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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 29, 2022 11:30pm-11:59pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines. an adviser to ukraine's president zelensky has said the country is suffering heavy losses as fighting intensifies east but added that russian losses were worse. russia's foreign minister sergei lavrov has claimed that his country does not consider itself to be at war with nato — and sadi the kremlin had not threatened anyone with nuclear weapons. the six time grand slam tennis champion boris becker has been jailed in the uk for two and a half years, for lying about his assets during bankrupcy proceedings. the premier of the british virgin islands andrew foye has appeared in court in america, on drugs and money laundering charges. he was arrested by us agents,
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posing as cocaine traffickers. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are sam lister, who is the deputy political editor at the daily express, and the journalist and author, shyama perera. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the telegraph says female tory mps are demanding neil parish is expelled from the party — after he was accused of watching pornography in the commons. the times says some colleagues want the devon mp to "go now." meanwhile, the i says westminster employees are increasingly afraid to report abuse in the workplace — with staff suggesting the complaints procedure is there to simply protect parliament's reputation. the mirror leads with the downfall of a tennis legend — after boris becker was jailed for two and a half years
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over a bankruptcy scam. the sun simply says it's "time!" for the former wimbledon champion. the daily mail continues to highlight calls from tory mp for the police to investigate claims that senior labour figures breached covid restrictions last year. the guardian reports on the tory peer michelle mone who's home was raided today as a ppe firm linked to her is investigated. the daily express says what britain really cares about�* in relation to the cost of living crisis following a poll by the paper. so let's begin... let's start first of all with the times. welcome sam and shyama. the times. welcome sam and shyama. the time saying go now. how important do you think it is as neil parrish himself has said couple wait for the outcome of the inquiry. we
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himself has said couple wait for the outcome of the inquiry.— himself has said couple wait for the outcome of the inquiry. we hope that we don't operate _ outcome of the inquiry. we hope that we don't operate a _ outcome of the inquiry. we hope that we don't operate a kangaroo - outcome of the inquiry. we hope that we don't operate a kangaroo court . we don't operate a kangaroo court system in this country. innocent until proven guilty. he is entitled to see that process through. i think the pressure on him now politically is very intense. the mps particularly women mps who feel particularly women mps who feel particularly offended by what happened or what allegedly happened. i think the political pressure on him will be intense. his wife and both he and his wife have given interviews today. he clearly feels quite crestfallen, you could see it in his face. his wife and said she's going to stand by him, they've got a 40 going to stand by him, they've got a a0 mac year marriage and she will stick by him is more matter to get through and navigate. she's embarrassed by it. he feels for her and all of this was up the rest of
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the family, the whole nation is been speaking about this over the last a8 hours it really is embarrassing for his family and you've got to really feel for them.— his family and you've got to really feel for them. shyama, in terms of ickin: u- feel for them. shyama, in terms of picking up on _ feel for them. shyama, in terms of picking up on what _ feel for them. shyama, in terms of picking up on what sam _ feel for them. shyama, in terms of picking up on what sam said - feel for them. shyama, in terms of picking up on what sam said about| picking up on what sam said about particularly female mps. what does an allegation like this mean to what kind of atmosphere is like in the commons chamber? my kind of atmosphere is like in the commons chamber?