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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2022 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at four. in an exclusive interview with the bbc — neil parish has said he's is resigning as an mp, after admitting he watched pornography in the house of commons. in the end i could see that the fury and damage i was causing my family and damage i was causing my family and my constituency and association was not worth carrying on. i’ll was not worth carrying on. i'll brin: was not worth carrying on. i'll bring you all the latest updates and reactions on that story. police officers searching for 33—year old katie kenyon who went missing a week ago have found the body of a woman. the ministry of defence says russia has been forced to merge and redeploy some of its forces in ukraine, because of failed advances in the north—east of the country
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the government is taking urgent action to limit the amount of some hormone replacement therapy products women can access, to improve general supply. neil parish, the mp being investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the house of commons, has told the bbc he is going to resign. in an exclusive interview he says what he did was a �*moment of madness' and �*totally wrong'. mr parish is the mp for tiverton and honiton in devon. yesterday he insisted he would carry on as an mp while an investigation continued, but has now changed his mind.
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let's ta ke let's take a moment to watch a little bit of this interview carried out exclusively for bbc south west and my colleague. yes, i thought that i could explain to the standards committee what happened and it would be worth explaining what happened, which i will in a minute, but in the end i could see the fury and the damage i was causing my family and my constituency and association, it was not worth carrying on. is your decision based on an acknowledgement of wrongdoing? yes, and i will explain to you exactly what it is. 0k. the situation was that funnily enough i was looking at tractors and i did get into another website with a very similar name, and i watched it for a bit, which i should not have done. but my crime, my biggest crime, is that on another occasion i went in a second time.
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and that was deliberately? that was deliberately. was that in a select committee or in the chambers? it was waiting to vote, not sure if it is technically chambers or not, it is on the side door as you enter back into the lobbies. so to be clear, on at least one occasion that you blatantly viewed pornography on your mobile phone in the chamber of the house of commons? yes. what made you think that was remotely acceptable? nothing made it feel... so what was going through your mind? a moment of madness and also totally wrong. what i do want to put on record is for my rights and wrongs, i was not proud of what i was doing. the one thing i was not doing, which i will take to my grave as being true, is i was not actually making sure people could see it, in fact i was trying to do quite the opposite and it was wrong
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what i was doing, but this idea that i was there watching it and intimidating women, i have 12 years in parliament and probably have one of the best reputations ever, or did have, so if there had been anything else on me, the press would have got it by now. i thought i may as well come and tell the truth and that is why i am resigning. but you could have viewed this content privately in your own time, but you chose to do it in the chamber of the house of commons. yes, madness, total madness. i'm not going to defend it. i am also not going to defend what i did. what i did was absolutely totally wrong and so in the end, what do you do? i could have... what was going through your mind? i appreciate you decided having accidentally stumbled across this content that you wanted to view more more of it. but what on earth possessed
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you to choose to do that in the house of commons? i do not know. i think i must have taken a complete leave of my senses and sensibilities and sense of decency, everything. i'm not defending what i did for one moment, but i thought the best thing i can do, and that is why i want to put this on record, is absolutely tell the truth. we have had a response to that interview and to the news that he will be resigning, neil parish will be resigning as an mp. the shadow leader of the house of, and is said, open mac mr parish's resignation was the right decision but she says, "it is shocking that the conservatives and others tobacco to drag out over
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many days. time and again the tories refused to act, resorting to cover—ups and dragging the reputation of other mps and the house down with them's. does closed courts. ben wright is here. a significant interview this and lots to pick through and consequences will be picked overfor a few to pick through and consequences will be picked over for a few days. yes, and neil parish who was not very well known till yesterday but now will go down in history books in the house of sleaze after trying to look at a website about tractors, initially, but as he said in the interview deliberately then look to the website again while waiting to vote. this wasn't so offensive to many people, but he thought, after he had been named yesterday, that he could plough on through this and hope that a parliamentary investigation by the standards commissioner might enable him to save his career but as he said,
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clearly the damage this was doing to his family, constituency in devon meant that he realised by the time we came to this interview this afternoon that he couldn't carry on. he was full of remorse in that interview, describing his actions as a moment of madness. he said he was clearly not proud of what he was doing. he also said he was not trying to intimidate anybody. he said he was looking at this material discreetly, he wasn't trying to throw what he was doing which has been said over the last few days and what made this so offensive to people was that he was being seen by other mums of the house of commons when he was doing this. but he is going and it will mean a by—election in his constituency of tiverton and honiton in devon and he is sitting in a very large majority of 25,000 from the last election and you would assume that that would be an easy hole for the party, but politics is a very volatile place at the moment, particularly with this being the
