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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 4, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the politial commentatorjo phillips, and nigel nelson, political editor of the sunday people and the sunday mirror. hello to both of you. we will chat in a moment, let's look at the front pages. the sunday telegraph reports on a "teatime treat for the nation" as it shows a picture of her majesty with paddington bear — the surprise sketch which opened the platinum jubilee concert tonight at buckingham palace.
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"ma'amalade, your majesty?" — the same picture is on the front of the mail on sunday. the sunday times also features the queen and paddington, saying the night was a "party of a lifetime for the world's grandmother. " it certainly was. "thank you for being there for us, mummy" — the sunday express quotes prince charles�*sjubilee tribute speech at the concert. the observer reflects on a long weekend of celebrations on its front page, describing the festivities as a "carnival of memory." and a picture of brian may performing on the victoria memorial monument earlier tonight is on the front of the sunday mirror, with the headline "rock �*n royal". those are the front pages, really wonderful front pages, those are the front pages, really wonderfulfront pages, i might say, this evening. hello to you both. before we start,
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i take it you both enjoyed the concert this evening? absolutely, i thou~ht it concert this evening? absolutely, i thought it was _ concert this evening? absolutely, i thought it was fantastic. _ concert this evening? absolutely, i thought it was fantastic. the - thought it was fantastic. the numbers of people behind that making it happen, the technicians, the lighting, the sound, the crowd control, security— it wasjust brilliant. a tribute to everybody, i think everyone shall be breathing a huge sigh of relief. i think a lot of people shall be having a well—earned drink afterwards, huge success. well-earned drink afterwards, huge success. ., , . , well-earned drink afterwards, huge success. ., , ., ., success. the logistics that went into that. success. the logistics that went into that- i _ success. the logistics that went into that. i was _ success. the logistics that went into that. i was thinking - success. the logistics that went into that. i was thinking that. success. the logistics that went i into that. i was thinking that when i was watching _ into that. i was thinking that when i was watching it. _ into that. i was thinking that when i was watching it. i— into that. i was thinking that when i was watching it. i thought - into that. i was thinking that when i was watching it. i thought it - into that. i was thinking that when i was watching it. i thought it was| i was watching it. i thought it was absolutely fabulous, a tremendous kind of— absolutely fabulous, a tremendous kind of tribute to the queen. it must've — kind of tribute to the queen. it must've taken a couple of years to actually _ must've taken a couple of years to actually have got there. i love the way it _ actually have got there. i love the way it was — actually have got there. i love the way it was all constructed, and the way it_ way it was all constructed, and the way it went — way it was all constructed, and the way it went through basically her entire _ way it went through basically her entire 70 — way it went through basically her entire 70 years. i was reflecting white _ entire 70 years. i was reflecting white i— entire 70 years. i was reflecting while i was _ entire 70 years. i was reflecting while i was watching andrew lloyd
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weber, _ while i was watching andrew lloyd weber, i_ while i was watching andrew lloyd weber, i was in school whenjoseph and the _ weber, i was in school whenjoseph and the amazing technicolor dream coat came _ and the amazing technicolor dream coat came out. bring it right up to date with— coat came out. bring it right up to date with the eurovision song entry. i date with the eurovision song entry. i wanted _ date with the eurovision song entry. i wanted to— date with the eurovision song entry. i wanted to know if he was actually in joseph and i wanted to know if he was actually injoseph and the amazing technicolor dream coat. in joseph and the amazing technicolor dream coat. laughter the theme was _ technicolor dream coat. laughter the theme was going _ technicolor dream coat. laughter the theme was going to _ technicolor dream coat. laughter the theme was going to that - technicolor dream coat. laughter the theme was going to that 70 - technicolor dream coat. laughter i the theme was going to that 70 years of pop music, musicals, and momentous moments. but let us begin with the way the concert kicked off, and that caught everyone by surprise, just such a delight to watch— the front page of the sunday telegraph, "queen's tee time treat for the nation." it certainly was. it was lovely, it will remind people of the james bond skit which was used in the opening of the 2012 olympics. and it was such a secret that nobody in the royal family knew
