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tv   Newsday  BBC News  May 19, 2022 11:00pm-11:29pm BST

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welcome to newsday, i'm mariko oi live from singapore. and i'm karishma vaswani coming to you live from sydney australia. it's the day before australians decide who will be their next prime minister — incubent scott morisson or his rival labour leader anthony albanese. australia's economy grew strongly throughout the pandemic — but many are concerned that the rising costs of living and climate change are making it unlivable. also in the programme — joe biden is on his way to south korea on his first asian trip as us president. he will also be visiting japan in an effort to bolster ties with the region. the international committee of the red cross says it has registered thousands of ukrainian prisoners of war from the azovstal plant in mariupol this week.
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36 years later — the wait is overfor top gun fans — and tom cruise is lauded with the highest honour at the cannes film festival. this is bbc news. it's newsday. hello and welcome to newsday, broadcasting live to you today from sydney, australia. in just 2a hours, australians will head to the polls to choose their next government. iconic images, of course, for people here in australia, but around the world as well, this week, australia has been in the global headlines, hasn't it? it'sjust has been in the global headlines, hasn't it? it's just a day before the election. we will talk you through some of the main issues in just a moment, but first let me talk you through the facts
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and the figures. the liberal—national coalition has been in power since 2013 and is seeking another three—year term. going up against them are the opposition labour party, minor parties and independent candidates. all 151 seats in the lower house of the house of representatives will be up for grabs. the party or coalition holding a majority in the lower house will form a government. voting is compulsory for all australians — who must register when they turn 18. if you don't do that, then you face a fine of about 15 us dollars — or 20 australian dollars. and while you don't vote directly for a prime minister in australia — voting for the party instead — based on which party wins, the leader becomes the prime minister. and this election it's a choice between two men who are very familiar to australian voters — the incumbent scott morrison — or scomo as he is sometimes called here and anthony albanese — who in keeping with australia's affection for nicknames ending with oh — is sometimes known as albo. our australia correspondent
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shaimaa khalil is with me. great to have the on the programme. i remember when you first came out to australia and we had that discussion, didn't we? you are entering a really major story right now. you are confronted first—hand with the effects of global warming is. �* , ,., , ., , , with the effects of global warming is. absolutely. it was my first week on november _ is. absolutely. it was my first week on november 2019 _ is. absolutely. it was my first week on november 2019 and _ is. absolutely. it was my first week on november 2019 and we - is. absolutely. it was my first week i on november 2019 and we exchanged is. absolutely. it was my first week - on november 2019 and we exchanged a message and you said i thank you are walking into a big story. of course, it was the start of that catastrophic bushfire season. it was my first story and i would say by far, one of the biggest if not the basic —— biggest story i've covered here in australia. it was after years of drought, and this was a relay, if you will, the country's touching this and seeing this first—hand, the effects of a warming planet, not the science is clear, he asked me cannot link this to one
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particular incident, but the veracity and have our regular extreme rather has become really is a sign of what australia is facing. thank you, i cover this when i started. last week i was in brisbane, queensland, speaking to people's whose homes were destroyed in floods comes on this ban if two years, apart from the pandemic, australians have been through so much of what climate change and extreme weather would look like. in your conversations, and your time reporting here, particularly for the election, is that what the voters are telling you? is that the sense you get from them from the electorate? i you get from them from the electorate?— you get from them from the electorate? ~ ., , electorate? i think for the benefit of our viewers, _ electorate? i think for the benefit of our viewers, it _ electorate? i think for the benefit of our viewers, it is _ electorate? i think for the benefit of our viewers, it is very - electorate? i think for the benefit l of our viewers, it is very important to note how politically sensitive the climate debate is, how toxic it is and this is why you will see that even though it is so pertinent, it touches everyone. politicians have almost steered clear from speaking out right about it. i think it depends on where you are. if you are here in sydney from if you are in
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the big cities, this is a topic that everybody talks about. the independent politicians, the candidates have made the centre to their campaigning, but candidates have made the centre to theircampaigning, but again, i candidates have made the centre to their campaigning, but again, iwas their campaigning, but again, i was in their campaigning, but again, iwas in regional queens land, an area thatis in regional queens land, an area that is so heavily dependent economically dependent on fossil fuels and there is a real worry there that the rating is on the wall, yes, this is coming to a head, but what are you going to do if you replace fossil fuels? what is going to happen? so you see that the two major parties, the way that they are campaigning sounds very different in big cities when they are in regional australia where they are still backing the mining industry. those economic issues _ backing the mining industry. those economic issues coming _ backing the mining industry. those economic issues coming to - backing the mining industry. those economic issues coming to the - economic issues coming to the forefront certainly in this election, but ijust want forefront certainly in this election, but i just want to forefront certainly in this election, but ijust want to pick up on another story that i know you've covered extensively here in your time. it's a big election issue as well, the treatment of women in australia. if well, the treatment of women in australia. ., ,., . ~ ., well, the treatment of women in australia. ., . ~ ., australia. if we go back to those independents, _ australia. if we go back to those independents, the _ australia. if we go back to those - independents, the tl independence, the colour they've chosen, it is so symbolic. if you look at how they