— kind of atmosphere is like in the commons chamber? my feeling is that this isn't just — commons chamber? my feeling is that this isn't just about _ commons chamber? my feeling is that this isn'tjust about female _ commons chamber? my feeling is that this isn'tjust about female mps. - this isn't just about female mps. for what— this isn't just about female mps. for what ever reason that this tape was open, — for what ever reason that this tape was open, it— for what ever reason that this tape was open, it wasn't done specifically because they were women around _ specifically because they were women around him. ~ ., v specifically because they were women around him. ~ . �*, ., around him. what's the impact more specifically? — around him. what's the impact more specifically? it _ around him. what's the impact more specifically? it perhaps _ around him. what's the impact more specifically? it perhaps comes - around him. what's the impact more specifically? it perhaps comes as - specifically? it perhaps comes as a... y specifically? it perhaps comes as a... , specifically? it perhaps comes as a... sorry, carry on. ithink the imact a... sorry, carry on. ithink the impact on _ a... sorry, carry on. ithink the impact on everybody _ a... sorry, carry on. ithink the impact on everybody male - a... sorry, carry on. ithink the impact on everybody male and| a... sorry, carry on. i think the - impact on everybody male and female is one _ impact on everybody male and female is one of— impact on everybody male and female is one of shock, surprise and bewilderment. because this sort of behaviour. — bewilderment. because this sort of behaviour, it doesn't matter whether was a _ behaviour, it doesn't matter whether was a pawn— behaviour, it doesn't matter whether was a pawn tape or a tape of baboons
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made _ was a pawn tape or a tape of baboons made and. _ was a pawn tape or a tape of baboons made and, you should be watching video and — made and, you should be watching video and house of commons put up not when _ video and house of commons put up not when you are there in parliamentary business to represent your constituency. if on top of that, — your constituency. if on top of that, what _ your constituency. if on top of that, what do you happen to be watching — that, what do you happen to be watching accidentally, what you open liy watching accidentally, what you open by the _ watching accidentally, what you open by the sake of it doesn't matter what _ by the sake of it doesn't matter what the — by the sake of it doesn't matter what the circumstances are, it's pornography. then that really is a grievous — pornography. then that really is a grievous offense. it might not be a deliberate — grievous offense. it might not be a deliberate offense. it might of been done to— deliberate offense. it might of been done to upset anybody but the point is that— done to upset anybody but the point is that sitting on a bus with somebody watching pawn next to is discussing. sitting on a train, and library _ discussing. sitting on a train, and library. here today even people in churches — library. here today even people in churches have been sitting there watching — churches have been sitting there watching porn. it savesjust the loss of— watching porn. it savesjust the loss of control. i think the implication is not about sexual harassment, it's about behaviours that cause — harassment, it's about behaviours that cause us to lose sight of our boundaries — that cause us to lose sight of our boundaries and social boundaries. this would — boundaries and social boundaries. this would not be acceptable in any
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other— this would not be acceptable in any other workplace until it had been investigated. the person would not be allowed, if this was a poster employed they would be moved out and put on _ employed they would be moved out and put on leave until it was sorted. it was the _ put on leave until it was sorted. it was the head of logistics they would be moved out and put on leave until it was— be moved out and put on leave until it was sorted. the fact that mps keep— it was sorted. the fact that mps keep getting away with absolutely everything before the investigation is not _ everything before the investigation is not acceptable. people have to be taken _ is not acceptable. people have to be taken out _ is not acceptable. people have to be taken out of the space, investigated and then— taken out of the space, investigated and then put back if they were wrongfully taken out.- and then put back if they were wrongfully taken out. looking on that workplace _ wrongfully taken out. looking on that workplace is _ wrongfully taken out. looking on that workplace is a _ wrongfully taken out. looking on that workplace is a space - wrongfully taken out. looking on that workplace is a space as - wrongfully taken out. looking on that workplace is a space as you | that workplace is a space as you were saying, we go on the back says west minister of victims too scared to report mps. 0f west minister of victims too scared to report mps. of course there are other allegations. to report mps. of course there are otherallegations. it's to report mps. of course there are other allegations. it's not really been a good few weeks for the perception of culture at west minister. sam, as somebody who perhaps knows more about it than many of us. what does this say about
