alluding to a wedding gathering at the prime minister and his wife are planning in a couple of weeks' time at checkers, we should say there's absolutely no suggestion that the calculations being made by prime minister borisjohnson of the party are directly connected to that event. ., ., ., , ~ event. not that i have seen. a coule event. not that i have seen. a couple of _ event. not that i have seen. a couple of things _ event. not that i have seen. a couple of things to _ event. not that i have seen. a couple of things to pass - event. not that i have seen. a couple of things to pass on - event. not that i have seen. a couple of things to pass on to | event. not that i have seen. a - couple of things to pass on to you. the times have been a useful source and on this developing story, whether new people who accepted the job of the education department is will who yesterday resigned from the department for education. after you discover that he repeated inaccurate
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lines of the situation with chris and he resigned because they were true by number ten nectar mr johnson's decision, he has accepted a job in the department for education and ben riley smith, political editor of the telegraph was written about some of the events and site number ten in the last 24 hours and he says borisjohnson's most loyal advisers were in number ten in the morning and they snacked from a hearty tree of bacon and pots of black coffee only a few hours of sleep, one person familiar with the scene said, mrjohnson's mood was sanguine, good—natured and good—humored, there was mild frustration that is come to this and he is very self aware, the source said. numberten is he is very self aware, the source said. number ten is posted pictures from the first meeting of mr johnson's cabinet is been quite significantly rearranged and should the prime minister showing the meeting of the cabinet room and we're seeing him surrounded by some
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familiarfaces as we're seeing him surrounded by some familiar faces as well as some newly appointed cabinet ministers too. the prime minister has also released some photos showing a more personal side of the story, mrjohnson's family behind the doors of 10 downing street following his resignation statement. there are a few people in the uk who don't have an opinion on borisjohnson in 2019, the general election with the party secured historic landslide victories with him at the helm. don valley was won by the conservatives in the 2019 election and danny savage has this report from there. i’m election and danny savage has this report from there.— election and danny savage has this report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go- — report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go- i _ report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go. i think— report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go. i think he's— report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go. i think he's done - report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go. i think he's done a - report from there. i'm very sorry to see him go. i think he's done a lot| see him go. i think he's done a lot for us. �* ., ., for us. believing the alternative is? if the labour— for us. believing the alternative is? if the labour party - for us. believing the alternative is? if the labour party gets - for us. believing the alternative is? if the labour party gets it i for us. believing the alternative j is? if the labour party gets it or the scottish _ is? if the labour party gets it or the scottish national— is? if the labour party gets it or the scottish national party, - is? if the labour party gets it or| the scottish national party, that this mixes tremble. bad
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the scottish national party, that this mixes tremble.— this mixes tremble. bad time, reall . this mixes tremble. bad time, really- with — this mixes tremble. bad time, really. with what _ this mixes tremble. bad time, really. with what is _ this mixes tremble. bad time, really. with what is happened | this mixes tremble. bad time, i really. with what is happened and pushing _ really. with what is happened and pushing things _ really. with what is happened and pushing things too _ really. with what is happened and pushing things too far— really. with what is happened and pushing things too far and - really. with what is happened and pushing things too far and he - really. with what is happened and pushing things too far and he had| really. with what is happened and i pushing things too far and he had to id pushing things too far and he had to go in _ pushing things too far and he had to go in the _ pushing things too far and he had to go in the end — pushing things too far and he had to go in the end. and _ pushing things too far and he had to go in the end. and he's— pushing things too far and he had to go in the end. and he's been- pushing things too far and he had to go in the end. and he's been very. go in the end. and he's been very untrustworthy _ go in the end. and he's been very untrustworthy and _ go in the end. and he's been very untrustworthy and no other- go in the end. and he's been very. untrustworthy and no other options, i think _ untrustworthy and no other options, i think. ~ ., y untrustworthy and no other options, ithink. ~ ., , . untrustworthy and no other options, ithink. ., , . ., i think. authority too much and he said too many _ i think. authority too much and he said too many people. _ i think. authority too much and he said too many people. -- - i think. authority too much and he said too many people. -- upset. i i think. authority too much and he l said too many people. -- upset. of eniland said too many people. -- upset. of england very _ said too many people. -- upset. of england very much _ said too many people. -- upset. of england very much a _ said too many people. -- upset. of england very much a tory _ said too many people. -- upset. ij england very much a tory heartland and duncan kennedy has been there. i think it's time to go, really, isn't it? he tried to hang on but yeah, not much to say, really. it has to be done. yes, i am a conservative. he's resigned. oh no. i be done. yes, i am a conservative. he's resigned. oh no.— be done. yes, i am a conservative. he's resigned. oh no. i never wanted him and in — he's resigned. oh no. i never wanted him and in the _ he's resigned. oh no. i never wanted him and in the first _ he's resigned. oh no. i never wanted him and in the first place _ he's resigned. oh no. i never wanted him and in the first place because - he's resigned. oh no. i never wanted him and in the first place because i i him and in the first place because i thought— him and in the first place because i thought he — him and in the first place because i thought he was economical with the truth and _ thought he was economical with the truth and that's proven to be the case _ truth and that's proven to be the case. �* , ., ., truth and that's proven to be the case. m ., ., , ., ~ case. it's a great shame. i think it's a very _ case. it's a great shame. i think it's a very clever _ case. it's a great shame. i think it's a very clever man _ case. it's a great shame. i think it's a very clever man and - case. it's a great shame. i think it's a very clever man and he i it's a very clever man and he stripped himself up. it is a shame,
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i think he could have gone out on a much better note.— much better note. next, we go to cheltenham _ much better note. next, we go to cheltenham and _ much better note. next, we go to cheltenham and gloucestershire i much better note. next, we go to i cheltenham and gloucestershire and there are some voters there. i believe it is time to introduce somebody who has got that credibility because that's what's lost in the respect and i think that is my reason behind this, i think. it's time to give room to somebody else. i5 it's time to give room to somebody else. , �* , it's time to give room to somebody else. , ,,.,,.._ else. is the thing, it's basically who's going to _ else. is the thing, it's basically who's going to offer— else. is the thing, it's basically who's going to offer this? - else. is the thing, it's basically who's going to offer this? is i else. is the thing, it's basically i who's going to offer this? is going to make _ who's going to offer this? is going to make anything better for us as it is going to — to make anything better for us as it is going to be another nightmare? bring _ is going to be another nightmare? bring back— is going to be another nightmare? bring back a lot of people in this country. — bring back a lot of people in this country, we are not london centric. we are _ country, we are not london centric. we are not— country, we are not london centric. we are not government centric. he based — we are not government centric. he based her— we are not government centric. he based her views— we are not government centric. he based her views and _ we are not government centric. he based her views and votes - we are not government centric. he based her views and votes on - we are not government centric. he based her views and votes on the i based her views and votes on the people _ based her views and votes on the people in— based her views and votes on the people in our— based her views and votes on the people in our local— based her views and votes on the people in our local areas - based her views and votes on the people in our local areas and - based her views and votes on the people in our local areas and i. based her views and votes on the| people in our local areas and i am based her views and votes on the i people in our local areas and i am a floating _ people in our local areas and i am a floating voter~ — people in our local areas and i am a floating voter. sometimes - people in our local areas and i am a floating voter. sometimes i'm - people in our local areas and i am a floating voter. sometimes i'm limp| floating voter. sometimes i'm limp them, sometimes _ floating voter. sometimes i'm limp them, sometimes in _ floating voter. sometimes i'm limp them, sometimes in conservative. i floating voter. sometimes i'm limp i them, sometimes in conservative. --
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lived them, sometimes in conservative. lived them —— lib dem. yelling like i think you've lied and i think you should go. he is not credible any more. i i think you should go. he is not credible any more.— i think you should go. he is not credible any more. i think is being -ushed credible any more. i think is being pushed out. _ credible any more. i think is being pushed out, definitely. _ credible any more. i think is being pushed out, definitely. covid-19,| credible any more. i think is being i pushed out, definitely. covid-19, he did manage — pushed out, definitely. covid-19, he did manage well _ pushed out, definitely. covid-19, he did manage well and _ pushed out, definitely. covid-19, he did manage well and he decided - pushed out, definitely. covid-19, he| did manage well and he decided read from beginning. hopefully, some of that will_ from beginning. hopefully, some of that will be remembered, but we need to move _ that will be remembered, but we need to move on _ that will be remembered, but we need to move on. that will be remembered, but we need to move on— to move on. good riddance, he gone aies to move on. good riddance, he gone ages ago- you _ to move on. good riddance, he gone ages ago. you can't _ to move on. good riddance, he gone ages ago. you can't have _ to move on. good riddance, he gone ages ago. you can't have someone i to move on. good riddance, he gone| ages ago. you can't have someone in the highest _ ages ago. you can't have someone in the highest office _ ages ago. you can't have someone in the highest office the _ ages ago. you can't have someone in the highest office the country- ages ago. you can't have someone in the highest office the country you - the highest office the country you cannot— the highest office the country you cannot trust~ _ the highest office the country you cannot trust. the _ the highest office the country you cannot trust-— cannot trust. the decision to step down as leader _ cannot trust. the decision to step down as leader of _ cannot trust. the decision to step down as leader of the _ cannot trust. the decision to step i down as leader of the conservatives, here is one response, the uk foreign secretary as you mentioned earlier, she is cut short her trip to the foreign ministers meeting after borisjohnson situation became
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peerless, she has tweeted this. foreign ministers making the thoughts known as well. matt hancock was forced to resign last year and remember he breached social distancing guidelines but he worked closely boris johnson distancing guidelines but he worked closely borisjohnson during the pandemic and become a high—profile figure in the government for time and this what he said. we figure in the government for time and this what he said.— figure in the government for time and this what he said. we serve very closely together _ and this what he said. we serve very closely together and _ and this what he said. we serve very closely together and getting - and this what he said. we serve very closely together and getting the - closely together and getting the country through the pandemic and on the vaccination programme for instance, which was the first one in the world and the fastest roll—out in europe as he is very enthusiastic about saying and rightly so. for me, it is a sad day that he's had to leave and what matters now is making
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sure that we have the right approach, the right ideas for the next prime minister and make sure that we have somebody who has a very broad appeal they can reach out beyond traditional conservative voters and the north and the south in scotland and wales, england and northern ireland.— northern ireland. looking at some the areas. — northern ireland. looking at some the areas, northern _ northern ireland. looking at some the areas, northern ireland, - northern ireland. looking at some the areas, northern ireland, here| northern ireland. looking at some i the areas, northern ireland, here is chris page. it is fair to say that the vast majority of politicians, be they unionist, nationalist and neither held borisjohnson pretty low esteem but what people are now asking is what will change in downing street will mean for the history of the evolution in this part of the uk. there has been a fully functioning default government since february when the democratic unionist party collapsed the power sharing over the arrangements for northern ireland and the northern ireland protocol. the question is, with a new prime minister take a more moderate line on the protocol
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and critics of the legislation have argued that it breaks international law and with a new resident of number ten law and with a new resident of numberten maintain law and with a new resident of number ten maintain borisjohnson's number ten maintain boris johnson's position number ten maintain borisjohnson's position or even harden it? from wales, here is how griffith. hat wales, here is how griffith. not a huie wales, here is how griffith. not a huge surprise _ wales, here is how griffith. not a huge surprise that _ wales, here is how griffith. not a huge surprise that it's _ wales, here is how griffith. not a huge surprise that it's been - huge surprise that it's been welcomed by the first minister mark drakeford and said the uk needed a stable government and so, this was the right thing to do. it's also being welcomed by most conservatives, at least is willing to speak to members of the press. first minister who watch this turmoil and side presents an opportunity is the first minister nicola sturgeon.
