Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 29, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: two british men, paul urey and dylan healy, have been captured by russian forces while providing humanitarian aid in ukraine. it comes as russia confirms it fired missiles into kyiv last night — the first direct attack on the capital for a fortnight. translation: the first one struck on the outside, — translation: the first one struck on the outside, it — translation: the first one struck on the outside, it was _ translation: the first one struck on the outside, it was really _ translation: the first one struck on the outside, it was really loud. - translation: the first one struck on the outside, it was really loud. i - the outside, it was really loud. i thought it fell somewhere near my office. after about ten seconds, a second one hits here.— second one hits here. they have killed so many _ second one hits here. they have killed so many people. - second one hits here. they have killed so many people. it - second one hits here. they have killed so many people. it is - second one hits here. they havel killed so many people. it is really difficult — the leader of the british virgin islands is arrested in florida on charges of drug smuggling and money laundering. a new hormone replacement therapy tsar is appointed as more than a million women are affected by supply issues.
2:01 pm
a report warns black children are disadvantaged in schools because they are viewed as �*less innocent�* and more adult—like. former tennis star boris becker is in court — as he faces a prison sentence of up to seven years over bankruptcy. and downton abbey is back on the big screen — we talk to the film's stars. in the past few minutes, two british aid workers missing in ukraine have been named as paul urey and dylan healy. the nonprofit organisation, presidium network, said the men were providing humanitarian assistance in ukraine
2:02 pm
ben brown is in kyiv. hello from kyiv. the attack coincided with the visit here of the united nations secretary general antonio guterres who had just finished a meeting with president zelensky. we heard the explosions, and shortly afterwards, the secretary general told me he was shocked by the attack. ukraine says it was an attempt to humiliate the un. they called it a barbaric act, heinous act and a postcard from moscow. moscow says the missiles were launched from a submarine in the black sea. meanwhile an aid organisation says it believes two british volunteers providing humanitarian assistance here in ukraine have been captured by the russian military, near the city of zaporizhzhia.
2:03 pm
they have been named as paul urey in dylan healy. joe inwood, here in kyiv, has our first report. if kyiv thought it was safe from russian attack, last night was a rude awakening. the capital had not been targeted by russian missiles for two weeks. translation: the first one struck on that side, - it was really loud. i thought it fell somewhere near my office. after about ten seconds, the second one hit — here. i then realised this one was even closer. translation: they've killed so many people. | it's really difficult. our brothers, thanks to them for our freedom, they won't leave anything standing. i can't any more. russia says it was targeting a missile production facility. four people were hospitalised and one woman was killed. what's most extraordinary about this attack is that it happened while the secretary general of the united nations
2:04 pm
was in kyivjust a couple of miles away. according to vitali klitschko, the mayor of the city, moscow was sending a message. translation: this is the "hello" to him. i mr putin has shown him a middle finger at this moment. _ shelling and destroying our houses. _ it had already been a tiring day for antonio guterres, after witnessing for himself the site of alleged russian war crimes, he held meetings aimed at solving one of the toughest issues of the war, setting up humanitarian corridors from the besieged city of mariupol. it's hoped there could be some movement today but, so far, even the diplomatic might of the un has failed to a achieve a breakthrough. nato is now warning this conflict could last for years. all sides say they want a diplomatic solution but after the events of yesterday, that feels as far away as ever. joe inwood, bbc news, kyiv.
2:05 pm
alexandra taylor is the chief of media relations at the osce. shejoins me from vienna. just tell us, you were very active here in ukraine in a kind of monitoring role, but because of the wall, you have been forced out. tell us what is the latest situation with regards osce here in ukraine. yes. regards osce here in ukraine. yes, we have been _ regards osce here in ukraine. yes we have been monitoring here regards osce here in ukraine. 12: we have been monitoring here in ukraine for eight years, transparently observing and reporting on the situation in ukraine, providing facts from the ground. the mandate for the mission expired on the 31st of march, and because we are a consensus —based organisation, we were unable to
2:06 pm
reach consensus on renewing or amending their mandate. so, yesterday the chairman in office, polish foreign minister, gave instructions for the osce to close the mission, so we are no longer able to complete those tasks. {lila able to complete those tasks. ok, how man able to complete those tasks. 0k, how many people have you had here in ukraine? we how many people have you had here in ukraine? ~ : how many people have you had here in ukraine? ~ . ., , :: :: how many people have you had here in ukraine? ~ . ., , ',':ii :: ,, ., ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members, ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members. with — ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members. with a _ ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members, with a great _ ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members, with a great deal— ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members, with a great deal of- ukraine? we have nearly 1300 mission members, with a great deal of them i members, with a great deal of them working in the donbas area, we conducted the test using international teams of civilian unarmed monitors, they would report daily on the security situation for the past eight years. fiend daily on the security situation for the past eight years.— daily on the security situation for the past eight years. and you are sa ini the past eight years. and you are saying you _ the past eight years. and you are saying you were _ the past eight years. and you are saying you were the _ the past eight years. and you are saying you were the eyes - the past eight years. and you are saying you were the eyes and - the past eight years. and you are | saying you were the eyes and ears the past eight years. and you are - saying you were the eyes and ears of the international community. so, in a sense, you are saying the world has lost something by you having to leave this country.— leave this country. indeed, we had to actually evacuate _ leave this country. indeed, we had to actually evacuate our— to actually evacuate our international mission starting on the 24th of february, because there was civilian and unarmed, and
2:07 pm
unfortunately the osce flag is not bullet—proof, so we evacuated them and relocated national staff, so we don't have that mechanism in place any more. we continue to have another mission in ukraine, which is working on humanitarian assistance. their base at a western ukraine. they're doing educational activities on the increase risk for civilians to mines, abandoned ordinance and other relics of war, unfortunately our largest mission is in the process of closing.- our largest mission is in the process of closing. any other idea when ou process of closing. any other idea when you could _ process of closing. any other idea when you could be _ process of closing. any other idea when you could be back? - process of closing. any other idea when you could be back? that - process of closing. any other idea - when you could be back? that depends on the decision _ when you could be back? that depends on the decision of— when you could be back? that depends on the decision of the _ when you could be back? that depends on the decision of the 57 _ when you could be back? that depends on the decision of the 57 member - on the decision of the 57 member states. we only operate on consensus decisions, so they would have to come to an agreement on any new mission or mandate. mil come to an agreement on any new mission or mandate.— come to an agreement on any new mission or mandate. all right, thank ou ve mission or mandate. all right, thank you very much _ mission or mandate. all right, thank you very much indeed. _ with me now is ukrainian mp ivanna klympush—tsintsadze. thank you very much for being with
2:08 pm
us. can i ask you to civil about the attack last night? we heard it from here, pretty close to the centre, actually, and while the united nations secretary—general was here. do you think there was a deliberate attack by moscow, timed to coincide with his visit?— with his visit? absolutely, i think it shows disrespect _ with his visit? absolutely, i think it shows disrespect that - with his visit? absolutely, i think it shows disrespect that russia . with his visit? absolutely, i think. it shows disrespect that russia has two the international organisations and to any agreements and deals, and it promises to honour, and i think it promises to honour, and i think it shows russia does not have any red lines that it wouldn't be able to cross, and i think that is very alarming for the whole international community. d0 alarming for the whole international communi . ,, ~ community. do you think the un secretary general _ community. do you think the un secretary general was _ community. do you think the un secretary general was able - community. do you think the un secretary general was able to i secretary general was able to achieve very much when he was here? you want to see that it may put in then he went to see your president, volodymyr zelensky, then he went to see your president, volodymyrzelensky, has then he went to see your president, volodymyr zelensky, has he made any progress? i volodymyr zelensky, has he made any ”roress? : : , progress? i agree with many ukrainians _ progress? i agree with many ukrainians who _ progress? i agree with many ukrainians who agreed - progress? i agree with many ukrainians who agreed that i progress? i agree with many i ukrainians who agreed that he progress? i agree with many - ukrainians who agreed that he should have made the first visit to ukraine and then go to russia if he had that
2:09 pm
in mind, but irrespective of the lining, so to say, i was very sceptical with regard to this visit, i did not expect any real agreements, or even humanitarian corridors to come out as a result of this visit, and unfortunately the reality proves that.— reality proves that. what is the latest on the _ reality proves that. what is the latest on the situation - reality proves that. what is the latest on the situation in - reality proves that. what is the - latest on the situation in mariupol? 70 desperate civilians trapped there in the city, and in the city steel plant there. it in the city, and in the city steel plant there-— in the city, and in the city steel plant there. it is heartbreaking, for ukrainians _ plant there. it is heartbreaking, for ukrainians to _ plant there. it is heartbreaking, for ukrainians to watch - plant there. it is heartbreaking, for ukrainians to watch how- plant there. it is heartbreaking, for ukrainians to watch how our| for ukrainians to watch how our defenders are doing their utmost, absolutely impossible to hold their last stronghold of mariupol, and the inability of anybody from outside, also, from the international community, irrespective of many efforts, as far as i understand, to reach the possibility to get our civilians out.— reach the possibility to get our civilians out. ., ., ., ., civilians out. nato have said today this wall could _ civilians out. nato have said today this wall could go _ civilians out. nato have said today this wall could go on _ civilians out. nato have said today this wall could go on for— civilians out. nato have said today this wall could go on for years - civilians out. nato have said today this wall could go on for years and that the west has to be prepared for