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are really holding the balance of power, analysts have said if this is a close election, but it will be, which it is, that tl independence will hold the balance of power. they have come really, really close. they are becoming a real threat to various established government seats here in sydney and melbourne, and if you look visually at it, it is four independent female candidates that are actually challenging four male candidates that have very established seats. fascinating stuff. we could _ established seats. fascinating stuff. we could talk _ established seats. fascinating stuff. we could talk all - established seats. fascinating stuff. we could talk all day . established seats. fascinating i stuff. we could talk all day about this, which we the time, sadly, we don't. the bbc�*s australia correspondent, what a star. we got lots more for you on the australia election. and don't forget you can follow all the election coverage on our website — www.bbc.co.uk/news, including this story from frances mao on why 96% of australian lawmakers — are white.
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that's it from out here in australia, back to you in singapore. thanks, karishma. lets get some other news. joe biden is on his way to asia — his first trip to the region as us president. his first stop is south korea — where he'll meet the new president yoon suk yeol. he then heads to tokyo to meetjapan�*s prime minister — fumio kishida. and he'll hold a summit with the quad, that's the us, japan, australia and india. all of this is sure to be watched closely by neighbouring china. to discuss this i am joined now by niels graham, assistant director with the atlantic council geoeconomics centre live in washington dc. thank you so much forjoining us on the programme. what message do you think president biden would like to send to the asian countries and more
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importantly, i guess, what kind of reception where he received? find importantly, i guess, what kind of reception where he received? and you so much for — reception where he received? and you so much for having _ reception where he received? and you so much for having me _ reception where he received? and you so much for having me today. - reception where he received? and you so much for having me today. so - reception where he received? and you so much for having me today. so from my perspective, biden�*s trip to asia has two key messages, to reaffirm american alliances in the region as well as american partnerships, and to demonstrate to the region that despite the crisis in ukraine, the asia—pacific and the indo pacific specifically is laser focused importance for america's strategic industry, and through the launch of the economic framework and i think the economic framework and i think the administration also wants to demonstrate that in addition to the very robust long—standing security commitments from the united states has for its region, they are still very interested in very willing to engage with the region on economic issues and work with the region to set rules and standards around issues of trade and climate end of trade and climate and climate end of their economic policy focus areas. of course, china will be closely watching his trip to the beach and. have we heard from beijing responding to this trip already?
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yes. we have. the foreign minister has gone and basically said that they don't really see a purpose for they don't really see a purpose for the framework and they don't see a purpose for the trip. really, i think it's within the administration's preview to demonstrate, now, this deal does have a lot of weight to it, life importance to the region, and there is meat on the bones that it puts onto the deal that their beach and is interested in engaging with the us overall. £31 is interested in engaging with the us overall. . ., , is interested in engaging with the us overall. _, , _, , us overall. of course, countries like japan. _ us overall. of course, countries like japan, south _ us overall. of course, countries like japan, south korea - us overall. of course, countries like japan, south korea and - like japan, south korea and australia already have pretty close ties with the united states, but when it comes to developing nations but they don't particularly want to have to choose between the us and china. how would they like to respond? china. how would they like to resond? . china. how would they like to respond?_ china. how would they like to resond? ,, ~ ., �*, respond? sure, so i think that's really the _ respond? sure, so i think that's really the most _ respond? sure, so i think that's really the most important - respond? sure, so i think that's really the most important thing | respond? sure, so i think that's i really the most important thing to watch what this framework overall. i think a lot of the policies and the framework around climate, around labour, ground infrastructure and things that countries that you point out, like japan, things that countries that you point out, likejapan, singapore, south korea are already aligned with the us. it will be interesting and important to watch what the us can
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barely offer towards developing nations to incentivise them to actually sign onto the deal and to make robust and serious commitments around things like labour standards, and traditional market access commitments that the us have traditionally put into these trade deals. ., ~ traditionally put into these trade deals. . ~ , ., traditionally put into these trade deals. . ~ . ., traditionally put into these trade deals. . . ., ., deals. thank you so much for “oining us on newsday fl deals. thank you so much for “oining us on newsday this i deals. thank you so much for “oining us on newsday this morning. h deals. thank you so much forjoining us on newsday this morning. thankl us on newsday this morning. thank ou. in the uk, the met police say their investigation into lockdown breaches in and around downing street has now ended. number ten says prime minister boris johnson has been told he faces no further action. the met issued a total of 126 fines to 83 people, for events happening across eight different dates. mrjohnson, and his wife carrie, received fixed penalty notices last month — for attending a celebration for his birthday. ukraine's president says russian forces have "completely destroyed" the eastern donbas region —, accusing moscow of senseless bombardments as it intensifies its attacks.