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here is nicola sturgeon today's. we won't see that women prime minister that we _ won't see that women prime minister that we did _ won't see that women prime minister that we did not — won't see that women prime minister that we did not vote _ won't see that women prime minister that we did not vote for— won't see that women prime minister that we did not vote for yet _ won't see that women prime minister that we did not vote for yet another. that we did not vote for yet another prime _ that we did not vote for yet another prime minister— that we did not vote for yet another prime minister that— that we did not vote for yet another prime minister that we _ that we did not vote for yet another prime minister that we did - that we did not vote for yet another prime minister that we did not votej prime minister that we did not vote for and _ prime minister that we did not vote for and would — prime minister that we did not vote for and would not _ prime minister that we did not vote for and would not vote _ prime minister that we did not vote for and would not vote for- prime minister that we did not vote for and would not vote for even - prime minister that we did not vote for and would not vote for even if. for and would not vote for even if given _ for and would not vote for even if given the — for and would not vote for even if given the chance. _ for and would not vote for even if given the chance. this _ for and would not vote for even if given the chance. this is - for and would not vote for even if given the chance. this is about i given the chance. this is about so much _ given the chance. this is about so much more — given the chance. this is about so much more than _ given the chance. this is about so much more than one _ given the chance. this is about so much more than one individual. given the chance. this is about so. much more than one individual from scotland. _ much more than one individual from scotland. the — much more than one individual from scotland, the westminster- much more than one individual from scotland, the westminster system i scotland, the westminster system doesn't _ scotland, the westminster system doesn't represent _ scotland, the westminster system doesn't represent our— scotland, the westminster system doesn't represent our best - scotland, the westminster system. doesn't represent our best interests and that— doesn't represent our best interests and that is— doesn't represent our best interests and that is why— doesn't represent our best interests and that is why we _ doesn't represent our best interests and that is why we don't _ doesn't represent our best interests and that is why we don't just - doesn't represent our best interests and that is why we don'tjust need i doesn't represent our best interests and that is why we don'tjust need aj and that is why we don'tjust need a change _ and that is why we don'tjust need a change of— and that is why we don'tjust need a change of prime _ and that is why we don'tjust need a change of prime minister— and that is why we don'tjust need a change of prime minister or- and that is why we don'tjust need a change of prime minister or a - and that is why we don'tjust need a change of prime minister or a wider| change of prime minister or a wider changing _ change of prime minister or a wider changing of— change of prime minister or a wider changing of the _ change of prime minister or a wider changing of the guard _ change of prime minister or a wider| changing of the guard westminster. change of prime minister or a wider. changing of the guard westminster. i think scotland — changing of the guard westminster. i think scotland it's _ changing of the guard westminster. i think scotland it's a _ changing of the guard westminster. i think scotland it's a permanent - think scotland it's a permanent alternative _ think scotland it's a permanent alternative which— think scotland it's a permanent alternative which is _ think scotland it's a permanent alternative which is why - think scotland it's a permanent alternative which is why the - alternative which is why the independent _ alternative which is why the independent choices- alternative which is why the independent choices are - alternative which is why the - independent choices are necessary. let's pause — independent choices are necessary. let's pause in — independent choices are necessary. let's pause in the _ independent choices are necessary. let's pause in the politics but- independent choices are necessary. let's pause in the politics but you i let's pause in the politics but you can find it on the bbc live page. failing to recoverfrom can find it on the bbc live page. failing to recover from that injury, here is speaking a few minutes ago. unfortunately, as you can imagine, i am here because i have to plug for
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the tournament now everyone saw yesterday that i have been suffering with the pain in my abdominal and something that is not ok there and, yeah. that's confirmed. i have a tear in the muscle and so, the communication is too late because even like that, i was thinking the whole day of the position to make but, i think it is, yeah, i think it does make sense to go and even if i tried to keep going, very tough circumstances and that one, i think. it is obvious that if i keep going, the injuries are going to be worse and worse.
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the injuries are going to be worse and worse-— the injuries are going to be worse and worse. ., ., ., ., , ., ., and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coveraie and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coverage on — and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coverage on that _ and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coverage on that on _ and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coverage on that on the _ and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coverage on that on the website. - and worse. rafael nadal is out, more coverage on that on the website. uk| coverage on that on the website. uk has reached the conservative parties down the process of selecting a person who will be the fourth prime minister in six years. in 2016, david cameron favoured remaining in the eu when he lost the brakes a referendum, he stood down. he was replaced by theresa may who spent several years trying to fashion a form of brexit that the eu would sign up to it would get through parliament. that did not work out. she within stepped down and be replaced by borisjohnson and development, we saw what happened with his election. and we in terms of my replacement, the field is open the attorney general has said that she is definitely
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standing, steve baker, the backbencher said he seriously considering this much longer list as well which they are working through and it's an open field, so, it's not yet clear who will replace boris johnson. joining me as mark elliott who is professor of public law at the university of cambridge and is also a legal adviser to the house of lords constitution committee and thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. thank you very much for 'oining us on sac newt thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news.- help - thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news.- help me - on bbc news. hello. help me understand — on bbc news. hello. help me understand the _ on bbc news. hello. help me understand the constitutional| understand the constitutional dimensions of what is playing out because on face value this appears to be a matterfor the because on face value this appears to be a matter for the conservative party and its process rather than anything broader.— party and its process rather than anything broader. yes, that's right and under a _ anything broader. yes, that's right and under a constitution, - anything broader. yes, that's right and under a constitution, when i anything broader. yes, that's right| and under a constitution, when the prime ministerfinds and under a constitution, when the prime minister finds themselves in this position, we would normally expect the internal party process to be given time to run and then, for
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them to resign as prime minister. once a new leader has been identified. that is what happened when david cameron resigned and when theresa may resigned. bind when david cameron resigned and when theresa may resigned.— theresa may resigned. and while that internal party — theresa may resigned. and while that internal party process _ theresa may resigned. and while that internal party process plays _ theresa may resigned. and while that internal party process plays out, - internal party process plays out, what about the liver parties idea of bringing in a vote of no confidence in the prime minister if they are not satisfied with how this process is going, how would that fit in? i think it's a constitutional fail—safe backstop and it would be a appropriate under a constitution for an individual party to have sole control of this kind of thing. the underlying constitutional principle is the government can only carry on in the prime minister can only carry on while they're in a position to command the confidence and support of the house of commons and so, the
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house of commons which says that it's not acceptable for boris johnson to remain until september or october, for example. that it is open to the house of commons as a whole to hold a vote of no—confidence and eject them than that. no-confidence and e'ect them than that, , ., , no-confidence and e'ect them than that. , .,, , ., no-confidence and e'ect them than that. , , ., that. some people up and pointing out that the _ that. some people up and pointing out that the prime _ that. some people up and pointing out that the prime minister - that. some people up and pointing out that the prime minister has i out that the prime minister has indicated an intention to stand down as prime minister if, and i appreciate that this is unlikely but the process to replace and played out but during the summer, he decided that it of a case for staying. is there any means that he can do that is the statement today the end of the matter? i can do that is the statement today the end of the matter?— the end of the matter? i think it's fairly likely _ the end of the matter? i think it's fairly likely at _ the end of the matter? i think it's fairly likely at the _ the end of the matter? i think it's fairly likely at the end _ the end of the matter? i think it's fairly likely at the end of- the end of the matter? i think it's fairly likely at the end of the - fairly likely at the end of the matter. there is no under the conservative parties leadership rules that are going to stand in contest if you was simply to reject the outcome of that contest and refused to resign. i think at that point, it would be in orderfor the queen to dismiss them and to appoint
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the winner of the conservative leadership election is the new prime minister. . ~ leadership election is the new prime minister. ., ,, , ., , leadership election is the new prime minister. ., «i , ., , . ., minister. thank you very much for ex-lainini minister. thank you very much for explaining that — minister. thank you very much for explaining that to _ minister. thank you very much for explaining that to us _ minister. thank you very much for explaining that to us and - minister. thank you very much for explaining that to us and thank. minister. thank you very much for| explaining that to us and thank you professor mark elliott. this story is an astonishing political development because we don't have to go back very far. two and a half years and borisjohnson was master of all he was surveying in political terms, certainly. major mandate from voters, big majority in the house of commons of the day, he's on his way out, his authority is gone within his party and elsewhere too. his integrity is being questioned widely at his legacy as a leader is also being queried. it is a journey with a great number of highs and lows and her deputy political correspondent has been considering it.
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i want to talk to the crowd. riding high and doing what he did best, borisjohnson on the campaign trail, persuading millions to back brexit. crowd cheers. many credit, or blame, him for the victory that followed. the pasty of independence! he was a leading contender to replace david cameron when he resigned after the referendum, but a close ally decided to publicly voice concerns about mrjohnson's flaws. i realised that while boris does have those very special abilities to communicate and to reach out, what he did not have was the capacity to build and to lead that team and to provide the leadership the country needs at this critical moment. it was an early warning from someone who knew him well. he abandoned his campaign, leaving loyal supporters distraught. but his ambitions weren't thwarted for long. theresa may's brexit plans hit the buffers and tory mps saw him as the man to get it done. he entered downing street with a team willing to ignore the usual conventions of politics. at the time, many mps
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were determined to stop the uk leaving the eu without a deal. mrjohnson asked the queen to suspend parliament, a move deemed unlawful in the supreme court, and kicked more than 20 tory mps out of the party. david gauke was one of them. he was prepared to adopt tactics that other prime ministers would not have adopted, prepared to use language that other prime ministers would not have been prepared to adopt. basically, because he felt that the rules didn't apply to him. the problem is that the approach that he took over brexit is also the approach that he has taken over other matters, personal as well as policy. to break the deadlock, an election was called and the conservatives won their biggest majority in more than 30 years. for his new government, though, everything was put on hold when it was hit by the worst health crisis in modern times. from this evening, i must give the british people a very simple instruction.
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you must stay at home. the prime minister himself became seriously ill with covid. i still have a temperature... he was admitted to intensive care and spent three days in hospital. a key ally throughout this time was dominic cummings, his unconventional style aggravated many. sorry i'm late. and within a year of the election victory, he had resigned after a bitter power struggle, clashing with tory mps and the prime minister's wife. he soon went on the attack, becoming mrjohnson's fiercest and most damaging critic. he doesn't have plan, he doesn't know how to be prime minister, and we only got him in there because we had to solve a certain problem, not because we thought that he was the right person to be running the country. mrjohnson was criticised by his ethics adviser over the complicated funding of a lavish flat refurbishment. he infuriated colleagues by trying to water down standards on public life to help a colleague, only to u—turn later.
