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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 9, 2022 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines... initial results from the philippines�* election show the presidential contender ferdinand marcos, jr is heading for a landslide win. mr marcos appears to have more than twice the number of votes than his main rival. vladimir putin has described the invasion of ukraine as a "pre—emptive strike". he alleged — without evidence — that kyiv had been planning military operations in areas of ukraine that russia has taken control of. he was addressing troops on moscow's red square as part of a huge military parade for the anniversary of the defeat of nazi germany. ukraine's president has said that putin was repeating the crimes of hitler's regime. as violence grips the sri lankan capital colombo, the prime minister mahinda rajapaksa has
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offered his resignation. at least five people have died in the protests, including an mp from the ruling party. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are annabel denham, who's director of communications at the iea — the institute of econonomic affairs — and the broadcaster, john stapleton. we will say hello to them and just a little bit. we'll say hello to you all shortly, let's look at the front pages. the financial times, which leads on the news that labour leader sir keir starmer says he will quit if he's fined by durham police for breaking lockdown rules.
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the metro carries the same story on its front page, but also has a picture of the queen, who won't be attending the state opening of parliament, with prince charles taking her place the daily telegraph leads on the queen's absence — and says the move could be seen as a significant shift in prince charles�* responsibilities as heir to the throne. the sun says it's the first time the monarch will miss the state opening in 59 years. the times is leading with keir starmer, and mentions claims that staff present at the "beergate" event were drunk — something denied by the mp mary foy, whose office was used for the gathering. the guardian says it has evidence compiled by the labour party that shows the curry and beers that are under investigation were part of the working day — meaning they were permitted under covid rules at the time. but the daily mail accuses sir keir of putting pressure on the police by promising to resign if fined — as any decision to do so could effectively kill off
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opposition to the government. the mirror, though, boasts an exclusive sit—down with sir kier, hailing his commitment to step down if fined as honourable. two big stories dominating the front pages. good evening again, thanks to both for coming back and talking us through these front pages. quite a lot of detail, quite a lot of controversial stories with dividing opinion. let's start with the guardian this time. the headline is, "starmer�*s campbell: leader pledges to quit if he is fined over beergate."john, do you to quit if he is fined over beergate." john, do you want to kick off this time? fix, beergate.�* john, do you want to kick off this time?— off this time? a huge gamble by sir keir starmer _ off this time? a huge gamble by sir keir starmer because his _ keir starmer because his professional reputation is on the line and could lead to him having to resign as leader of the labour party, putting pressure on boris johnson. you'd have to resign as
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well if he resigns or a similar offence. the guardian comes up with some evidence suggesting he'll be in the clear because they say it labour party has evidence of time recorded chats after the events, which is essential to the controversy, showing he was working even after the event closed. they've said the view that he should be in the clear. this puts a lot of pressure on both politicians and the police, but we must dismiss all those thoughts because the police have to look at the facts and disregard any political implications. according to the guardian, keir starmer is in the clear. he has a few questions to answer, for example, i think i'm right in saying that when these allegations first emerged, it was suggested that borisjohnson had been involved in partying and downing street, sir keir starmer said he should resign even before a fixed penalty notice was assigned to borisjohnson. he should resign
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under the same circumstances. why is it taken so long for this to come through? you may have realised he they said that was an honest mistake, possibly it was, possibly it wasn't. durham police will establish the facts, and they have some previous on this because the durham police investigated the dominant cummings breach of regulations on his ill—fated trip to durham. they determined he had breached regulations, but they took the view that they never issued a fixed penalty notice retrospectively of an alleged crime or offence like this, therefore they wouldn't a pursue it —— dominic cummings. it'll be interesting to hear what they say about starmer. we be interesting to hear what they say about starmer.— about starmer. we had a former labour party _ about starmer. we had a former labour party strategist - about starmer. we had a former labour party strategist on - about starmer. we had a former labour party strategist on underj about starmer. we had a former- labour party strategist on under the tony blair years, suggesting it had to be today because we have the
