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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 25, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson says policy is more important than personality — as he faces renewed calls to quit from conservative backbenchers after the party lost two by—elections if you are saying you want me to undergo some sort of psychological transformation, you know, ithink that our listeners would know that that our listeners would know that thatis that our listeners would know that that is not going to happen. police in norway say they're treating a shooting at a gay nightclub as a �*terrorist�* attack. america wakes up to inflamed divisions over abortion after the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to the procedure. ijust think that i just think that is a terrible
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overturning of health care that will specifically harm women of colour and marginalised peoples. this specifically harm women of colour and marginalised peoples.- specifically harm women of colour and marginalised peoples. this is a heavy responsibility. _ and marginalised peoples. this is a heavy responsibility. to _ and marginalised peoples. this is a heavy responsibility. to make - and marginalised peoples. this is a heavy responsibility. to make an i heavy responsibility. to make an abortion— heavy responsibility. to make an abortion illegal and impeccable throughout our nation. a second earthquake rocks an area in south—eastern afghanistan — causing further deaths and destruction. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network — only a fifth of train services are expected to run. and it's day two of performances at glastonbury — with sir paul mccartney as the saturday night headliner. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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borisjohnson says he will not undergo what he calls a �*psychological transformation�* of his character. speaking to the bbc, the prime minister insisted that policy was more important than personality. it's been a particularly bruising week for mrjohnson, after the conservatives lost two by—elections, before the resignation of his party chairman. this report from our political correspondent, tony bonsignore, contains some flash photography. the war in ukraine, inflation, the threat of a global recession, there is plenty for commonwealth leaders in rwanda to ponder. but, for boris johnson, domestic politics is never far away. this week's by—election defeats in wakefield and tiverton and honiton have spooked some tory mps and oliver �*s resignation as party chairman has, yet again, thrown the spotlight on the prime
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minster�*s leadership. some think his behaviour is the problem and want a change of direction. n behaviour is the problem and want a change of direction.— change of direction. i remember he sat in his letter _ change of direction. i remember he sat in his letter cannot _ change of direction. i remember he sat in his letter cannot be - change of direction. i remember he sat in his letter cannot be business| sat in his letter cannot be business as usual. i'm not hearing you say i have had with the voters are sad and i'm going to change. same acts are what we are going to change, even if you want me, sorry, let's be absolutely clear, michelle. if you're saying you want me to undergo some kind of psychological transformation, you know, ithink that our listeners would know that is not going to happen. it that our listeners would know that is not going to happen. ii the that our listeners would know that is not going to happen. if the prime minister won't _ is not going to happen. if the prime minister won't change _ is not going to happen. if the prime minister won't change his _ is not going to happen. if the prime minister won't change his ways, - is not going to happen. if the prime i minister won't change his ways, some in his party, including veteran tory mp andrew ridgeon, are considering trying to force through a change to the leadership rules so the prime minister can face another no—confidence vote soon rather than waiting another year as is currently the case. if those threats are meant to intimidate, they are not working. i think probably, voters were really fed up with hearing a lot of conversation about me in relation to
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things that they thought i should not have been doing and stuff that i got wrong when what they wanted to hear about was what we were doing for them. hear about was what we were doing forthem. forthe hear about was what we were doing for them. for the country. and for their lives. and so that the lesson i take is that we have just got to get the focus on all the things that we are doing to take the country forward. ., ,., ., , forward. labour, though, is convinced — forward. labour, though, is convinced the _ forward. labour, though, is convinced the problems - forward. labour, though, is convinced the problems run forward. labour, though, is- convinced the problems run deeper. this is not a problem with boris johnson — this is not a problem with boris johnson. this is a problem with the tory party~ — johnson. this is a problem with the tory party. regardless, labourwill be ready— tory party. regardless, labourwill be readyin— tory party. regardless, labourwill be ready to beat the tory party, whoever — be ready to beat the tory party, whoever is _ be ready to beat the tory party, whoever is at the head of it. after rwanda, whoever is at the head of it. after rwanda. it _ whoever is at the head of it. after rwanda. it is _ whoever is at the head of it. after rwanda, it is on _ whoever is at the head of it. after rwanda, it is on to _ whoever is at the head of it. after rwanda, it is on to germany - whoever is at the head of it. he rwanda, it is on to germany and spain for borisjohnson full stop he will be hoping his time on the world stage will strengthen his position back home. the foreign secretary liz truss says she has absolute confience in borisjohnson following the by—election losses. she's been speaking to out deputy africa editor anne soy at the commonwealth heads of government meeting in the rwandan capital kigali.
