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tv   Newsday  BBC News  May 8, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm mariko oi. the headlines... polls are opening in the philippines�* presidential election, and it's a divisive battle to succeed rodrigo duterte. and i'm karishma vaswani, live in manila, where more than 18,000 posts, from president to town councillor, are up for grabs in the elections. we'll be hearing from a political analyst about what's at stake in the philippines shortly. our other main headlines. more than 60 people are thought to have been killed after a russian bomb hit a school in eastern ukraine. john lee, the man who oversaw the crackdown on protesters in hong kong, becomes the territory's new leader. he replaces carrie lam.
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actor shooti gatwa has been announced as the new lead in doctor who in one of british tv�*s longest running dramas. it feels really amazing. it's a true honour. this role is an institution and it's so iconic and it means a lot to so many people, including myself. live from our studio in singapore... this is bbc news. it's newsday. it's six in the morning here in singapore, and also in the philippines, where the polls have just opened in the most divisive presidential election for many years. there are several candidates hoping to replace the current leader, hardliner rodrigo duterte, but just two clear frontrunners. leading in the polls is ferdinand
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"bongbong" marcosjunior. the main challenger to him is leni robredo. polls in the philippines arejust opening, and karishma vaswani is at a polling station in manila. karishma, over to you. big day for the philippines. and i'm cominu big day for the philippines. and i'm comin: to big day for the philippines. and i'm coming to you _ big day for the philippines. and i'm coming to you from _ big day for the philippines. and i'm coming to you from the _ big day for the philippines. and i'm coming to you from the elementary school in manila on a typical day. today it's been transformed into one of the biggest polling stations in the city. some of the boulders have just streamed in behind me. —— the voters. it's an enormous selection. more than 18 thousand votes are what people are going to have to choose for today. people are going to have to choose fortoday. because people are going to have to choose for today. because of the number of posts, voters have been told to make up posts, voters have been told to make up their minds before they get here. when they do get here, there's no
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complication or confusion. you get in, make your vote and get out. this is happening against the pandemic as well. the elections are being held in the post pandemic era. there's a lot of protocols to ensure they are held safely. there's a medical team outside to check for anybody displaying symptoms of covid, and anybody who has a fever or temperature of over verse 37 and a half celsius is taken to an isolation booth. the instructions are coming fast and furious behind me so that all analysers know what to tell voters. all of this is taking place against the backdrop, as you pointed out, highly divisive elections. controversial with polls appearing to suggest recent opinion polls ferdinand marcos could well be
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in the running —— the son of ferdinand marcos. we'rejoined by professorjean strength go. great to have you on the show with us today. looking at the number of voters, quite quickly and early, what do you expect to turn out to be?— expect to turn out to be? filipinos have always _ expect to turn out to be? filipinos have always loved _ expect to turn out to be? filipinos have always loved to _ expect to turn out to be? filipinos have always loved to vote. - expect to turn out to be? filipinos have always loved to vote. we - have always loved to vote. we usually — have always loved to vote. we usually have 80% voter turnout compared to other countries. i'll be expecting _ compared to other countries. i'll be expecting such a rate, given that this is_ expecting such a rate, given that this is a — expecting such a rate, given that this is a very important election. in this is a very important election. in terms— this is a very important election. in terms of— this is a very important election. in terms of the main issues are voters, what are they in this election?— voters, what are they in this election? ., , , , election? the name issue is the unemployment. _ election? the name issue is the unemployment, especially - election? the name issue is the l unemployment, especially reeling from the — unemployment, especially reeling from the pandemic, and the second one would _
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from the pandemic, and the second one would be the prices of goods. we have had _ one would be the prices of goods. we have had a _ one would be the prices of goods. we have had a high inflation rate in recent— have had a high inflation rate in recent months, and of course, how to pandemic— recent months, and of course, how to pandemic proof our health system. you talked — pandemic proof our health system. you talked about some of the economic issues here, but in the lead up to this vote, there hasn't been the main campaign promises from any political party? yes. been the main campaign promises from any political party?