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backdrop and it is impossible to say what might happen. find backdrop and it is impossible to say what might happen.— backdrop and it is impossible to say what might happen. and in many ways the damaue what might happen. and in many ways the damage is — what might happen. and in many ways the damage is already _ what might happen. and in many ways the damage is already done _ what might happen. and in many ways the damage is already done and - what might happen. and in many ways the damage is already done and it - the damage is already done and it was called to the beginning of the weaker senior people in the conservative party knew who this was and yet it has taken until now a resignation. and yet it has taken until now a resignation-— and yet it has taken until now a resianation. �* ., , , ., . resignation. and that is problematic for the conservative _ resignation. and that is problematic for the conservative party _ resignation. and that is problematic for the conservative party and - resignation. and that is problematic for the conservative party and a - for the conservative party and a number of female tory mps have said as much. this was raised at a meeting of conservative meet mps on tuesday night and then there were speculation around westminster about who mp involved might be. it was not until yesterday afternoon that the conservative party's chief whip withdrew or suspended mr parish from the tory party in parliament pending the tory party in parliament pending the outcome of an investigation after mr parish referred to him to the commission for standards. yesterday afternoon it was considered that this may well go through a lengthy investigation before mr parish's political fate was decided. that was considered
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untenable yesterday and he has now realised he cannot continue. i don't know whether there were conversations between him and number ten orfurther conversations between him and number ten or further conversations today with the whips as they read the papers this morning. you can still hear the anger across the house of commons about the fact this has happened in the first place and how it had been dealt with.— happened in the first place and how it had been dealt with. where do we no from it had been dealt with. where do we go from here _ it had been dealt with. where do we go from here than _ it had been dealt with. where do we go from here than in _ it had been dealt with. where do we go from here than in terms - it had been dealt with. where do we go from here than in terms of- go from here than in terms of political reaction, question for parliament as you do to earlier on in the by—election and practical issues? he in the by-election and practical issues? , , , ., , issues? he will resign his seat but we don't know _ issues? he will resign his seat but we don't know yet _ issues? he will resign his seat but we don't know yet the _ issues? he will resign his seat but we don't know yet the timing - issues? he will resign his seat but we don't know yet the timing of. issues? he will resign his seat but. we don't know yet the timing of the by—election, there is another by—election, there is another by—election coming up in wakefield for us to look forward to. where goes next in terms of the reputation of parliament, hard to see and this comes in a week or we have had all sorts of stories and claims and focus on sexism and misogyny in parliament. senior mps have come forward with their own stories of intimidation and harassment and it has been a bad week for the reputation of parliament once again and i think perhaps this will again
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be a moment where parliament looks hard at itself and asks what sort of culture is it fostering about people being able to do this by writing to vote in the chamber. == being able to do this by writing to vote in the chamber.— being able to do this by writing to vote in the chamber. -- waiting to vote. i vote in the chamber. -- waiting to vote- i know _ vote in the chamber. -- waiting to vote. i know you'll— vote in the chamber. -- waiting to vote. i know you'll be _ vote in the chamber. -- waiting to vote. i know you'll be keeping - vote. i know you'll be keeping us across the reaction of this throughout the day. the latest now from ukraine, where the ministry of defence says russia has been forced to merge and redeploy some of its forces in ukraine, because of failed advances in the north—east of the country. the mod blamed tactical shortcomings including inconsistent air support. in the last few weeks, moscow has refocused its efforts in the country's east and ukraine's army have released pictures today showing what is says are strikes on russian reinforcements to the area around the city of izyum, a key battleground in the kharkiv region. meanwhile, less than 20 miles from the southern front lines is the city of mykolaiv. 0n the black sea coast, it stands between the russian army and 0desa. shelled nearly daily, it's been without running
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water for over two weeks. caroline davies has been speaking to those who live on a city on the edge of the war. birdsong in mykolaiv. spring has arrived, but there's little sign of a new beginning. we're in the south of the city at the moment with the bomb disposal unit. they're following up on reports that they've had of multiple rockets have landed, and then checking to see if they can make the area safe. through a suburban front yard into what remains of valery�*s sitting room. a rocket hit his home two days ago. translation: there was a strong explosion and when a rocket - fell here, there was a massive shock wave. books, my things, everything is damaged. the unit move from home to home, removing a rocket from a front room and a section of an unexploded bomb from the driveway. the city is less than 20 miles from the front line and has been heavily shelled since the beginning of the war. this children's hospital was hit a little over three weeks ago. translation: at the moment, j we've got used to the situation, and it is scary.