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about this. and i think what it did, it set the tone which followed through, this sort of affection, the nation's great grandmother, if you like. but it was humorous, gently humorous and charming. and how clever — then both having them tapping on their teacups as they started that fantastically memorable opening of the queen music. it was absolutely inspired, whoever thought of it was brilliant.— of it was brilliant. nigel, we essentially _ of it was brilliant. nigel, we essentially learned - of it was brilliant. nigel, we essentially learned what - of it was brilliant. nigel, we | essentially learned what was of it was brilliant. nigel, we i essentially learned what was in of it was brilliant. nigel, we - essentially learned what was in the queen's handbag. aha, essentially learned what was in the queen's handbag.— essentially learned what was in the queen's handbag. a tremendous pond there on the — queen's handbag. a tremendous pond there on the mail _ queen's handbag. a tremendous pond there on the mail on _ queen's handbag. a tremendous pond there on the mail on sunday. - queen's handbag. a tremendous pond there on the mail on sunday. but - there on the mail on sunday. but yes. _ there on the mail on sunday. but yes, the — there on the mail on sunday. but yes, the idea that she carries around — yes, the idea that she carries around a _ yes, the idea that she carries around a marmalade sandwich and that handbag _ around a marmalade sandwich and that handbag - _ around a marmalade sandwich and that handbag — again, forthe around a marmalade sandwich and that handbag — again, for the last 70 years. _ handbag — again, for the last 70 years, everyone has been wondering what's _ years, everyone has been wondering what's inside there. so it was an absolute — what's inside there. so it was an absolute masterstroke to suddenly
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brin- absolute masterstroke to suddenly bring out _ absolute masterstroke to suddenly bring out a sandwich. and you kind of think. _ bring out a sandwich. and you kind of think, "given the kind of duties she's— of think, "given the kind of duties she's had — of think, "given the kind of duties she's had to — of think, "given the kind of duties she's had to perform, she probably does _ she's had to perform, she probably does keep— she's had to perform, she probably does keep a sandwich in there." turning — does keep a sandwich in there." turning to — does keep a sandwich in there." turning to the mail on sunday, we'll never see the likes of it again, will we? ~ ., �* ., �*, will we? we won't, and it's interesting, _ will we? we won't, and it's interesting, many - will we? we won't, and it's interesting, many papers l will we? we won't, and it's i interesting, many papers will will we? we won't, and it's - interesting, many papers will be having souvenir additions, but the male has topped the charts with the 8160 page platinum special edition —— daily mail. it's interesting even in this era of internet, youtube, people not reading papers and print and everything else — and nigel will know more about newspapers than i do — there is still this desire for something to keep. we probably all got them in the bottom of drawers and cupboards, and things, the special commemorative additions, or
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whatever they are. i think it is interesting they've decided there is an appetite for 160 pages. i’ll interesting they've decided there is an appetite for 160 pages.— an appetite for 160 pages. i'll also be ickin: an appetite for 160 pages. i'll also be picking up _ an appetite for 160 pages. i'll also be picking up a — an appetite for 160 pages. i'll also be picking up a cepy. _ an appetite for 160 pages. i'll also be picking up a copy, filing - be picking up a copy, filing away nicely. what did you make of her acting skills, nigel? let's be honest, she's well versed in facial expressions, isn't she? i honest, she's well versed in facial expressions, isn't she?— expressions, isn't she? ithought this was even _ expressions, isn't she? ithought this was even better _ expressions, isn't she? ithought this was even better than - expressions, isn't she? ithought this was even better than the - expressions, isn't she? i thought i this was even better than the james bond sketch during the olympics. you -ot a bond sketch during the olympics. you got a 96—year—old tapping out "we will rock_ got a 96—year—old tapping out "we will rock you" at the end. the acting — will rock you" at the end. the acting was— will rock you" at the end. the acting was absolutely superb, and again— acting was absolutely superb, and again you — acting was absolutely superb, and again you wonder how much time went into that _ again you wonder how much time went into that i_ again you wonder how much time went into that. i was reflecting that presumably paddington is an illegal immigrant — and on that basis, priti patel— immigrant — and on that basis, priti patel would — immigrant — and on that basis, priti patel would want her to go off to rwanda. �* , rwanda. laughter i did wonder -
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rwanda. laughterl i did wonder whether rwanda. laughter _ i did wonder whether someone at the palace thought that to and thought it would be a great sketch to make of timely clinical point. laughter i was not expecting that! more me! where do we _ i was not expecting that! more me! where do we go — i was not expecting that! more me! where do we go from _ i was not expecting that! more me! where do we go from here? - i was not expecting that! more me! where do we go from here? let's l i was not expecting that! more me! | where do we go from here? let's go to the front — where do we go from here? let's go to the front of _ where do we go from here? let's go to the front of the _ where do we go from here? let's go to the front of the times. _ where do we go from here? let's go to the front of the times. the - to the front of the times. the sunday times brings the element of the fact that she is so well respected globally.