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i have absolute confidence in the prime minister. he is doing a fantasticjob. he has led on delivering on breaks it, helping britain recover from covid, delivering on breaks it, helping britain recoverfrom covid, we were the first country to fully develop the first country to fully develop the vaccine and get it rolled out and now he is doing a brilliantjob of supporting ukraine in the appalling war against russia. find appalling war against russia. and the conservatives have just lost two important by—elections. should he be considering his position? as well? you'll make incumbent governments do tend to lose by—elections. that's not a predictor of the future. what we are making sure is that we are getting the economy going, we are helping the economy grow so people have more opportunities, morejobs in the future and that is secure the next election. and the migrants deal which has been signed between the uk and the rwandan government has come under a lot of scrutiny, even here
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in rwanda. and your government has said that it remains undeterred, and will continue with this but there have been criticisms, even here in orlando, that, you know, the record of the rwandan government is not great on human rights, tops and reports on the british british government have also, you know, raised questions about media freedom and democracy here. does that change now? ~ . , and democracy here. does that change now? ~ ., , ., now? well, we are very determined to follow through — now? well, we are very determined to follow through on _ now? well, we are very determined to follow through on this _ now? well, we are very determined to follow through on this migration - follow through on this migration partnership. it is very important we break the business model of these appalling people traffickers who are putting peoples lives at risk, particularly in the english channel. in this partnership that we have developed with rwanda benefits both countries working very closely together and have been very good discussion when i was here with the rwandan foreign minister about how we can continue to develop the partnership between our two nations. can you confirm of children will be
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among those asylum seekers who are sent here? ella can confirm that there will be no unaccompanied children as part of this arrangement. and in fact it will be 90% adult men who are part of this arrangement. in norway, two people have been killed and 21 injured after a shooting. the attack happened in 3 separate locations in the capital, oslo, and included a gay bar. a 42—year—old man has been arrested and charged with murder, attempted murder and terrorist acts. oslo's annual pride parade was due to be held on saturday, earlier, i spoke with ehspen ors, journalist for the norwegian broadcasting corporation nrk, who is in oslo who gave me the latest. it all happened a quarter past one o'clock this morning local time. and a lot of people were outside
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celebrating the big pride weekend here in oslo and then a man came up toa bar, here in oslo and then a man came up to a bar, he was carrying a bag. in that bag he had two guns, one automatic gun and one handgun and he started shooting randomly at people. this is a very crowded area in downtown central oslo. just a few minutes away from the parliament and the government buildings, also close to the court buildings and one of these buyers, as i say, is a gay bar. always pretty crowded with people and especially now because of these pride celebrations. and two people are confirmed killed and 21 injured. ten of these are badly injured. ten of these are badly injured. he was taken by police after a fairly short time and has been questioned, but he has not said anything to the police just yet. [30 anything to the police 'ust yet. do we anything to the police just yet. do we know why the police, did they say
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why they have designated as a terrorist attack? it is why they have designated as a terrorist attack?— why they have designated as a terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality _ terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality and _ terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality and the _ terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality and the obvious - the brutality and the obvious targeting of innocent people in the street. they do not yet know whether it was linked to this day bar or if he just chose a place where a lot of people were gathered. because he has just chose not to speak to the police just yet but because, one, he was heavily armed and two, attacking innocent people in the street, they are so far saying this is a terrorist attack but on these fronts this morning the police also said that it might be some level of psychiatry involved with this ban. he is known to the police from earlier. one, because he was arrested for carrying an illegal knife and to because he was arrested with the drugs on him. he has also been known to the security police.