2:10 pm
a long haul. the west is giving more weapons, we know that. even germany are now giving heavy weapons to you, to ukraine. us president, joe biden, proposing the $33 billion worth of aid. do you think you're getting enough help now from the west? definitely we see these tectonic changes, and absolutely incomparable assistance to anything that we were receiving before. ithink assistance to anything that we were receiving before. i think there is still more that will be needed, and i would not want the worst thing that we go into long term war. i think the more we are being backed, the faster we will be able to win, and faster to regain our territories and faster to regain our territories and get those occupiers and aggressive state out of our territory. is aggressive state out of our territory-— territory. is that a realistic proposition? _ territory. is that a realistic proposition? to _ territory. is that a realistic proposition? to try - territory. is that a realistic proposition? to try them i territory. is that a realistic. proposition? to try them out territory. is that a realistic- proposition? to try them out of all the territory that they have taken in the east already, to drive them even out of crimea? we
2:11 pm
in the east already, to drive them even out of crimea?— even out of crimea? we have to understand _ even out of crimea? we have to understand that _ even out of crimea? we have to understand that we _ even out of crimea? we have to understand that we don't - even out of crimea? we have to understand that we don't have i even out of crimea? we have to i understand that we don't have any other choice to survive. that is our only option, for the nation in the country to survive, to get them out. for them is notjust defending your territory, it means going on the attack to push them out of what they have got already. that attack to push them out of what they have got already.— have got already. that is going on attack on our _ have got already. that is going on attack on our own _ have got already. that is going on attack on our own territory, - have got already. that is going on attack on our own territory, i - have got already. that is going on| attack on our own territory, i think it's about defence, again. find attack on our own territory, i think it's about defence, again. and how loni do it's about defence, again. and how long do you _ it's about defence, again. and how long do you think— it's about defence, again. and how long do you think this _ it's about defence, again. and how long do you think this could - it's about defence, again. and how long do you think this could go - it's about defence, again. and how long do you think this could go on| long do you think this could go on for? do you agree with the native assessment that this could last for years? it assessment that this could last for ears? ., years? it will well defend on the assistance _ years? it will well defend on the assistance on _ years? it will well defend on the assistance on how— years? it will well defend on the assistance on how fast - years? it will well defend on the assistance on how fast you - years? it will well defend on thei assistance on how fast you know years? it will well defend on the - assistance on how fast you know what level of assistance we will be getting, whether we will be getting the air defence we need, whether we will be getting the rockets of mid—to long range artillery tanks, fighterjets, all of this is needed, because we have incredible armed forces and an incredible nation that is fully backing those armed forces and territorial defence while all united in getting them all out, but
2:12 pm
obviously only human beings cannot do everything, so we need the instruments to ensure that our goal is achieved. i am totally sure that we don't have any other way out of this war, just winning. and we have to win. this war, “ust winning. and we have to win. : ~' ,, , this war, “ust winning. and we have to win. ., ,, i. , . ., to win. thank you very much, a member— to win. thank you very much, a member of— to win. thank you very much, a member of the _ to win. thank you very much, a member of the ukrainian - to win. thank you very much, a - member of the ukrainian parliament here in kyiv. millions of ukraine's children have fled their homes since the war began — the united nations children's agency unicef estimates two thirds of the country's children are now displaced. for some, it's an even harder journey, because they don't have their parents with them. one children's home on the eastern front line — in luhansk — had to relocate hundreds of miles across the country to the western city of lviv. danjohnson has been to meet some of those who moved there. watch for the flush of panic across angelina's face. air raid siren wails.
2:13 pm
but she knows the drill. she's been through more air raids than any 11—year—old should. air raid siren contnues. the lives of these orphanage children are now dominated by running from war and taking coverfrom attacks. are you scared, angelina? angelina tells us to stay down, and keep away from the windows. she's a veteran even before she's reached her teenage years. smartphone apps show alerts spreading across the country, and thoughts turn to home. "this is lysychansk", angelina say. reading memories of the town she was evacuated from. "i want to go home. "the more they shoot, the more
2:14 pm
i want to go back", she says. but angelina has no idea what awaits. this is why they came west. bombs landed close to their orphanage in the luhansk region soon after they escaped in the early days of the invasion. local officials sent us these pictures of the damage. the un says nearly five million ukrainian children are now refugees. this man tells me he heard shooting and bombing early on the morning of the invasion. translation: | didn't know. exactly what the sounds were. then russian tanks invaded lysychansk. we packed all our stuff. the manager was thinking we would evacuate to lviv or kyiv. lviv it was, but even this far west, they're not safe. his phone now holds videos of a missile strike nearby. translation: it was very close to here. i we even saw the fire. the windows were blown out and some shrapnel flew in.
2:15 pm
it was here on the floor. i was working on fragments of glass. angelina offers a lesson in the attempt to redraw ukraine's geography. "take me back to lysychansk", she says. "i want the war to be over, "then we will rebuild lysycha nsk and our country. " danjohnson, bbc news, lviv. in the last few minutes we had more news on the british humanitarian workers, the aid workers missing here in ukraine. they have been named as paul urey and dylan healy. the nonprofit organisation says the men were super three by providing humanitarian assistance when they were captured by the russian military. they were detained at a
2:16 pm
checkpoint in the south of this country on monday. we've heard from paul urey �*s mother, has released a statement saying she was worried about the situation. she also added her son as a diabetic insulin. the foreign office is said to be seeking more information. an update on the latest fighting in the east and the donbas region, ukraine has said that it is taking heavy losses there because of this huge russian offensive there. that is where russia is now concentrating its firepower. ukraine sing its troops are being hit by rockets, artillery, mortars and bombing from the air, but it is also saying it has inflicted colossal losses on the russian military. that is the latest from here and kyiv, back to the studio in london. the premier of the british virgin islands has been arrested in florida on drug trafficking and money laundering charges. andrew foye was detained by us agents posing
2:17 pm
as cocaine traffickers. here's our diplomatic correspondent, james landale. good day to my people of the british virgin islands and those abroad. this is andrew fahie, premier of the british virgin islands, effectively the prime minister of the small british overseas territory in the eastern caribbean but perhaps not for much longer. for yesterday, he was arrested at this airport in miami by undercover us drug enforcement agents pretending to be members of a mexican cartel. now he's facing charges of drug—trafficking and money—laundering. the head of the dea said... there have long been questions over the way this sun—drenched tax haven has been governed, where thousands of secretive holding companies are used to hide money.
2:18 pm
since january last year, andrew fahie has been the subject of a commission of inquiry into allegations of misgovernment and corruption in the islands. a commission where he was controversially defended by the conservative mp, the former attorney general, geoffrey cox. the foreign secretary, liz truss, said she was appalled by what she called "these serious allegations". she spoke to the governor of the bvi, john rankin, a diplomat who represents the queen there. he'll chair an emergency meeting of the territory's cabinet later today. the foreign secretary, visiting the netherlands this morning, said mr fahie's arrest demonstrated the importance of the commission of inquiry, which is expected to report soon. as for mr fahie, he's expected in court later. when he was detained he reportedly said, "why am i being arrested? "i don't have any money or drugs." james landale, bbc news.
2:19 pm
the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the uk has decreased by nearly a quarter, according to the office for national statistics. about1 in 23 people would have tested positive for the virus in the week to 23rd april, down from 1 in 17 the previous week. black schoolchildren are likely to face tougher punishments than other pupils because they're viewed as less innocent, and more like adults. a new report from the commission on young lives in england says a racial bias known as adultification, means black children have lower levels of safeguarding. concerns have been growing since the case emerged of child o - a 15—year—old girl who was strip searched at her school in london without an appropriate adult present. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. black girls and boys, they're treated differently. yeah, 100%, 100%. i do think there's a lot of, like, problems with racism. in south london, these teenagers say the way they look
2:20 pm
affects their experiences in and out of school. a few days ago, i got i stopped and searched. did you understand the nature of the search, did they kind of go through why they stopped you and explained? no. i asked for their police station, their name, . they didn't give me nothing, theyiust left _ this is their reality, and last month, the shocking case of child o, the 15—year—old black girl who was strip—searched at school by police, led to angry protests. this case, yet again, adds to the wider issue of how black people are treated by the authorities in this country — exposing more resentment, more fear and more mistrust in places where young people should feel safe. today, a new report, chaired by england's former children's commissioner, looking at how to improve support for vulnerable young people, has made a number of recommendations. it starts with training for teachers, i think, to have anti—racist practise
2:21 pm
and racial discrimination at the heart of that initial teacher training. it isn't at the moment. to have recruitment drives, to get more black teachers into the classroom and in senior leadership roles and in governor roles, too. at the moment, 90% of teachers are white, especially in primary school. he is actually huge in history... the government says the teaching workforce is becoming more diverse, and it's strengthened safeguarding guidance for schools, with regular training for staff. but child safeguarding leaders are becoming increasingly worried about a racial bias, known as adultification — where black children, like child o, are met with suspicion rather than care. black girls tend to be perceived as being loud, as being aggressive and being hyper resilient. so if you want to, again, explore the adultification of black girls, let's look at the history. we have to root it within, or place it, within slavery and colonialism.