— any political party? yes, because usuall , any political party? yes, because usually. parties _ any political party? yes, because usually, parties or— any political party? yes, because usually, parties or candidates - any political party? yes, becausel usually, parties or candidates who are running — usually, parties or candidates who are running for posts tend to appeal based _ are running for posts tend to appeal based on _ are running for posts tend to appeal based on personality, based on sound bites and _ based on personality, based on sound bites and slogans that they believe would _ bites and slogans that they believe would appeal to voters. though is that what — would appeal to voters. though is that what you're seeing in this election— that what you're seeing in this election as well, that cult of personality election as well, that cult of personali_ election as well, that cult of ersonali j , ., , ., personality becoming a big part of who people _ personality becoming a big part of who people vote _ personality becoming a big part of who people vote for? _ personality becoming a big part of who people vote for? exactly. - personality becoming a big part ofj who people vote for? exactly. tell us a little bit _ who people vote for? exactly. tell us a little bit more _ who people vote for? exactly. tell us a little bit more about - who people vote for? exactly. tell
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us a little bit more about that. - us a little bit more about that. polls suggest that the son of the former strongman, polls suggest that the son of the formerstrongman, bongbong, he's former strongman, bongbong, he's known formerstrongman, bongbong, he's known as, polls suggest he's in the running. are these reliable typically?— running. are these reliable icall ? , typically? typically polls are reliable, especially - typically? typically polls are j reliable, especially pollsters typically? typically polls are - reliable, especially pollsters who have been there for more than 30 years— have been there for more than 30 years and — have been there for more than 30 years and who have put up electoral surveys _ years and who have put up electoral surveys in _ years and who have put up electoral surveys in many electoral cycles. however. — surveys in many electoral cycles. however, because of the huge turnout invited _ however, because of the huge turnout invited presidents runs —— in the vice _ invited presidents runs —— in the vice president's running, there have been _ vice president's running, there have been questions in regards to the polls _ been questions in regards to the polls. surveys have methodology. what _ polls. surveys have methodology. what is _ polls. surveys have methodology. what is the appeal of bongbong marcos to voters? the what is the appeal of bongbong marcos to voters?— what is the appeal of bongbong marcos to voters? the appeal is his false narrative. _
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marcos to voters? the appeal is his false narrative. that's _ marcos to voters? the appeal is his false narrative. that's not - marcos to voters? the appeal is his false narrative. that's not what - false narrative. that's not what many voters — false narrative. that's not what many voters would _ false narrative. that's not what many voters would say, - false narrative. that's not what many voters would say, they i false narrative. that's not what - many voters would say, they would say they believe him.— many voters would say, they would say they believe him. indeed. but he has positioned _ say they believe him. indeed. but he has positioned himself _ say they believe him. indeed. but he has positioned himself as _ say they believe him. indeed. but he has positioned himself as someone l has positioned himself as someone who wiii— has positioned himself as someone who will continue, whatever it is that his — who will continue, whatever it is that his father has started and initiated _ that his father has started and initiated. based on the glory days of the _ initiated. based on the glory days of the passed. initiated. based on the glory days of the passed-— initiated. based on the glory days ofthe assed. ~ ., ., ., of the passed. wonderful to have you on the show- — of the passed. wonderful to have you on the show. live _ of the passed. wonderful to have you on the show. live from _ of the passed. wonderful to have you on the show. live from manila. - on the show. live from manila. thanks so much, mariko. thanks for that, karishma. _ thanks so much, mariko. thanks for that, karishma. we'll— thanks so much, mariko. thanks for that, karishma. we'll have - thanks so much, mariko. thanks for that, karishma. we'll have much - thanks so much, mariko. thanks for i that, karishma. we'll have much more on the elections on our website, including this guide on all the candidates and what they stand for. just log on to bbc.com/news or download the bbc app. there are signs russia is stepping up its offensive in the eastern donbas region
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of ukraine, just a few hours before the annual victory day parade is to due to take place in moscow. more than 60 people are now feared dead after the bombing of a school in eastern ukraine, where civilians had been sheltering. the russian attack was on the village of bilohorivka in the donbas region. 0ur correspondent laura bicker has the story. this was a school in the village of bilohorivka. it was being used as a shelter when it was hit by an air strike. around 60 people are feared dead under this rubble. russia is stepping up its assault on eastern and southern ukraine. in mariupol, they seek out the last ukrainian fighters holed up in the vast azovstal steel plant. "keep watching and see how they move," is the command made of this russian drone operator. there are thought to be around 2000