- the fact that she is so well respected globally. the fact that she is so well resected aloball . , ., ., , respected globally. yes, and i was 'ust respected globally. yes, and i was just watching _ respected globally. yes, and i was just watching the _ respected globally. yes, and i was just watching the tribute _ respected globally. yes, and i was just watching the tribute from - respected globally. yes, and i was just watching the tribute from the | just watching the tribute from the new australian premiere, which i thought was extremely gracious and very dignified and genuinely affectionate. i know we're coming on other issues later, but it is this fantastic new dirty dutch dignity, the service, no one can question the fact that for 70 years, she's dedicated her entire life to the
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service of this country and the commonwealth. and the effect she's had through what i suppose you call a soft power, soft diplomacy, whether it's worth writing with president reagan or the endless state banquets and the meetings, tours, and everything else. and i think it's very nice, actually, we are in a world where people are very quick to take umbrage an attack other people because they've got a different point of view. and i think this was a really lovely... nobody forced those people to queue for hours and hours in trafalgar square. it was just lovely to see people having a good time, but with that real genuine affection. and we would like to think that the queen felt that it was heartfelt.— that it was heartfelt. "fourteen
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presidents. _ that it was heartfelt. "fourteen presidents, "says _ that it was heartfelt. "fourteen presidents, "says the - that it was heartfelt. "fourteen presidents, "says the sunday l that it was heartfelt. "fourteen - presidents, "says the sunday times. we will never see this again, the amount of respect that she engendered in people and presidents, and countries, as well. do you think this is the end of an era? it and countries, as well. do you think this is the end of an era?— this is the end of an era? it hasn't ended yet. _ this is the end of an era? it hasn't ended yet, bear— this is the end of an era? it hasn't ended yet, bear in _ this is the end of an era? it hasn't ended yet, bear in mind, but - ended yet, bear in mind, but certainly— ended yet, bear in mind, but certainly we will never see anything like this— certainly we will never see anything like this again. even were prince charles— like this again. even were prince charles to — like this again. even were prince charles to take over now, to reach this kind _ charles to take over now, to reach this kind of— charles to take over now, to reach this kind of milestone, you have to be 145 _ this kind of milestone, you have to be 145 and — this kind of milestone, you have to be 143. and even prince william now is actually _ be 143. and even prince william now is actually a bit past it probably to go— is actually a bit past it probably to go and — is actually a bit past it probably to go and do it. but you must a member— to go and do it. but you must a member that the queen probably knows more member that the queen probably knows rnore about— member that the queen probably knows more about the way this country is run then— more about the way this country is run then absolutely everybody else -- rnust _ run then absolutely everybody else —— must remember. she's been through 14 prime _ —— must remember. she's been through 14 prime ministers. she's had private — 14 prime ministers. she's had private conversations with them, she's— private conversations with them, she's been— private conversations with them, she's been her —— made her own decisions — she's been her —— made her own decisions about them and we will never— decisions about them and we will never know what they are. she's also been _ never know what they are. she's also been able _ never know what they are. she's also been able to— never know what they are. she's also been able to advise world leaders. it
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been able to advise world leaders. it was _ been able to advise world leaders. it was a _ been able to advise world leaders. it was a moving tribute from michelle _ it was a moving tribute from michelle obama when she came on — it 'ust michelle obama when she came on — it just shows _ michelle obama when she came on — it just shows what kind of international reputation the queen has got _ international reputation the queen has not. ~ . ., has got. what did you meet of -- make of the. _ has got. what did you meet of -- make of the, before _ has got. what did you meet of -- make of the, before we - has got. what did you meet of -- make of the, before we talk - has got. what did you meet of -- | make of the, before we talk about brian may and his musical opening of the event, but did you think of the shots of the royal family in the audience? they were delightful, waving the flags. i audience? they were delightful, waving the flags.— waving the flags. i thought the children looked _ waving the flags. i thought the children looked a _ waving the flags. i thought the children looked a little - waving the flags. i thought the children looked a little bit - waving the flags. i thought the | children looked a little bit tired at one point and i thought, you know, they've had lots of excitement and being told to behave. but i thought it was great — william and kate, and their kids are a credit to the country in the queen, into prince charles, and prince william's speech was articulate, heartfelt, and very important because he made