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the culture and the atmosphere there? . . , the culture and the atmosphere there? ., ., , , ., ., there? parliaments reputation has been dented _ there? parliaments reputation has been dented in _ there? parliaments reputation has been dented in the _ there? parliaments reputation has been dented in the last _ there? parliaments reputation has been dented in the last few- there? parliaments reputation has| been dented in the last few weeks. it's not been a great time for anybody who works in parliament. it appears on the outside to be and that isn't the case when you worked there, there are people who behaved very badly. and use their power in ways that they absolutely shouldn't. most people get on with the jobs and try to behave in a civilised way. 0bviously these really horrible on pleasant phases are the ones that make the headlines. it that's why we are hearing about this all the time. i think on the complaint side of things, there has been in place system put in place of people can go and complain about mps. 0bviously and complain about mps. obviously there is a power imbalance and has to address it. it turns out actually, some of the people who
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provided evidence to that it is an inquiry their names were released to him and they would be able to give evidence to the investigation on the basis of anonymity and that clearly wasn't the case. all these kinds of incidents on divine faith for victims. about coming forward with incompetence. and there people who support their claims. it's all getting very messy, i'm afraid. irate getting very messy, i'm afraid. we will see how the follow continues from the stories will be looking at, particularly the outcome of the inquiry regarding the mpe neil parrish was up if we look at the other big story of today, of course boris becker. it in the sun as it is mentioned in some of the other papers tomorrow morning the downfall of tennis legend boris becker. shyama, how does this fit that
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template that we see of the rise and fall of the stars? we put them up on pedestals and then somehow almost inevitably it seems there the fall. i suspect there are these falls in every— i suspect there are these falls in every walk— i suspect there are these falls in every walk of life it's just at the stars _ every walk of life it's just at the stars lives — every walk of life it's just at the stars lives are public. of course we see it _ stars lives are public. of course we see it large — stars lives are public. of course we see it large. from the music industry to the film industry to the sports _ industry to the film industry to the sports industry there are people who have reached stardom and public adulation— have reached stardom and public adulation very quickly. and i guess and i_ adulation very quickly. and i guess and i have — adulation very quickly. and i guess and i have absolutely no idea if there's— and i have absolutely no idea if there's truth in it but i imagine that— there's truth in it but i imagine that what— there's truth in it but i imagine that what happens is, there is a skip in— that what happens is, there is a skip in your— that what happens is, there is a skip in your maturity at some point because _ skip in your maturity at some point because you're spending so much time bein- because you're spending so much time being brilliant at what you do that you lose — being brilliant at what you do that you lose part of that growing up process because your life is entirely— process because your life is entirely wedded to the sport or the art. entirely wedded to the sport or the art per— entirely wedded to the sport or the art. per haps that feeds into boris becker's— art. per haps that feeds into boris becker's bad luck here in avoiding
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taxes _ becker's bad luck here in avoiding taxes i_ becker's bad luck here in avoiding taxes. i can't stop smiling because actually, _ taxes. i can't stop smiling because actually, there is something charming about boris becker even when _ charming about boris becker even when you — charming about boris becker even when you know that he's done is all out of— when you know that he's done is all out of 25— when you know that he's done is all out of 2.5 million quid which should've gone into public coffers. it's should've gone into public coffers. it's great — should've gone into public coffers. it's great that there is a tradition being _ it's great that there is a tradition being set— it's great that there is a tradition being set up, there's always a blonde — being set up, there's always a blonde boris on the page somewhere. i was thinking how different it would've been perhaps a few the judge of that court. boris is charming. i judge of that court. boris is charming-— judge of that court. boris is charming. judge of that court. boris is charminu. ., , ., , charming. i would still have sent them away _ charming. i would still have sent them away for — charming. i would still have sent them away for two _ charming. i would still have sent them away for two and - charming. i would still have sent them away for two and a - charming. i would still have sent. them away for two and a half years. i them away for two and a half years. i might've _ them away for two and a half years. i might've asked him to autograph well, _ i might've asked him to autograph well, nothing rude, we cannot do pornography any more, i couldn't ask them _ pornography any more, icouldn't ask them to— pornography any more, i couldn't ask them to autograph my chest. no, definitel . them to autograph my chest. no, definitely. and _ them to autograph my chest. idrr, definitely. and sam, picking up on what we are saying about, you have these rises and falls in everyone's life but of course the stars like this, with boris becker to achieve great heights at 17, there's much further to fall. it’s