2:22 pm
these mums, who are also local authority and school governors, say everyone has a responsibility. if you have an understanding of the injustices and the discrimination that is happening towards young black girls, you are more than capable to be in a position to say, hang on, i don't agree with this, let me insert myself onto a governing board and actually use my privilege to be able to speak up on behalf of that community, or on behalf of young black girls. my black skin isn't a threat. their black skin isn't a threat. her tears arejust as important as your tears. in the case of child o, the metropolitan police has apologised and the independent office of police conduct is expected to release the findings of its investigation next month. adina campbell, bbc news. the labour party has admitted its deputy leader, angela rayner, was present when sir keir starmer was seen drinking beer with colleagues
2:23 pm
in april last year — at the time there were coronavirus restrictions in place limiting who you could mix with indoors. the party acknowledged it had previously told journalists that angela rayner was not at the event. let's talk to our political correspondentjonathan blake. how are they explaining away this mismatch between reality and what they told journalists? than mismatch between reality and what they told journalists?— they told “ournalists? an honest mistake they told journalists? an honest mistake is the _ they told journalists? an honest mistake is the explanation i they told journalists? an honest mistake is the explanation that l mistake is the explanation that labour are giving. they say there was no need to hide or conceal angela rayner�*s presence at the particular event, given their position, that no rules were broken. so, that's what labour are saying, nevertheless, it has the discrepancy in accounts and the change in position from labour about whether angela rayner was there or not, has brought fresh scrutiny on this event, which as you say happened in april last year in the run—up to the
2:24 pm
hartlepool by—election, where sir keir starmer was pictured drinking beer at the durham miners club. labour have always said that no rules were broken. sir keir starmer has insisted that time and time again, that they had a takeaway in between work meetings, and campaigning, at the time, and although the rules in england at the time said that indoor socialising with members of another household or support bubble was banned, there were exceptions for work contexts. so, that has been a labour�*s defence to this all along. durham constabulary looked into it, but in february of this year said they would take no further action. there has been political pressure, however, on durham police to reopen their investigation, or to look again at whether rules were broken, given the metropolitan police's action in london against government figures and other members of staff, civil servants, who were at events and parties in government buildings
2:25 pm
throughout the pandemic, which have subsequently been found to have broken the rules when police initially had said that there was no case for that to be investigated, or at least no case for any fines to be issued. so, some difficulty for a labour of this event, but as i say, their defence of what was happening at the time has not changed, even if they have now accepted that angela rayner was present at the event, having initially said that she was not. ., ., ., ,, , ., , not. for the moment, thank you very much. the three—time wimbledon men's singles champion, boris becker, will be sentenced today for breaking uk insolvency laws. live now to southwark crown court in london and our correspondent there, helena wilkinson. just remind us of the background to this case. ~ ., , just remind us of the background to this case. ~ . , this case. well, it was three weeks a . o this case. well, it was three weeks aio here this case. well, it was three weeks ago here at — this case. well, it was three weeks ago here at southwark _ this case. well, it was three weeks ago here at southwark crown i this case. well, it was three weeks | ago here at southwark crown court, boris becker was found guilty of four counts under the insolvency act, and they
2:26 pm
boris becker to district that it might declare property in germany, and also he was found guilty of transferring hundreds of thousands of pounds from his business account after his bankruptcy. he was acquitted by a jury of a further 20 counts, and the trial heard here at southwark crown court that boris becker, who was once the golden boy of tennis, had made a huge amount of money during his career, around £38 million, but things went downhill financially for him when he had a very high—profile expensive divorce, and also an expensive lifestyle, and the court heard that that included £22,000 a month for a rented house in wimbledon. it was declared bankrupt in 2017 and he told the jury bankrupt in 2017 and he told the jury here that he was shocked and embarrassed by that. the sentencing hearing began here at southwark crown court around midday,
2:27 pm
prosecution and defence both made submissions to the judge, and the court heard that the maximum sentence boris becker could receive for each of those counts is seven years, but his defence barrister told the judge in years, but his defence barrister told thejudge in his submissions, he said that boris becker has nothing and nothing to show for his glittering sporting career. he said it was nothing short of a tragedy. his is not a fall from grace but a public humiliation. he told the court, thejudge, that if it public humiliation. he told the court, the judge, that if it was under two years in prison, then that should be a suspended sentence, but let's just show the huge interest in the boris becker sentence hearing the boris becker sentence hearing the case here outside southwark crown court, and you can see dozens and dozens of photographers, camera crews, reporters, and a lot of camera crews, of course, from germany. the sentencing hearing will resume here at 3pm. judge deborah
2:28 pm
taylor will begin her sentencing and boris becker will find out what he will be sentenced to. but boris becker will find out what he will be sentenced to.— boris becker will find out what he will be sentenced to. a hormone replacement therapy tsar has been appointed by the government to try to tackle supply issues with the drug. madelaine mcternan was part of the task force that planned the covid vaccine roll—out. the department of health and social care says she will use her knowledge of supplying millions of vaccines to help address the shortage of hrt. the products are used by about a million women in the uk to treat menopause symptoms. joining me now from warwickshire, victoria palfrey — who has been campaigning to raise awareness of the issues bought on by menopause. or perimenopause, as we should more accurately call it, i suppose. it's not true to say, is it, that it only happens to women in middle age? it can happen to women much younger than that, too.—
2:29 pm
than that, too. yes, perimenopause -hases than that, too. yes, perimenopause hases the than that, too. yes, perimenopause phases the period _ than that, too. yes, perimenopause phases the period before _ than that, too. yes, perimenopause phases the period before your i than that, too. yes, perimenopause phases the period before your last l phases the period before your last period, so many women like yourself to be back myself, i am experiencing perimenopausal symptoms, and your natural oestrogen and hormone levels are fluctuating, it's only really when i started on my hrt that i noticed a difference, and i know that that is what it is, i am perimenopausal. at, that that is what it is, i am perimenopausal.— that that is what it is, i am perimenopausal. that that is what it is, i am --erimenoausal. ., ., ., , perimenopausal. a lot of women put u- with it, perimenopausal. a lot of women put up with it. don't _ perimenopausal. a lot of women put up with it, don't they, _ perimenopausal. a lot of women put up with it, don't they, for _ perimenopausal. a lot of women put up with it, don't they, for longer i up with it, don't they, for longer than they need to, not realising that there are things that can help. what sort of products do work, in your experience? if you cannot take them, how much of a setback is it?
2:30 pm
the say this type comes in gel patches or sprays, transdermal say patches or sprays, tra nsdermal say for patches or sprays, transdermal say for most people, so when you start hrt, tends to be on the gel, because it is more easy to administer and you can increase the dose fairly quickly, and you can feel the effects very quickly. it is very individualised, because women absorb it differently, so the gel can sometimes absorb better than patches, or the sprays, sometimes absorb better than patches, orthe sprays, orvice versa, so i've been on it for over 12 months now, but it has taken me to this point to find a dosage and the type that suits me the best, so i am on patches now, and i don't take the gel, but for women that now are finding that they can't get hold of the gel, it is to then transition onto a different type, it is
2:31 pm
worrying, because any kind of change in your dosage or the delivery can change relief of your symptoms, so you are kind of looking to start all over again to then find a level, and there will be arguments that sum is better than none, of course, and if women are desperate then they will take whatever they can get, but it is not quite as easy as swapping from one to the other with no kind of change are sound effects. thea;r of change are sound effects. they can have a _ of change are sound effects. they can have a massive _ of change are sound effects. they can have a massive impact on how well you feel. what would you say to madelaine mcternan, the news are who is hopefully going to sort out the supply issues? iam happy i am happy she has been appointed and can address this kind of shortage in the short—term and can get things on an even keel. i am really frustrated it has got to this point. i have had trouble getting
2:32 pm
hold of my patches for 12 months. i had to call around pharmacies to get hold of them. now the gel is the problem which has a knock—on effect, so the thing is demand for only ever increase now that women are becoming aware of the list of symptoms and the paramedic menopausal phase. the impact on the workforce, family life, the long—term health benefits of hrt, it's only going to get, demand is only going to increase so we need a long—term solution, better education, better training for gps, and we need to government to take seriously. 50 and we need to government to take seriousl . . , and we need to government to take seriousl . ., , ., ., seriously. so many women have stru: led seriously. so many women have struggled for — seriously. so many women have struggled for so _ seriously. so many women have struggled for so many _ seriously. so many women have struggled for so many years i seriously. so many women have struggled for so many years in l struggled for so many years in silence, not being able to talk about it. what would you see to any woman who is not feeling like she did, often women say ijust don't feel like myself any more. what would your advice be?—
2:33 pm
feel like myself any more. what would your advice be? that's the thin , if would your advice be? that's the thing. if you _ would your advice be? that's the thing, if you know _ would your advice be? that's the thing, if you know when - would your advice be? that's the thing, if you know when you i would your advice be? that's the thing, if you know when you are | would your advice be? that's the i thing, if you know when you are not feeling like yourself, often i found it was very out of body, i was almost looking out at myself, not really there, there was no joy, almost looking out at myself, not really there, there was nojoy, i just did not look forward to anything and suddenly the needles come, you are really tired all the time, yourjoints are aching, little things and if i was a woman starting to think to you know what i feel funny and different, i would firstly go to your chiefs, talk about it, talk to friends about it as well, there is also lots of amazing resources online and social media, especially the balanced menopause app. i would say don't be scared of it, it's a different phase in our lives, i'm quite looking forward to the next few decades, because i know there is a solution and i think sharing our experiences is the best
2:34 pm
way. sharing our experiences is the best wa . ., . y sharing our experiences is the best wa . ., ., , ., sharing our experiences is the best wa. ., ., way. totally agree. hrt patch made a difference to — way. totally agree. hrt patch made a difference to me _ way. totally agree. hrt patch made a difference to me in _ way. totally agree. hrt patch made a difference to me in four— way. totally agree. hrt patch made a difference to me in four days, - way. totally agree. hrt patch made a difference to me in four days, would i difference to me in four days, would never go back. thank you. you've learned something today about me. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's lizzie. good afternoon. we're well into the semi—finals of the world snooker championship where it's an all british last 4 at the crucible with 11; world titles between them. england's 2019 winner judd trump is still firmly in control of his match against the three—time champion from wales, mark williams, extending his 7—1 lead from last night. but williams didn't let trump have it all his own way and made his 13th century of the tournament. the session finished 11—5 to trump. the first to 17 frames will go through to the final. they'll resume later this evening. on the table now, ronnie o'sullivan and john higgins are about to continue their semifinal. these are live pictures, ronnie o'sullivan walking out for his