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absolutely clear where his political priorities lie, which is with the environment. and i thought the tone was really good. but looking at this picture of the sunday people, this is a marvellous photograph because queen certain debts queen torrey is certainly doesn't look too amused by brian mae. fine certainly doesn't look too amused by brian mae. ., , ., , ., , brian mae. one does not test one is not amused- — brian mae. one does not test one is not amused- -- _ brian mae. one does not test one is not amused. -- queen _ brian mae. one does not test one is not amused. -- queen victoria. - brian mae. one does not test one is not amused. -- queen victoria. we| not amused. -- queen victoria. we were all wondering _ not amused. -- queen victoria. we were all wondering whether - not amused. -- queen victoria. we were all wondering whether brian . not amused. -- queen victoria. we i were all wondering whether brian mae would _ were all wondering whether brian mae would get _ were all wondering whether brian mae would get back on the roof again, and may— would get back on the roof again, and may be 20 years on, the insurers said, _ and may be 20 years on, the insurers said. sorry _ and may be 20 years on, the insurers said. sorry so— and may be 20 years on, the insurers said, sorry. so as a compromise they went— said, sorry. so as a compromise they went with _ said, sorry. so as a compromise they went with the — said, sorry. so as a compromise they went with the victoria memorial. but that bit— went with the victoria memorial. but that bit worked, as well. the went with the victoria memorial. but that bit worked, as well.— that bit worked, as well. the sunday exress, that bit worked, as well. the sunday express. you've _ that bit worked, as well. the sunday express, you've already _
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that bit worked, as well. the sunday express, you've already tapped - that bit worked, as well. the sunday express, you've already tapped on . express, you've already tapped on it, joe, the tribute from her son, prince charles, very touching that he began by addressing her as who she was to him, mummy. stand he began by addressing her as who she was to him, mummy.— he began by addressing her as who she was to him, mummy. and it was somethin: she was to him, mummy. and it was something that _ she was to him, mummy. and it was something that i _ she was to him, mummy. and it was something that i think— she was to him, mummy. and it was something that i think perhaps - she was to him, mummy. and it was something that i think perhaps a few years ago, probably in some households around the country and elsewhere, there would've been some sneering, sniggering, if you like. but i thought the reaction of the crowd, the applause to that was really nice, the people recognised that yes, he's the prince of wales and the heir to the throne, he's increasingly doing more duties — but increasingly doing more duties — but in fact, she is still his mother. and i think it was again, he pitched his right, and i thought it was good camilla came on the stage with him. i don't know if you picked up on this, nigel, but the fact that he brought prince philip back into it and said he'd be proud of her. yes
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absolutely. _ and said he'd be proud of her. yes absolutely, and i thought that prince — absolutely, and i thought that prince charles actually got the tone absolutely right in the same way as joe just— absolutely right in the same way as joe just said that prince william did. joe just said that prince william did the — joe just said that prince william did. the one thing the queen is done, _ did. the one thing the queen is done, and — did. the one thing the queen is done, and i_ did. the one thing the queen is done, and i think this is what the last three — done, and i think this is what the last three days have shown, is she couldn't— last three days have shown, is she couldn't go to every event but she has an— couldn't go to every event but she has an ability to really genuinely bring _ has an ability to really genuinely bring the — has an ability to really genuinely bring the nation together. and there were a _ bring the nation together. and there were a lot _ bring the nation together. and there were a lot of happy people who had been gathering, who've come together and all— been gathering, who've come together and all been good—humored, differences are forgotten. that seems — differences are forgotten. that seems to— differences are forgotten. that seems to be the most important thing about— seems to be the most important thing about the _ seems to be the most important thing about the monarchy, which is why prince _ about the monarchy, which is why prince charles had to getjust about the monarchy, which is why prince charles had to get just the i’ili'it prince charles had to get just the right tone — and he did, it was the personal— right tone — and he did, it was the personal touch, right tone — and he did, it was the personaltouch, mummy, and it right tone — and he did, it was the personal touch, mummy, and it was the international touch which was about— the international touch which was about how— the international touch which was about how she's been the mother to the nation, — about how she's been the mother to the nation, and also to other nations, _ the nation, and also to other nations, as well, the commonwealth.