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ukrainian soldiers still determined to make one last stand. we don't have high chances of survival while we would be captured, yeah? surrender for us is unacceptable because we cannot grant such a big gift to the enemy because every person who is captured is the exchange fund, is the resource. all the women and children who'd used this plant as a refuge for more than two months have been rescued, according to ukrainian officials. but daily shelling has decimated their once thriving city. the mayor claims those still there are being forced to carry permits to move around, and some men are even being held in camps. translation: this means that the russian occupying forces translation: this means - that the russian occupying forces are holding captive more than 100,000 people. they are using them to clear rubble and dead bodies. our local population is now forced to work for food in the city that
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has been turned into a ghetto, in my opinion, established by the russian army. centres have been set up to help the tens of thousands of mariupol families trying to rebuild their shattered lives. eight—year—old vicky loves it here, but her mum is struggling to forget those harrowing last moments in her home town. translation: planes, missiles, then ships. . everything was on fire around you. people in the streets, - torn off limbs, it was tough. it was frightening. i don't want to recall any of that. those left behind in mariupol must make what they can of their war—torn lives. and even amid the scattered ruins of their school, some have found a place to play. laura bicker, bbc news, zaporizhzhia. ukraine has been hosting the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, and the us
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first lady, drjill biden — who both made separate unannounced trips to the country. mr trudeau visited the town of irpin and announced canada will deliver new weapons and equipment to ukraine. the us first lady held talks with her ukrainian counterpart, 0lena zelenska, near the polish border. drjill biden said the visit on what is mother's day in the united states, was intended to show support to the people of ukraine. on monday, there will be military processions in russia to commemorate the soviet victory over nazi germany in 1945. but this year, the sight of tanks and troops on red square in moscow and other russian cities will have an added significance following the invasion of ukraine. the kremlin has been accused of using the memory of world war two to justify its offensive against its neighbour. from moscow, our russia editor, steve rosenberg, reports.
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this time of year, the traffic in moscow gets rather heavy. it's the final practice for the annual military parade. victory day marks the defeat of hitler's germany. but this year, putin's russia on the offensive. rehearsing on red square what moscow says are paratroopers back from ukraine. russia's invasion there is been presented here is another glorious presented here as another glorious chapter in russia's history. and so, you get this. in the run—up to victory day, across russia, organised displays of the letter z, the symbol of russia's offensive in ukraine, from schools... ..to stallions. at this sports festival outside
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moscow, we found lots of zs. patriotic pe to support the army. many here believe the kremlin's parallel reality, which portrays russia as a victim, not the aggressor. "nato's pressuring us," says natalia. "we'll fight to the end." "they have risen from hell to destroy us," natasha says, "the fascists, the americans, everyone who is against russians." but it was president putin who started this by attacking ukraine. more than two months later, he appears far from victory. he will be hoping that memories of world war ii will at least rally russians behind the kremlin. the defeat of nazi germany was a glorious moment in russian history, but today, the kremlin is using that victory, using the past, to try to justify the present. it's mobilising the patriotic
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fervour of victory day to secure public support for russia's offensive in ukraine. and that continues. kremlin critics warn that what russia is doing now in ukraine, what much of the world calls a war of conquest, casts a shadow over russia's great victory in world war ii. this victory, it was for our future. and now, we lost our future because of one man and his name is vladimir putin. he stole our future. he stole this victory. he stole our history. russians can celebrate the past. it's the future that's uncertain. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. you're watching newsday on the bbc.
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still to come on the programme — trading disputes casts doubt over the future of power sharing in northern ireland after sinn fein becomes the largest party in the assembly. i, nelson rolihlahla mandela, do hereby serve to the faithful of the republic of south africa. after six years of construction and numerous delays, the channel tunnel has been formally opened by the queen and president mitterrand. the tunnel is still not yet ready for passengers and freight services to begin. for centuries, christianity and islam struggled for supremacy. now, the pope's visit symbolises their willingness to coexist. roger bannister became the first man in the world to run a mile _ in underfour minutes. memories of victory as the ve celebrations reach their climax.