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you don't know what comes tomorrow, what comes within an hour, what may happen to your relatives, to your patients. in the premature babies' ward, care continues. the windows have been blocked and the unit have relocated into the centre of the building. translation: we can't - evacuate children who need artificial ventilation. we can't close the department, because there are other children who may need our help. dotted around the city, people queue to refill their bottles at tankers or at natural springs. mykolaiv has been without running water since the supply was cut off after russian shelling more than two weeks ago. now, even the fire brigade have to find new ways to refill. here, it's our bathroom. no water too. grandmother tatiana has decided to stay in the city despite the constant shelling and lack of water. it's not easy, but what we can do? i was trying to join - the army, but they say that "you are a little bit too old. and another problem,
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you are nearly blind". | i said, "maybe i'm nearly blind, - but i can smell a russian tank, 0k?" if it will be necessary, - if russians will come here, of course i will fight. after months of living on the edge of the battle, mykolaiv has found a way to continue. but the constant threat from russia sits just over the horizon. caroline davies, bbc news, mykolaiv. 0leksiy goncharenko is an mp for the port city of 0desa in southern ukraine. he told us ukraine is thankful for all the assistance the uk's provided — and that the situation in the black sea has recently changed. first of all, i'm very thankfulfor all support we are receiving from the west from the united kingdom, very specially thankful for the leadership which the united kingdom and its prime minister shows in the help of ukraine and, yes, harpoon and brimstone missiles from the uk, they are en route, they are coming to ukraine and they are strengthening our
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defence on the sea, but even without, i can tell you that we were very successful with the attack against the russian flag ship. it was a missile cruiser which became a submarine because it was sent down by ukrainians and that changed the situation in the black sea. fears are growing that russia might finally declare a formal war on ukraine — which comes amid reports of considerable loses on the side of the russian army, as well as continuing displacement of local civilians. to explain what a formal declaration of war would mean from a legal standpoint, with us here is sean corbett, a former raf air vice—marshal. thank you for coming in the programme. we talk about special military operations when we refer to how vladimir putin reflects on what is happening. what difference would
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that shift in language mean if any? it is quite significant actually if he does do it. i mean, just the announcement is almost, if you like, announcement is almost, if you like, a tacit admission that the forces are not operating well but if you look at it from their perspective, it helps to developing narrative we are seeing in russia at the moment that russia is now at war with nato as opposed to just ukraine which helps him describe or explain why more than two months and we are still going. there are some very practical issues, this is as well and one of those is on mass mobilisation. the troops he has about 50—50 conscripts and professional and although the conscripts are not supposed to be in ukraine right now we know that they have been with strong evidence but declaring war would allow him legally to use conscripts. it would also allow him to recruit more people, whether that is reservists
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or even veterans. at the moment, it is the spring draft and about 134,000 new troops but they are, as we say, annual conscripts who would not be legally allowed to go to the fight. at the same time, because last year was my conscripts have come to the end of their time, theoretically they would have to depart. declaring that as an actual war would allow him to do a lot more with those troops. in war would allow him to do a lot more with those troops.— with those troops. in terms of havin: with those troops. in terms of having to _ with those troops. in terms of having to do _ with those troops. in terms of having to do a _ with those troops. in terms of having to do a lot _ with those troops. in terms of having to do a lot more - with those troops. in terms of having to do a lot more with l having to do a lot more with those troops, i alluded to the significant losses earlier on of the russian forces and also this idea to do that we are learning about reforming, redeploying, merging troop movements as a result of things not going as well as planned in the northeast of ukraine from a russian perspective. can you shed any light on that? absolutely, i think about three weeks ago when it wasn't going well
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for them and carefully decided to pull back money went into belarus so forces tend to operate and what we call battalion tactical groups which are groups that can fight as a coherent unit and have all the assets whether that is a cannot reconnaissance, artillery or tanks etc. and when those get written down to a certain extent there just not functional. so what has been happening is the remnants of the battalion tactic groups are withdrawing into belarus and reforming with one group joining another to come up with, i think they have recreated 23 now out of about 120 and they are redeployed all the way to the east of the donbas. 0n all the way to the east of the donbas. on paper, that looks good for them, donbas. on paper, that looks good forthem, but donbas. on paper, that looks good for them, but bear in mind these troops were pretty exhausted anyway and lost a lot of equipment and if you combine more than one group you don't have the same ethos, you don't have the same leadership and leadership is a big issue right now and the command and control gets difficult as well. some of these