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indeed _ nations, as well, the commonwealth. indeed. taking of the memories, i think that was one of the aims, she wanted to create the memories from these days of celebrations. the front page of the observer says that exactly a long weekend in a carnival of memory. exactly a long weekend in a carnival of memory-— exactly a long weekend in a carnival of memo . , ., ,., ., ,, ,., of memory. they also make the point in the lead article, _ of memory. they also make the point in the lead article, in _ of memory. they also make the point in the lead article, in the _ of memory. they also make the point in the lead article, in the observer i in the lead article, in the observer that this is part of a long goodbye that this is part of a long goodbye that began with her solitary appearance at prince philip's funeral last year. and i think it's not putting a dampener on the proceedings in the success of the jubilee celebrations. but it is a good buy in a sense that we are seeing her withdraw from the big public appearances, and charles and william are doing much, much more, so she wasn't at the derby today, princess and took that role instead.
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—— princess and. we would all have to be 370 to ever see this again. so it is important and it is something that when we come through these dusty old clippings, or our grandchildren do, it will be something that we will remember. stand something that we will remember. and the ro al something that we will remember. and the royal families, the royals the royalfamilies, the royals dispatched around the country to make sure that they were in touch with people and reaching out, something the queen did and delivered for her subjects. that was really important too. bear in mind that such is what's going on in london. �* , that such is what's going on in london. 3 . v that such is what's going on in london. �*, ., �*, ., ., london. it's what's going on elsewhere. _ london. it's what's going on elsewhere, so _ london. it's what's going on elsewhere, so you - london. it's what's going on elsewhere, so you have - london. it's what's going on elsewhere, so you have so l london. it's what's going on - elsewhere, so you have so many street _ elsewhere, so you have so many street parties happening — but somehow this feels materially different. i think people are coming
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together— different. i think people are coming together as an outpouring not just of respect. — together as an outpouring not just of respect, but a kind of love for the monarch. we are coming to the end of— the monarch. we are coming to the end of her— the monarch. we are coming to the end of her rain now and i think people — end of her rain now and i think people genuinely wanted to show how much she _ people genuinely wanted to show how much she was actually valued. the li . ht show much she was actually valued. tie: light show this evening much she was actually valued. ti9: light show this evening was fantastic. : :, light show this evening was i fantastic._ absolute fantastic. amazing. absolute fantastic- _ fantastic. amazing. absolute fantastic. laughter - fantastic. laughter we had the lights projected on the stonehenge, i think that was in the papers a few days ago, but i don't know if you also caught the tribute that was made on the swiss alps. i didn't see that. essentially, - that was made on the swiss alps. i didn't see that. essentially, it - that was made on the swiss alps. i didn't see that. essentially, it was | didn't see that. essentially, it was the laruest didn't see that. essentially, it was the largest ever _ didn't see that. essentially, it was the largest ever light _ didn't see that. essentially, it was the largest ever light artwork- didn't see that. essentially, it was the largest ever light artwork of i the largest ever light artwork of its kind, that switzerland paid to her, this tribute on the burmese alps. my final point is, i was calculating that in march, we are likely to see a spike in the birth
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rate. what do you both think of that? there was so much joy this evening. i that? there was so much 'oy this evenina. :, , ~ that? there was so much 'oy this evenin. :,, ,, , ., evening. i was thinking platinum miaht be evening. i was thinking platinum might be a _ evening. i was thinking platinum might be a new _ evening. i was thinking platinum might be a new name, _ evening. i was thinking platinum might be a new name, or- evening. i was thinking platinum might be a new name, or some l might be a new name, or some derivative of that. the might be a new name, or some derivative of that.— derivative of that. the idea of a short form. _ derivative of that. the idea of a short form, plat, _ derivative of that. the idea of a short form, plat, would - derivative of that. the idea of a short form, plat, would be - derivative of that. the idea of a short form, plat, would be it. l derivative of that. the idea of a | short form, plat, would be it. it short form, plat, would be it. it! itii-i'it short form, plat, would be it. might be short form, plat, would be it. it might be elizabeth or something like that. , . ,, :, that. lets her turn back to the sunday times, _ that. lets her turn back to the sunday times, change - that. lets her turn back to the sunday times, change of - that. lets her turn back to the sunday times, change of gear that. lets her turn back to the i sunday times, change of gear - sunday times, change of gear — politics, let's bring that back into it. "tories face crushing midterm —— by election defeat over lies." brute by election defeat over lies." we saw boris by election defeat over lies." 9 saw borisjohnson being booed and heckled as he went to the cathedral yesterday for the service of thanksgiving. according to the sunday times, labour are now 20 points ahead. we've got two by elections coming up, one in wakefield and one in tiverton, and it's widely expected the labour