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state opening of parliament tomorrow. and in his view, secure starmer had to be clear to the guardian pick out this line, as you mentioned there, john, about this timing, the whatsapp messages, the fact that food was consumed, yes, but work was done after that, therefore part of the regulations and should be fine. you then take a look at the same story on the front of the daily mail. annabel, if you can talk us through this, they pull out a very different details there. the headline is, "starmer accused of piling pressure on police." what do they mean by that?— piling pressure on police." what do they mean by that? absolutely right, it's interesting _ they mean by that? absolutely right, it's interesting the _ they mean by that? absolutely right, it's interesting the spin _ they mean by that? absolutely right, it's interesting the spin that - they mean by that? absolutely right, it's interesting the spin that can - it's interesting the spin that can be it's interesting the spin that can he put — it's interesting the spin that can he put on — it's interesting the spin that can be put on beergate, on these stories particularly _ be put on beergate, on these stories particularly as we get further and further_ particularly as we get further and further into the weeds, it's really quite _ further into the weeds, it's really quite extraordinary at the level of
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detail_ quite extraordinary at the level of detail that we are now having to go into about — detail that we are now having to go into about what time precisely the eating _ into about what time precisely the eating ended and the work commenced, but the _ eating ended and the work commenced, but the cover_ eating ended and the work commenced, but the cover of the daily mail is mps claiming that starmer announcing he would _ mps claiming that starmer announcing he would resign if issued with a fixed _ he would resign if issued with a fixed penalty notice is a cynical ploy to influence the outcome of the durham _ ploy to influence the outcome of the durham constabulary's investigation. i durham constabulary's investigation. i myself— durham constabulary's investigation. i myself am feeling pretty cynical about _ i myself am feeling pretty cynical about these claims. like john said, ithink— about these claims. like john said, i think the — about these claims. like john said, i think the police will establish the facts — i think the police will establish the facts and issue a fine or not issue _ the facts and issue a fine or not issue a — the facts and issue a fine or not issue a fine _ the facts and issue a fine or not issue a fine based on those facts, and nothing else, and not considering the political ramifications of the decision they may still— ramifications of the decision they may still echo may arrive at. but it does _ may still echo may arrive at. but it does throughout interesting questions for a long time, we talked
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about— questions for a long time, we talked about what— questions for a long time, we talked about what a leadership challenge to borisjohnson could look about what a leadership challenge to boris johnson could look like, about what a leadership challenge to borisjohnson could look like, who's the oven _ borisjohnson could look like, who's the oven ready candidate now that rishi sunak has been plagued with the non—dom status of his wife. more recently— the non—dom status of his wife. more recently has — the non—dom status of his wife. more recently he's received a fine himself _ recently he's received a fine himself. but we've given little thought — himself. but we've given little thought to who would fill keir starmer's shoes were he to resign. of course _ starmer's shoes were he to resign. of course if— starmer's shoes were he to resign. of course if he resigns in angelo rayner— of course if he resigns in angelo rayner is — of course if he resigns in angelo rayner is also issued with a fine, then— rayner is also issued with a fine, then that — rayner is also issued with a fine, then that takes out the leader in then that takes out the leader in the deputy leader of the opposition. we could _ the deputy leader of the opposition. we could find ourselves in an unusual situation where the prime minister— unusual situation where the prime minister is — unusual situation where the prime minister is coming under immense pressure _ minister is coming under immense pressure to— minister is coming under immense pressure to resign because the leader— pressure to resign because the leader of— pressure to resign because the leader of the opposition has himself resigned _ leader of the opposition has himself resigned in a sort of, because the operation — resigned in a sort of, because the operation to bring both himself and boris _ operation to bring both himself and borisjohnson down. so operation to bring both himself and boris johnson down. so we operation to bring both himself and borisjohnson down. so we could be facing _ borisjohnson down. so we could be facing two _ borisjohnson down. so we could be facing two leadership contests at the same — facing two leadership contests at the same time in british politics