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groupings have got people from the southern, central and eastern military districts.— southern, central and eastern military districts. interesting. i want to focus _ military districts. interesting. i want to focus on _ military districts. interesting. i want to focus on the _ military districts. interesting. i want to focus on the civilians l want to focus on the civilians because my colleague ben brown earlier in kyiv listed quite distressing details which i won't repeat now but about more discoveries about the way civilians have suffered in this war in ukraine so far. what is it, is there something particular about why russia is conducting itself or is this just standard behaviour in these circumstances? thisjust standard behaviour in these circumstances?- thisjust standard behaviour in these circumstances? there will be a little bit of both — these circumstances? there will be a little bit of both actually, _ these circumstances? there will be a little bit of both actually, but - these circumstances? there will be a little bit of both actually, but it - little bit of both actually, but it is actually the way the russians do business. deliver of atrocities is the will of the people of ukraine, because it's all about moral component and the will to fight, but it's also about preventing any insurgency or sabotage and that sort of thing and making people
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terrified. it is very deliberate and as you say is horrific. just terrified. it is very deliberate and as you say is horrific.— as you say is horrific. just lastly, and a wider _ as you say is horrific. just lastly, and a wider and _ as you say is horrific. just lastly, and a wider and philosophical. as you say is horrific. just lastly, i and a wider and philosophical note, just briefly, this idea that if russia declares a war and it steps up russia declares a war and it steps up in the ways or the practical ways that you mention, but also those philosophical and questions about facing the west and nato and suddenly this escalation, as this caught western countries and intelligence agencies by surprise? because interestingly, intelligence before the invasion was that this invasion is going to happen and we should take it seriously and that proved to be right, but we haven't heard those calls but loudly in the years or decades leading up to that. i think it's fair to say that we had a mind on other things at those times, the counterterrorist war etc and maybe we did take a rise of the russians because if there's one good thing to come out of this is that nato has recalibrated what it is
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therefore. it has actually started to look at deterrent policies but also it has mobilised a very coherent way to bolster its flanks. for raf air marshal, thank you very much coming on. you're watching bbc news. neil parish is designing as an mp after admitting he watched pornography in the commons. the ministry of defences russia has been forced to merge and redeploy some of its forces in ukraine because of failed advances in the northeast the country. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's isaac. good afternoon.
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england's women have won the six nations grand slam title , they beat france but 24 points to 12. in the second half england could only add to their lead from the boot of emily scarab but despite a late try from the french women, the red roses held firm for the win and the grand slam and that is their fourth consecutive six nations title. it means so much. obviously we have fortunate to have a couple of days but they mean so much every single time we get to do it. obviously there are certain players who have had so much to do this campaign and they would love to have been here and contribute so much of this for every person in our squad. while wales lost their final women's six nations match against italy in cardiff by ten points to eight. however, it's still a third place finish which is their best in 13 years. wales had two players sin binned in the first half and italy
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capitalised with scrum half sara barratin touching down to give them the lead. it took wales until the 75th minute to get a score — keira bevan went over and wales had a one point lead. but they were unable to hold on and a last minute penalty from michealla sillari sealed the win for italy. it's advantage liverpool in the premier league title race — that's after they beat newcastle 1—0 away to take a two point lead at the top of the table. manchester city players will be nervously waiting for the tea—time kick—off against leeds where reclaim top spot. into the second half in the four games currently under way — burnley trail watford in that crucial clash at the bottom of the table, elsewhere brighton and aston villa are currently leading. crystal palace though have just equalised at southampton in the last few minutes... it's been a dramatic final day in league one. wigan and rotherham have been
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promoted to the championship in the two automatic promotion places after they won their games at shrewsbury and gillingham respectively. wigan will go up as champions. while mk dons, sheffield wednesday, sunderland and wycombe all make the play offs. but disappointment for gillingham, doncaster, afc wimbledon and crewe who are all relegated to league two. fleetwood escaped the drop on goal difference. in the women's super league, one game manchester city moved into the champions league places after thrashing brighton. city scored three times in the opening 15 minutes — with khadija shaw getting two of them. brighton pulled two goals back but then city really kicked on in the second half, shaw finishing with four goals as city won 7—2. the result means they leapfrog manchester united into third place. they play west ham tomorrow lunchtime. mino raiola, the agent who represented some of the world's best footballers has died at the age of 54.