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great heights at 17, there's much further to fall.— great heights at17, there's much further to fall.— further to fall. it's quite tragic reall . further to fall. it's quite tragic really- he _ further to fall. it's quite tragic really. he was _ further to fall. it's quite tragic really. he was such _ further to fall. it's quite tragic really. he was such a - further to fall. it's quite tragic really. he was such a tennis l further to fall. it's quite tragic- really. he was such a tennis hero, a tennis legend, it really is a dramatic fall. his reputation is in tatters. it actually he's never been squeaky clean. is it really in tatters? i think that might�*ve happened a long time ago. the horses already bolted, if you will. clearly it's been very serious today. he's obviously serving jail time it doesn't get much syrup more serious than that. the prosecutor said that he clearly was found to be lying and deliberately, willfully misleading people, always blaming others instead of taking responsibility for his own actions.— his own actions. pretty damning, reall . his own actions. pretty damning, really- we _ his own actions. pretty damning, really. we move _ his own actions. pretty damning, really. we move onto _ his own actions. pretty damning, really. we move onto the - his own actions. pretty damning, l really. we move onto the because his own actions. pretty damning, - really. we move onto the because the tragic war in ukraine obviously continues to make the news sadly, as we know. on the front page of the telegraph is the west feels put in
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will declare all out war on russia's v day. will declare all out war on russia's v da . . �* , ' will declare all out war on russia's v da . ., �* , ' ., will declare all out war on russia's vda. ' ., , v day. that's the 9th of may. yes, from boris — v day. that's the 9th of may. yes, from boris becker— v day. that's the 9th of may. yes, from boris becker to _ v day. that's the 9th of may. yes, from boris becker to boris - v day. that's the 9th of may. yes, j from boris becker to boris karloff, affectively. vladimir putin is expected on may nine, which is the day we _ expected on may nine, which is the day we see — expected on may nine, which is the day we see all those march is for the great — day we see all those march is for the great victory parade to turn the language _ the great victory parade to turn the language around the invasion of ukraine — language around the invasion of ukraine into a more military language and to declare it as a war. and this _ language and to declare it as a war. and this would allow him to conscript and build up his fading armies — conscript and build up his fading armies. what it says is that declaring _ armies. what it says is that declaring war would enable the kremlin— declaring war would enable the kremlin to call up more conscripts and keep— kremlin to call up more conscripts and keep them beyond their usual one-year— and keep them beyond their usual one—year term. and keep them beyond their usual one—yearterm. it and keep them beyond their usual one—year term. it also allowed them to impose martial law to shore up its economy and close its borders. i'm its economy and close its borders. i'm not— its economy and close its borders. i'm not sure — its economy and close its borders. i'm not sure how you can do this as they— i'm not sure how you can do this as they run— i'm not sure how you can do this as they run out— i'm not sure how you can do this as they run out money every day. technically russia one would think would _ technically russia one would think would be _ technically russia one would think would be doubling the amount of money— would be doubling the amount of