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in another development, the international committee of the red cross says it's registered hundreds of ukrainian prisoners of war, who've left the besieged azovstal steelworks in theukrainian port city of mariupol. the russian authorities say that all those who have left will be treated in line with international standards, but there are fears that some could face prosecution by president putin's courts. from moscow, our russia editor steve rosenberg reports. tired and wounded. moscow released these images of ukrainian fighters leaving the steelworks they'd been defending in mariupol, giving themselves up to the russians. ukraine is hoping for a prisoner swap, but in russia there are calls to put some of the soldiers on trial for war crimes. they are killers, they are criminals, but we give them medical care. but your country invaded ukraine with more than 100,000 troops.
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that's aggression, isn't it? no, it's not an aggression. it's not an aggression. don't believe us. moscow tries to justify invading ukraine with a false claim — that it's gone in to fight nazis. a war crimes trial could shore up an unconvincing narrative. the kremlin wants russians to believe that in ukraine their army is battling nazis, and nato, europe and america were all plotting away to attack and destroy the motherland. and there are many here who believe this parallel reality. not everyone does. dmitry admits that his country, russia, is the aggressor. he is appalled by the bloodshed and once his whole town to know it. he has transformed outside of his shop into a message board with the names of ukrainian towns
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russia has attacked. kherson, irpin, kyiv. "peace to ukraine," it says. he has even turned his roof into the ukrainian flag. translation: | thought| this would be a good way of getting information out, because for the first few weeks of the war our people didn't know what was happening. they didn't know that russia was shelling cities. some don't want to know. "traitor" has been graffitied on dmitry�*s door. and the police have been round. he's been fined for discrediting the army. "the front of a shop isn't for expressing opinions," she says. "he can say what he thinks," says anton. "i think attacking a neighbouring country is a strange thing to do." and in russia protesting can be a dangerous thing to do.
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but dmitry is refusing to stay silent. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. the us senate has approved nearly $40 billion in aid to ukraine — the largest aid package since russia invaded. meanwhile, the secretary of state antony blinken warned the world is facing the "greatest global food security crisis of our time", as more than 20 million tonnes of grain is piled up in ukraine, because of the war. he's called on russia to allow ships to leave black sea ports, including the key city of odesa, with food and fertiziler. our correspondent caroline davies reports from odesa. ukraine's wheat helps to feed the world, but while its black sea ports remain closed, much of it is beyond the world's reach. over 3,000 tons of grain fill yuriy�*s warehouse, but because of the issues transporting it out of the country, no—one wants to buy it. translation: | don't know -
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who in the world to ask for help. we would like to be helped to sell this grain at any price, as long as the people don't go hungry. i think that all western countries should help us. you need to bang your fist on the table, open the ukrainian ports, stop the russian invasion and take out this grain. how do you feel knowing that there are many people around the world that would be desperate for this crop? translation: there's a feeling of despair. i i'm talking now with tears in my eyes. it's hard to say. yuriy�*s problems are faced by farmers across the country. this crop is due to be harvested in just over a month's time, but the farmers here still have no idea where they're going to store it or how they're going to get it out of the country. some goods can be taken out by road, others by rail, but not in the same quantities that used to be transported by sea. since russia began its
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invasion, ships can't move forfear of being hit. and the sea has also been mined, which could take months to remove. andrey stavnitser is the owner of one of the largest ports in ukraine. we have about 80 ships that are basically ghost ships in ukraine right now. the crews have left them, some of them are full, some of them are empty, they're in the ports or outside the ports, they're standing idle, and for the crews to come back, their shipping companies have to get clearance from insurance companies, and these insurance companies are obviously not happy to allow this to happen because the sea is full of mines. how long do you think it will be until you can reopen the port again? we have no idea when we will be able to reopen the port. we are facing a disaster that's going to happen in the next few weeks when the new crop is here and the old crop is not exported. the un has warned that unless russia allows the ports to reopen, there could be mass hunger
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and famine for years.