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what have you done to this place? a heavy by—election defeat to the liberal democrats was the first sign that voters weren't impressed. fundamentally, boris came to downing street without a ideology, without a strategy and without a plan, then chose the wrong strategists around him, and i think that every time he got busted, rather than owning up to it, he did the usual boris thing, which is to say, i'm not going to apologise or change, we're going to ride it out, and he was tied down by his own character and, in the end, he proved quite inflexible. last year, stories started leaking out about rule—breaking parties in number ten while the rest of the country was in lockdown. after a police investigation, mrjohnson was fined for a birthday celebration in the cabinet room. altogether, over 120 fines were issued to staff. a report by a senior civil servant blamed a failure of leadership and mrjohnson was accused of lying about what went on. the final straw was a chaotic response to allegations of sexual misconduct against the deputy chief whip, chris pincher. mrjohnson was again accused of not
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being up front about what he knew. for some, though, there is a legacy to be proud of. i think we do need to recognise that he delivered on his promise to get brexit done and he got us through the pandemic with the most successful vaccination programme in europe, so there is much to be positive about. for many of mrjohnson's colleagues, though, his downfall is not a surprise. vicki young, bbc news. he often talks about his interest in history and this is a graphic that connects to that because here is how mrjohnson's time in office may compare with others who have held this office. it looks set to be one of the shortest ten years at number ten in a century. here is a list of prime ministers who have served for
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the shortest amount of time. he needs 28 days, till the 4th of august, to outlast theresa may. he was another fight. so far he has only served one day more than neville chamberlain who was the conservative prime minister between 1937 and 1940. let's bring in our political correspondent. the totals... . ,. . political correspondent. the totals... . , , political correspondent. the i totals. . ._ not political correspondent. the totals... . , , notthe totals... fascinating stuff. not the most important — totals... fascinating stuff. not the most important thing today - totals... fascinating stuff. not the most important thing today but. most important thing today but nonetheless it highlights the fact that this politician who looks to be staring at least two terms in office after that victory in 2019, to such an extraordinary turnaround of his fortunes. it an extraordinary turnaround of his fortunes. . , an extraordinary turnaround of his fortunes. ., , ., , .,, fortunes. it has to be the most dramatic downfall _ fortunes. it has to be the most dramatic downfall of _ fortunes. it has to be the most dramatic downfall of any - fortunes. it has to be the most| dramatic downfall of any british political leader weary since the second world war. if you think about it, 2016 when he one the referendum for the leave side, until now, he is
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utterly and completely dominated british politics, wipe the floor with all those more conventional politicians and now this. i would add one thing. you are making a point about the difference between quality and one thinks about boris johnson, in terms of the effect on this country, i do think anyone is going to take breaks it away from him. whether one thinks it is a good idea or a bad idea, him. whether one thinks it is a good idea ora bad idea, and him. whether one thinks it is a good idea or a bad idea, and those three years, that is one of the biggest policy changes in this country in 40 years. policy changes in this country in 40 ears. ., ., ., ,., ., , years. part of the reason he was able to do _ years. part of the reason he was able to do that _ years. part of the reason he was able to do that was _ years. part of the reason he was able to do that was his - years. part of the reason he was i able to do that was his personality. he gave to the backset campaign when needed it, and without it it might not have gone across the line. he delivered a selection victory in 2019 and when we talked about the election a lot was made about the different voters he was able to pull them within the the party itself, within the mpc is also made a central point, of course, that is what a strong leader will do. but he
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is gone now in full the talk of unity from the foreign secretary that would appear to be unlikely. it is certainly true that his going, let's remember what a charismatic campaigner he was. i was thinking about this, number of years ago i was out on the campaign trail with him when he was mayor, competing to be mayor of london and i was thinking it isjust be mayor of london and i was thinking it is just incredible. be mayor of london and i was thinking it isjust incredible. as attacks are left of centre, just brilliant. right of centre politicians had struggled in this country to make the populist argument. especially in london. that is what united _ argument. especially in london. trust is what united the party and won the elections. let's remember. this was happening already. the tensions in that coalition, both in the country and in parliament were becoming apparent already so that idea of some chunk of the traditional conservative support mainly around here in the south—east of england, how would you put it, balance the
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books kind of conservatism. don't spend more than you can afford, keep taxes down put up a working—class voters in the north of england were, a lot of it is very run down, post industrialisation, they used to vote labour for years and years, though to break certain like the idea of if the government is spending the state is being interventionist. keeping both those two wins together, in reality, the country, it is going to be a stretch. {lin reality, the country, it is going to be a stretch-— be a stretch. on top of that you have iot be a stretch. on top of that you have got backset. _ be a stretch. on top of that you have got backset. something i be a stretch. on top of that you l have got backset. something mr johnson lead in the backset campaign and delivered as well via the election and negotiations with the eu but even the reading breaks it supporter has been critical of boris johnson pointed out that northern ireland are still outstanding and theissue ireland are still outstanding and the issue around the good friday agreement, everyone pointed out before the break such a deal and it has not gone away.— has not gone away. absolutely not while everyone _ has not gone away. absolutely not while everyone is _ has not gone away. absolutely not while everyone is focused - has not gone away. absolutely not while everyone is focused on - has not gone away. absolutely not while everyone is focused on his i while everyone is focused on his character, she is about character, i
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do think breaks it is a part of it and the sort of sense within his own party that, as they would see it, this 80 seat majority leaving the eu, it has all been squandered. what on earth has been achieved? what major changes? they feel that never mind not being able to enact what vision and post breaks it britain, he cannot even articulate it, even. that also points to the real struggle that the conservative party is going to have. i didn't think borisjohnson going is the end of the turbulence because the conservatives are going to have to figure out, post backset, based borisjohnson, what is post breaks it britain all about? singapore on terms? something rather different? what is it? just terms? something rather different? what is it? , . «i , terms? something rather different? whatisit? , , what is it? just quickly, boris johnson is — what is it? just quickly, boris johnson is still _ what is it? just quickly, boris johnson is still in _ what is it? just quickly, boris johnson is still in power, - what is it? just quickly, borisl johnson is still in power, there what is it? just quickly, boris - johnson is still in power, there are some indications he will not announce policy decisions and concerns by some that he will try to get a lot of things done he wants to do, what are you hearing from your sources about her number ten might play this? you might have been told
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that the conservative party will be very anxious to make sure that doesn't happen but, briefly, there's been a lot of talk about could they been a lot of talk about could they be a caretaker? i'm hearing that is rather unlikely but at the fact that it was mentioned as a measure of the anger in the conservative party. they wanted boris johnson to anger in the conservative party. they wanted borisjohnson to leave 24—hour is ago, may be that is why there was talk of a caretaker. just a reminder, in terms of the timetable, the ft is reporting that conservative sources are saying they believe a replacement could be in place by early september. we have to see if they confirm that publicly. sir bob neill is a conservative mp and a little bit earlier on i asked him believe the question of the day which is when does he think boris johnson should go?— which is when does he think boris johnson should go? ideally, i would referred johnson should go? ideally, i would preferred he — johnson should go? ideally, i would preferred he went _ johnson should go? ideally, i would preferred he went today _ johnson should go? ideally, i would preferred he went today and - johnson should go? ideally, i would preferred he went today and we - johnson should go? ideally, i wouldj preferred he went today and we had an interim prime minister step in. constitutionally unusual but dominic rab, the deputy prime minister, he is not standing as a candidate so would not have any skin in the game
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and i think it would be perfectly plausible for him to become prime minister. you must have a prime minister, as such, but on the understanding that it would be a caretaker basis because the damage that has been done is not going to go away whilst boris is in downing street so that's my preferred option and if that cannot be achieved then we should certainly, greatly accelerate the process that is being talked about and i think the 1922 committee already understands that and i think we should had the ballot amongst conservative mps which whittles the numbers down to two next weekend that finishes next week i get the ballot papers out to our members, most of the mount e—mail nowadays, straightaway, i don't see why they could not be turned around with in another three weeks. you think there _ with in another three weeks. you think there could _ with in another three weeks. you think there could be turnaround in three weeks and of course parliament is heading toward summer recess are not too long but if you are a diverse take that why would the committee not get to work right now, slate is new committee, get the
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whole thing running? i slate is new committee, get the whole thing running?— slate is new committee, get the whole thing running? i would have had that, whole thing running? i would have had that. do _ whole thing running? i would have had that, do the _ whole thing running? i would have had that, do the process, - whole thing running? i would have i had that, do the process, tomorrow, but parliament is not sitting, to be fair. parliament will be sitting on monday and they will do that as quickly as they possibly can, to be fair. the executive commit do any arrangements for the ballots that day so the can be done very quickly. i'm not sure the process works well in the party has been in government as opposed to opposition but it is what it is at the moment so i think we should greatly truncate the process but that needs the agreement of the party which includes the voluntary sites representatives but when i say to them, the amount of damage that has been done, i am sorry to say, to the party's reputation and standing, never mind electoral prospects, you have to press the reset button straightaway and that is, because it is about the prime minister's character and personality that means you have got
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to change the character with a number ten as soon as you possibly can. i , . , can. juve is the prime minister iassed can. juve is the prime minister passed my _ can. juve is the prime minister passed my personality. - can. juve is the prime minister passed my personality. let's i can. juve is the prime minister. passed my personality. let's talk about that. and you are watching him standing in the street behind me earlier, letting it be known that he would stand down, i wonder what your reflections were on the fact that your party chose to back him, chose to put into power, chose to make him the person he was their public face given the issues, the questions around mrjohnson's trustworthiness are not remotely new? i5 around mrjohnson's trustworthiness are not remotely new?— are not remotely new? is one of those situations _ are not remotely new? is one of those situations where - are not remotely new? is one of those situations where i - are not remotely new? is one of those situations where i had - are not remotely new? is one of - those situations where i had worked with boris well and a personal level when he was mayor of london and he's been a very effective and popular mayor and by a country mile if it was a prospect of having our most effective electoral performer as opposed tojeremy carbon, potentially getting into number 10 downing street that was a no—brainer as far as i was concerned.