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money it— would be doubling the amount of money it makes because it can charge much _ money it makes because it can charge much higher— money it makes because it can charge much higher rises for what it sells. as it— much higher rises for what it sells. as it can _ much higher rises for what it sells. as it can change any foreign currency _ as it can change any foreign currency, they are becoming slowly penniless _ currency, they are becoming slowly penniless but without recourse to funds _ penniless but without recourse to funds i'm — penniless but without recourse to funds. i'm not sure how this works. but i _ funds. i'm not sure how this works. but i do _ funds. i'm not sure how this works. but i do think, i think there's an awful— but i do think, i think there's an awful lot were not being told. i 'ust awful lot were not being told. i just wait — awful lot were not being told. i just wait to see what does happen on may the _ just wait to see what does happen on may the 9th. just wait to see what does happen on may the 9th— may the 9th. sam, what difference does this make? _ may the 9th. sam, what difference does this make? a _ may the 9th. sam, what difference does this make? a civilian - may the 9th. sam, what difference does this make? a civilian being i does this make? a civilian being bombed in kyiv or mariupol, they might think well, they could argue that it feels like all out war now. yes, it's true but itjust will mean a significant ramping up of the whole military operation. i think the fear is all the way along we haveis the fear is all the way along we have is a nation been cheering on the ukrainians forfighting off have is a nation been cheering on the ukrainians for fighting off the more powerful enemy in a way that they have this tremendous courage
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they've shown. 0rdinary civilians arming themselves and seeing office invasion the best they can. but all the while what's happening, it's almost seems to be making the situation worse and that the theory is that russia willjust respond and even more aggressive ways. we see the fear of chemical weapons and that kind of thing. 0bviously the fear of chemical weapons and that kind of thing. obviously going even than that. it's almost like every time they aren't defeated the russians will come back ten times harder. thisjust seems russians will come back ten times harder. this just seems that indication that that is what the next step in this whole process will be and even more brutal assault on ukraine. i be and even more brutal assault on ukraine. ., ., , ,., be and even more brutal assault on ukraine. ., ., , ., ukraine. i want to stay with you for the next month. _ ukraine. i want to stay with you for the next month. this _ ukraine. i want to stay with you for the next month. this is _ ukraine. i want to stay with you for the next month. this is your - ukraine. i want to stay with you for the next month. this is your front. the next month. this is yourfront page. the daily express, what britain cares about it says on the front page, what britain really cares about. this is following a pole. cares about. this is following a ole. , ., ., ., . pole. tell us more about that. we commissioned _ pole. tell us more about that. we commissioned a _ pole. tell us more about that. we commissioned a poll— pole. tell us more about that. we commissioned a poll earlier - pole. tell us more about that. we commissioned a poll earlier this i commissioned a poll earlier this
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week, it's carried out on monday and tuesday, round 2000 people across the uk. ahead of next week's local elections to see what voters are most concerned about. 0bviously elections to see what voters are most concerned about. obviously we had such negative headlines about party gate and various other issues as we've been discussing tonight surrounding parliament. perhaps unsurprisingly you may agree or disagree, the cost of living crisis absolutely was top priorityjust beyond anything else. people are really feeling that strain. that is what is consuming at the moment. that's closely followed by concern about the nhs and the covid pandemic, the economy, the war in ukraine covered it the key concerns for voters at the moment. and from 11 different issues, party gait was absolutely at the bottom. it seemed to really not be a big dealfor people anymore. i think there seems
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to be a sense that voters are tired of hearing about it. the prime minister always makes this point that voters don't want to hear politicians talking about themselves, they want to hear them talking about their concerns. i'm sure he will be chaired by the results tonight. 0bviously, we've got a week to go and voters will actually deliver their votes and see what they really think.— actually deliver their votes and see what they really think. shyama, do ou think what they really think. shyama, do you think this _ what they really think. shyama, do you think this is _ what they really think. shyama, do you think this is a _ what they really think. shyama, do you think this is a case _ what they really think. shyama, do you think this is a case of- what they really think. shyama, do you think this is a case of itjust - you think this is a case of itjust being time that's passed sense party gait? and sam says there's this wariness about it. or is it actually regardless of how much time is past, the cost of living crisis has become such a huge pressing priority that it would have overshadowed any party gait concerns anyway. i it would have overshadowed any party gait concerns anyway.