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memories of another killer are obviously going to come following this attack, i mean, he killed 70 people. what sort of reaction has beenin people. what sort of reaction has been in norway to this? just people. what sort of reaction has been in norway to this?— people. what sort of reaction has been in norway to this? just a half an hour ago. _ been in norway to this? just a half an hour ago, after _ been in norway to this? just a half an hour ago, after the _ been in norway to this? just a half an hour ago, after the streets - been in norway to this? just a half| an hour ago, after the streets here in central oslo, i saw people on the way down to the london pub which is the name of this gay bar. carrying both of these rainbow flags to celebrate pride, also flowers. so i suspect the amount of flowers outside their will grow. pro—gay campaigners are now 15, 20 minutes ago, said two people, although it is not going to be a parade, but do go out, celebrate, as if it was a regular weekend because of what has happened. regular weekend because of what has ha ened. ~ ., ., regular weekend because of what has ha- -ened. ~ ., ., ., , regular weekend because of what has ha -ened. ~ ., ., ., , ~ happened. what are the gun laws like in norwa ? happened. what are the gun laws like in norway? they _ happened. what are the gun laws like in norway? they are _ happened. what are the gun laws like in norway? they are very _ happened. what are the gun laws like in norway? they are very strict - happened. what are the gun laws like in norway? they are very strict so - in norway? they are very strict so it is not very _ in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy _ in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to _ in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get - in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get hand - in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get hand or i it is not very easy to get hand or get hold of a handgun and certainly
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not an automatic gun as he was carrying. the police did not know whether these weapons were registered on the press conference earlier today. registered on the press conference earliertoday. i'm registered on the press conference earlier today. i'm sure we will know more about that later. all police, all over norway today have chosen to take up guns, temporarily, so that they going to be armed for the next few days at least. for the next few days at least. abortion clinics are closing in more than a dozen republican—controlled us states, after yesterday's supreme court ruling which overturned the constitutional right to abortion. religious groups have been celebrating, while supporters of abortion rights have been protesting. frances read reports. protest from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe v wade is seismic. pro—choice demonstrators say they are horrified that millions will lose their legal
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right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility, to make abortion unthinkable and illegal throughout our nation. to ensure no woman stands alone in a post—roe america, to be the post—roe generation! cheering. elizabeth made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states already where, as of this minute, abortion access is denied and illegal, i feel pretty numb and pretty angry about that and, truly, i feel a little bit helpless.
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while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws which mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although, the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life is at risk. others are expected to either introduce new restrictions or resurrect pre—roe bans. and in states where opinions on abortions are closely split, the legality of the procedure could be determined on an election by election basis or via legal battles. critics of the decision say it's an injustice and, without plans to support those who are pregnant, will impact the poorest in society in a country, that, for the most part, has no universal health care or paid family leave. the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult. it's a slap in the face to women
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about using their own judgment, to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. singing. # jesus loves the little children...# _ but, within the us, this is only the beginning, and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feeljustice has finally been served. francis reed, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson says policy is more important than personality — as he faces renewed calls to quit from conservative backbenchers after the party lost two by—elections police in norway say they're treating a shooting at a gay nightclub as a �*terrorist�* attack. america wakes up to inflamed divisions over abortion after the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to the procedure.