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party will take wakefield, and the lib dems are in with a fighting chance of getting the tiverton one. there's also rumours swelling around about how many tory mps have submitted letters to sir graham brady, calling for a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister. and there are rumours about 190 mps are likely to vote against him. we won't know for sure until graham brady makes an announcement, and there's also interestingly here, a tory donor who is been quite generous to the conservative party — and he's basically said he won't be doing it again unless borisjohnson goes. as much as borisjohnson would've liked to put everything behind him with the publication of sue gray's report, its quite clear that he's in a worse position than he was before that was published. 50
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he was before that was published. so what are your thoughts on that, nigel? i what are your thoughts on that, niel? ~ , , what are your thoughts on that, niel? ~' , , ., nigel? i think these figures are cuite nigel? i think these figures are quite interesting. _ nigel? i think these figures are quite interesting. nobody- nigel? i think these figures are i quite interesting. nobody actually knows _ quite interesting. nobody actually knows how many letters graham brady has got. _ knows how many letters graham brady has got. nor _ knows how many letters graham brady has got, nor do we know when he will sit down and — has got, nor do we know when he will sit down and actually count them. he may leave _ sit down and actually count them. he may leave it — sit down and actually count them. he may leave it until after the two by elections — may leave it until after the two by elections i— may leave it until after the two by elections. i think what was most interesting about this particular pole with the fact that 56% of people — pole with the fact that 56% of people are saying that partygate is the reason are going against the tories _ the reason are going against the tories in — the reason are going against the tories in wakefield. and that gives the lie that jacob rees—mogg constantly saying nobody cares about partygate. _ constantly saying nobody cares about partygate, people really do. i do think— partygate, people really do. i do think however, borisjohnson being booed _ think however, borisjohnson being booed at— think however, borisjohnson being booed at the service on friday was unfortunate. i think this is the time _ unfortunate. i think this is the time actually not to bring politics into it _ time actually not to bring politics into it he — time actually not to bring politics into it. he is our national leader, the head — into it. he is our national leader, the head of— into it. he is our national leader, the head of government, and i think you should — the head of government, and i think you should have been treated with a
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bit more _ you should have been treated with a bit more respect. and i'm the first person to — bit more respect. and i'm the first person to give him a hard time in our newspapers. person to give him a hard time in our newspapers-— person to give him a hard time in our newspapers. well, let's turn to the front page _ our newspapers. well, let's turn to the front page of _ our newspapers. well, let's turn to the front page of the _ our newspapers. well, let's turn to the front page of the observer, i the front page of the observer, because labour are coming forward and saying that they are the party of patriotism and british values, tying it to exactly what we've seen this week the celebrations. this tying it to exactly what we've seen this week the celebrations.- this week the celebrations. this is lucy powell. _ this week the celebrations. this is lucy powell, the _ this week the celebrations. this is lucy powell, the shadow- this week the celebrations. this is lucy powell, the shadow culture l lucy powell, the shadow culture secretary, got a piece in the observer basically saying that labour is standing up for british institutions. she's talked about the bbc, channel4, institutions. she's talked about the bbc, channel 4, which she says the tories want to undermine — she admits that being patriotic isn't something that labour has always looked comfortable with, but she goes on to say that progressive politics has been at its most successful and transformational when it captures the best of british values. i think interestingly that it's unfortunate that partygate sounds trivial — although i did like leave's joke at the opening of the
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concert tonight —— lee back. but where i think borisjohnson and the conservative party have so misjudged the public mood is that they've underestimated the story put into decency, integrity and honesty, and what we expect of people in public service. and i think that has come home to roost, and you couldn't see anything more stark than the genuine affection and respect for the queen and what's going on in the conservative party.- and what's going on in the conservative party. nigel, paper does say that — conservative party. nigel, paper does say that what _ conservative party. nigel, paper does say that what happened i conservative party. nigel, paper does say that what happened at | conservative party. nigel, paper. does say that what happened at st. paul's, that borisjohnson was no longer seen by the public as a leader who upholds the british standards. this question of leaders continues because as far as the tories go, who would you replace borisjohnson with? and also, sir keir starmer, is he the right leader for the party for labour? i