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downing street that was a no-brainer as far as i was concerned.— as far as i was concerned. well, from breaks _ as far as i was concerned. well, from breaks it _ as far as i was concerned. well, from breaks it to _ as far as i was concerned. well, from breaks it to providing - from breaks it to providing assistance to ukraine, borisjohnson has promoted an image of global britain on the world stage but of course his critics would contest that image but he very much has said that image but he very much has said thatis that image but he very much has said that is what he wants this country to be. but look at some of the reaction to his resignation. our diplomatic correspondent has this. the british government is in turmoil this morning. prime minister borisjohnson, a key ally, announces that he is resigning. the downfall of borisjohnson has made international headlines. the prime minister, who as a child wanted to be king of the world, who took the uk out of the eu and promoted the country as global britain. it is time to change the record, to recover our natural and historic role as an enterprising, outward looking and truly global britain. generous in temper and engaged with the world. the crisis in ukraine has provided borisjohnson an opportunity to show british generosity. the uk was the first european country to send arms —
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with cross—party support. but as support for his leadership at home drained away, ukraine appeared for him a welcome distraction. in president zelensky, he found a grateful ally who today expressed sadness. translation: thank you, - boris johnson, for understanding the threat of the russian monster and always being at the forefront of supporting ukraine. moscow, by contrast, gloated with one official saying he'd been hit by his own boomerang. we have a deal with the eu that is ready to go. it is oven ready as i never tire... brexit had propelled borisjohnson to power. he got his deal, but his plan to override parts of it brought fury in european capitals. and there are few tears being shed in most of europe tonight at his demise. he is making great progress, so it's an honor to have you here. we will be discussing trade. we can quadruple our trade with the uk... borisjohnson has drawn comparisons
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with donald trump — both populist, controversial leaders. despite the smiles, relations withjoe biden are cooler, with no trade deal in sight and concerns in washington over northern ireland. i think he's seen as a big and charismatic personality, but i'm afraid one that could not be trusted to stick to deals. his word was not his bond. we are now a country which unilaterally rips up international agreements. i think we're diminished on the international stage and there's ground to be made up. boris johnson relished the world stage. he's reordered british foreign policy. but there are, to put it mildly, decidedly mixed views of his overall performance and of the legacy he'll leave. caroline hawley, bbc news. borisjohnson boris johnson tweeted borisjohnson tweeted in the last half hour saying i've spoken to president as a lansky elliott
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reiterate our unwavering support for ukraine. we will supply vitals defence aid. thank you for your venture. you are a hero. everybody loves you, says borisjohnson. whoever replaces mrjohnson as leader will have to appeal to voters of all ages. let's try to understand that challenge by speaking to the chairman of the romford young conservatives. good of you to join as an bbc news. i wonder if you are glad that borisjohnson has gone? i think boris going is a great idea for the country and for the party. the timing has happened a lot quicker than i expected. but the fact that boris has gone as a win for members of the conservative party as well as the country. i am surirised party as well as the country. i am surprised to _ party as well as the country. i am surprised to see _ party as well as the country. i am surprised to see you _ party as well as the country. i am surprised to see you sounding so
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certain. when you talk with your friends who support conservatives, why would they want to get rid of a man two and a half years after he delivered a majority for you? in local elections recently we have had a lot of issues when speaking to voters on the door about boris's behaviour at the highest levels in downing street, whether partygate or other scandals to do with the cabinet as a whole and voters have said they were not going to vote conservative this time because of boris and ultimately, that has affected the balance of local government in romford so boris affecting even the local council level show that it was time for him to go. level show that it was time for him to io, , i, level show that it was time for him to oi. y., ., level show that it was time for him to io. ., ., level show that it was time for him to io, ., ., ., to go. say you wanted him gone and in a few weeks. _ to go. say you wanted him gone and in a few weeks, we _ to go. say you wanted him gone and in a few weeks, we think _ to go. say you wanted him gone and in a few weeks, we think that - to go. say you wanted him gone and in a few weeks, we think that he - in a few weeks, we think that he will be. what do you want instead of by thisjohnson? notjust in terms of the personalities but what kind of the personalities but what kind of policies are a priority for you? for me personally, back to thatcher
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policies is what i would like to see. i'd like to see lower taxes, the conservatives have always been their party of low taxes. i would like to see is go back to that. are they to see has increased our military spending and continue to support our allies in ukraine and to encourage other members of nato to pay more to their defence to strengthen and secure europe from russian aggression and ijust strengthen and secure europe from russian aggression and i just want some integrity in downing street. interested that you want to see tax cuts. this is becoming a dividing line for conservatives. we see jacob rees mogg criticising rishi sunak saying he was standing on the way of tax cuts but how does the conservative party about levelling up, to use borisjohnson's phrase, if it is cutting taxes question make doesn't need to bring in money to spend it in parts of the country that need help? {lii spend it in parts of the country that need help?—
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spend it in parts of the country that need help? of course. we are currently on _ that need help? of course. we are currently on cost _ that need help? of course. we are currently on cost of _ that need help? of course. we are currently on cost of living - that need help? of course. we are currently on cost of living crisis - currently on cost of living crisis and taxing the working class, especially in poorer areas of the country is not the answer. what we should be doing is cutting taxes to give people in those areas a chance to keep more of their hard earned money and we should make cuts in unnecessary areas to then use that to level up. unnecessary areas to then use that to level up— to level up. before i let you go, who is your _ to level up. before i let you go, who is your choice _ to level up. before i let you go, who is your choice to _ to level up. before i let you go, who is your choice to replace i to level up. before i let you go, i who is your choice to replace boris johnson? �* . ., , who is your choice to replace boris johnson? �* i ., , , johnson? ben wallace is the safest o ition johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries — johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries and _ johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries and i _ johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries and i would _ johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries and i would like - johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries and i would like to - johnson? ben wallace is the safest option fries and i would like to see | option fries and i would like to see the tale but i think ben will be the safest option. iinfill]! the tale but i think ben will be the safest option-— safest option. will have to see if he throws _ safest option. will have to see if he throws his _ safest option. will have to see if he throws his hat _ safest option. will have to see if he throws his hat into _ safest option. will have to see if he throws his hat into the - safest option. will have to see if he throws his hat into the ring. i he throws his hat into the ring. thank you very much forjoining us. we appreciate your time and bbc news. ben wallace is one of those who is being quite heavily tipped to be a serious contender. he has not confirmed if you're standing not but let's cast our eye over who is being talked about. that fair have been
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speaking to us with the chalkboard and gave us the runners. it is early days but, as to be expected, the markets are red—hot when it comes to this next conservative leader base. we have seen a significant change in the odds today. for ben wallace, he has been cut into 3—1 from 17—2. he leads the way is favoured but that is not to say that we have not seen other candidates and potential candidates backed as well. rishi sunak is popular. 25% of all money has been for the former chancellor who is now 5—1. penny margin is solid firm favourite with punters. 6-1, solid firm favourite with punters. 6—1, currently. but you do go through the list and you do see that there are some other potential candidates in there. jeremy hunt further down the short board, 18—1.
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it is of experience when it comes to conservative leadership race. obviously finishing second back in 2019 to borisjohnson. i wonder if he could be that steady pair of pants they could potentially be looking for. jeremy hunt 18—1. very interesting. a long way to go in that race and there are several rounds of voting. just among conservative mps, which whittled the field down to two and then those to face a vote of conservative party members although sirjohn major, former prime minister, said leave the members out of it to make this process quicker. at the moment it does not seem that is going to happen but we will see. the prime minister's office have released some photos, giving us an insight into the days events. in these photos, we see borisjohnson along with his family. this isjust inside the door thatis family. this isjust inside the door that is behind me. black on one side and wait on the other. we can see
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some of the prime minister's supporters. jacob rees mogg, nadeem darius, arguably the two most loyal supporters of his within the cabinet. they did not waver throughout this process. those are some photos released and a hug between mrjohnson and his wife carrie along with our son. number ten has posted pictures from the first meeting of borisjohnson's reshaped cabinet. let's have a look at this. some familiar faces. he reshaped cabinet. let's have a look at this. some familiarfaces. he has had quite a time, hasn't he? got promoted into the chancellor's role after rishi sunak resigned last night was privately advising boris johnson to go and this morning he was publicly saying borisjohnson should go but he has not resigned and he is staying in thatjob. dominic raabjust across and he is staying in thatjob. dominic raab just across the table, the deputy prime minister. if there was an interim option, some people within the conservative party will take that to happen. he would be favourite to adopt the interim prime minister role. no sign, i should
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say, that that is going to happen. dominic raab has said he was not going to be standing. on the right, another big hitter within the cabinet to advised boris johnson privately that he should go but did not resign. she has remained as home secretary as well. some people being promoted into the cabinet. other staying despite the fact they helped to give borisjohnson the push out of the door. now, shortly after half past 12 this afternoon, mrjohnson walked out of the store, the podium had been set up, and he confirmed what we had already had a few minutes before. it is what we had already had a few minutes before.— what we had already had a few minutes before. it is clearly now the will of _ minutes before. it is clearly now the will of the _ minutes before. it is clearly now the will of the parliamentary - the will of the parliamentary conservative party that there should be a new leader of that party and therefore a new prime minister. and i have agreed with sir graham brady, the chairman of our backbench mps, that the process of choosing that
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new leader should begin now. and the timetable will be announced next week. and i have today appointed a cabinet to serve, as i will, until a new leader is in place. i cabinet to serve, as i will, until a new leader is in place.— cabinet to serve, as i will, until a new leader is in place. i would 'ust i uickl new leader is in place. i would 'ust quickly mention i new leader is in place. i would 'ust quickly mention joe i new leader is in place. i would 'ust quickly mention joe biden, i new leader is in place. i would just quickly mention joe biden, the - new leader is in place. i would just quickly mention joe biden, the us| quickly mentionjoe biden, the us president, said he is looking forward to continuing to closely cooperate with the government of the uk and is called the uk and the us the closest of friends and allies so a statement from joe biden very much in line with what we would expect to hear. do remember, as we cover their cyber bbc news, you can also follow the story online via the bbc news life page which you can find at bbc dot—com and you're welcome to keep sending your questions way and i will do my best to answer them. hello. a heat wave is about to develop across parts of england and temperatures reach up the to the 20s, low 30s and the hotspots lasting until the start of next week as well. now, as this high pressure
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moves and across us, around that as you know now for several days, are rather system is bringing cloudy skies, breezy conditions it even a chance for a little rain at times and parts of scotland and northern ireland. and then during the night, into friday morning, it is likely we'll see for the optics of rain in northwest scotland, may be few spots into northern ireland at times. and there will be some areas of cloud in england and wales but also clear spells with temperatures as friday begins in the mid to low teens. then during friday, in a cloud that you see it in the new wells will tend to clear away to allow more sunshine compared with today for parts of northern england will cloud over again late afternoon into the evening. sunny skies to and eastern parts of scotland in northern west of scotland and northern ireland, with temperatures close to average for the time of year that will stay rather cloudy with each of year that will stay rather cloudy with a chance to sing a little light rain. temps are going up in england and wales and the hardest parts
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of southeast england will be at 30 degrees. high—pressure is moving and across the uk during the weekend. in and indeed during saturday, will still have some cloud running around and into western parts of scotland and northern ireland. eastern and southern scotland will see some spells. a fair amount of sunshine to come through wales and england on saturday, may well be at this stage, temperatures take a little bit of a step backwards but we are still talking mid to upper 20s and the very warmest areas, temperatures head up a bit more again on sunday. it will start some areas of cloud on sunday but sunshine breaks are more widely with scotland and northern ireland, it will feel warmer but still the chance of the far north and northwest of scotland with more cloud and more breeze in the western isles, you're not talking about want to likely to be doing so more through northern ireland and scotland and to get into england and wales on sunday in the mid to upper 20s around 30 degrees in parts in southeast england. hardest on monday and tuesday through england and wales as it gradually turns cooler in scotland and northern ireland with the weather from moving through with the chance of rain. cooler air filters further south from the midweek though it states fairly warm across southern areas
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and after that, some uncertainty but it may well be some heat comes back again later in the week with all of your weekend.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, i'm live with you from downing street. borisjohnson has been forced out by his own party — he'll carry on as a caretaker leader and prime ministerfor now. i want you to know how sad i am to be giving up the bestjob in the world. but them's the breaks. the lain is for world. but them's the breaks. the plan is for the _ world. but them's the breaks. the plan is for the prime minister to stay well a new successor is found. but opposition parties — and a growing number within his own party — think mrjohnson should leave number 10 now.
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we have had pictures of him posting the latest cabinet meetings. he has a new cabinet to replace those who've resigned — but says any major decisions will be left for the next government. mrjohnson has made clear he wanted to stay in office, that he has a mandate from the electorate — but that he'd been forced to go. as we have seen at westminster of the herd instinct is powerful and when the herd moves, it moves. and my friends, and politics, no one is remotely indispensable. just one other non—political story to bring you this evening. rafael nadal has pulled out of wimbledon. he has an abdominal injury — and says doesn't make sense to continue.
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borisjohnson will stand down as prime minister and leader of the conservative party. within the next few weeks, if not sooner, britain will have a new prime minister, though it's not yet clear who that might be, or exactly how long the process could take. the financial times has been reporting that: "conservative party grandees intend to install a new uk prime minister by early september when the house of commons returns from its summer break, that's according to mps with knowledge of the plans." and this from sky news chief political correspondentjon craig: "borisjohnson's pps james duddridge tells mejohnson intends to continue as mp after leaving downing st."...