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across— the same time in british politics across the — the same time in british politics across the two main parties, which would _ across the two main parties, which would be _ across the two main parties, which would be pretty extraordinary. lots more politics. _ would be pretty extraordinary. lots more politics, don't know how key in the pop to make a public will be on this. john, ijust want the pop to make a public will be on this. john, i just want to the pop to make a public will be on this. john, ijust want to point the pop to make a public will be on this. john, i just want to point out something keir starmer wanted to hammer home and lots of labour party members have tried to hammer out, the difference between beergate and partygate. clearly feeling pressure here that everyone will be tarred with the same brush in the public�*s view, do you think that's getting any kind of success in making the distinction? i any kind of success in making the distinction?— distinction? i think we will have some success. _ distinction? i think we will have some success. i— distinction? i think we will have some success. i watched - distinction? i think we will have some success. i watched his, . distinction? i think we will have - some success. i watched his, albeit brief, press conferences afternoon interestingly in front ofjust brief, press conferences afternoon interestingly in front of just three journalists, that way the labour party arrange that, i don't know if that was an act of something that happened, or if i got that wrong. i thought he came through very well. my thought he came through very well. my own personal view is that i get
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the impression, i've never met sir keir starmer, i get the impression he is a very decent, honest guy, he's got an impeccable record in public prosecutions, and i think he is trying to establish himself as someone who is rather different to borisjohnson who, let's someone who is rather different to boris johnson who, let's face someone who is rather different to borisjohnson who, let's face it, has an uncomfortable relationship with the truth, and has aired on that occasion and may regard not just in his professional life, but personal life. not necessarily everyone, but i think a lot of people won't think starmer has set the world on fire. the labour party may acknowledge that deep down, he is a decent guy, whether you believe rightly or wrongly, as the police may take a different view... the police may take a different view on
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sir keir starmer, that he and his colleagues were right within the covid rules and relations at the time. ~ ., ., ., ., time. we will have to wait for the final decision _ time. we will have to wait for the final decision from _ time. we will have to wait for the final decision from the _ time. we will have to wait for the final decision from the police. - final decision from the police. let's stick with politics — inside the times, page two of the times, a slightly technical story but the implications could be absolutely huge if this plays out as it says here. the headline is, "liz truss set to dig protocol after giving up on the eu talks." it's a tough one, but annabel, talk us through this in simple terms? i’ll but annabel, talk us through this in simple terms?— simple terms? i'll do my best. i must say. _ simple terms? i'll do my best. i must say. l'm — simple terms? i'll do my best. i must say, i'm quite _ simple terms? i'll do my best. i must say, i'm quite surprised i simple terms? i'll do my best. i i must say, i'm quite surprised this is only— must say, i'm quite surprised this is only made the inside cover of the times, _ is only made the inside cover of the times, as _ is only made the inside cover of the times, as this is a potentially very significant — times, as this is a potentially very significant development. this is the foreign— significant development. this is the foreign secretary liz truss, who took _ foreign secretary liz truss, who took over— foreign secretary liz truss, who took over brexit negotiations after lord frost— took over brexit negotiations after lord frost resigned before christmas, and he's decided that there's— christmas, and he's decided that there's little point in trying to reach — there's little point in trying to reach a — there's little point in trying to
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reach a brexit deal with the eu, and she'll— reach a brexit deal with the eu, and she'll move — reach a brexit deal with the eu, and she'll move as soon as next week to scrap _ she'll move as soon as next week to scrap part— she'll move as soon as next week to scrap part of— she'll move as soon as next week to scrap part of the northern ireland protocol — scrap part of the northern ireland protocol in — scrap part of the northern ireland protocol in british law, signifying a unilateral action being taken by the uk _ a unilateral action being taken by the uk government when it comes to the uk government when it comes to the northern ireland protocol. now i think we _ the northern ireland protocol. now i think we need to bear in mind that the protocol itself is clearly not working. — the protocol itself is clearly not working, this has put a hard border in the _ working, this has put a hard border in the irish— working, this has put a hard border in the irish sea in order that trade flows _ in the irish sea in order that trade flows can— in the irish sea in order that trade flows can continue seamlessly between northern ireland and the republic— between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, but it's thrown up republic of ireland, but it's thrown up all— republic of ireland, but it's thrown up all sorts— republic of ireland, but it's thrown up all sorts of issues. and of course, _ up all sorts of issues. and of course, these have been exacerbated by the _ course, these have been exacerbated by the results of the elections for the northern ireland assembly last week, _ the northern ireland assembly last week, for— the northern ireland assembly last week, for the first time in northern ireland's— week, for the first time in northern ireland's hundred year existence and nationalist _ ireland's hundred year existence and nationalist party. sinn fein having been _ nationalist party. sinn fein having been the — nationalist party. sinn fein having been the political wing of the ra.