— gait concerns anyway. i suspect it's more the question _ gait concerns anyway. i suspect it's more the question of, _ gait concerns anyway. i suspect it's more the question of, the - gait concerns anyway. i suspect it's more the question of, the cost - gait concerns anyway. i suspect it's more the question of, the cost of. more the question of, the cost of living _ more the question of, the cost of living is— more the question of, the cost of living is a — more the question of, the cost of living is a personal concern. it's something _ living is a personal concern. it's something people have to manage every— something people have to manage every day — something people have to manage every day. party gait is something the tapping over there that you very cross— the tapping over there that you very cross about but if their problem and they've _ cross about but if their problem and they've gotten manager where is the cost of _ they've gotten manager where is the cost of living is something that
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each _ cost of living is something that each of— cost of living is something that each of us _ cost of living is something that each of us managers in our own space was up _ each of us managers in our own space was up i _ each of us managers in our own space was up i speak as someone who is sitting _ was up i speak as someone who is sitting on— was up i speak as someone who is sitting on a hot water bottle rather than having the heat on even though it's freezing in this kitchen. it's definitely— it's freezing in this kitchen. it's definitely top of the list. i would've thought, everybody i speak with is going on the rise in food prices, — with is going on the rise in food prices, the _ with is going on the rise in food prices, the rise in petrol prices but i _ prices, the rise in petrol prices but i do — prices, the rise in petrol prices but i do if— prices, the rise in petrol prices but i do if next week, i don't know if it happens— but i do if next week, i don't know if it happens before thursday's local— if it happens before thursday's local election we hear how large the profits— local election we hear how large the profits of— local election we hear how large the profits of her energy companies have been, _ profits of her energy companies have been, record profits do while we are paying _ been, record profits do while we are paying ridiculous amounts for our energy _ paying ridiculous amounts for our energy 0f— paying ridiculous amounts for our energy. of course we don't know yet what, _ energy. of course we don't know yet what. how _ energy. of course we don't know yet what, how the new parish story will ricochet _ what, how the new parish story will ricochet. there will be a lot of people — ricochet. there will be a lot of people are outraged irrespective of this circumstance, they will be outraged — this circumstance, they will be outraged that it happened at all. i think— outraged that it happened at all. i think there are a lot of voters who probably— think there are a lot of voters who probably would be quite poorly. i think— probably would be quite poorly. i think is what happening and i imagine _ think is what happening and i imagine in sam's role really, your everyday— imagine in sam's role really, your everyday there's a whole new set of
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questions _ everyday there's a whole new set of questions you could come up with. | questions you could come up with. i want questions you could come up with. want to stay questions you could come up with. i want to stay on this issue. what shyama was saying is the fact that it's stuff that affects us directly such as the cost of living crisis rather than party gait which as you say, could potentially be gazing. however near the time and the immediate aftermath of party gait was there a comparative survey to show how people with feeling about it then? �* . ., �* , it then? blind me. i can't remember what happened _ it then? blind me. i can't remember what happened last _ it then? blind me. i can't remember what happened last week. _ it then? blind me. i can't remember what happened last week. general l what happened last week. general point people are always more angry when a new story breaks, when it's fresh, when it's new and hearing it for the first time they are shocked for that then it becomes a sense of everyone's banging on about that again and people switch off. i'm sure probably if you went back to the polls at the time am sure you have a very different result. it
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comes only a week, two weeks after the prime minister received his fixed penalty notice. they have been big significance quite recently on this. i think you would've thought that might of pushed it up the agenda a little bit but no. it was at the bottom. second the bottom from memory. migration and climate change were bottom 3rd. it's quite a clear sense that it is about money, the economy was up there's an awful lot of compassion for people in ukraine. actually, when i spoke to conservative mps about it they said there are two big things on the doorstep when they been canvassing the cost of living in the war in ukraine and our response to it. that chimed in with the results that we found. i chimed in with the results that we found. , ., ., , .,