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the tweet reads. it's been a day of fast moving developments here in downing street. let's have a listen to how borisjohnson announced his resignation just a few hours ago: in the last few days i've tried to persuade my colleagues that it would be eccentric to change governments we are delivering so much and we have such a vast mandate of when were actually only a handful of points behind in the polls. even a midterm after, quite a few months of relentless sledging and the economic scene is so difficult domestically
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and internationally. i regret not to have been successful in those arguments and of course, it is painful to be able to see through so many ideas and projects myself but as we have seen at westminster, the herd instinct is powerful and when the herd moves, it moves and, my friends, and politics, no one is remotely indispensable and are brilliant system will produce another leader equally committed to taking this country forward through tough times, notjust helping families to get through it but changing and improving the way we do things. cutting burdens on businesses and yes, cutting taxes because that is the way to generate the growth in the income we need to pay to create public services. and for that new leader, i say whoever he or she may be, i will give you as much support as i can and to you,
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the british public, i know there are many people who will be relieved and perhaps quite a few will also be disappointed and i want you to know how sad i am to be giving up the bestjob in the world. but them's the breaks. there is boris johnson, there is borisjohnson, not for the first time, brass band music is drifting across downing street which is just over there and that's be absolutely clear our borisjohnson said, announcing the intention to step down and he is not yet stepped down it what's happened now is the process is beginning with the timetable is said to be confirmed but the ft saying it was around six weeks and not confirming publicly borisjohnson submitted clear the way to remain prime minister in the meantime for however long that process takes almost certainly through to the autumn. that
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timetable potentially shifting from a number of different sites because, some tory mps want him to go right now. james duddridge mp is one of his closest aides — and was in no 10 when borisjohnson resigned. he will not be there by the conservative party conference. we will have a new leader and to a degree, it is not a matterfor the prime minister, it's a matterfor the party chairman in coordination with the committee in graham brady speaking informally to colleagues and those who can get him here, they want a faster process, particularly on the parliamentary side. ibis want a faster process, particularly on the parliamentary side.- on the parliamentary side. as the brass band _ on the parliamentary side. as the brass band plays _ on the parliamentary side. as the brass band plays the _ on the parliamentary side. as the brass band plays the national- brass band plays the national anthem, was stopped for a political is corresponded to his ear. the may be people watching and how do both
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not have a set system so that when we are in the situation, we know things like how long the process will take? haste things like how long the process will take? i i, i, things like how long the process willtake? i ., ., ., , will take? we do have a set system in some ways. _ will take? we do have a set system in some ways. a — will take? we do have a set system in some ways, a party _ will take? we do have a set system in some ways, a party that - will take? we do have a set system in some ways, a party that winds i will take? we do have a set system | in some ways, a party that winds the most seats in physic and command the majority in parliament forms of government, right? and that is what is not going to be an election. the iart of is not going to be an election. the part of the — is not going to be an election. the part of the prime minister says unexpectedly and then we are waiting for a committee on the ruling party to tell us when this will happen. there is a committee to at least make the rules. i'm not here to defend the system, certainly. it certainly has its quirks but by the way, i think what you have been hearing and quoting his right and it is the case that the grandees who run the conservative party in an ideal world probably would want a successor to borisjohnson in early september. successor to boris johnson in early september-— successor to boris johnson in early setember. , . , ., september. give us a crash course on how this works _ september. give us a crash course on how this works most _ september. give us a crash course on how this works most of _ september. give us a crash course on how this works most of the _ september. give us a crash course on how this works most of the 1922 - how this works most of the 1922 committee that represents the
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backbench mps they control this process in the meeting on monday, is that right? assumed that holds, what happens to that meeting as you look doing some of this crash course stuff. i doing some of this crash course stuff. ~i ., doing some of this crash course stuff. ~i i, i, �* , doing some of this crash course stuff. ~i ., ., �*, ., stuff. i know that's not true. essentially. _ stuff. i know that's not true. essentially, you _ stuff. i know that's not true. essentially, you have - stuff. i know that's not true. essentially, you have a - stuff. i know that's not true. i essentially, you have a system whereby it is the mps the conservative party who whittled down the list too. there are seven or eight candidates and they get to make their case to the conservative party as a range of votes, inside parliament and is then submitted to the conservative party membership of hundred thousand people, does that make sense? i don't believe it's a good method but you do understand it. ., , good method but you do understand it. error message about the presidential _ it. error message about the presidential system - it. error message about the presidential system in - it. error message about the i presidential system in america it. error message about the - presidential system in america works we have to support your party and then tacked positions to try to win then tacked positions to try to win the support of the overall electorate, tory mps wants is the
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same as the conservative party members. same as the conservative party members-— same as the conservative party members. ., �* , ., , , members. that's a very interesting i uestion members. that's a very interesting question but _ members. that's a very interesting question but it's _ members. that's a very interesting question but it's getting _ members. that's a very interesting question but it's getting into - members. that's a very interesting question but it's getting into the i question but it's getting into the weeds of british politics. i believe are ire weeds of british politics. i believe are pretty much there. _ weeds of british politics. i believe are pretty much there. we - weeds of british politics. i believe are pretty much there. we are - weeds of british politics. i believe i are pretty much there. we are stuck in those weeds, _ are pretty much there. we are stuck in those weeds, covered _ are pretty much there. we are stuck in those weeds, covered in - are pretty much there. we are stuck in those weeds, covered in those i in those weeds, covered in those weeds. it is very interesting because that is the criticism that is made by some conservative mps that, my goodness, our members here and are far more right—wing than we are and are gung ho in any kind of issue and they tend to be older and rather interesting, since brexit and borisjohnson, i'm not sure that the membership is that much further to the right that the parliamentary conservative party than it used to be because there was, certainly when i first started reporting, be because there was, certainly when ifirst started reporting, you can find conservative mps that say plainly, they don't want to give the membership too much power, that's a pretty feisty fuse that make it hard to win elections. bi, pretty feisty fuse that make it hard to win elections.— to win elections. a person were an awful lot about, _ to win elections. a person were an awful lot about, he _ to win elections. a person were an awful lot about, he is _ to win elections. a person were an awful lot about, he is in _ to win elections. a person were an awful lot about, he is in the - to win elections. a person were an awful lot about, he is in the news| awful lot about, he is in the news quite often. he is a crucialfigure
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here, the head of the 1922 committee and its right to say is in charge of the process? . i and its right to say is in charge of the process?— and its right to say is in charge of the process? , ithink he is, he is a committee _ the process? , ithink he is, he is a committee to _ the process? , ithink he is, he is a committee to help _ the process? , ithink he is, he is a committee to help them - the process? , ithink he is, he is a committee to help them and i the process? , i think he is, he is i a committee to help them and yes, he's highly respected in the conservative party, the kind of person to borrow from an americanism, straight shooter. good to see you. — americanism, straight shooter. good to see you. rob _ americanism, straight shooter. good to see you, rob is _ americanism, straight shooter. good to see you, rob is been _ americanism, straight shooter. good to see you, rob is been with us for an awful long time during downing street in the previous days, thanks as ever in the the former conservative prime ministerjohn major has said it would be "unwise" for borisjohnson to stay in office until the autumn. sirjohn wrote a letter to the 1922 committee of backbench conservative mps warning mrjohnson would continue to have "the power to make decisions" affecting the whole country — despite losing the support of his mps and ministers.
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he outlines two possible solutions. either the deputy prime minister should take over on an 'acting basis�* or "the 1922 committee should arrange for the new leader of the party to be elected solely by mps, with the winner being installed as prime minister, and then endorsed by party members". so in effect, cancelling the vote by the tory party members, and shortening the whole process. he does say that "neither of these options is ideal". the process of selecting a new conservative leader we are not making any predictions as to where we may end up tomorrow but borisjohnson is going nowhere for now. the process of selecting a new conservative leader effectively begins now. and the timetable will be decided
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by the leadership of the 1922 committee of backbench conservative mps. the rules — as they stand today — is that any candidate needs the support of 8 conservative mps to take part. some in the party say that bar should be raised — one saying a 'wacky races' contest with lots of candidates should be avoided. the candidates then get whittled down to 2 over several rounds of voting amongst conservative mps. only then does the wider membership of the conservative party get to have its say — in a final run—off to decide the winner. two candidates and it's at that point, unless a john major gets two candidates and it's at that point, unless ajohn major gets his way that the conservative party members get involved because it's them who will elect a replacement
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just as they elected boris johnson backin just as they elected boris johnson back in 2019 and as rob was saying, the conservative party is a lot of members but it's a very tiny fraction of the country as a whole but it will be those members of the system stays the same who will choose the next prime minister of the uk. it isa it is a complicated system that is under pressure but for the moment, it remains in place even before the process is begun, leave some people who have said they want to be the next leader. before the process has even begun, two big conservative names said they aren't running deputy prime minister dominic raab and michael gove have ruled themselves. michael gove had called for mrjohnson to resign yesterday, but was instead sacked as housing secretary in the evening. now — who is running. the first person to throw their hat in the ring is the uk's attorney general, suella braveman.
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let's have a listen. i'm putting myself forward because i believe that the 2019 manifesto is fit for purpose and presents a bold and inspiring vision of our country and inspiring vision of our country and want to deliver on the promises contained in that manifesto. the mp for high wycombe steve baker, a leading brexiteer, was the second to go on the record with leadership ambitions. he said he certainly has ambitions. i am seriously considering standing because members consistently bring me in the top ten initial respect them and take that seriously. a number of borisjohnson's former and current cabinet members are tipped as possible successors. former chancellor of the exchequer rishi sunak and former health secretary sajid javid made themselves top
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contenders when they resigned on tuesday. they paved the way for the stream of ministerial resignations that eventually forced johnson out. mrjavid previously bid for the leadership in 2019, making it to the final four before dropping out to support mrjohnson. earlier today our correspondent nick eardley reported that mrjavid is seriously considering running for conservative party leader and pm. rishi sunak was once seen as a possible future conservative leader. but the past few months have seen his reputation dented following a controversy over his wife's tax affairs. his resignation this week seems to have re—energised his leadership hopes. on tuesday evening rishi sunak
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was replaced by nadhim zahawi, who by wednesday evening was already calling on mrjohnson to quit. mr zahawi is another potential candidate for the top job. it doesn't mean you're the most popular with conservative mps in this rate it's interesting. you have to navigate the mps in order to reach the final stage and sit before the party members and some mps have started to declare their favourites. already putting his support behind tom to be the next leader. he is the chairman of the influential committee in the commons. mr green
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told sky news that having someone who is not in easier to announce whether that is definitely the case. another person we should definitely take about is the defence secretary was coming top and of party members, he is also announced whether or not he will run. he had this to say about the next leader. this is the first prime minister in — next leader. this is the first prime minister in a _ next leader. this is the first prime minister in a generation _ next leader. this is the first prime minister in a generation to - next leader. this is the first prime j minister in a generation to reverse taking money out of the fence and put into investment. the £24 billion is gone into defence for a four—year period is the first time in most peoples generations that are proper returned investment. until then from 1991 when i was serving, chancellor
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after chancellor took out the dividend. looking to everything the next prime minister will invest in our defence. next prime minister will invest in our defence-— next prime minister will invest in our defence. ., �* , , , ., our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago — our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago i— our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago i was _ our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago i was saying _ our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago i was saying to - our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago i was saying to you, i our defence. that's been well is two minutes ago i was saying to you, let me read from an article in the daily telegraph or as i have served before and i hope to answer the call as prime minister in his lunch is leadership did in the telegraph and he says, it is time for renewal and so, all the signs are ever going to have a wide field here and let us see with the mps in the country, the conservative party members might be looking for conservative party members might be joining me now isjoe twyman, who's the co— founder of the polling organisation delta poll of stuck about boris johnson of stuck about borisjohnson going. do you think your polling will be glad that? . i