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this has— been the political wing of the ra. this has really forced the issue to the fore, — this has really forced the issue to the fore, with not much wiggle room, really. _ the fore, with not much wiggle room, really. but _ the fore, with not much wiggle room, really. but to— the fore, with not much wiggle room, really, but to consider unilateral action— really, but to consider unilateral action will— really, but to consider unilateral action will hopefully bring the eu back to _ action will hopefully bring the eu back to the negotiating table. and my hope _ back to the negotiating table. and my hope at least is that we can move towards _ my hope at least is that we can move towards the _ my hope at least is that we can move towards the proposals we set out in the lord _ towards the proposals we set out in the lord frost was at command paper last year. _ the lord frost was at command paper last year, when the uk respected eu customs rules when it came to exporting _ customs rules when it came to exporting goods to the eu via northern ireland. but in return, we have _ northern ireland. but in return, we have a _ northern ireland. but in return, we have a very— northern ireland. but in return, we have a very free trade of goods within— have a very free trade of goods within gb— have a very free trade of goods within gb and northern ireland. sol think that's — within gb and northern ireland. sol think that's what the foreign secretary is really trying to... that's — secretary is really trying to... that's interesting, the article, the that�*s interesting, the article, the warnings— that's interesting, the article, the warnings— john, pick up on this if you can," liz truss has been told this unilateral action could result in the eu suspending all cooperation
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with the uk, except for ukraine, and instigating legal action against the government, and potentially a trade war." ., �* , government, and potentially a trade war.“ . �*, . y�* war. " that's what they're suggesting- _ war. " that's what they're suggesting. not - war. " that's what they're suggesting. not forget . war. " that's what they're i suggesting. not forget that war. " that's what they're - suggesting. not forget that this war. " that's what they're _ suggesting. not forget that this was a protocol negotiated by liz truss's government and was a great diplomatic triumph of the time, the same time that borisjohnson was saying there would be no checks on goods entering northern ireland. there have been those checks, and the dup are saying that because of those checks, business and northern ireland is suffering, threatening the security and stability of the province, and they are suggesting quite categorically that they will not enter into government with sinn fein, despite the results of last week because my collection, until this protocol issues sorted out. so this protocol issues sorted out. so this is a gut reaction from liz truss to save the northern ireland assembly, or get them working again,
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hopefully for the sake of the northern irish people who have been six months without any sort of reliable, working government— as they've done twice in the past, when they've done twice in the past, when they had a crash with the national health service, and they had a crisis like all the rest of the uk with regards to the cost of living. so it far from with regards to the cost of living. so it farfrom ideal situation so it far from ideal situation for them. interesting that liz truss is taking this view, given in mind when rishi sunak was saying they were less enthusiastic about such a move, and if she went ahead and did it, it could lead to major disruption of relations with the eu somewhat fascinating to see where this goes with northern ireland, if there's a stalemate nothing is happened, elections are over again there. let's move to the other big story on most pages, let's focus on the telegraph — this is the state
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opening of parliament, and a big announcement in that the queen won't be there tomorrow, annabel? that’s be there tomorrow, annabel? that's riaht, be there tomorrow, annabel? that's riuht, it'll be there tomorrow, annabel? that's right. it'll only _ be there tomorrow, annabel? that's right. it'll only be — be there tomorrow, annabel? that's right, it'll only be the _ be there tomorrow, annabel? that's right, it'll only be the third - be there tomorrow, annabel? that's right, it'll only be the third time - right, it'll only be the third time she's— right, it'll only be the third time she's missed this constitutional ceremony, and the first time since 1963. _ ceremony, and the first time since 1963, previously having missed it because — 1963, previously having missed it because she was pregnant. sol 1963, previously having missed it because she was pregnant. so i think the nation _ because she was pregnant. so i think the nation will be deeply saddened to hear— the nation will be deeply saddened to hear that the queen won't be there _ to hear that the queen won't be there. there have been mounting concerns— there. there have been mounting concerns over her health in recent months. _ concerns over her health in recent months, mobility issues have made it clear she _ months, mobility issues have made it clear she cannot make it to parliament tomorrow. she's missed events— parliament tomorrow. she's missed events already this year, and there was an— events already this year, and there was an announcement that she would not host— was an announcement that she would not host more royal garden parties this year— not host more royal garden parties this year either. she's still doing zoom _