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the italian looked after the likes of manchester united midfielder paul pogba and borrusia dortmund striker erling haaland. in a statement posted online, his family called him �*the most caring and amazing football agent that ever was.�* next, let's head to the crucible in sheffield where mark williams has come back from 9—2 down to draw level withjudd trump at 14 frames all, in the final session of their semifinal. 17 frames are needed to win. earlier today the penultimate session of the match between ronnie o'sullivan and john higgins finished 15—9 to o'sullivan, they resume at seven o'clock tonight. looks like trump is going to win that frame. that is all the sport for now and i will have more in the next hour. a body has been found by police
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searching for a woman who went missing more than a week ago. 33—year old mother of two, katie kenyon, was last seen getting into a ford transit van in burnley on the 22nd of april. this is part of the forest of bowland which is an area of lancashire, an area of outstanding natural beauty with remote moorland and forest like this one but sadly, after last night the discovery last night has been turned into a crime scene. there have still been significant police activity here today. as you can see, there are officers here, up to about a dozen police vehicles. the tents behind me you can see behind me ijust for equipment, i must stress, but they also have another special search team which has turned up today to search the immediate area to look for more evidence. as you said, katie was last seen on friday the
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22nd of april getting into a ford transit van and it was a sighting of that van that led them to focus their research in this area. last night they found the body of a woman. now they have told us they are not confirming at this stage formally that the woman's identity is katie's but they do believe it is her body and her family have been told and they continue to be supported by specially trained officers. they also have added that their thoughts are with them at this time. so is one of the activity that is happening here, a postmortem examination will be carried out to try to determine the cause of death and of course what has happened meanwhile is that a 50—year—old man, andrew butterfield from burnley, was arrested earlier this week and charged in court with katie's murder and he will appear later on in the year. and he will appear later on in the ear. . ~' and he will appear later on in the ear. ., ~ , ., and he will appear later on in the ear. ., ~ i. ., ., and he will appear later on in the ear. ., ~ ., ., ., and he will appear later on in the ear. ., ., ., ., year. thank you for that and can you remind us of — year. thank you for that and can you remind us of the _ year. thank you for that and can you remind us of the timeline _
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year. thank you for that and can you remind us of the timeline here - year. thank you for that and can you remind us of the timeline here of. remind us of the timeline here of when we first started hearing about this case that led us to this point? so, as i said, katie disappeared on the 22nd of april. the last sighting of her was in burnley getting into a ford transit van. several days ago the police did indicate that they thought that they were not looking for a missing person. they did indicate that they did think this would be a search for katie's body and there has been a huge police search operation which is notjust involved lancashire police but also at merseyside, greater manchester officers, north wales police and also the local mountain rescue people, so it has been an enormous operation to reach this point. the officers here now are notjust from the lancashire police force. fiur the lancashire police force. our thanks to joe — the lancashire police force. our thanks to joe for _ the lancashire police force. our thanks tojoe for that the lancashire police force. our thanks to joe for that update.
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history will be made at madison square gardens, as the first all female headline bout takes centre stage at the new york venue tonight. the undefeated katie taylor, of ireland, and puerto rico's, amanda serrano will face off in what's been billed as the biggest fight in women's boxing. it will be the sixth time taylor, has put her belts on the line, since winning them injune 2019. the enormity of the occasion, shows just how far female boxing has come, and taylor say�*s she proud to have played a part in that. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello. for some the last day of april has brought much needed rain and for othersjust a april has brought much needed rain and for others just a continuation of a very dry theme. the wettest weather has been found in scotland and northern ireland but it will be thinking southwards as we head through tonight. but rain tending to weaken somewhat but there will be missed and mark and hill fox here and there and much milder than it was last night with seven or 10 degrees. but a bit of a flip in her fortunes tomorrow, the cloud is and what weather will be found across england and wales but eastern parts of england probably will not see
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much rain, worse for scotland and northern ireland there will be something drier, a little brighter still with extensive cloud and the odd shower but sunny spells for most lifting temperatures to 70 degrees. it will be cooler further south. as we head into bank holiday monday quite a mixed day. large areas of cloud and some sunny spells and equally the odd spot rain and the odd spot of shower here and there and highest temperatures at 18 degrees feeling a little bit cooler further north. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: in an exclusive interview with the bbc, neil parish has said he is resigning as an mp, after admitting he watched pornography in the house of commons. in the end i could see the fury and the damage i was causing my family and my constituency and association, it was not worth carrying on. police officers searching
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for 33—year old katie kenyon who went missing a week ago have found the body of a woman. the ministry of defence says russia has been forced to merge and redeploy some of its forces in ukraine, because of failed advances in the north—east of the country. the government is taking urgent action to limit the amount of some hormone replacement therapy products women can access, to improve general supply. now on bbc news, the media show. hello and welcome to the media show. today we are going to look at three grand plans, the first comes from elon musk. twitter has become kind of de facto town square so it's just really important that people have both their reality and

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