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do you think your polling will be ilad that? ~' do you think your polling will be ilad that? ,, ., ., , glad that? , i think the ma'ority of ieiole glad that? , i think the ma'ority of people have — glad that? , i think the ma'ority of people have said * glad that? , i think the ma'ority of people have said i t glad that? , i think the ma'ority of people have said ijust _ glad that? , i think the ma'ority of people have said ijust of h glad that? , i think the majority of people have said i just of the - glad that? , i think the majority of people have said ijust of the lastl people have said ijust of the last few days but over the last few weeks and months that it is a boris johnson should resign and it predates even the party gate. you will expect that given that the majority of the country did not actually vote for him but regardless of that, you have a situation where going in this week, more than half of current conservative support a he was doing a bad job and so, while his vociferous supporters would definitely be keeping the flag flying frame, i don't think they'll be that many people in the country were devastated to see him go. it’s were devastated to see him go. it's earl to were devastated to see him go. it's early to be asking you this but let me go for it anyway. with boris johnson saying he'll go, to what degree to the negative associations with mrjohnson's go with them and not affect the conservative party or
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to what degree is this whole saga damaging the tories? haste to what degree is this whole saga damaging the tories?— damaging the tories? we look at thinis damaging the tories? we look at things historically _ damaging the tories? we look at things historically and _ damaging the tories? we look at things historically and go - damaging the tories? we look at things historically and go to - damaging the tories? we look at. things historically and go to where this is happened, you see after david cameron resign, there wasn't really a significant change in the polls, even when theresa may became leader, it did not change things significantly at that time. there was a slight bounce and boris johnson became prime minister but before that with theresa may his resignation, did not bring about any significant change either. and so, expect that if we do see change and it is significant, we will only arrive once the new leader is in place if at all. and so, the conservatives are looking at depositions and poles of the moment notjust in terms of voting intention across all the different metrics and who's going to be dealing with the cost of living crisis in the economy, looking at all of those things, i think they're going to be disappointed if they're looking for a significant change in the next few days.—
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looking for a significant change in the next few days. mentioning some ofthe the next few days. mentioning some of the pressing _ the next few days. mentioning some of the pressing issues, _ the next few days. mentioning some of the pressing issues, with - the next few days. mentioning some of the pressing issues, with the - of the pressing issues, with the left tackle and i wonder what you know or understand about peoples priorities especially conservative voters because it seems we talk about this before, since brexit, that priority has shifted around a bit. {lin that priority has shifted around a bit. .,, , ., , , that priority has shifted around a bit. , , ,, ., that priority has shifted around a bit. , ,, ., , bit. on most peoples lists now is the cost of _ bit. on most peoples lists now is the cost of living _ bit. on most peoples lists now is the cost of living and _ bit. on most peoples lists now is the cost of living and how - bit. on most peoples lists now is the cost of living and how to - bit. on most peoples lists now isj the cost of living and how to deal with that. with the difficult situation of any conservative leader will find themselves in is how to do at that, and noticed the priority notjust at that, and noticed the priority not just of conservative voters belabour voters and so on, it's how you do with that that will really, and any with the site this leadership contest because there are some within the conservative party and some of the supporters of the conservatives who believe that the solution is to spend more government money and how to finance that, through raising taxes, perhaps through raising taxes, perhaps through borrowing but certainly not
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straightforward. alternatively, a significant wing that believes cutting taxes and encouraging businesses and who to appeal to it which time is very difficult political tight group is when the borisjohnson struggled with and one that i imagine whoever chooses to throw their hat into the ring for this contest will have to answer the and those convince with their answers may decide the outcome. haste answers may decide the outcome. we know that behind the door is your number ten, they were telling him to go and taking a chance here because he could end up losing and lubricant and of getting a coalition and the lib dems and how is this whole saga in the conservative party seeing labour and their leader sir keir
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starmer? 5ir labour and their leader sir keir starmer? ,, ,, ., starmer? sir keir starmer was ahead of boris johnson on personal- starmer? sir keir starmer was ahead of boris johnson on personal ratings| of borisjohnson on personal ratings going into the soul crisis and given what has happened to the conservatives of the past few days, i would imagine that situation is only improved for the labour party and really, that's of the heart of this whole issue because in seven change significantly since voting intention and others since the local elections is pretty static and suggested that the conservative party didn't have enough to when the majority they needed to keep boris johnson in parliament. and boris johnson in parliament. and boris johnson claimed whenever they can bring that around, particularly with some time remaining until the general election and many people and however many other 50 or so conservative ministers believe the change into, the top and the damage that borisjohnson had done in his personal attributes, with the people
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trusted him, with the people thought he had good judgment are behaved fairly, all of those things are now so ingrained that he could not be turned around in british politics and all the conservatives moving forward is will the next conservative leader, whoever that is, be able to bring about the kind of change that is needed in order for the conservatives to get the majorities that they need or will labour now be in prime position for the next year or two years, however long it takes given where the conservatives are now and also where the conservative government has to go on the next few years with regards to things like the economy, inflation and most importantly, the cost—of—living crisis. i’m inflation and most importantly, the cost-of-living crisis.— cost-of-living crisis. i'm sure we'll be talking _ cost-of-living crisis. i'm sure we'll be talking to _ cost-of-living crisis. i'm sure we'll be talking to you - cost-of-living crisis. i'm sure we'll be talking to you as - cost-of-living crisis. i'm sure we'll be talking to you as you j we'll be talking to you as you continue your your polling. as we continue our coverage, the big question at the beginning of the day was is borisjohnson going to go the
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big question for this afternoon and evening is when is he going to go and many of the mps have been quick to say he should simply go with the delay. he should go without delay. listen to this. mexico would not be tenable for them to continue as a caretaker if he cannot fulfil to continue as a caretaker if he cannot fulfi— to continue as a caretaker if he cannot fulfi ., , ., cannot fulfil what they referred to the lack of integrity _ cannot fulfil what they referred to the lack of integrity and _ cannot fulfil what they referred to the lack of integrity and we - cannot fulfil what they referred to | the lack of integrity and we cannot have that — the lack of integrity and we cannot have that. and tracking onto the privileges — have that. and tracking onto the privileges committee and potentially finding _ privileges committee and potentially finding that he knowingly misled the house _ finding that he knowingly misled the house. , , , , ., ., , house. this number the sustainable until the autumn _ house. this number the sustainable until the autumn and _ house. this number the sustainable until the autumn and the _ house. this number the sustainable until the autumn and the lack - house. this number the sustainable until the autumn and the lack of - until the autumn and the lack of confidence — until the autumn and the lack of confidence that— until the autumn and the lack of confidence that the _ until the autumn and the lack of i confidence that the parliamentary party _ confidence that the parliamentary party has — confidence that the parliamentary party has expressed _ confidence that the parliamentary party has expressed and - confidence that the parliamentary party has expressed and it's - confidence that the parliamentary party has expressed and it's earlyj party has expressed and it's early for the _ party has expressed and it's early for the prime _ party has expressed and it's early for the prime minister— party has expressed and it's early for the prime minister to- party has expressed and it's early for the prime minister to set- party has expressed and it's early for the prime minister to set the| for the prime minister to set the timetable. — for the prime minister to set the timetable. to— for the prime minister to set the timetable, to be _ for the prime minister to set the timetable, to be honest. - for the prime minister to set the timetable, to be honest. thai. for the prime minister to set the timetable, to be honest. that this is not about _ timetable, to be honest. that this is not about individual— timetable, to be honest. that this is not about individual promotion l timetable, to be honest. that this i is not about individual promotion or individual personalities, it is about restoring confidence fast in our system of government and that is urgent and it cannot be delayed for
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two or three months, needs to start tonight. let's look at the key dates. the 1922 committee will elect a new executive on monday, its likely that executive will play a big role in the leadership contest that will follow the next key date — parliament ends for the summer two weeks today — on thursday 21stjuly. the conservative party conference begins 2nd october in birmingham — but as we're hearing a successor could be in place well before that.
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aiming for the beginning of september, we should say for this one borisjohnson gone right there are other conservative mps — plenty of them on the bbc today — who say borisjohnson should get his way and remain as prime minister for several months more until a successor is chosen. have a listen. i think he should stay. this has been a very disruptive period and i think more disruption would not be welcome — both for those people running businesses and in the country and for the wider national security situation in europe. there are no ideal outcomes but it has been the case in the past that where a prime minister steps down, they stay in office pending the election of a successor. so i think that's the only viable option now. i do think that the pm should stay on and we should govern the way| we need to because, as you can imagine, we still need to pass. policy, pass laws and it's important that we have a cabinet in position. and we have ministers there to be
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able to deliver on that. _ the leadership election and process should happen i think as quickly as it reasonably can. we've got to make sure we make the right choice but we should do it as quickly as we're reasonably able to. there's a big difference between being a prime minister, he was only talking a few weeks ago about serving until the 2030s, versus just acting in a caretaker capacity for a short period of time, not introducing new policy. former conservative deputy prime minister and i've been speaking to him about what he would like the prime minister to do. mi; him about what he would like the prime minister to do.— prime minister to do. my lack of trust and boris _ prime minister to do. my lack of trust and boris is _ prime minister to do. my lack of trust and boris is precisely - prime minister to do. my lack of trust and boris is precisely that, j prime minister to do. my lack of i trust and boris is precisely that, a lack of trust and leaving them in a position where he can use the power of the premiership to push his own causes is very dangerous thing to do
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and will only perpetuate the uncertainty, much more sensible is to adopt rules which speed up the process and put in place the deputy prime minister rather than the one who does not stand and provide be reasonably placed to do that. it is noticeable that _ reasonably placed to do that. it is noticeable that all of this cabinet ministers we know yesterday went to speak to boris johnson ministers we know yesterday went to speak to borisjohnson to say ministers we know yesterday went to speak to boris johnson to say that look, it's time speak to borisjohnson to say that look, it's time for speak to boris johnson to say that look, it's time for you to speak to borisjohnson to say that look, it's time for you to go speak to boris johnson to say that look, it's time for you to go have now come out to say it's time for you to go now. now come out to say it's time for you to go now-— now come out to say it's time for you to go now. that's up to them, ou you to go now. that's up to them, you asked — you to go now. that's up to them, you asked me _ you to go now. that's up to them, you asked me my _ you to go now. that's up to them, you asked me my opinion, - you to go now. that's up to them, you asked me my opinion, i- you to go now. that's up to them, you asked me my opinion, i havel you asked me my opinion, i have given it to you. emma john majors has been saying as well. iitfufhezit given it to you. emma john ma'ors has been saying as well. what about john majors suggestion _ has been saying as well. what about john majors suggestion that - has been saying as well. what about john majors suggestion that forgive l john majors suggestion that forgive the conservative party members voting such as the situation that actually, it would be betterfor mps tojust actually, it would be betterfor mps to just work this out very quickly? i agree with that because what happens when you have this process of going to the membership of the
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tory party, you get a very slanted electorate and the more extreme electorate and the more extreme electorate than the bulk of the tory vote and the more extreme electorate than the centre ground of british politics where elections by a larger one. you have been very critical of both boris johnson's you have been very critical of both borisjohnson's character you have been very critical of both boris johnson's character and leadership but also his signature policy, breaks it. what are your expectations of a new conservative leader because surely, although he is departing, the party is now within his mode and that signature policy and that commitment to a particular type of euroscepticism is not going to suddenly change? that is the judgment _ not going to suddenly change? trust is the judgment that the party has got to make. and i understand the argument that, in the red wall seats, talking about foreigners and immigrants and all of that has a certain attraction but i think that
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has now been blown because, believe what they are interested in is standards of living, they know privately well the economy is in a mess but of course, but you have to do is balance the south of england where we have seen three devastating by—election losses and a part of the reason for that is breaks it. at the tory party want to reposition themselves to win from the centre ground, they have got to stop this ridiculous parody of the right wing of europe, a lot of bureaucrats impeding our progress. i’m impeding our progress. i'm interested _ impeding our progress. i'm interested in _ impeding our progress. i'm interested in your comment that you believe the by—election result is connected to breaks it. as it is not correct that a lot of the difficulty is currently playing at westminster are connected to borisjohnson and his character and if he departs the stage, perhaps the conservative party can maintain its policy approach and still flourish of england? approach and still flourish of eniland? i, i, approach and still flourish of eniland? ., ., ,, england? you have missed the point. his ioli england? you have missed the point. his policy of — england? you have missed the point. his policy of exit _ england? you have missed the point. his policy of exit was _ england? you have missed the point. his policy of exit was based _ england? you have missed the point. his policy of exit was based on - england? you have missed the point.