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this year either. she's still doing zoom meetings and is still performing some of her duties. undoubtedly this does mark her stepping back at least in the short—term, but one suspects for longer— short—term, but one suspects for longer and — short—term, but one suspects for longer and beginning to pass the baton— longer and beginning to pass the baton on— longer and beginning to pass the baton on to charles. i think it's quite _ baton on to charles. i think it's quite interesting in that last point is that— quite interesting in that last point is that a _ quite interesting in that last point is that a few years ago, there was lots of— is that a few years ago, there was lots of talk about charles stepping aside. _ lots of talk about charles stepping aside, abdicating the throne so that william _ aside, abdicating the throne so that william could become the monarch. but we _ william could become the monarch. but we are — william could become the monarch. but we are not hearing that, at least _ but we are not hearing that, at least at — but we are not hearing that, at least at the moment, not that i've read _ least at the moment, not that i've read i_ least at the moment, not that i've read ithink— least at the moment, not that i've read. i think the nation has accepted _ read. i think the nation has accepted that charles will indeed become — accepted that charles will indeed become king, and tomorrow willjust become king, and tomorrow willjust be the _ become king, and tomorrow willjust be the beginning of us being eased into that _ be the beginning of us being eased into that. .. . be the beginning of us being eased into that. ., . ., be the beginning of us being eased into that. ., , ., ., , into that. lots of front pages car in: into that. lots of front pages carrying this. _ into that. lots of front pages carrying this, looking - into that. lots of front pages carrying this, looking at - into that. lots of front pages carrying this, looking at the l into that. lots of front pages - carrying this, looking at the front page of the sun, "crown and out" is there headline. the statement from there headline. the statement from the palace talking about the ill health of the queen, describing as episodic mobility problems. we don't
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know any more details than that, really, but episodic mobility problems is how they describe it. of course quite apart from the queen's absence, this is a piece of importance because of the legislation which is what it's actually really about, about what the government will do next? yes. the government will do next? yes, and one thing _ the government will do next? yes, and one thing missing _ the government will do next? £3 and one thing missing from it, as i understand it, according to the telegraph, is an absence of any promise about what they'll do about the cost of living crisis. that will come at a future stage, it's not there according to the daily telegraph. what they can talk about is these 38 new bills, including a crackdown on peaceful protests — presumably a crackdown on organisations like extinction rebellion and the fuss they cause, in the destruction they cause —— and the disruption they cause, whether
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protests are warranted or not. also extending stop and search powers, which i think is an interesting one given that when theresa may was home secretary, then prime minister, she changed the rules on stop and search because she said the rules were being carried out disproportionately, but they actually didn't work. boris johnson's government apparently is reversing that. we'll need more detail about that. 38 new bills, the headline is that the crackdown is on protesters like extension rebellion, making it an offence —— a more serious offence if they disrupt public transport. they can find business centres up to 12 months for those found guilty. what business centres up to 12 months for those found guilty.— those found guilty. what you think about that's _ those found guilty. what you think about that's the _ those found guilty. what you think about that's the line _ those found guilty. what you think about that's the line that's - those found guilty. what you think. about that's the line that's emerged on the front page of the telegraph, annabel, out of all those pieces of legislation? i annabel, out of all those pieces of legislation?— annabel, out of all those pieces of leaislation? . ., , ., ., legislation? i certainly wonder what the conservative _ legislation? i certainly wonder what the conservative government - legislation? i certainly wonder what the conservative government must| legislation? i certainly wonder what i