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this night is dedicated to everyone who believes in the future of peace and freedom. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm mariko 0i in singapore. 0ur headlines. polls havejust opened in the philippines' presidential election in a divisive battle to succeed rodrigo duterte. more than 60 people are thought to have been killed after a russian bomb hit a school in eastern ukraine. heavy fighting continues in the east of the country. the man who oversaw the crackdown on protesters in hong kong during pro—democracy demonstrations has become the territory's new leader. john lee, a staunch beijing
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supporter, was the sole candidate in the closed voting process, and his appointment is widely being seen as a move by the chinese government to tighten its grip on the city. he replaces carrie lam after she announced she would not be seeking a second term in office. danny vincent reports. i hereby declare that the only candidate, mrjohn lee ka—chiu, is returned in the above—mentioned election. congratulations. there was only ever one person in the running for this race. the authorities call this a closed circle election. but critics say it was just a selection process. john lee was the sole candidate. he was voted in by overwhelmingly pro—beijing representatives. having restored orderfrom chaos, it is high time that hong kong starts a new chapter of development. the former police officer is seen
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as a hardliner, a beijing loyal, who quietly rose up the ranks of the police force before becoming the city's second highest ranking official. he oversaw the implementation of the national security law and cracked down, ending the pro—democracy protest movement. with education, with prevention and with enforcement, we can turn the tide to let people know that protection and national security is everybody�*s responsibility. that advocacy for independence of hong kong is against the law. power to the people! but today, before voting began, a small group staged a protest calling for universal suffrage. i spoke to one police officer under condition of anonymity. i think the law is always a weapon. i think they're now using it more to achieve their political or financial means. police in hong kong has been the force available to
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the government to enforce anything. and today's hong kong, the majority of its political opposition are in prison or have left the city. hong kong was promised a certain political freedoms when it was returned to china in 1997. hong kong people were said to rule hong kong. to many, today marks the start of a political era for the territory. danny vincent, bbc news, hong kong. politicians in northern ireland are being urged by the uk government, as well as by the irish and us governments, to agree once again to a power sharing government in the wake of local election results. for the first time in more than 100 years of northern ireland's history, a nationalist party has emerged with the largest number of seats. that party, sinn fein, now needs to nominate a first minister for northern ireland. here's our ireland correspondent, emma vardy. the balance of power between the two different visions for this island has shifted — symbolically, at least.
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what do you think it means for northern ireland? well, it means maybe stormont will get back together and maybe it won't. i mean, this is what we've been living with for years now, dysfunctional politicians and dysfunctional systems. the immediate challenge for northern ireland is to heal the divisions caused by the brexit arrangements. the anger over a new border down the irish sea, which split the unionist vote. this place is under the jackboot of the eu, and we have been effectively held hostage in an economic united ireland. goods carried over the irish sea on ferries from britain, on ferries from britain undergo new checks when they reach these shores. undergo new checks when they reach these shores, which is perceived by some unionists as severing northern ireland's place in the uk and is disrupting the functions of many businesses. attempts to make the arrangement simpler has put the uk government at loggerheads with the eu. the eu has shown no flexibility |and it's very disappointing thatj
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what we're hearing is that the eu is already saying it won't - show any flexibility, and that's why it is absolutely right that we, - as the uk government, are very clear. - we want to get a resolution on this with the eu, - but we have never taken anything off ithe table in terms of resolving thisl issue for the people of northern ireland. while this persists, the dup has said it won't go back into the power—sharing executive, which sinn fein argues holds everyone to ransom. a fundamentalist approach that it is either the executive or the protocol, but you can't have both, that is not helping somebody with the cost of living. i'm a committed devolutionist, the dup are committed devolutionists, but it can only be on sound, stable footing, which means consent for both unionists and nationalists. hi, guys, . get you— the watermelon or the coconut today? sinn fein's victory also raises new questions over what it says about the choices voters are making for northern ireland's future. the party strongly believes in holding a border poll, a vote on whether northern ireland should remain part of the uk. there is only one person that can call a border poll and that is the secretary of state for northern ireland. he's obliged to call a border poll
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if it appears to him that there is a majority in favour of a united ireland within northern ireland. at the moment, the opinion polls suggest that support for a united ireland is within the 30—a0% range, so we've still got a considerable distance to travel before we get to that point. sinn fein is pushing for the governments in belfast and dublin to plan for what a united ireland might look like, fleshing out the details of things like health care and the economics of it all. and although there doesn't appear to be a majority here for it right now, sinn fein's electoral success will give more prominence to their campaign. for now, the problem for sinn fein is how to translate their victory into real power, because unless there's agreement between the parties, northern ireland remains in deadlock. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the israeli army has shot dead a palestinian man who it says was trying to cross the security barrier illegally from the occupied west bank into israel.