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here's gavin. england have a first innings lead over new zealand in the first test despite being 55—6 yesterday their incredible recovery was made possible. they came agonisingly close to a century. he was out on 97, three short. another post 150 and together with another player helped england parse new zealand's total of 329th eventually, he was caught for an incredible 162 and england were all out, not long later for 360. a lead of 31. new zealand i13. the for 360. a lead of 31. new zealand 113. the final day of the swimming world championships in budapest
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today. the only gold of the games for great britain so far was one in the 50 metres freestyle yesterday. the bronze medallist that from the blocks and held his farm in the closing stages. second individual world crown after winning gold in the butterfly five years ago. nottingham forest have signed from a german club for a club record fee. the 24—year—old is a nigerian international and joins in a five year dealfor international and joins in a five year deal for a international and joins in a five year dealfor a reported £5 million. he scored 20 goals in 43 games across all games this season and said it has always been a dream to play in the premier league. us women's national team forward described the supreme court ruling overturning the rand mark within a row the weight as sad and cruel. abortion is made bigger across the us after the ruling in 1973 often referred to as the roe v wade case was that the us supreme court has right. 26 conservative states can
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now introduce new abortion restrictions or bans. she made her comments on a ten minute speech as she fought back tears. fire comments on a ten minute speech as she fought back tears.— she fought back tears. pro choice means that _ she fought back tears. pro choice means that you _ she fought back tears. pro choice means that you get _ she fought back tears. pro choice means that you get to _ she fought back tears. pro choice means that you get to choose. i means that you get to choose. pro—choice allows other people to be pro—life if that is what works for them or that is what their beliefs are awed if that is where they are out in their life. pro—life does not allow anybody to make a choice. final stages born today and the men's draw is later. britain's jack draper was locked out. a two—time wimbledon champion, and an early break in the first set. and in the last few moments she has now got that sat on the board. consecutive titles here but she has faced with
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an emphatic form so far on the weekend before the start of wimbledon. that is over on bbc one if you want to catch that. that is just about all the sport from us for now. just to remind you you can get coverage of the 2022 uk athletics championships from manchester but starts now on the red button. the hundred metres as data and a qualification event for the worlds which comes out later this summer and of course you can get more and older stories we have been talking here on the bbc sport website at the usual address. thank you very much, gavin, thank you. thank you very much, gavin, thank you. the taliban's health minister has told the bbc that afghanistan urgently needs international support to deal with the aftermath of the earthquake that's killed more than a thousand people. hospitals which were in near collapse since the foreign funding which ran them was frozen, are struggling to treat the injured. from paktika province, the bbc�*s south asia correspondent yogita limaye reports.
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for people in afghanistan, pain is unrelenting. war, hunger and now an earthquake. eight—year—old shakrina was rescued with injuries to her leg when her house collapsed. her elder sister died. in the next bed, their mother, meera. "we were under the debris until the morning, when some people pulled us out. they took us to a nearby clinic. i asked them, "where is my daughter?" they told me she had died," she said. "we are poor people. we have debts and now we've lost everything." bibi havar lost 18 members of herfamily.
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three of her sons were among them. both she and her daughter have multiple fractures. "my heart is in pain. when i go back from here, my children won't be there. it makes me so sad." on the day after the earthquake, 75 patients were brought here — more than the capacity of the hospital that was already struggling to treat regular illnesses. stretched even before the earthquake hit, they're trying to do their best here, but even this main provincial hospital doesn't have the equipment to treat critical patients, so those who had injuries to their spine or their brain, they've had to send them to other facilities, which means people who have already spent hours travelling to this hospital then had to make another long journey to get any treatment at all. i asked the taliban's health minister whether they had got the international support they'd
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been asking for. we have received some humanitarian aid and assistance from the neighbouring countries like iran, pakistan, india and some of the arab countries. so are waiting for our partners and different countries around the world to when and how they can provide humanitarian aid and assistance. but many would argue that the taliban has not lived up to its commitments on human rights or women's rights. how can the world then recognise this government, and in situations like this directly offer you assistance or money? i think there is some miscommunication between the international partners, they still cannot understand the people, and some statements of the taliban. ordinary afghans are caught in the politics.