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his policy of exit was based on a - his policy of exit was based on a pack of lies and from that moment on, we have seen this duplicity as the central characteristic of his government. so you can't separate the bits. you either want integrity and truth or you are prepared to put up and truth or you are prepared to put up with something less. the people come to the view that they are not prepared to do that so new leader has got to command respect and integrity and if you start beating the nationalist xenophobic drum brakes that you will never succeed in getting that. you brakes that you will never succeed in getting that-— in getting that. you are saying it was built on _ in getting that. you are saying it was built on a _ in getting that. you are saying it was built on a pack _ in getting that. you are saying it was built on a pack of _ in getting that. you are saying it was built on a pack of lies - in getting that. you are saying it was built on a pack of lies and i was built on a pack of lies and there was an element of xenophobia but we saw in 2019 when boris johnson said i will get breaks it down he won a sizeable majority in the house of commons. haven't we got to respect that they tapped into a desire in this country to leave the european union, a desire that has not gone away? i european union, a desire that has not gone away?— european union, a desire that has not gone away? i am afraid i know why people _ not gone away? i am afraid i know why people voted _ not gone away? i am afraid i know why people voted for _ not gone away? i am afraid i know why people voted for breaks - not gone away? i am afraid i know why people voted for breaks it. i not gone away? i am afraid i know i why people voted for breaks it. they were told that we would get our
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country back. well, self—evidently, we have not done that. we were told that very considerable boost to our economy. the economy is now shown to be the least effective in europe except for russia. we were told they would be no border on the irish sea, actually we have got trouble on the irish sea. we were told that we would be able to unite and we've actually now got sinn fein as the largest party in northern ireland and we have got scots national is asking for a second so the whole thing has been a pack of lies. some non—political news for you now. rafael nadal has withdrawn from wimbledon after failing to recover from an abdominal injury. here he is speaking a little earlier. well, unfortunately, as you can imagine, i am well, unfortunately, as you can imagine, iam here well, unfortunately, as you can imagine, i am here because i have to pull out from the tournament. as
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everybody so yesterday. i have been suffering with a pain in the abdominal and suffering with a pain in the abdominaland i suffering with a pain in the abdominal and i know something was not ok there, as yesterday i said. and, yeah, that is confirmed. i have a tear in the muscle, in the abdominal. so... the communication is too late even like that, i was thinking during the whole day about the position to make that i think it's... yeah. ithink the position to make that i think it's... yeah. i think it's... the position to make that i think it's... yeah. ithink it's... don't make sense to go, even if i tried during my career to keep going, very tough circumstances. in that one, i think, it is obvious that if i keep going and the injury is going to be worse and worse. iie
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going and the injury is going to be worse and worse.— worse and worse. he is out. more coveraie worse and worse. he is out. more coverage of— worse and worse. he is out. more coverage of that _ worse and worse. he is out. more coverage of that through - worse and worse. he is out. more coverage of that through the - worse and worse. he is out. more coverage of that through the bbc| coverage of that through the bbc sport app. let's go back to the story we are of course covering. boris johnson's story we are of course covering. borisjohnson's decision to step down as leader of the conservative party and as prime minister. in time. once a successor is chosen. as i was coming in, reports of a story in the late afternoon, was approaching the gates, nigel farage, former leader of the uk independence party and former leader of the breaks at a party, very high profile breaks at a party, very high profile breaks it supporter during that breaks it supporter during that breaks that campaign in 2016, alongside borisjohnson, though they representing slightly different wings of the breaks that campaign. he is now a contributor and has a programme on gb news. i quickly asked him what he had made of events. ., , ., ., events. inevitable. it had to happen- _ events. inevitable. it had to happen. confidence - events. inevitable. it had to happen. confidence had - events. inevitable. it had to - happen. confidence had collapsed. notjust in westminster but actually over half the conservative voters
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have had enough. something had to happen. for him on a personal level it is sad. it gives the conservative party a chance to rethink and be set and this is notjust about dishonesty, it is notjust about covering up the truth. he was elected as a conservative and governed as a liberal and that upset the wrong people in the country. what are you looking for from the then new conservative leader? at the mic that is up to them. i would like to see somebody who decides that breaks it needs to be completed. we have got half of breaks it. it is not really working for the. boris johnson says he has got breaks it down. ., johnson says he has got breaks it down. i, i, ., johnson says he has got breaks it down. ., ., ., , ., ., down. no, no, never to be got over the line in — down. no, no, never to be got over the line in terms _ down. no, no, never to be got over the line in terms of— down. no, no, never to be got over the line in terms of leaving - down. no, no, never to be got over the line in terms of leaving but - the line in terms of leaving but there is a lotto do. joining us now is henry hill who is the deputy editor of the website conservative home. thank you forjoining us. no thank you for 'oining us. no problem. _ thank you forjoining us. in; problem. thank you. thank you forjoining us. no problem. thank you. boris i thank you forjoining us. no - problem. thank you. boris johnson is u iset not problem. thank you. boris johnson is upset not least _ problem. thank you. boris johnson is upset not least because _ problem. thank you. boris johnson is upset not least because he _ problem. thank you. boris johnson is upset not least because he feels - problem. thank you. boris johnson is upset not least because he feels he i upset not least because he feels he has this mandate from the 2019 election which he believes gives in
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the right to remain in thisjob, something that is now not going to happen. but unless i'm missing it, i am not seeing a big surge of outrage among conservative voters and conservative supporters. have i not been looking in the right you might know, the prime minister has a hard core of supporters who are furious but i think amongst the broader conservative family, if you want to call it that, there is mainly a sense of relief because it does not matter if you started out as pro boris or anti—boris, the left or right of the party, this government has not been delivering. it's not been capable of delivering for a long time has been lurching from crisis to crisis and all of us who wanted an effective conservative government, whateverform of conservatism that is, then welcome this as a chance for a change in the other problem, of course, is even before then, borisjohnson was not really doing anything with his 2019 mandate. this government was not grappling with the big structural problems facing the country so when he appeals to that mandate now, the answer is, you know, you've had it
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for three years, have we got to show for three years, have we got to show for it? do you think may be the reason he was not delivering, meeting your expectations is perhaps his leadership has been based around his leadership has been based around his personality rather than a particular political ideology? ida. his personality rather than a particular political ideology? no, i think it is as _ particular political ideology? no, i think it is as much _ particular political ideology? no, i think it is as much to _ particular political ideology? no, i think it is as much to do _ particular political ideology? no, i think it is as much to do with - particular political ideology? iifr, i think it is as much to do with his personality because borisjohnson is very, very good at covering popularity but he was very bad at using it. we hated spending political capital so he wanted this big mandate in 2019 and had a majority, i think a majority in parliament were to be at the power to the drive through some important reforms but that would have involved alienating parts of the electorate and eventually becoming unpopular and eventually becoming unpopular and he fought show such shy of doing it he backed down on reform and back down in ireland, back down again and again and again what ended up happening is he fitted away his vertical capital on a series of meaningless candles and has very few accomplishments to his name as he steps down as prime minister. iie steps down as prime minister. he took some of his speech earlier listing what he considers to be his achievements but whether you are
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vital he is right, he is on his way. let's talk about the leadership race thatis let's talk about the leadership race that is coming up. what do you think will be the bigger dividing lines between the candidates? weill. will be the bigger dividing lines between the candidates? well, there are several axes. _ between the candidates? well, there are several axes. this _ between the candidates? well, there are several axes. this leadership - are several axes. this leadership election more than any other i can remember, there are so many incredibly serious issues to deal with. inflation, energy, the threat of scottish separatism, the northern irish border, the tax cuts, think based on the fact that bcc night is going to be one of the frontrunners the broad flavour will probably be a sort of continual revolution candidate like liz truss who wants to be or gesture in the direction of vertical is based on rishi sunak or ben wallace wants to steady the ship. who wants to reassure some conservative voters that the conservatives are still a party that they can vote for.— they can vote for. have you got a iarticular they can vote for. have you got a particular person _ they can vote for. have you got a particular person you _ they can vote for. have you got a particular person you favour? - they can vote for. have you got a particular person you favour? i i particular person you favour? i obviously am going to be covering it so would not want declare this early
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anyway but it is an open base. we surveyed activists and found an incredibly high number of don't know so there are some people, wallace and sunak are ahead of the pack but there are plenty of scope for plenty of people to do what david cameron did in 2005 and while everyone with an early build up lead and overturn the entire table. that cannot be ruled out at this point. {line the entire table. that cannot be ruled out at this point.- ruled out at this point. one last question. _ ruled out at this point. one last question, given _ ruled out at this point. one last question, given the _ ruled out at this point. one last question, given the fact - ruled out at this point. one last question, given the fact you - ruled out at this point. one lastj question, given the fact you are expressing belief and given the fact that you are listing the things that borisjohnson has not achieved, both in terms of policy and how he has carried himself in office, do you think it is right that he is still in office? that he is still bidding this country? i in office? that he is still bidding this country?— this country? i think that given that given _ this country? i think that given that given that _ this country? i think that given that given that the _ this country? i think that given that given that the deputy - this country? i think that given i that given that the deputy prime minister is not running, as far as we know, for leadership, boris johnson should have stepped down and the reason we have a deputy prime minister so we can have a caretaker. it would be a cleaner exit had gone now but unfortunately, as with everything else from the owen paterson scandal to partygate, he always wants to drag it out. he
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always wants to drag it out. he always digs in and the result is always digs in and the result is always more pain, more bad headlines and eventually, the same outcome. annually, thanks for speaking to us. henry hill, deputy editor of the website conservative home. this is been an all—consuming story in the uk for obvious reasons but when the uk for obvious reasons but when the uk changes its leader or sets in train a process that will change the leader there is a big international story too. international story too. let's look at some international reaction to boris johnson's resignation. just a short time ago in the us — white house press secretary karine jean—pierre was asked to react to borisjohnson's exit. though, she didn't mention his name. our alliance with the united kingdom continues to be strong. a special relationship with the people in the country will continue to endure, none of that changes. and i will remind you, we could go, just a week ago today when the president was in
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nato, in madrid, for a historic nato summit, you heard him speak at the press conference, and use of what happened. you saw a reassurance and a real affirmation, nato countries saying again what they are going to continue to do. continue to support ukraine in their effort to defend their democracy, against putin's brutal war. and so that is not going to change. that is the white house press secretary. borisjohnson's statement came between noon and one o'clock so right in the middle of the us breakfast shows and he was how they broke the story. a shocking reversal from a shocking reversalfrom prime minister borisjohnson overnight. expected to resign after three years in office. british prime minister borisjohnson announces he will resign after a series of scandals because of dozens of colleagues
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abandoned him. this because of dozens of colleagues abandoned him.— because of dozens of colleagues abandoned him. this is already a week of high _ abandoned him. this is already a week of high political— abandoned him. this is already a week of high political drama - abandoned him. this is already a | week of high political drama here abandoned him. this is already a i week of high political drama here in the uk. breaking news, after calls to step down borisjohnson agreed to resign. i'm nowjoined from new york by simon schama, who's professor of history at columbia university. thank you very much forjoining us. a pleasure. thank you very much for 'oining us. a pleasure.— a pleasure. now, would you agree that, regardless _ a pleasure. now, would you agree that, regardless of— a pleasure. now, would you agree that, regardless of what _ a pleasure. now, would you agree that, regardless of what happened today, borisjohnson's place is a historicalfigure is today, borisjohnson's place is a historical figure is secure today, borisjohnson's place is a historicalfigure is secure because of what he did breaks it? yes. historical figure is secure because of what he did breaks it?- of what he did breaks it? yes, i thinkthat _ of what he did breaks it? yes, i think that is — of what he did breaks it? yes, i think that is true, _ of what he did breaks it? yes, i think that is true, actually. - of what he did breaks it? yes, i think that is true, actually. he l think that is true, actually. he found a flag and a cause to wrap himself in and, you know, i remember that enormous occasion, i think it was at wembley, was it not? and actually, he declared british independence day and i do not know that breaks it, which was a near thing in some ways, would actually
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have happened without him. on the other hand, you know, the history books will also not fail to mention the notorious bet. that he had two alternative columns ready to go. one supporting breaks it and one not supporting breaks it and one not supporting breaks it and one not supporting breaks it. so we will see him as someone who found a cause which enabled people to believes in him as a person of principle. find him as a person of principle. and how do you _ him as a person of principle. and how do you place _ him as a person of principle. and how do you place him among other successful populist politicians who we have seen a definite western countries? does he fit within a traditional populism or is he very much his own man? i traditional populism or is he very much his own man?— traditional populism or is he very much his own man? i think he is as own british — much his own man? i think he is as own british style _ much his own man? i think he is as own british style of— much his own man? i think he is as own british style of populist. - much his own man? i think he is as own british style of populist. i - own british style of populist. i will say that, you know, if you are at others, or donald trump, they like to serve hatred, really. boris johnson is all about people trying