2:35 pm
semifinal. this is the second session. continuing the first session. continuing the first session that happened last night. last night's very tense first session finished a—frame all. these two have 10 world titles between them, 6 for o'sullivan, fourfor higgins. o'sullivan will equal stephen hendry�*s record of 7 if he wins this year. these are live pictures from bbc 2. this session will go on until 6pm. manchester united's interim manager ralf rangnick will become austria's new national coach at the end of the season. the austrian fa met today to decide the appointment. rangnick has confirmed he'll combine his new role with a consultancy position at united next season. the club are on course for their worst points tally in a premier league season. west ham have confirmed two people have been identified, following an alleged attack on german commentators during their europa league semifinal in london last night. german newspaper bild reported the tv commentators had their headsets ripped off and thrown on the floor by a home fan. they were broadcasting from the back row of the media section which had
2:36 pm
supporters directly behind it. west ham said they've passed on the information to the police. the football writers' association has named the winners of their footballer of the year awards for this season. the men's winner is liverpool forward mo salah, who previously won it back in 2018. the egyptian is having a remarkable campaign, scoring 22 goals, and contributing 13 assists, and of course his side could still win the quadruple. and the chelsea striker sam kerr has been named women's footballer of the year. the australian is the wsl�*s top scorer with 18 goals this season, including a goal in last night's win over tottenham which saw her side move four points clear of arsenal at the top of the table. staying with football and chelsea women have announced theirji so—yun will return to south korea at the end of the season. that's all the sport for now. families with disabled children are worried that rising household bills could make their child's condition worse, because many rely on energy—intensive equipment, such
2:37 pm
as electric hoists and wheelchairs. the disability charity contact says hundreds of parents are concerned they'll be forced to cut back, or stop using the equipment altogether. our disability affairs correspondent, nikki fox, has this report. what film is it, molly—moo? they're making the rest of it. they're making the best of it, but molly and her mum, adelle, are going through the toughest of times. shall we put some songs on? three years ago, molly was an active 10—year—old. let's wipe that chin. but then she was diagnosed with a rare life—limiting condition called batten disease, which has taken her mobility and her vision. she's always full of beans, giggling. funny! just lets nothing get in her way whatsoever. she's amazing. they're ready in the swing. there's no escaping the amount of specialist equipment molly uses each day. ok. adelle is a single mum, so she can't do without it. but it all needs power. we've got two wheelchairs,
2:38 pm
two ceiling track hoists, a through—floor lift, two suction machines and an electric bed. adelle is struggling to keep up with the bills. her only option is to cut back on essentials. it's getting to a point of, do we put fuel in the car and take molly for a day out? or do we need to put that aside to be able to pay for gas and electric? there's no extra help for us whatsoever. don't get me wrong, everybody should get help. but parents with disabled children who aren't able to go out and work and earn a decent living, you know, there should be something out there to help support us. adelle is not alone. in a survey by the charity contact, almost 2,000 families feared their child's condition could get worse as a result of rising energy prices. more than 50 organisations have written to the chancellor, asking for benefits to be increased in line with inflation. we would like to see the governmentjust recognise that disability means extra costs. at the moment, the measures that the government has taken don't
2:39 pm
go anywhere near far enough, in terms of supporting families who are doing their best under incredibly challenging circumstances. i'm getting a smile... the government says it's announced a £22 billion package of support for the hardest hit this year, including over £9 billion to help with rising energy bills. come on, then. but as those bills are expected to rise again later this year, adelle fears the short time she may have left with her daughter will be spent worrying about how she'll financially get by. she's spending what is potentially the last few years of her life stuck in, because we can't afford to go out and do things. it's absolutely ridiculous. how does it make you feel that you can't give molly the best quality of life? obviously, you have times where you do break down and things kind of do hit you again. but you have to keep going, you have no choice.
2:40 pm
and you just don't let these things get you down. got to stay strong for molly, because if i'm not strong, then there's nobody else to be strong for her. and you can hear more about this on the bbc�*s new access all podcast, with nikki fox on bbc sounds. the authorities in india are warning that around half the country may be facing a prolonged heatwave. the mercury has risen to 45 degrees in some places. divya arya has more from the state of rajasthan. the heat is scorching here. we are in the middle of the desert, in a city which is normally known as a popular tourist action blue destination. destination, but is in the news for its soaring temperatures. now, the heat does get unrelenting in this desert area, temperatures going all the way up to 50 degrees in june. but they have started climbing much earlier this summer. the indian meteorological department has released data of 75 cities across the north—western central
2:41 pm
regions of india, including the city ofjaisalmer, where the temperature is either 43 degrees or more, which is substantially high for this time of the year. now, people have been advised to stay indoors as much as possible. some states have ordered school closures. others, like rajasthan here, have ordered power cuts up to four hours in industrial establishments and in rural households. now, that is a huge problem because rural households also see a huge water crisis in this period of summer and are dependent on power supply to pump water. we've seen many women walk to open wells and rainwater harvesting ponds, too — to fetch water on their heads. and they have to make multiple trips for that. so for those who have to step out, the advice is to wear cotton clothes, cover as much of their body as possible to avoid sunburns. and neighbouring pakistan has issued a heat warning after the hottest march in 61 years. the mercury has reached 47 degrees celsius in parts of the country. saad sohail, from the bbc urdu service, has more. the authorities in pakistan have issued a heat wave alert as the country experiences
2:42 pm
record—breaking april temperatures. especially along the border area between india and pakistan. such severe heat waves haven't been registered in the region until the month of may and june, but scientists agree that climate change has sped up the melting of glacier ice in the himalayas as well. the daytime temperatures in the southern part of pakistan is likely to be ao—asf higher than normal. one city recorded temperature in a couple of days ago was 116 fahrenheit, which is higher than what is usually recorded in the month of april, according to the pakistan meteorological department, these temperatures are likely to increase gradually, impacting millions of lives in the country and the harvest of wheat as well. especially at a time when the ukraine war has sparked a food crisis. as the intensity of the heat
2:43 pm
increases, the public has been advised to stay indoors and avoid unnecessary exposure of sunlight. the chinese city of shanghai has been under lockdown for the past five weeks to contain the spread of covid infections. but, as the government starts to ease restrictions there, beijing is going the other way, and closing more gyms, malls and cinemas. for the latest, our correspondent stephen mcdonnell. for the moment, no live performances, it's a huge part of beijing's, and this is part of the of controls here to try to slow the spread of the omicron variant in beijing's. without having to shutdown completely shutdown another
2:44 pm
one of this country's megacities. so tens of millions of people have been tested in beijing over the past few days. what's happening instead of shutting the whole city down is that where the cases are turning up and it is only around 50 everyday, that housing block, that immediate neighbourhood will be shutdown. in the cbd behind me there is one section of that for example, an area which is currently shutdown. the other thing that's happening is that you need to show that you have done a covid test in the last few days. there's going to be a lot of testing going on. for example, to go into our building here, we need to show within 48 hours we've got a clear covid test. i suppose that involves doing one every 23 days until they left that restriction. it's all to
2:45 pm
try to control covid in a way which does not involve replicating what happened in shanghai and has been very tough for people there. they are in their fifth week, is going to go on for weeks because even though the numbers have gone down, they are too significant to lift that lockdown and the only slight easing has been some neighbourhoods, if they have been cases, people were allowed to move around the immediate streets around where they live but that, as i say, is only a few places, the vast majority of people still stuck at home. the headlines on bbc news... two british men captured by russian forces while providing humanitarian aid in ukraine have been named as paul urey and dylan healey by the nonprofit organisation presidium network. the family of one of them, paul urey say they are extremely worried and hope for his safety. it comes as russia confirms it fired missiles
2:46 pm
into this city last night, the first direct attack on kyiv for a fortnight. a report warns black children are disadvantaged in schools because they are viewed as "less innocent" and more adult—like. a trial to extend the school day in wales is coming to an end. for the last ten weeks, pupils at 14 schools have been offered an extra hour every day, with the focus on activities rather than academic learning. our correspondent hywel griffith has been to see how it's gone. it's changed definitely for me, because i've enjoyed school a lot more, because it's like something to look forward to at the end of the day. the day flys past really fast. before, it used to be bit boring. after you go home, there's nothing really to do. but now there's something to look forward to and do, like, after school. so you'll be sad to see it end? yeah. spread the dough out and you're i
2:47 pm
going to turn the tray as you do it. time's up on this school's big experiment. an extra hour every day for ten weeks to stretch and excite these children about learning again coming out of the pandemic. so, did it work? yeah, it's made it feel a little bit different because when i wasn't doing these activities, i was looking forward to go home and play on my ipad and all that. but now after school, i get to do other activities and i get to see my friends more time. yes, great. good. from taekwondo... ..to lego and ceramics, they've been put through their paces — not in traditional academic subjects, but sessions that help build confidence. it's also helped out many parents, likejordan, whose daughter took part. i would say it's been beneficial. as a working parent, - i would say it's definitely been more beneficial because instead of thinking about childcare i costs, they're staying i in school that extra times. after ten weeks of cooking,
2:48 pm
drumming, dancing and everything else, one lesson has already been learnt — that rolling out the extra hour for every school and every pupil in wales would be hugely complicated and expensive. hello, come on in. welcome to the lego club. the school had the freedom to piece together its own plan, with staff offered extra pay if they wanted to help and local companies employed to come in, too. only years 5 and 6 took part. offering it to every child would be tough. it would be a very difficult task to run for every year group, especially for us — being over three sites. it would definitely need possibly one or two full—time employers to... so a huge undertaking? yeah, huge, yeah, definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah.