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keir starmer, is he the right leader for the party for labour?— for the party for labour? i think keir starmer _ for the party for labour? i think keir starmer probably - for the party for labour? i think keir starmer probably is. - for the party for labour? i think keir starmer probably is. i'm i for the party for labour? i think keir starmer probably is. i'm a | for the party for labour? i think. keir starmer probably is. i'm a bit uncomfortable with lucy powell coming — uncomfortable with lucy powell coming out about patriotism on a weekend — coming out about patriotism on a weekend like this. i would like to have actually seen the whole thing io have actually seen the whole thing go with— have actually seen the whole thing go with them keeping out of politics if possible. as far as the leadership challenges for boris johnson — leadership challenges for boris johnson go, people say that there's no alternative to him — there certainly— no alternative to him — there certainly is, you've gotjeremy hunt. the _ certainly is, you've gotjeremy hunt, the safe pair of hands candidate, you would have time to candidate, you would have time to can heart. — candidate, you would have time to can heart, the new kid on the block if you _ can heart, the new kid on the block if you want— can heart, the new kid on the block if you want to break with the past. you've _ if you want to break with the past. you've got— if you want to break with the past. you've got elizabeth truss with her margaret _ you've got elizabeth truss with her margaret thatcher, free—market margaret thatcher, free— market economics margaret thatcher, free—market economics which would be very well with the _ economics which would be very well with the party, and penny mourdaunt would _ with the party, and penny mourdaunt would be _ with the party, and penny mourdaunt would be a _ with the party, and penny mourdaunt would be a compromise candidate. there _ would be a compromise candidate. there are — would be a compromise candidate. there are plenty of people they are willing _ there are plenty of people they are willing to _ there are plenty of people they are willing to take on the mantle. just to end, willing to take on the mantle. just to end. we've _ willing to take on the mantle. just to end, we've got about a minute,
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just returning back to this evening — if both of you could just give me an idea of what really stood out for you, what really touched you? the lit u- the you, what really touched you? tu9 lit up the corgi with the bow was such a surprise that myjaw dropped while i was sitting on the sofa, as did the cat who was slightly confused. did the cat who was slightly confused-— confused. laughter frankly _ confused. laughter frankly l _ confused. laughter frankly i don't - confused. laughter frankly i don't thinkl confused. laughter i frankly i don't think you confused. laughter - frankly i don't think you can be queen, i love brian may, even if he couldn't get on the roof he still plays a cracker.— couldn't get on the roof he still plays a cracker.- i - couldn't get on the roof he still plays a cracker.- i thinkl couldn't get on the roof he still| plays a cracker.- i think it plays a cracker. nigel? i think it was actually _ plays a cracker. nigel? i think it was actually to _ plays a cracker. nigel? i think it was actually to see _ plays a cracker. nigel? ! think it was actually to see how- plays a cracker. nigel? i think it was actually to see how much i plays a cracker. nigel? i think it - was actually to see how much durand durand have aged over the years. and then of— durand have aged over the years. and then of course, there was rod stewart — then of course, there was rod stewart belting it out. i thought it was great — stewart belting it out. i thought it was treat. : . was great. laughter we all had _ was great. laughter we all had to - was great. laughter we all had to do - was great. laughter we all had to do it. was great. laughter - we all had to do it double take was great. laughter _ we all had to do it double take with durand durand. when it comes to aid, 78 to perform at the end, diana ross
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and ifeel absolutely 78 to perform at the end, diana ross and i feel absolutely amazing, 78 to perform at the end, diana ross and ifeel absolutely amazing, and she looked fabulous, didn't she? she's got so much material, that beautiful black and white dress i thought was lovely, and i thought the mixture of celeste singing "what a wonderful world" was absolutely delightful. there was so much there, the cast of hamilton, there was something for everybody and i think they got the tone right. thea;r something for everybody and i think they got the tone right.— they got the tone right. they really did, they got the tone right. they really did. something _ they got the tone right. they really did, something for _ they got the tone right. they really did, something for everyone, - they got the tone right. they really i did, something for everyone, indeed. as ever, think you both very much, enjoy the rest of your weekend, thank you. rod stewart and diana ross were my favourite of the evening. that's it for the papers this evening. next we'll have the weather forecast. but for now goodbye.