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this is newsday on the bbc. i'm mariko oi in singapore. our headlines... australians head to the polls tomorrow to pick their next prime minister, between incubent
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scott morisson and his rival labour leader, anthony albanese. the number of people living in extreme poverty across latin america and the caribbean has risen, according to the united nations. in sao paulo — latin america's biggest city the homeless population grew by 30% during the pandemic to 35,000 people. a cold snap this week has pushed sao paulo's authorities to do more about the issue. a warning, this report from our south america correspondent katy watson contains some distressing imagery. fatherjulio makes the same early—morning pilgrimage day in, day out. loaded up to feed the masses who had spent a long, cold night on the streets. crowds of people that are getting bigger every day. but as we arrive, people are in shock. a
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man collapsed after sleeping rough, within minutes of arriving here, he was dead. fatherjulio knows everyone here knows, that dying is a brutal reality. but when life is so hard, there is little room for reflection. the priority here is to find something warm to wear and some food to eat. shortly after, in walks a man with suspected hypothermia. translation:— a man with suspected hypothermia. translation: people here wonder, will i be translation: people here wonder, will! be next? _ translation: people here wonder, willi be next? number— translation: people here wonder, will i be next? number of _ translation: people here wonder, will i be next? number of people - will i be next? number of people coming here is striking. poverty is accelerating, six or 700 people come here every day, and the calljust makes the situation worse. here every day, and the call 'ust makes the situation worse. outside, the aueue makes the situation worse. outside, the queue goes _ makes the situation worse. outside, the queue goes on, _ makes the situation worse. outside, the queue goes on, people - makes the situation worse. outside, the queue goes on, people with - the queue goes on, people with little resistance against the cold. iago has been on the streets for five months. he shows me his tent that he shares with his wife. last night, the temperatures were icy, he tells me, explaining they made a fire outside the tent to keep them
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warm. not far away, fire outside the tent to keep them warm. not faraway, more fire outside the tent to keep them warm. not far away, more shivering warm. not faraway, more shivering people warm. not far away, more shivering people waiting forfood. people waiting for food. authorities have put on a soup kitchen and are trying to get those on the streets shelter during the cold snap, but demand is high. the clock strikes six, the sense of relief are those in the queue, the government is running out of time, such as the scale of the problem. translation: the pandemic and the economic crisis have exacerbated any quality, that inequality is showing itself on the streets of brazil's biggest city. this queue gives an idea of the scale of the problem, first night, there were more than 800 people queuing here. if you look down there. tonight, they are expecting well over 1000. this woman says she hasn't been able to be her kids today. she has six of them, one baby just a few months old. they spent
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five months sleeping rough after she lost herjob as a cleaner. prior, like so many, preparing for another night of called on the streets of sao paulo. katie watson, bbc news. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines sri lanka has defaulted on its debt for the first time in history, as the country struggles with the worst financial crisis in more than 70 years. it comes after a 30 day grace period to meet unpaid debt interest payments expired on wednesday. the taliban has ordered female afghan tv presenters and other women on screen to cover their faces while on the air. already, women must wear a face veil in public or risk punishment — as restrictions are tightened on women. at the cannes film festival in the south of france — tom cruise has been the biggest attraction so far. the actor is there, to help launch his top gun sequel — top gun — maverick — and the festival paid
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a special tribute to him, and his a0 year career in hollywood. from cannes, tom brook reports the french air force put on a big show for tom cruise at the cannes film festival, honouring him with an impressive fly—past by eight fighter jets. people are standing in line for hours to get a glimpse of him and screaming and yelling and saying, "tom, tom!" "turn around — wave at me!" in recent days, cruise has been at several premieres for his new top gun — maverick film. despite all the hoopla that surrounds him, he is keen to point out that his new picture is celebrating us naval aviation culture. it really is representing that culture, aviation, the navy culture and it kind of has the same ethics of doing the right thing, about family, about tradition. tom cruise made his big breakthrough in 1983 in the coming—of—age comedy risky business. he was also the start of the hugely successful mission impossible series. rightly or wrongly, he is perceived as a commercial actor. some wonder if his career warrants a special tribute
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from the cannes film festival, including giving him an honorary surprise palm d'or, the festival's highest award. i think what cannes is doing by saying, "come in, tom cruise," there was some reservations. he doesn't make the finest movies, he doesn't make arthouse pictures, but he does power cinema, and i think that is why cannes is honouring him this year. in 1986, tom cruise starred in the original top gun, playing a us navy test pilot. it was a huge hit. it was made in cooperation with the pentagon. in the wake of the film, recruitment into the us military reportedly shot up. some say the film glamorised combat, a point that i put to a very young tom cruise at that time. if we wanted to make a war film or a film that glorifies combat, we would have been blowing people away from the beginning to the end. it's a film about character, and essentially, in the end, big battle, the adversary is faceless, nameless. the opponent is symbolic of the character and his conflict.