2:49 pm
when you go home, you're going to cook these. they're going to have to go in the oven, ok? so what will the end result be? some unions oppose the extra hours, warning they can turn schools into childcare centres. the welsh government says it will evaluate what's been learnt here before making any decisions. hywel griffith, bbc news, abertillery. james corden has announced he is leaving the us talk show the late late show. he's hosted the show for seven years, but the actor has previously said he never intended for the programme to be his "final destination". i have decided to sign for one more year on the show, and that this will be my last year hosting the late late show. audience: aww! don't you dare! there will be tears, there will be so many tears. this has been the hardest decision i have ever had to make, it really has. i've never taken this job for granted, ever. it was a hit tv drama that ran for six series, chronicling the lives of the crawley family in the refined surroundings
2:50 pm
of an english country estate. downton abbey moved to the big screen in 2019 and you probably know it's back for another outing, the second film is in cinemas today, following the family to the south of france. our correspondent alex stanger caught up with the cast. have you told them, lady grantham? she's told us nothing. do sit down. how do you feel when you pick up a downton script? i count my lines. his own name. yeah, yeah, yeah. "does he survive to the end?" mr barber is a producer and director. he wants to make a film at downton. i'm alwaysjust so intrigued to see what he has next. i this whole storyline i with the film crew coming in and invading downton and, - you know, mary becoming so integral to that really surprised me. action! cut, cut. sorry? you usually have, even in a small scene, have a beginning, middle and end. but this — no way. it seems the public only want films that talk. i should have thought the best
2:51 pm
thing about films is that you can't hear them. it's almost more challenging than having a ginormous i part with lots of lines, with lots of scenes. i it takes a lot... it takes a real sense of craft. you need to know when to come in and... and make it natural. and what level to come in and make it natural. and when to talk over each other! yes. i know you've probably been asked it before, but have you taken anything from the set? you know, we can't take anything because it's all... goes into storage and it's all very much protected and looked after. you can buy stuff from the gift shop. yeah. but it's not the same. yeah, you can buy some marmalade. do you remember when we went to... i always call it - downton abbey world. but i think it has - a different name to that. the exhibition. there were really fun things in the shop. i they were, like, baubles with our faces on and stuff like that. i i got my mum a daisy bauble. daisy and mrs patmore. is that a little bit horrifying? it's quite funny. there is something about him. like a wild animal ready to spring. is there going to be a trilogy?
2:52 pm
if the second film is halfway as successful as the first, then who knows? it would be a treat. i mean, the fact is that we've all managed to get back together because we don't throw chairs at each other and we enjoy being injulian fellowes�* story. and if the audience still feels the same about us after this film, then, who knows? maybe. alex stanger, bbc news. the koko nightclub in camden was where madonna held her first ever british gig, and the venue where prince liked to play secret shows when he came to london. it closed three years ago for a major renovation, before being struck by fire, a flood and covid. tonight, it ll reopen with a concert by the rock band arcade fire. our music correspondent mark savage has been for a look around. from lady gaga to the rolling stones, koko has played host to some of the biggest names in music. three years ago, it closed for renovation. then disaster struck.
2:53 pm
150,000 litres of water damage during the fire, so that is quite something to deal with, which can rip through the fabric of the building. the fire damage could actually have been worse, but the dome at the top of the building melted and acted like a chimney to draw the flames away. it was a lucky escape for the venue, which first opened in 1900 as the camden theatre. charlie chaplin was an early performer, and after the second world war, the bbc used it to stage shows by monty python and the goons. he is one of mrs thatcher's incomprehensives. after the bbc left in 1983, it was named the best nightclub in europe. lager is about 90p, which is not bad. i if you do we want to be exotic and impress somebody, i the cocktails are exotic and cost £2.50, but they are nice. - the cocktails might cost a bit more now, but they are ready
2:54 pm
to open their doors again. with just 24 hours to go, the final touches are being put to the auditorium where on friday night, arcade fire will be the first band to take to the stage. whenever we play a venue that has been host to so many incredible performers over the years, you feel at onstage, it's always so much more exciting to play at a venue like that. it is always amazing when you can visualise what it was like when somebody like charlie chaplin was there, it still looks like that. everybody was looking at the same thing. after the fire pushed back opening night by a further 18 months, the venue's owner says he is relieved that the day has finally arrived. this looks great, first show tomorrow night.
2:55 pm
yes, an incredible moment for us, we will go into 27 shows in a row, which is quite special. mercury prize nominee moses boyd says he has missed playing venue. this has always been one of my favourite places to play. sonically, in terms of energy and the vibe, i have seen so many good shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature, you can play to people behind you on the stage, how will that change things for you? i think that is incredible, if i had a choice, i would be playing every night with the audience around me. but it is notjust the main stage coming back. koko is now seven venues, including a jazz lounge, a piano bar, and a dj space inside the dome. we've painstakingly reinstated every beam, truss and panel as per the original specification. it is a break—out space from the roof terrace next door, we've painstakingly reinstated every beam, truss and panel— as per the original specification. it is a break—out space - from the roof terrace next door, and it connects back into our bar here and the auditorium - theatre below.
2:56 pm
so you can walk straight from here into the main concert space? i love the idea of a secret staircase, that sounds like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch of the venue is now set up for live streaming, an idea that sounds obvious now after the pandemic, but was a bit of a gamble when it was first designed in 2013. live streaming opens you up to performing beyond the four walls. being set up for live streaming is definitely the way of the future. after venues struggled during the pandemic, koko's new template could help live music rediscover its rhythm. mark savage, bbc news. quite a change. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. for many of us it's a brighter, sunnier, warmer day today, compared with yesterday.
2:57 pm
in south yorkshire, for example, underneath all of this cloud yesterday, the temperature just topped out at nine celsius. it is much brighter out there today, and the temperature is heading up closer to the average for the time of year, 14 or 15 celsius. and that is the story across much of the uk. high pressure, plenty of dry weather again. an area of cloud, though, through much of the midlands, east anglia, south—east england, and hanging on through much of the afternoon. only beginning to clear later on. in fact, the odd lighted shower out of that towards essex and kent can't be ruled out. and the cloud here will be holding temperatures back compared with elsewhere where you get the brightest skies. early drizzle in north—east scotland petering out. the odd shower popping up in central and eastern parts of scotland. sunnier day in northern ireland, and temperatures are higher than yesterday, but there will be a few spots in south—east england, with the thickest cloud that may just hang around nine or 10 celsius as we go through the afternoon. that cloud doesn't disappear tonight. cloud increases through the night in northern ireland, the north and western scotland, keeping the frost at bay, whereas from southern scotland across wales and england, there will be a patchy frost and the coldest spots getting just below freezing, going into tomorrow morning.
2:58 pm
rewarded with a bright and sunny start to the day after the clear skies overnight. such a different day for northern ireland and scotland. we have got a weather system moving in. that is bringing in rain for the start of the weekend, gradually pushing across more of scotland during the afternoon, with a stronger wind, as well. lots of england and north wales getting it in that late afternoon, tomorrow, especially into the evening. ahead of that cloud increasing but staying dry for many daylight hours here. and as for the temperatures, they are going to be higher, especially towards east anglia and south—east england, compared with today. that weather system, then, moves south overnight and into sunday. it does begin to weaken on sunday. still has some rain with it, through particularly parts of wales and the western side of england, but elsewhere in england, you could see the little patchy rain from the cloud on sunday. not as much as many would like to see. in northern ireland and scotland, a few sunny spells break out, through the day on sunday, whereas in wales and england, it will be a cooler day. and then we are onto the bank holiday. expect a lot of cloud. there will be a few sunny spells
2:59 pm
breaking through and there. england are staying dry. there will be a little showery rain at times, more especially across northern areas. a cooler feeling day across scotland, and warmer feeling day across much of wales and england.