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hello. there's rain for many of us in the forecast for the week ahead. in the short term, that rain will come in the form of heavy showers and thunderstorms for parts of england and wales. this is the bigger picture for sunday. an area of high pressure still the dominant feature across scotland and northern ireland, keeping things fine and dry here, but this system pushing up from france will generate some heavy showers and thunderstorms. and through sunday morning, they're likely to be in a zone through parts of wales, the midlands, into east and north—east england, slowly working their way northwards. behind it turning drier, but we're not out of the woods, because further thunderstorms could develop as the cloud breaks to allow some sunshine. we'll see quite a lot of mist and low cloud plaguing many eastern coasts — with the breeze off the north sea, that's going to make it feel quite cool. but across a large swathe of scotland and northern ireland, once again, it's a fine and dry day with temperatures in the high teens, if not low 20s celsius. but feeling quite cool through parts of the midlands and northern england where we have that zone of cloud, showers, and the breeze as well. now as we move into monday, the area of low pressure responsible
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for the showers and thunderstorms slowly starts to pull away north and eastwards. it will take its time, which means we're likely to keep some showers going through monday morning, particularly through parts of eastern england. but gradually easing away, and then for most on monday it's mainly dry, with some bright or sunny spells. could see a few showers just clipping the far south—west of england. temperatures actually feeling a little bit warmer across the southern half of the uk, with a bit more in the way of sunshine, generally in the mid—to—high teens for many. we keep the chance of a few showers lingering through coastal counties as we move into tuesday, but tuesday actually is looking for many a fairly quiet day, with light winds, chance of 1—2 showers across england and southern coastal counties — many will be dry. a bit more in the way of cloud, though, across scotland and northern ireland than we've seen recently, but there will be some breaks in that to allow for some bright or sunny spells. so it's a quiet and quite pleasant day for many. when the sun is out we could see temperatures up to around 20—21 celsius across the southern half of the uk. then we look to the west,
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to our next atlantic front, which will be making its presence felt as we move through wednesday, working its way from west to east and bringing all of us a spell of rain. there will be some showers on either side of that as well. what we'll find through the day is that as it moves slowly north and eastwards, things will turn drier and brighter from the west, so some afternoon sunshine for parts of wales, the midlands, south—west england, and northern ireland. temperatures again mid—to—high teens, so pleasant enough when the sun is out, but that rain may lingerfor a good part of the day across scotland, and certainly feeling cooler than it has done this weekend. now that front moves away, briefly it's drier, but not for long, because here's our next atlantic front through thursday, and this one is likely to generate some quite heavy spells of rain, but also develop a stronger wind, as well. so it turns progressively wet and windier through south—west england, wales, and northern ireland through the morning — and all of that will be gradually working its way north and eastwards, and i think many of us will see quite a heavy spell of rain for a time on thursday, coupled with some strong winds. but they are coming from the south—west, so temperatures still in the mid—to—high teens.
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notice the squeeze in the isobars — we'll keep those strong winds as we head through friday, but then, slowly through the weekend, this area of high pressure just starts to nudge in from the south—west, so the winds ease, most of the rain tends to ease away, as well. so as we move through the weekend and into the following week, things are looking drier. but actually for a good part of next week we've got some rain in the forecast for much of the uk. keeping an eye on the stronger winds as well, particularly for the end of the week, before things start to turn drier and brighter, particularly for england and wales, as we move into the following week. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm chris rogers with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. # i've been inclined # da, da, da... # rock stars including sir rod stewart wow the crowds at the buckingham palace jubilee concert — prince charles gives a moving tribute to his mother for her 70 years of service. you continue to make history. you laugh and cry with us, and most importantly, you have been there for us, for these 70 years. and a surprise appearance on screen from the queen with the nation's favourite bear — where we found out what she keeps in her handbag. perhaps you would like a marmalade sandwich?
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i always keep one for emergencies.

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