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now, 36 years later, we have the top gun — maverick sequel. the film has been getting outstanding reviews. it's seen as less jingoistic than its predecessor. tom cruise is not an actor without controversy. he has long been an outspoken advocate of scientology, but it doesn't seem to have harmed his hollywood career. top gun — maverick is set to put him back on top and bring some solid, much—needed business to cinemas around the world struggling to recover from the impact of covid. tom brooke, bbc news, cannes. yesterday, we brought you the news that eintracht frankfurt won the 2022 europa league championship. now, the victorious team have returned home to frankfurt to this reception. the german club beat the rangers 5—4 in a penalty shoot—out to win their second european trophy. that's all for now —
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stay with bbc world news.
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hello there. after the thunderstorms that brought us a noisy night last night, the weather has calmed down. today, it turned into a beautiful day for many places with lots of sunshine overhead. last night's went there looked a lot more dramatic with these vicious thunderstorms pushing up these vicious thunderstorms pushing up from the south. thousands of lightning strikes and very heavy rain, gusty winds, a few more thunderstorms grazed into the southeast corner first thing this morning, but they have cleared away. the weather has calmed down tonight, certainly a quieter night, we will see marco drifting up from the south, bit of rain from that cloud later in the night, equally, some shower a rain getting into parts of northwest scotland and may northern ireland later on, some clear spells, chilly for eastern scotland in northeast england, but a mild night
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elsewhere. tomorrow, this rental system will push in from the northwest, bringing shower a rain. this one here will bring some very heavy thunder remained across the near continent, which mayjust graze into parts of kent, but more generally, there will be some outbreaks of rain tomorrow morning across the midlands and prest of eastern england. without this band of cloud and shower a rain drifting across northern ireland into western scotland, wales, the western side of england and a few heavy, thundery downplays popping up elsewhere, albeit with some sunny spells in between. quite breezy tomorrow and a little cooler than it has been, 1a to 19 degrees, although, those temperatures are around the average for the time of year. now, what about the beak and? high—pressure to the south of us, that high—pressure close enough to give a decent amount of hype pressure. bringing some outbreaks of rain. the best of the sunshine on saturday will be found or and in sunshine on saturday will be found orand in wales, i sunshine on saturday will be found or and in wales, i think even here there will be large amounts of cloud, thicker cloud for northern ireland and much of scotland bringing some outbreaks of rain, though a good part of northeast
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scotland will stay dry with some sunshine. 1a degrees in glasgow, 21 celsius the hyatt in london. into the second half of the weekend, more parental systems to the northwest. also this weather system drifting up across the bay of biscay. that could introduce some showers to sunday, certainly across the channel islands, but may be into southern counties of england as well. a lot of mist low cloud for western parts to start the day. some shower a rain through northern ireland, scotland, some parts of not trusting and wales. elsewhere, spells of sunshine and typed temperatures between 16 and typed temperatures between 16 and 22 celsius. goodbye for now. hello, and welcome to our look ahead
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to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the former pensions minister, lady ros altmann, and dan sabbagh, who is the defence and security editor at the guardian. hello both, we'll chat to both in just a hello both, we'll chat to both in 'us. ., ., �* hello both, we'll chat to both in iusi ., ., i , hello both, we'll chat to both in 'usi ., ., �* , �* , ., just a moment. but first, let's have a look at the _ just a moment. but first, let's have a look at the front _ just a moment. but first, let's have a look at the front pages _ just a moment. but first, let's have a look at the front pages and - just a moment. but first, let's have a look at the front pages and see i a look at the front pages and see what's happening. the guardian reports on the results of the police investigation into lockdown parties in downing street and whitehall, saying civil servants are "furious" the pm escaped with only one fine. the telegraph focuses on the forthcoming sue gray report into the parties — saying she wants to name the key players, but fears she'll come under pressure not to do so. the mirror contrasts borisjohnson�*s claim in december that no rules were broken, with today's news that a total of 126 fines were issued by police. the mail says the investigation cost £460,000 and brands it a farcical waste of time.

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