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found. i 'ust want to squeeze in a look found. ijust want to squeeze in a look at something _ found. ijust want to squeeze in a look at something in _ found. ijust want to squeeze in a look at something in the - found. ijust want to squeeze in a look at something in the daily - look at something in the daily telegraph. supply crisis forcing the rationing of hrt. shyama, it's one of the things it says here is that demand has risen by two thirds in the past year. i’m demand has risen by two thirds in the past year-— the past year. i'm not surprised. everybody's _ the past year. i'm not surprised. everybody's been _ the past year. i'm not surprised. everybody's been going - the past year. i'm not surprised. everybody's been going crazy - the past year. i'm not surprised. everybody's been going crazy at| the past year. i'm not surprised. - everybody's been going crazy at home because _ everybody's been going crazy at home because of— everybody's been going crazy at home because of lockdown. if you're suffering — because of lockdown. if you're suffering the symptoms of the menopause, which are truly terrible, you are _ menopause, which are truly terrible, you are going to rushing to the doctor— you are going to rushing to the doctor and demanding some sort of action _ doctor and demanding some sort of action i_ doctor and demanding some sort of action. i speak as someone who used to have _ action. i speak as someone who used to have hrt— action. i speak as someone who used to have hrt patches. butjust before we bid _ to have hrt patches. butjust before we bid into _ to have hrt patches. butjust before we bid into lockdown there was a shortage — we bid into lockdown there was a shortage of h or t patches in the country. — shortage of h or t patches in the country, we can get them for women. i country, we can get them for women. i ended _ country, we can get them for women. i ended up— country, we can get them for women. i ended up on— country, we can get them for women. i ended up on hrt tablets and of course _ i ended up on hrt tablets and of course for— i ended up on hrt tablets and of course for two years had not been over to _ course for two years had not been over to see — course for two years had not been over to see your doctor. i don't know— over to see your doctor. i don't know whether they are right for me or wrong _ know whether they are right for me or wrong i— know whether they are right for me orwrong. ijust know whether they are right for me or wrong. ijust think hrt is a life saver— or wrong. ijust think hrt is a life saver for— or wrong. ijust think hrt is a life saver for eight lot of us. if only it stops— saver for eight lot of us. if only it stops the hot flashes and nothing else i_ it stops the hot flashes and nothing else. i think the idea that we have
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an hrt_ else. i think the idea that we have an hrt czar. — else. i think the idea that we have an hrt czar, should be as arena. it's an hrt czar, should be as arena. it's sort — an hrt czar, should be as arena. it's sort of— an hrt czar, should be as arena. it's sort of fun but it's not funny if that— it's sort of fun but it's not funny if that makes sense. because hrt, it is life—changing for a lot of women. ithink— is life—changing for a lot of women. i think an _ is life—changing for a lot of women. i think an hour particularly in stressful— i think an hour particularly in stressful environments, symptoms that could — stressful environments, symptoms that could be easily managed in a more _ that could be easily managed in a more gentle lifestyle actually start to overwhelm the individual. we will have to leave it there. thank you and have a lovely thank you both and have a lovely bank holiday weekend. that's it for me in the papers. goodbye. good evening. 0ne place to start and that is with
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news that the legendary tennis player boris becker was jailed today for two and a half years. the former wimbledon champion was sentenced for hiding £2.5 million worth of assets and loans to avoid paying debts. 0ur correspondent natalie pirks was at southwark crown court and explains becker's downfall. he burst on the scene in 1985. he was unseeded and begin the youngest man at that point to win wimbledon for sabine proved he was no flash in the pan by doing it again the year after and then he ended up winning six grand slams, three of them at wimbledon. a9 singles titles, a glittering ia year career, then after that he went on to become novak djokovic's coach, he was a very successful pundit for the bbc at wimbledon and other media institutions. of course he was also a brand ambassador. he earned a lot of money, £38 million in total. but then there were expensive lifestyle commitments as he put it.