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at three: two british volunteers missing in ukraine are named as paul urey and dylan healy by aid organisation presidium network. paul's family say they are extremely worried and hope for his safety. it comes as russia confirms it fired missiles into kyiv last night — the first direct attack on the capital for a fortnight translation: the first one struck on the i outside, it was really loud. i thought it fell somewhere near my office. after about ten seconds, a second one hit here. they have killed so many people. it is really difficult. the leader of the british virgin islands is arrested in florida on charges of drug smuggling and money laundering a new hormone replacement therapy tsar is appointed as more than a million women are affected by supply issues. a report warns black children
3:01 pm
are disadvantaged in schools because they are viewed as less innocent and more adult—like. former tennis star boris becker is in court — as he faces a prison sentence of up to seven years over bankruptcy. we're expecting to find out shortly. welcome to the programme. two british aid volunteers missing in ukraine have been named as paul urey and dylan healy. the nonprofit organisation, presidium network, said the volunteers were providing humanitarian assistance in ukraine when they were captured by the russian military. paul urey�*s family say they are extremely worried and hope for his safety. they were detained at a checkpoint near the city of zaporizhzhia
3:02 pm
ben brown is in kyiv. hello from kyiv. the attack coincided with the visit here of the united nations secretary general antonio guterres who had just finished a meeting with president zelensky. we heard the explosions, and shortly afterwards, the secretary general told me he was shocked by the attack. ukraine says it was an attempt to humiliate the un. moscow says the missiles were launched from a submarine in the black sea. meanwhile, an aid organisation says it believes two british volunteers providing humanitarian assistance here in ukraine have been captured by the russian military, near the city of zaporizhzhia. they have been named as paul urey and dylan healy. joe inwood, here in kyiv,
3:03 pm
has our first report. if he thought it was safe from our attack, it was in for a rude awakening. translation: , , .~' awakening. translation: , , ., translation: the first struck on that side. after _ translation: the first struck on that side. after about _ translation: the first struck on that side. after about ten - translation: the first struck on | that side. after about ten seconds a second one hit. here. i then realised this one was even closer. translation: they've killed so many people. | it's really difficult. our brothers, thanks to them for our freedom, they won't leave anything standing. i can't any more. russia says it was targeting a missile production facility. four people were hospitalised and one woman was killed. what's most extraordinary about this attack is that it happened while the secretary general of the united nations
3:04 pm
was in kyivjust a couple of miles away. according to vitali klitschko, the mayor of the city, moscow was sending a message. translation: this is the "hello" to him. i mr putin has shown him a middle finger at this moment. _ shelling and destroying our houses. _ it had already been a tiring day for antonio guterres, after witnessing for himself the site of alleged russian war crimes, he held meetings aimed at solving one of the toughest issues of the war, setting up humanitarian corridors from the besieged city of mariupol. it's hoped there could be some movement today but, so far, even the diplomatic might of the un has failed to achieve a breakthrough. nato is now warning this conflict could last for years. all sides say they want a diplomatic solution but after the events of yesterday, that feels as far away as ever.
3:05 pm
with me now isjoe inwood. you were talking their new report about those hopes of evacuating people from mariupol. is there any more news on that, any progress on that at all? i more news on that, any progress on that at all? ~ , more news on that, any progress on that at all?— that at all? i think this is one of those situations _ that at all? i think this is one of those situations where - that at all? i think this is one of those situations where we i that at all? i think this is one of those situations where we will. those situations where we will believe it when we see it. we have heard so many times about humanitarian corridors, and the problem is also intractable. the differences between the sites are great. it does feel a little bit more optimistic than we have felt before, especially i think the involvement of the united nations, but no, we don't have confirmation that people are coming out yet. we have had reports come from mariupol�*s mare in the last few hours talking about an attack on a field hospital at a steel plant. that is just on one side, but he says there are a number of injuries that happen, because of that, that kind of thing isn't going to make
3:06 pm
things easier. i think it is a waiting game, as it has been every single time. waiting game, as it has been every single time-— single time. let's “ust focus on the situation single time. let'sjust focus on the situation militarily _ single time. let'sjust focus on the situation militarily in _ single time. let'sjust focus on the situation militarily in the _ single time. let'sjust focus on the situation militarily in the east i single time. let'sjust focus on the situation militarily in the east of i situation militarily in the east of this country. the eastern front, if you like, in donbas. you have been there in the last few days, and i know that ukrainians have been saying it is tough going for their troops. they are taking losses, but there are also saying they're inflicting what they call colossal losses on the russian military who are launching that concerted fire part now in the east.— are launching that concerted fire part now in the east. yeah, you and i have spoken _ part now in the east. yeah, you and i have spoken about _ part now in the east. yeah, you and i have spoken about this _ part now in the east. yeah, you and i have spoken about this before, i i have spoken about this before, they seem to have shifted from a first phase of the war which was urban warfare, to a second, more attritional stage of the conflict. here we are talking about trenches and the russians are resorting to the kind of usual modus operandi, lots of heavy artillery, rocket barrages, and they're inflicting casualties on the ukrainians. the sort of ordnance that is raining
3:07 pm
down and cannot be wasted, but they are making strategic withdrawals, and they're inflicting very heavy losses on the russians. when they try to come through their positions and counter artillery barrages, but this is a different face of the conflict, it is grinding, very brutal, and will cause great losses on both sides.— on both sides. thank you, that is our key have _ on both sides. thank you, that is our key have corresponded i on both sides. thank you, that is our key have corresponded with i on both sides. thank you, that is i our key have corresponded with the latest. joining me now is dr patricia lewis, who leads the international security programme at chatham house and was also director of the un institute for disarmament research from 1997 to 2008. thank you for being with us. what is your assessment of this conflict? nato have been saying that the west should prepare for a long haul here, perhaps even years.— perhaps even years. definitely we should prepare — perhaps even years. definitely we should prepare for— perhaps even years. definitely we should prepare for all— perhaps even years. definitely we should prepare for all possible i should prepare for all possible eventualities, including something that happens very suddenly, the use
3:08 pm
of unconventional weapons, as you say, the long haul, all this preparation should be in place, we cannot predict the future, so we need to think about the range of possibilities and plan for all of those eventualities. that is just basic good practice. those eventualities. that is “ust basic good practice.i those eventualities. that is “ust basic good practice. what is your assessment. _ basic good practice. what is your assessment, we _ basic good practice. what is your assessment, we were _ basic good practice. what is your assessment, we were just i basic good practice. what is your| assessment, we were just talking about the military strategy of russia in the east, we know they are concentrating their firepower there now, do you think ukrainians will be able to withstand that firepower? it has been really heartening as to how much firepower ukraine has been able to withstand, and i think that we would be fully foolish to doubt that they will be able to do that. it's taxing kyiv with the new secretary
3:09 pm
general is a new departure, he has just been in moscow, these attacks which i understand killed people and killed a journalist, is really very shocking. we're talking about a un security council member, russia, a founder of the united nations, attacking a place which the un secretary general is to be. i think that this is a very new departure from the type of warfare that we have seen. this is a strong political statement from russia, and its time, i think, that the un secretary general got more political himself. : , secretary general got more political himself. . , , . ., himself. that is difficult for him to do. himself. that is difficult for him to do- he _ himself. that is difficult for him to do. he has— himself. that is difficult for him to do. he has got— himself. that is difficult for him to do. he has got a _ himself. that is difficult for him to do. he has got a security i himself. that is difficult for him i to do. he has got a security council with russia on it. surely in the end of the un is pretty toothless in this conflict?— this conflict? well, it shouldn't be. the this conflict? well, it shouldn't be- the un _ this conflict? well, it shouldn't be. the un stands _ this conflict? well, it shouldn't be. the un stands for - this conflict? well, it shouldn't i be. the un stands for something, the un has a charter, the charter is clear that there should be no invasions of this kind from one member state to another member states, and it is absolutely clear
3:10 pm
from the charter that this is illegal, and i think that the un secretary general is very strong ground in terms of using every political means of his office to not only negotiate a humanitarian corridor, not only to look at the safe delivery of humanitarian aid, may be also to think about doing that by sea, through odesa, that could be a very interesting and helpful thing to do, but also to use everything he has tried to end this, as he calls it, apocalypse. i think you use that word when he was talking about mariupol. we are in a situation at the moment where the un has been brought into it, whether it likes it or not, from a political perspective. it is notjust about the humanitarian corridors and support for civilians on the ground, this is now an attack, essentially,
3:11 pm
in a way, on the un secretary general. , , , , in a way, on the un secretary general, , , , ,, ., , general. just briefly, the russians have talked _ general. just briefly, the russians have talked about _ general. just briefly, the russians have talked about the _ general. just briefly, the russians have talked about the danger i general. just briefly, the russians have talked about the danger of i have talked about the danger of nato, they say, treating this as a proxy war, pouring weapons into ukraine, and they warned about a third world war. what of the dangers of all of this escalating, do you think? ., of all of this escalating, do you think? . ., , ,., , think? there are dangers, so, first thin , think? there are dangers, so, first thin, it's think? there are dangers, so, first thing. it's not _ think? there are dangers, so, first thing. it's not a — think? there are dangers, so, first thing, it's not a proxy _ think? there are dangers, so, first thing, it's not a proxy war, - think? there are dangers, so, first thing, it's not a proxy war, this i think? there are dangers, so, first thing, it's not a proxy war, this is. thing, it's not a proxy war, this is not a war which willingly engage, this is a russian of ukraine, and west has been supplying ukraine with weapons to defend itself against that invasion, so there is no proxy war as such. this is not something that nato has been spoiling for a fight and trying to get into, it's the other way around. i think we have to be careful not use statements like proxy war. there is a big risk of escalation. we are hearing those sorts of threats coming from russia, and we have to
3:12 pm
take them seriously, just as we have to take the possibility of a very long extended war seriously, so we have to think through all of the different options, all of the different options, all of the different ways in which he might respond to what russia does, and we have to be really creative and thinking how we will end this war, and this is very really need the good offices of the un secretary general, which i think now he is engaged, i would say. shill general, which i think now he is engaged, i would say.— engaged, i would say. all right, thank you _ engaged, i would say. all right, thank you very _ engaged, i would say. all right, thank you very much _ engaged, i would say. all right, thank you very much for i engaged, i would say. all right, thank you very much for your i thank you very much for your thoughts. earlier on i also spoke to a member of parliament here in kyiv, and she told me what she thought about this is that the deliberate provocation by russia. is that the deliberate provocation b russia. : is that the deliberate provocation b russia. ., ., , by russia. there are no red lines that they will _
3:13 pm