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the conservative government must be thinking _ the conservative government must be thinking about that being the take away _ thinking about that being the take away. here's the opportunity for them _ away. here's the opportunity for them to— away. here's the opportunity for them to set out their post—coronavirus agenda for the next couple _ post—coronavirus agenda for the next couple of _ post—coronavirus agenda for the next couple of years, which will of course — couple of years, which will of course take us up to 2024 when we are anticipating another general election — are anticipating another general election. and this is really them setting — election. and this is really them setting out what their plans are for the country, one has to imagine it boils _ the country, one has to imagine it boils down — the country, one has to imagine it boils down to a bit more moves to clamp— boils down to a bit more moves to clamp down— boils down to a bit more moves to clamp down on certain protests to occur— clamp down on certain protests to occur of— clamp down on certain protests to occur of the — clamp down on certain protests to occur of the impact of the so—called guerrilla _ occur of the impact of the so—called guerrilla protests launched by environmental groups like extinction rebellion— environmental groups like extinction rebellion and insulate britain, and 'ust rebellion and insulate britain, and just stopped oil. a number of bills being _ just stopped oil. a number of bills being carried over from the previous station _ being carried over from the previous station we — being carried over from the previous station, we are hearing about a lot of new _ station, we are hearing about a lot of new bills — that will become clear tomorrow. of new bills — that will become cleartomorrow. butjohn of new bills — that will become clear tomorrow. butjohn is right, i'm not— clear tomorrow. butjohn is right, i'm not hearing anything about how this government is planning to tackle — this government is planning to tackle the cost of living. of course
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they're _ tackle the cost of living. of course they're talking about the bonfire of they're talking about the bonfire of the eu _ they're talking about the bonfire of the eu regulations, but this seems like it's_ the eu regulations, but this seems like it'sjust bringing in new bills as though — like it'sjust bringing in new bills as though somehow legislation brought— as though somehow legislation brought in by whitehall, rather than brussels _ brought in by whitehall, rather than brussels is — brought in by whitehall, rather than brussels is fundamentally beneficial to the _ brussels is fundamentally beneficial to the uk_ brussels is fundamentally beneficial to the uk economy. i'd like to see us really— to the uk economy. i'd like to see us really ignite that on fire, i think — us really ignite that on fire, i think. �* . ., , us really ignite that on fire, i think. �* . . , . us really ignite that on fire, i think. . . , . think. i'm afraid i must cut you off the are think. i'm afraid i must cut you off they are mid-flow, _ think. i'm afraid i must cut you off they are mid-flow, annabel, - think. i'm afraid i must cut you off| they are mid-flow, annabel, thank they are mid—flow, annabel, thank you very much for that. and john, thank you, as well. the one story we didn't get to talk about was about acts throwing on the front page of the yorkshire post, a business that wants to allow people to drink alcohol at acts throwing sessions is facing opposition from police. i'm afraid we can't do that, if you want to learn more about that, you'll have to buy the yorkshire post tomorrow. that's it for the papers tonight. we will be back again tomorrow evening. dojoin us then if you can — but for now, goodnight.
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hi there, good evening. i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. sunderland are one win away from a return to the championship — after beating sheffield wednesday 2—1 on aggregate in their league one play—off semi final. tonight's second leg at hillsborough was heading to extra time before sunderland got the goal they needed to ensure they'll play wycombe in the final at wembley next saturday. joe lynskey reports. in the playoffs, it can all change with a goal. this is what it meant to sunderland. they've spent four years in leaguei — but now, they're one match from promotion. this club left the premier league in 2017, then kept sinking — consecutive relegations filmed in a netflix documentary — and they got stuck in the third tier. this was their latest attempt to escape — and a semifinal with sheffield wednesday, a giant club, as well.