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in a separate incident, an israeli police officer has been stabbed in jerusalem. his attacker has been shot. there have been a number of attacks by palestinians and israeli arabs in recent weeks. a bridge in northern pakistan has collapsed after a glacial lake had burst and released huge amounts of water into a local stream. this is the moment the bridge fell, in the town of hassanabad. local experts say the water volume at the shisper glacier lake had increased by 40% over the past three weeks due to unusually high temperatures in the north of the country. dr who, the long—running tv series about a time—travelling time lord, has revealed the new doctor. he's shooti gatwa, born in rwanda, and best known for starring in netflix's sitcom sex education. the bbc�*s lizo mzimba caught up with him on the red carpet for the bafta tv awards in london.
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a new doctor on the bafta red carpet. ncuti gatwa was announced in the role shortly before today's ceremony and he said he was keen to do justice to the part. this role is an institution and it's so iconic and it means a lot to so many people, including myself, and so it makes everyone feel seen as well. it's something that everyone can enjoy, to have had the baton handed over and i'm going to try and do my best. sex education, the netflix comedy drama that he's best known for, follows a group of young people exploring areas like sex and sexuality. gatwa plays the irrepressible eric. he was born in rwanda. his family came to the uk as refugees. he then grew up in scotland and went on to study drama.
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and went on to study drama before his big break came in 2019 with sex education. his character being seen as aspirational for many viewers who felt that his experiences on screen mirrored many of theirs. lizo mzimba, bbc news. and just before go — one more story about a remarkable achievement. a nepali sherpa has set a new world record by scaling mount everest for the 26th time. kami rita sherpa broke his own record set last year. he was among 11 other sherpas on an expedition to fix ropes at the start of the new climbing season that will see about 600 people scale the world's highest peak. he had previously said that he doesn't chase records, but thinks how to satisfy mountaineers and improve tourism to nepal. incredible achievement. that is it for this edition of newsday. we'll be back in manila with karishma vaswani, so dojoin us next hour as well. thank you so much for watching
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newsday and do stay with bbc world newsday and do stay with bbc world news if you can. thank you! alero, but weekend brought us plenty of dry weather. 0ne alero, but weekend brought us plenty of dry weather. one or two showers around, but sunday was dry pretty much across the board. this was the picture in chef fields. a bit of a change in the full forecast through the weekend. it's looking more unsettled. when they wetter,
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particularly for western scotland. could be some rain across england and wales, but it's been very dry recently. it's dominated by high pressure towards the east, but far enough away to allow these weather fronts from the northwest. rain �*s in. that'sjust fronts from the northwest. rain �*s in. that's just going to edge its way south eastwards. the winds picking up with gusts of 30 or a0 mph. things turning a bit hazy as this high cloud schools in. 22 or 22 to —— this high cloud schools in. 22 or 22 to -- 22 this high cloud schools in. 22 or 22 to —— 22 or 23 degrees. still high levels of pollen. with the cloud and breeze, pollen levels are low or moderate. through monday and overnight, these weather fronts slipped their way further southeast. fizzling out as they do so, so the odd spot of drizzle left for central and southern parts first things tuesday. it's going to be a mild and
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frost free day, so a bit of a breeze on tuesday. just putting that weather front slowly away towards the south, could stay quite murky down towards the likes of kent. showers most frequent in the far northwest. temperatures somewhere between 11—20 degrees, still above average to the south. we keep an i on this developing area of low pressure. some uncertainty as to the track of it, but it will bring some rain to some parts of england and wales. moving its way from west to east. further north across the ek, sunny spells. —— the uk. temperature at hers around 11—18 . bye—bye.
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hello. this is bbc news with rebecca jones. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first the headlines. a school in eastern ukraine is hit by a russian bomb. dozens of civilians are feared to have died. for the first time a nationalist leader is in line to be first minister in northern ireland, but the democratic unionists won't support a new government unless post brexit trading rules are scrapped. keir starmer is accused of hypocrisy over covid rules as his durham beer and curry are investigated by police. and on the night the best of british television is celebrated at the baftas, ncuti gatwa is named as jodie whitaker's successor in the tardis in the bbc one drama doctor who.

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