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this labourer is trying to cope with the grief of losing his wife and a fear of the future. "my family and i worked so hard to make our house, now it's gone," he said. "we will never be able to rebuild it without help." yogita limaye, bbc news. the third day of strike an update to a story that broke in the early hours of saturday morning considering that shooting that took place in oslo in norway. we understand now that the police there i designating the attack as islamist terrorism. their daily adjustment saying it was terrorism. now islamist terrorism so just to remind you what happened. two people were killed, 20 injured. more than 20 injured. ten of them seriously
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injured. ten of them seriously injured after a gunman opened fire injured after a gunman opened fire in the early hours of saturday morning. we also know that the assailant, who is a norwegian citizen of a veiny and who has been detained, is known to the security services. also, they have added that he is known to have had mental health issues. so that is an update on the norway shooting incident that took place in the early hours of saturday morning. one of the locations, you can see on the screen there, took place at a gay bar in there, took place at a gay bar in the early of this morning. more as and when we get it. more as and when we get it. the third day of strike action this week on the railways is taking place. thousands of rmt union members at network rail and 13 train operating companies have walked out in a dispute aboutjobs, pay, and conditions. helena wilkinson is in windsor. well, for those passengers arriving here from waterloo station, there are trains every 15 minutes. good
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news for people arriving here but are really different picture, once again, across the country for so many passengers. just one in five services are running today and for those heading to seaside destinations, like bournemouth and blackpool, there are no services running. there are not any services running. there are not any services running in cornwall either. there are still no sign of any breakthrough in this deal and earlier, the general secretary of the rmt told the bbc that they want to network rail to guarantee there won't be any redundancies. then;r won't be any redundancies. they think, and _ won't be any redundancies. they think, and i— won't be any redundancies. they think, and i believe _ won't be any redundancies. they think, and i believe that - won't be any redundancies. they think, and i believe that they could make _ think, and i believe that they could make that — think, and i believe that they could make that guarantee, that somebody is stopping them from doing it at this moment. and i suspect that is the politicians. so if they put that on the _ the politicians. so if they put that on the table that we can give you a guarantee — on the table that we can give you a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies we can get on with discussing — redundancies we can get on with discussing the changes that they want _ discussing the changes that they want to— discussing the changes that they want to make and the adaptation that they believe they need and then we can move _ they believe they need and then we can move onto the pay deal and we can move onto the pay deal and we
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can settle this dispute.— can settle this dispute. network rail say they — can settle this dispute. network rail say they are _ can settle this dispute. network rail say they are disappointed i rail say they are disappointed today's strike has gone ahead and they remain ready to talk, they say, adding that the strikes this week i likely to have cost the rail industry up to £150 million. the long—time presenter of the bbc�*s look north programme, harry gration, has died suddenly aged 71. harry gration was considered a huge figure in yorkshire, with his career spanning more than a0 years. he fronted many programmes, including the saturday sports show, grandstand. the bbc�*s director—general tim davie said harry gration was "loved everywhere, but especially in yorkshire". i'm joined by peter levy, presenter for bbc look north in east yorkshire and lincolnshire. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. first off, your reaction to the sad announcement. welcome absolutes shock _ the sad announcement. welcome absolutes shock last _ the sad announcement. welcome absolutes shock last night. - the sad announcement. welcome i absolutes shock last night. absolute shock. you mentioned yorkshire and
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he was known nationally as well through sport and also on the south coast, at south today for quite a few years as well. but he was mr yorkshire. everybody knows him. everywhere he went people knew him so it was a total shock. and he was one of those people that was, you never found anyone who had a bad word to say about him. he was very, very popular. and as a television presenter he was never flustered. he always knew the right thing to say. he was always a cross is brief and he always made people feel that they were extremely special when he was talking to them. did not matter whether they were, you know, an mp or cabinet minister or somebody who he was talking to any market. everybody got the same treatment. he was hugely popular and, as say, those were watching at the moment in yorkshire will absolutely feel that.