by russia. there are no red lines that they will not _ by russia. there are no red lines that they will not cross, - by russia. there are no red lines that they will not cross, this i by russia. there are no red lines that they will not cross, this is i that they will not cross, this is very alarming for the international community. d0 very alarming for the international community-— community. do you think the un secretary general _ community. do you think the un secretary general was _ community. do you think the un secretary general was able i community. do you think the un secretary general was able to i secretary general was able to achieve very much and he was here? you want to see vladimir putin, then he went to see your president, volodymyr zelensky. as you made any progress? iagree, i i agree, i was very sceptical with regard to the visit, did not expect any real agreement social monitoring corridors to come out as a result of this visit, unfortunately, the reality proves that.- this visit, unfortunately, the reality proves that. what is the latest on situation _ reality proves that. what is the latest on situation in _ reality proves that. what is the | latest on situation in mariupol? there are civilians trapped in the city, but also in the steel plant there. it city, but also in the steel plant there. , . , .,~ city, but also in the steel plant there. , . , ., there. it is heartbreaking and extremely extremely - there. it is heartbreaking and extremely extremely difficult j there. it is heartbreaking and i extremely extremely difficult for us ukrainians to watch our defenders are doing their utmost, to hold this
3:14 pm
last stronghold of mariupol, and from outside, the international community, irrespective many efforts to reach and get the civilians out. nato have said today this war could go on for years in the west has to be prepared for a long haul. the west is giving more weapons, we know that, even germany are now giving heavier weapons to you, to ukraine. the us president, joe biden, proposing $33 billion worth of aid. do you think you're getting enough help now from the west? definitely, we see these — help now from the west? definitely, we see these tectonic— help now from the west? definitely, we see these tectonic changes, i help now from the west? definitely, we see these tectonic changes, and | we see these tectonic changes, and absolutely incomparable assistance to anything we were receiving before. i think there is still some more there will be needed, and i would not want the west to think that we should go into long—term
3:15 pm
war. i think the more we are being backed, the faster we will be able to win, and faster to regain our territories and get those occupiers and aggressor states out of our territories. is and aggressor states out of our territories-— territories. is that a realistic proposition? _ territories. is that a realistic proposition? to _ territories. is that a realistic proposition? to drive i territories. is that a realistic proposition? to drive them | territories. is that a realistic. proposition? to drive them out territories. is that a realistic- proposition? to drive them out of all the territory that they have taken in the east already, to try to even of crimea? you taken in the east already, to try to even of crimea?— even of crimea? you have to understand _ even of crimea? you have to understand we _ even of crimea? you have to understand we have - even of crimea? you have to understand we have no i even of crimea? you have to j understand we have no other choice to survive. that is our only option, in orderfor the nation to survive. that is our only option, in order for the nation and the country to survive, to get them out. but that means notjust defending your territory, but that means notjust defending yourterritory, but but that means notjust defending your territory, but going on the attack to push them out of what they've already.— attack to push them out of what they've already. that is going on attack, they've already. that is going on attack. on _ they've already. that is going on attack, on our _ they've already. that is going on attack, on our own _ they've already. that is going on attack, on our own territory, i i attack, on our own territory, i think it is about defence again. and think it is about defence again. and how loni think it is about defence again. and how long do — think it is about defence again. and how long do you think this could go on for? do you agree with the nato assessment that this could last for years? it assessment that this could last for ears? . ., , ., assessment that this could last for ears? . :, , :, :, years? it could well depend to how much assistance _ years? it could well depend to how much assistance and _ years? it could well depend to how much assistance and how- years? it could well depend to how much assistance and how fast i years? it could well depend to how much assistance and how fast and| years? it could well depend to how. much assistance and how fast and of what level of assistance we will be getting, whether we will be getting
3:16 pm
the air defence we need, whether we will be getting the rockets of mid to long range artillery, tanks, fighterjets, all of this is needed, and munitions for all of this, because we have incredible armed forces and incredible nation that is fully backing those armed forces and territorial defence, we are all united in trying to get them out, but obviously only human beings cannot do everything, so we need the instruments to ensure that our goal is achieved. i am totally sure that we don't have any other way out of this war, just winning. or, we don't have any other way out of this war, just winning.— we don't have any other way out of this war, just winning. this war, “ust winning. a member of the this war, just winning. a member of the ukrainian _ this war, just winning. a member of the ukrainian parliament— this war, just winning. a member of the ukrainian parliament speaking i this war, just winning. a member of| the ukrainian parliament speaking to me here in kyiv. two british aid workers who are missing in ukraine have now been named as paul urey and dylan healy. the nonprofit organisation presidium network has said the men were providing
3:17 pm
humanitarian assistance here in ukraine when they were captured by the russian military. it says they were detained at a russian military checkpoint near the city of zachary zaporizhzhia. pull your deposit mother is put out a statement saying she is extremely worried about the situation and her son as a diabetic and needs insulin. the foreign office in london are said to be urgently seeking more information. that is latest from hearing kyiv, i will hand you back to the studio in london. the premier of the british virgin islands has been arrested in florida on drug trafficking and money laundering charges. andrew foye was detained by us agents posing as cocaine traffickers. here's our diplomatic correspondent, james landale. good day to my people of the british virgin islands and those abroad. this is andrew fahie, premier of the british virgin islands, effectively the prime minister of the small british overseas territory in the eastern caribbean but perhaps not for much longer.
3:18 pm
for yesterday, he was arrested at this airport in miami by undercover us drug enforcement agents pretending to be members of a mexican cartel. now he's facing charges of drug—trafficking and money—laundering. the head of the dea said... there have long been questions over the way this sun—drenched tax haven has been governed, where thousands of secretive holding companies are used to hide money. since january last year, andrew fahie has been the subject of a commission of inquiry into allegations of misgovernment and corruption in the islands. a commission where he was controversially defended by the conservative mp, the former attorney general, geoffrey cox.
3:19 pm
the foreign secretary, liz truss, said she was appalled by what she called "these serious allegations". she spoke to the governor of the bvi, john rankin, a diplomat who represents the queen there. he'll chair an emergency meeting of the territory's cabinet later today. the foreign secretary, visiting the netherlands this morning, said mr fahie's arrest demonstrated the importance of the commission of inquiry, which is expected to report soon. as for mr fahie, he's expected in court later. when he was detained he reportedly said, "why am i being arrested? "i don't have any money or drugs." james landale, bbc news. the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the uk has decreased by nearly a quarter, according to the office for national statistics. about1 in 23 people would have tested positive for the virus in the week to 23rd april, down from 1 in 17 the previous week.
3:20 pm
a hormone replacement therapy tsar has been appointed by the government to try to tackle supply issues with the drug. madelaine mcternan was part of the task force that planned the covid vaccine roll—out. the department of health and social care says she will use her knowledge of supplying millions of vaccines to help address the shortage of hrt. the products are used by about a million women in the uk to treat menopause symptoms. our health correspondent catherine burns told us that the current issue is due to supply and demand and that the new health tsar has a lot to deal with. madelaine mcternan is the lady who is doing this. she is the head of the vaccines task force. in some ways this is a very similar job that she has got, in others it is so different. the vaccines task force was doing something from scratch, and they did it very successfully. what she has got to do now is look at first of all this short term issue, with oestrogel and the knock—on effects, but actually
3:21 pm
there are bigger issues with this market. there is a rising demand right now. i spoke to one drug company boss yesterday and he said this is a wake—up call for us, for the industry, for government. something needs to be done. the labour party has admitted its deputy leader, angela rayner, was present when sir keir starmer was seen drinking beer with colleagues in april last year — at the time there were coronavirus restrictions in place limiting who you could mix with indoors. the party acknowledged it had previously told journalists that angela rayner was not at the event. our political correspondent jonathan blake, says labour claim they made an honest mistake. they say there was no need to hide or conceal angela rayner�*s presence at the particular event, given their position, that no rules were broken. so, that's what labour are saying — nevertheless, it has the discrepancy in accounts and the change in position from labour
3:22 pm
about whether angela rayner was there or not, has brought fresh scrutiny on this event, which as you say happened in april last year in the run—up to the hartlepool by—election, when sir keir starmer was pictured drinking beer at the durham miners club. labour have always said that no rules were broken. sir keir starmer has insisted that time and time again, that they had a takeaway in between work meetings, and campaigning, at the time, and although the rules in england at the time said that indoor socialising with members of another household or support bubble was banned, there were exceptions for work contexts. so, that has been labour's defence to this all along. durham constabulary looked into it, but in february of this year said they would take no further action. there has been political pressure, however, on durham police to reopen their investigation, or to look again at whether rules were broken,
3:23 pm
given the metropolitan police's action in london against government figures and other members of staff, and civil servants, who were at events and parties in government buildings throughout the pandemic, which have subsequently been found to have broken the rules when police initially had said that there was no case for that to be investigated, or at least no case for any fines to be issued. so, some difficulty for labour of this event, but as i say, their defence of what was happening at the time has not changed, even if they have now accepted that angela rayner was present at the event, having initially said that she was not. black schoolchildren are likely to face tougher punishments than other pupils because they're viewed as less innocent, and more like adults. a new report from the commission on young lives in england says a racial bias known as adultification,
3:24 pm
means black children have lower levels of safeguarding. concerns have been growing since the case emerged of child q - a 15—year—old girl who was strip searched at her schoool in london without an appropriate adult present. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. black girls and boys, they're treated differently. yeah, 100%, 100%. i do think there's a lot of, like, problems with racism. in south london, these teenagers say the way they look affects their experiences in and out of school. a few days ago, i got i stopped and searched. did you understand the nature of the search, did they kind of go through why they stopped you and explained? no. i asked for their police station, their name, i they didn't give me nothing, theyiust left _ this is their reality, and last month, the shocking case of child q, the 15—year—old black girl who was strip—searched at school by police, led to angry protests. this case, yet again, adds to the wider issue of how black people are treated by the authorities in this country — exposing more resentment,
3:25 pm
more fear and more mistrust in places where young people should feel safe. today, a new report, chaired by england's former children's commissioner, looking at how to improve support for vulnerable young people, has made a number of recommendations. it starts with training for teachers, i think, to have anti—racist practise and racial discrimination at the heart of that initial teacher training. it isn't at the moment. to have recruitment drives, to get more black teachers into the classroom and in senior leadership roles and in governor roles, too. at the moment, 90% of teachers are white, especially in primary school. he is actually huge in history... the government says the teaching workforce is becoming more diverse, and it's strengthened safeguarding guidance for schools, with regular training for staff. but child safeguarding leaders are becoming increasingly worried about a racial bias, known as adultification — where black children, like child q, are met with suspicion rather than care.