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he had a very high—profile divorce, a very high—profile paternity claim arising from a night spent with the russian model at a london restaurant, and things just began to spiral. £38 million gone and with it today his career and it's hard to see just how the reputation and career can recoverfrom this. bbc is not commenting whether we will ever see him working here again but for the next two wimbeldons at least, he will be in prison. to snooker�*s world championship at the crucible where there's been plenty of drama. judd trump had been leading by 11 frames to five to start the evening session. but an extraordinary comeback from three time champion mark williams. he won the evening session by six frames to two meaning tomorrow they'll resume with 2019 champion trump just two frames up at 13—11. over in the other semifinal we saw a bit of a ronnie 0'sullivan masterclass as the world number one moved into a 10—6 lead over john higgins. it had been a really close start with both players level
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at a—a after the opening session. but the rocket made five half centuries to gain a 9—6 advantage, before taking the 16th frame after a re—spotted black. they'll be back in action tomorrow morning. its been a big day for chelsea football club as we appear to be moving closer to finding out who will buy the club. bbc sport now understands that a consortium led by la dodgers owner todd bowly is set to be named the preferred bidder to takeover the club. it had been put up for sale before owner roman abramovich was sanctioned for his alleged links to russian president vladimir putin following the invasion of ukraine. west ham have confirmed two people have been identified after an alleged attack on german commentators. it was during their europa league semi—final in london last night against eintract frankfurt. german newspaper bild reported the tv commentators had their headsets ripped off and thrown on the floor by a home fan. they were broadcasting from the back row of the media section which had
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supporters directly behind it. west ham said they've passed on the information to the police. the football writers' association has named the winners of their footballer of the year awards for this season. the men's winner is liverpool forward mo salah, who previously won it back in 2018. the egyptian is having a remarkable campaign — scoring 22 goals, and contributing 13 assists, and of course his side could still win the quadruple. and the chelsea striker sam kerr has been named women's footballer of the year. the australian is the wsl�*s top scorer with 18 goals this season, including a goal in last night's win over tottenham which saw her side move four points clear of arsenal at the top of the table. let's turn our attention to the superfight at madison square garden, saturday history will be made between undefeated katie taylor, and the dangerous amanda serrano this weekend. both fighters will be part of the first all—female headline bout, at the new york venue,
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so famous for it's place in the boxing world. and there's a lot at stake too — our reporter ade adedoyin is there. a lot of excitement here, the atmosphere has been absolutely electric. the irish fans, the puerto rican fans and good voice. katie taylor and amanda serrano weighed in and storage of a one last time before the seminal bout on saturday. so much history to be made, the first time two women will headline a bout here at madison square garden. think about some of the all—time greats that have performed it might ali, fraser, lennox lewis, the likes of sugar ray robinson, katie taylor and amanda serrano willjoin that list on saturday night. when i caught up with katie earlierfor the significance of this night was not lost on her. this is notjust special for me and amanda it
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certainly feels like we are bringing the whole sport out. this is for the next generation of fighters. we are breaking barriers and that's exactly what i've always want to do. as for amanda serrano, she knows that victory on saturday night will really catapult her into superstar does, give her that because of a field she's been so great over the years. the odds—makers have serrano as the favorite. i was there when katie turner pulled up as a unified title she was given all the problems she can handle that night, could well be the same on saturday night. really tough fight to call. emma raducanu has won herfirst match since splitting with coach torben beltz earlier this week. she beat the world number a9 tereza martincova in straight sets in the opening round of the madrid 0pen — winning 7—6, 6—love. and we'll see mo farah back in action for the first time since missing out on qualification for the tokyo 0lympics. the four—time olympic champion, will take part in the vitality london 10k race on monday. the 39 year old has previously said he wants to continue to race on road and track. that's all the sport for now.
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hello. this bank holiday weekend weather is looking mixed. yes, there is a made in the forecast, not that much for england and wales but he could still be a bit of a nuisance factor on sunday. there will be quite a bit of sunshine around for england and wales on saturday under this area of high pressure, low pressure will be sweeping into scotland and northern ireland through the day. here turning and windier, heavy rain for scotland maybe a rumble of thunder. start england off with frosted mist and then plenty of sunshine through the day including eastern england which is been pretty great the last few days with a top temperature gray for the last few days with a top temperature 17 or 18 degrees but a bit coolerfor the north under the cloud and rain. a reversal of fortune on sunday, the cloudiest damp weather will be pressing her to wales, some patchy light rain and drizzle here. further north will see some breaking
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cloud along with sunny spells. we could see 16 degrees warmer spots, little bit fresherfor england and wales. in that area of low pressure clears so bank holiday monday looks mainly dry bar the odd shower. could see a few glimmers of brightness here and there.
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and a big fight in the big apple. katie taylor and amanda serrano square up, ahead of the most important women's boxing match in history.

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