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and, like you mentioned, he did many episodes of grandstand. he was often of going to work, covering various sports and doing grandstand when he did. i used to sit in to do look north while he was away. you'll wish used to say to me, he said, be good but not too good. he was incredible. you know, when he retired in 2020, just reflecting on what you said there about him being just down—to—earth. there was a comment that he made, make no mistake he said, that these good folk are the heartbeat of the programme. he really understood his audience, didn't he? he was institution in yorkshire. didn't he? he was institution in yorkshire-— didn't he? he was institution in yorkshire. ., ., ., , , yorkshire. you are absolutely so riuht. yorkshire. you are absolutely so right- and _ yorkshire. you are absolutely so right- and he — yorkshire. you are absolutely so right. and he knew, _ yorkshire. you are absolutely so right. and he knew, like - yorkshire. you are absolutely so right. and he knew, like i - yorkshire. you are absolutely so right. and he knew, like i did, i yorkshire. you are absolutely so l right. and he knew, like i did, you love the audience. you know. and there is a bond with those who work in the regions which i think is very strong with people. who are
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watching. they get to know you so well because you out there night after night and then they might equally see you in the supermarket the next day. and harry had that fantastic relationship and i always remember one weekend, he said to me, because we got on extremely well and to set me when we can, he said, i would love to go and see les miserables. this is going back to the mid—80s. and i said, i would like to see it as well. so he said, shall we go down on saturday, we will go on the train down london on the train? and of course, nobody knew me from adam. everybody knew harris are all the way down, all right, harry? the days before mobile phones. got to london, pattern lunch we went to see les miserables and he sat in the theatre watching it, crying his eyes out throughout the whole production. i always remember that. i was so gutted last night. so gutted. i did not even know what to
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write off what to say. just a tremendous shock and you don't come across people like that every day and several people in television have said the same, you know, during this morning, reading on social media as well. he was incredible. did you ever meet him? you didn't? no, i didn't but i completely get what you are saying about the regions. mine was east midlands stain people still stop me and say, i haven't seen you for a while. really quickly, really quickly, we are running out of time, he got his mbe. he was a sports commentator. did like that, the mbe and the charity work, he raised an enormous amounts of money for charity but that recognition, did that change in any way? hat that recognition, did that change in an wa ? ., ., ., ., �* 4' any way? not at all, i don't think so. he any way? not at all, i don't think so- he was _ any way? not at all, i don't think so. he was the _ any way? not at all, i don't think so. he was the person. - any way? not at all, i don't think so. he was the person. he - any way? not at all, i don't think so. he was the person. he was l any way? not at all, i don't think so. he was the person. he was aj so. he was the person. he was a bradford boy. he grew up in a back to back in bradford. and he didn't change. we had a great sense of
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humour. yes, he might have had been given a medal. he did raise a lot of money and won a lot of awards. he won several royal television society awards but i don't think it changed him tall. he was the same person and he was a tremendous broadcaster and, honestly, i mean, people who are watching who, i mean, you take retirement and less than two years later this happens. it is heartbreaking. absolutely heartbreaking. absolutely heartbreaking for anyone that this happens to. i heartbreaking for anyone that this happens to-_ heartbreaking for anyone that this happens to-— heartbreaking for anyone that this ha ens to. , ., . happens to. i remember watching him as a kid when — happens to. i remember watching him as a kid when i— happens to. i remember watching him as a kid when i lived _ happens to. i remember watching him as a kid when i lived in _ happens to. i remember watching him as a kid when i lived in the _ happens to. i remember watching him as a kid when i lived in the area. - as a kid when i lived in the area. thank you so much. thank you. a small world, isn't it?— small world, isn't it? that is a bit of a shock- _ small world, isn't it? that is a bit of a shock. thank _ small world, isn't it? that is a bit of a shock. thank you _ small world, isn't it? that is a bit of a shock. thank you very - small world, isn't it? that is a bit of a shock. thank you very much. small world, isn't it? that is a bit. of a shock. thank you very much. i went to school _ of a shock. thank you very much. i went to school there _ of a shock. thank you very much. i went to school there as _ of a shock. thank you very much. i went to school there as well. - of a shock. thank you very much. i | went to school there as well. thank you very much indeed. thank you very much indeed. lauren laverne has pulled out of the bbc�*s glastonbury coverage following the death of her mother. the bbc 6 music presenter shared the news on her instagram account. paying tribute to her mother, celia, lauren laverne wrote
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that she was the "kindest, most compassionate and most

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