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to feel warm and cuddly about unapologetic national self promotion. the famous picture of him waving his unionjacks during promotion. the famous picture of him waving his union jacks during the period of the olympic games, stuck. it is thought that he orchestrated this notion of him stuck in his high chair tells you something about it. he had a kind of genius for good nature in his way and this is not, i'm certainly not an apologist. everybody knows that, for boris johnson, but the british style was to make it, as inviting as fish and chips and a cup of hot tea, i think. and that is slightly different, really, from the ferocious edge of hating outsiders and immigrants or defending a kind of christian mission against hordes. he and nigel fry's and people like that, it is not to say they were not above scandalous lies including the notion that turkey would join the eu and
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hundreds of thousands of dangerous muslim immigrants were about to cross the straits of dover. he was perfectly capable of doing that but he gave it a kind of bluff sort of edge which made people feel they were doing the right thing behind his leadership when they voted for brexit. i wish that had not been the case, as you well know. find brexit. i wish that had not been the case, as you well know.— case, as you well know. and you mention mr _ case, as you well know. and you mention mrjohnson's _ case, as you well know. and you i mention mrjohnson's relationship with the truth. it can be quite hard, can't it? in the middle of events, to see how these moments fit into history but there would be critics who say mrjohnson has corroded trust in politics more broadly in the uk because of the number of times he said things which had then turned out not to be true. dojudge the long had then turned out not to be true. do judge the long term impact of his leadership at this stage?— leadership at this stage? depends, ou know. leadership at this stage? depends, you know- you _ leadership at this stage? depends, you know. you can _ leadership at this stage? depends, you know. you can take _ leadership at this stage? depends, you know. you can take to - leadership at this stage? depends, you know. you can take to views i you know. you can take to views about it. particularly sitting here
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in the united states i think, actually, there are jaws dropping in american politics and media that truth actually, guess what? prevailed, in this case. and what happened after lord macdonald simply published, went public with emotion, really, that borisjohnson's version of the whole chris pincher story was an outrageous falsehood. so you can say that, in the end, truth rose up and dislodged him. it is not the same as theresa may who went down over the inability to deliver her particular policy on the eu. this was a case, actually, integrity and competence rising up to throw him out. he is not yet thrown out of downing street. however, it has to be said, that the cabinet, for a very long time, and of the conservative party, stuck by him even though he knew, you know, he was a terrible culprit of mangling or falsifying the truth. now, why
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did they do that? one, electoral panic. two, a sense that the government was just panic. two, a sense that the government wasjust simply government was just simply chaotically incompetent and a great cascade of crises to do with the economy, to do with the cost of with the pandemic, to do with ukraine war. the country simply could not afford the crumbling sinkhole of government and chaos which seem to have settled over him. find government and chaos which seem to have settled over him.— have settled over him. and i should sa that have settled over him. and i should say that while _ have settled over him. and i should say that while increasing _ have settled over him. and i should say that while increasing numbers l have settled over him. and i should| say that while increasing numbers of people are not convinced by this number ten still insist that they and borisjohnson have never deliberately said things which were not true but they have a knowledge they have said things which were not to and then had to correct themselves. let me ask you one last question. i remembera themselves. let me ask you one last question. i remember a teenager sitting in a music lesson and my music teacher walking in a 1990 and saying, margaret thatcher has gone. i remember it as clear as yesterday. it was a momentous day, living through it, but all these years on
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it stills feels like momentous day for british history. how do you think today will fit into the long term history of british politics? oh, it is a huge day. i'm not your it is that you just margaret thatcher because the whole, you know, she was in powerfor so much longer and she really, whether you love her or hate it how come it was quite clear what she stood for. in the johnson, quite clear what she stood for. in thejohnson, it is more a matter of a man somehow meeting the moment but being very uncomfortable with two things. the day—to—day business of government and a set of clear principles. which, you know, historians will say was very unclear, if he had any at all. but a huge chapter in the history of our troubled united kingdom, you bet your life. troubled united kingdom, you bet our life. ., ~ i. , . your life. thank you very much indeed for _ your life. thank you very much indeed forjoining _ your life. thank you very much indeed forjoining us _ your life. thank you very much indeed forjoining us from - your life. thank you very much j indeed forjoining us from new your life. thank you very much - indeed forjoining us from new york. we appreciate it. b, indeed forjoining us from new york. we appreciate it.— a pleasure.
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there's reaction from the european union too, the eu's former chief brexit negotitator michel barnier tweeted: some reservations about how he has conducted his premiership. the suggestion being that has not been the case up to this point. both placing emphasis on the need to reset how relations have been
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working. here in the uk, let's look at further reactions to boris johnson's resignation. thank you very much indeed for your time. what were your emotions as you watch this lunchtime? element thank you for having me. itotally lunchtime? element thank you for having me. i totally support boris's resignation. it was definitely the right thing to do but i am absolutely... i right thing to do but i am absolutely. . ._ right thing to do but i am absolutel , , absolutely... i supported him in 2019, the — absolutely... i supported him in 2019, the leadership _ absolutely... i supported him in 2019, the leadership election, l absolutely... i supported him in i 2019, the leadership election, and as the conservative chairman across nottinghamshire i was proud to welcome him to nottingham and our city during that leadership election. he was elected in 2019 with a huge mandate, you know, the biggest conservative majority since thatcher. locally, he has helped to secure the election of the first conservative mp for 22 years and
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that in itself is a fantastic thing. look, he got breaks it's done. he has introduced a points—based immigration system and he is controlling that. that is what the majority of my residents in our community wanted. mr majority of my residents in our community wanted.— majority of my residents in our community wanted. mr smith, your listin: his community wanted. mr smith, your listing his achievements _ community wanted. mr smith, your listing his achievements in - community wanted. mr smith, your listing his achievements in your- listing his achievements in your eyes and saying you are proud to welcome him during the previous leadership election 2019, but, at that point, did you not have concerns about mrjohnson's character, the same concerns that have come back now and that to him being pushed out? that have come back now and that to him being pushed out?— being pushed out? at the time, in 2019, the conservative _ being pushed out? at the time, in 2019, the conservative party - being pushed out? at the time, in 2019, the conservative party had l 2019, the conservative party had been through another difficult period, bit like we are now, we needed somebody with charisma. we needed somebody with charisma. we needed somebody with charisma. we needed somebody who could win elections and i think boris proved he could do that. 2019, as i say, the biggest majority we have had since thatcher. he was the right person for the right time. he got
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breaks it's done and is a list of those achievements, because they were all beneficial to where i am and the wider nottinghamshire area and the wider nottinghamshire area and the wider nottinghamshire area and the country. he has had a tough time, the pandemic and things like that, and i think partygate, we saw was the start of the issues where i questioned his integrity. but i gave him the benefit of the doubt and i think his handling of the chris pincher allegations and misinformation about not being aware of those before he appointed him to a powerful position in government, is his downfall. i a powerful position in government, is his downfall.— is his downfall. i have only a minute or— is his downfall. i have only a minute or so _ is his downfall. i have only a minute or so but _ is his downfall. i have only a minute or so but you - is his downfall. i have only a minute or so but you have . is his downfall. i have only a i minute or so but you have got is his downfall. i have only a - minute or so but you have got quite a choice now, haven't you, looking at the field? we a choice now, haven't you, looking at the field?— at the field? we have and that is what comes _ at the field? we have and that is what comes with _ at the field? we have and that is what comes with a _ at the field? we have and that is what comes with a massive - at the field? we have and that is i what comes with a massive majority for that there are lots of people to choose from is not going to tell you tonight who i am backing. i don't know who is running at about two aerators it must be a leader who is
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aerators it must be a leader who is a true brake supporter and can hold that read will strong for us. i listened last night and there was music to my ears. she wanted to end the work agenda, solve channel crossings and stop foreign interfering in our affairs and carry on with levelling up. and i think we have missed out on the levelling up agenda slightly to a no fault of its own. but because of the council. and we need to carry on with that. mr smith, that is a long list of things you want from the next leader, whoever it is. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. mr smith, referencing the levelling up agenda in one of the big questions for whoever takes overfrom in one of the big questions for whoever takes over from boris johnson is how to find the funds to continue to support parts of the country which need more support, perhaps, than others. so it is a wide field for stopping at the attorney general has already said she will stand foot of dominic raab, deputy prime minister, won't. we
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understand michael gove also will not be standing and that the transport secretary is considering his options. frankly, that isjust the start the list. that is it for my time in downing street. we are getting ready for the news at ten coming up in a few minutes' time. hello. there is going to be a lot of talk about heat in the next three and a half minutes and so, we will get this out of the way quite quickly and that is rainfall or lack of it. the next five days, rainfall accumulations. in fact, there's hardly anything to come across a large part of the uk in the next ten days. there is some, although not a huge amount, especially towards western parts of scotland may be a little been to northern ireland to times because we have high pressure to the west of us and a familiar story this week is haeen around that area of high pressure around some weather friends at times bringing in the chance for a little rain, especially the further north you are. and on friday, through parts of western scotland and northern ireland, a few spots of light
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rain and drizzle, not amounting to very much. sunny spells in eastern scotland, where it won't quite as warm as it was on thursday. through much of wales and england though, a lot of sunshine and on thursday higher temperatures, near 30 and the hardest part of east anglia particularly southeast england. as we going to the weekend, the city of high pressure is going to gradually move across the uk. some more, particularly across the northern part will fall underneath and reflecting the chance for rain and there will still be some cloud and northern ireland, northern and western parts of scotland with temperatures post average the time of year and may be a little bit cooler through parts of wales and england, although there will be quite a bit of sunshine around. that trend reverses on sunday as we see high—pressure moving in across us and that means the warmth will build more widely and that's helped by more generous amounts of sunshine even into scotland and northern ireland, many more of us getting to see some sunshine here and the chance of rain really limited towards especially the northern isles. you will not be talking about one
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pure, and over the western isles but you will elsewhere in the low mid 20s but again, near 13 very warmest parts of southeast england. high—pressure right across going into monday and there is an area of low pressure that will start to slide a cold front towards the northern areas and particularly closer towards the north and northwest of scotland, with the fresh breeze and elsewhere, with the sunshine, light winds and temperatures heading up more and you will see temperatures well into the 20s and the warmest parts of northern ireland and scotland in the low 30s in the warmest parts of england and certainly not far from that, the hottest parts of wales, as well. that does mean we have a heat wave on the way through parts of england and wales. the weather front does slip more across scotland and northern ireland on tuesday with a greater chance of seeing some rain — as it moves southwards tuesday and wednesday, it will weaken with hardly any left on it once it reaches southern areas, but it does bring somewhat cooler air further south. and you'll see that then with our temperatures on tuesday.
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now, as the weather front move south, temperatures take a brief dip but stays very warm across southern areas even beyond that and then later in the week and into the following weekend is high—pressure slips away eastwards, low pressure may develop tour west but may allow another burst of heat to come our way from the south, particularly across other parts of the uk. that is one to watch. so, for next week, we start very warm to hot, there will be a heat wave continue into parts of england and wales. then turning cooler from the north, but barely cooler across southern areas, before we are watching that potential for something perhaps even hotter to arrive, especially in southern areas later in the week, and more especially into the following weekend. that's very much a focus from now on on weather for the week ahead. so, keep watching. situation and take them forward to
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monda. ,.,, ., ., monday. monday is a big game and we think we can — monday. monday is a big game and we think we can get _ monday. monday is a big game and we think we can get something _ monday. monday is a big game and we think we can get something out - monday. monday is a big game and we think we can get something out of- think we can get something out of that _
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borisjohnson is no longer conservative leader, but he wants to stay on as prime minister until a successor is chosen. ina in a statement that made no mention of his_ in a statement that made no mention of his recent — in a statement that made no mention of his recent difficulties, _ in a statement that made no mention of his recent difficulties, for- of his recent difficulties, withdrawing their support. as we have seen at westminster, the herd instinct is powerful and when the herd moves, it moves — and, my friends, in politics no—one is remotely indispensable.
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he expressed regret that his premiership is

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