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across the two legs were nearly 80,000 fans, a playoff record. and, though this second leg was tense, it came to life in the second half. wednesday were 1—0 down from the first game, but this goal leveled it. 1—1 on aggregate, and hillsborough lit up and expected. but sunderland held their nerve and the noise and, in stoppage time, got the winner. for the club and the coach, it's a temporary lift—off. sunderland have one more match to manage at wembley against wycombe. but, in front of record crowds, they've done the firstjob. and a city obsessed with football now hopes they can start to look up. joe lynskey, bbc news. erling haaland's summer move from borussia dortmund to manchester city could be confirmed this week. bbc sport has heard from separate sources that the £63 million
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transfer for the 21—year—old striker is agreed, with an announcement expected soon in germany. city are currently refusing to respond to the widespread reports. england have been knocked out of the cerebal palsy world cup. they were playing iran in the quarterfinals and did go one up before the iranians staged a fightback to win by 3—1 to seal their place in the last four. in tennis, emma raducanu's set to play in front of a british crowd for the first time since winning the us open, when she plays at the birmingham classic next month. raducanu ranked 12th in the world, but has not played in a competitive tournament on british soil since her run to the wimbledon fourth round last summer. after that, she, of course, went on to win her first grand slam title in new york. and staying with tennis — the former british number one joanna konta has revealed she is pregnant with her first child.
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announcing the news on social media, she said she was "busy baking my own little muffin right now". konta retired from tennis in december last year, after struggling with a long—term knee injury. and mo farah has pulled out of the great manchester run later this month. he's made the decision after a disappointing second—placed finish at the vitality london 10k last weekend, when he was beaten by an amateur club runner. farah says he needs another month of training to reach a competitive level. and finally, in a little over three weeks, scotland and ukraine will be going head to head at hampden in their world cup playoff semi final. the ukraine players of course are taking part in the shadow of the war at home. our sports news reporter chris mclaughlin has travelled to the team's training camp in slovenia to meet them. it's a nation fighting for its very survival. normality in ukraine ceased when russia invaded in february.
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teachers, bakers, bankers, and even footballers took up arms. but it's here in slovenia that some of those footballers now find themselves, preparing for a world cup qualifier against scotland next month — a fixture that, just a few weeks ago, seemed almost impossible. this group of players were always determined the game would go ahead. to provide a nation with hope that normality can return. and so, with training at home too dangerous, they search for match fitness here at the slovenian national training centre. every day, for me, for the guys, we receive messages from our soldiers. because a lot of soldiers, a lot of people in ukraine love football. and they ask for only one demand — please, make everything you can to go in the world cup.
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they have stories, how they moved with their families to save their families. they saw how people lost their homes, and even more lost close relatives. so yeah, the story was everybody — what they say now is the best news in the morning or during the day, isjust to receive a message from their relatives in ukraine that they are ok. many said they could never assemble, would never be ready. the backdrop may be slovenia, but this is ukraine, determined they will be ready when the whistle finally blows at hampden. chris mclaughlin, bbc news. and that's all the sport for now. from all of us here, goodnight.
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hello there. there's more rainfall in the forecast across more northern and western parts of the country over the next few days. little rain for the south and the east, and it will be quite windy at times thanks to low pressure always nearby — and you can see it's here anchored to the north of the uk on tuesday, lots of isobars on the charts, most of the showers will be in the north and the west. the overnight weather front will be weakening as it continues to move across east anglia in the southeast, barely anything on it. and then, for most places, tuesday afternoon looks bright — sunshine, showers, most of these in the north and the west, some of them will be heavy, even thundery. and the winds quite a feature as well, especially across western scotland. temperatures ranging from around the mid—to—high teens, could see 20 celsius across the southeast. so it's here where we'll see the highest pollen levels again. further north, although fairly high, it won't be quite as bad as what we've had over the last few days. so the wind, the rain, the showers begins to ease down around the middle—latter parts of the week, and then, into the weekend, high pressure starts to build in.
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it'll start to turn sunny and warmer, especially as we head on into next week.
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welcome to newsday, i'm karishma vaswani reporting live from manila where initial results show the presidential contender ferdinand marcos junior heading for a landslide win. the son of a former dictator, mr marcos — known locally as "bongbong" — appears to have more than twice the number of votes than his main rival, the outgoing vice president, leni robredo. i'm mariko oi, here in singapore. also on the programme: vladimir putin uses russia's victory day parade to justify his invasion of ukraine — but ther�*s no indication of any change of course. the point is that the kremlin's decision to attack ukraine has sparked a global condemnation and sanctions and is turning russia into a pariah.
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the leader of britain's main opposition party —

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