3:26 pm
black girls tend to be perceived as being loud, as being aggressive and being hyper resilient. so if you want to, again, explore the adultification of black girls, let's look at the history. we have to root it within, or place it, within slavery and colonialism. these mums, who are also local authority and school governors, say everyone has a responsibility. if you have an understanding of the injustices and the discrimination that is happening towards young black girls, you are more than capable to be in a position to say, hang on, i don't agree with this, let me insert myself onto a governing board and actually use my privilege to be able to speak up on behalf of that community, or on behalf of young black girls. my black skin isn't a threat. their black skin isn't a threat. her tears arejust as important as your tears. in the case of child q, the metropolitan police has
3:27 pm
apologised and the independent office of police conduct is expected to release the findings of its investigation next month. adina campbell, bbc news. families are concerned that costs for equipment will be too high. they are making the best of it, but molly and her mum are going through the toughest of times. three years ago, molly was an active ten—year—old. then she was diagnosed with a rare life limiting condition which has taken her mobility and her vision.
3:28 pm
she is always full of beans, giggling. she is amazing. there is no escaping the amount — she is amazing. there is no escaping the amount of— she is amazing. there is no escaping the amount of specialist _ the amount of specialist equipment molly uses in a day. she is a single mum, so she can't do without it, but it only needs power. we mum, so she can't do without it, but it only needs power.— it only needs power. we have two wheelchairs. _ it only needs power. we have two wheelchairs, flawless, _ it only needs power. we have two wheelchairs, flawless, suction i wheelchairs, flawless, suction machines and electric bed. adele is stru: ailin machines and electric bed. adele is struggling to _ machines and electric bed. adele is struggling to keep _ machines and electric bed. adele is struggling to keep up _ machines and electric bed. adele is struggling to keep up with - machines and electric bed. adele is struggling to keep up with the i struggling to keep up with the bills. only option is to cutback on essentials. bills. only option is to cut back on essentials— essentials. there is no extra help whatsoever- _ essentials. there is no extra help whatsoever. everyone _ essentials. there is no extra help whatsoever. everyone should - whatsoever. everyone should get help. parents and disabled children, they should be something out there to help support us. they should be something out there to help support ve— they should be something out there to help support ve— to help support us. adele is not alone. to help support us. adele is not alone- in _ to help support us. adele is not alone- in a _
3:29 pm
to help support us. adele is not alone. in a survey _ to help support us. adele is not alone. in a survey by _ to help support us. adele is not alone. in a survey by the - to help support us. adele is not} alone. in a survey by the charity contact, almost 2000 families feared their child plasma condition could get worse as a result of rising energy prices. more than 50 organisations have written to the chancellor asking for benefits to be increased in line with inflation. we would like to see the government 'ust would like to see the government just recognise that disability means extra costs. at the moment, the measures— extra costs. at the moment, the measures the government have taken don't go _ measures the government have taken don't go anywhere near far enough in terms _ don't go anywhere near far enough in terms of— don't go anywhere near far enough in terms of supporting families who are doing _ terms of supporting families who are doing their_ terms of supporting families who are doing their best under incredibly challenging circumstances. there is a acka . e challenging circumstances. there is a package of— challenging circumstances. there is a package of support _ challenging circumstances. there is a package of support for _ challenging circumstances. there is a package of support for families i a package of support for families this year, including £9 million for rising energy bills. but as those bills are expected to rise again later this year, adelle fears the short time she may have left with her daughter will be
3:30 pm
spent worrying about how she'll financially get by. she's spending what is potentially the last few years of her life stuck in, because we can't afford to go out and do things. it's absolutely ridiculous. how does it make you feel that you can't give molly the best quality of life? obviously, you have times where you do break down and things kind of do hit you again. but you have to keep going, you have no choice. and you just don't let these things get you down. got to stay strong for molly, because if i'm not strong, then there's nobody else to be strong for her. some breaking news regarding the mp who was reported for allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber. we understand that new parish has had the conservative witness suspended while that investigation takes place. mist parish has been the mp since 2010.
3:31 pm
prior to that he spent ten years as an mep and chairs the select committee. a spokesperson for the chief whip said new parish conservative mp is reporting himself to the standards commission. the name in the public and the whip removed while that investigation takes place. sport and a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. some news in this afternoon on the sale of chelsea football club. the british businessman sirjim ratcliffe, has made a late bid to buy chelsea. ratcliffe, who is the chairman of the global chemicals company, ineos, has offered £4.25 billion. that's the 2.5 billion for the initial purchase plus an extra £1.75 billion of further investment into the stadium and players over the next decade. the deadline for bidders was last month so it's not yet known
3:32 pm
if ratcliffe's offer will be considered. we're well into the semifinals of the world snooker championship where it's an all british last 4 at the crucible with 1a world titles between them. on the table now, ronnie o'sullivan and john higgins are continuing their semifinal. they started this session at 4 frames all. it is now 5—5. these two have 10 world titles between them. including 6 for o'sullivan, who'll equal stephen hendry�*s record of 7 if he wins this year. this session will go on until 6pm. earlier, the 2019 winner judd trump is still firmly in control of his match against the three—time champion mark williams, extending his 7—1 lead from last night. but williams didn't let trump have it all his own way and made his 13th century of the tournament. the session finished 11—5 to trump. the first to 17 frames will go
3:33 pm
through to the final. they'll resume later this evening. manchester united's interim manager ralf rangnick will become austria's new national coach at the end of the season. rangnick has confirmed he'll combine his new role with a consultancy position at united next season. the club are on course for their worst points tally in the premier league. they have erik ten hag starting as their new manager this summer but the club's former defender rio ferdinand says it's going to take more than a new manager to get back on track. cristiano has been talked about as the problem, but without him they would probably be languishing in tenth or 15th place. him and david de gea are the only people who can come out of the season with any type of positivity. ole was sacked midseason and then an interim boss comes in and it hasn't gone to plan. the results have got worse since then and the win percentage has gone down. i know that richard arnold, the new ceo is trying to get things in place to try and build the foundations and the club can then start to form a sort
3:34 pm
of comeback into the area where we are used to seeing them, challenging for titles. west ham have confirmed two people have been identified following an alleged attack on german commentators during their europa league semi—final in london last night. german newspaper bild reported the tv commentators had their headsets ripped off and thrown on the floor by a home fan. they were broadcasting from the back row of the media section which had supporters directly behind it.west ham said they've passed on the information to the police. staying with football and chelsea women have announced theirji so—yun will return to south korea at the end of the season. ji has been a pivotal member of emma hayes side, scoring 68 goals from midfield in her 8 years with the club. she's won 11 major trophies in her career and could yet extend that this season as chelsea are on course to win the wsl for the third year in a row. and mo farah will return to race running for the first time since missing out on qualification for the tokyo olympics the four—time olympic champion, who is now 39,
3:35 pm
will take part in the vitality london 10k race on monday. farah has previously said he wants to continue to race on road and track. that's all the sport for now. a reminder of the breaking news. conservative mp neil parish has had the whip suspended while he is investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the house of commons chamber. let's speak to our political correspondent who is in westminster. what more do we know? there was a meeting of conservative mps and at that meeting, two female mps and at that meeting, two female mps raised the case of a male colleague they said had been watching pawn on his phone in the house of commons chamber. initially, the party said they thought it should be referred to the parliament's independent system for
3:36 pm
independent process for investigating sexual conduct, called the icg s. we understand that has started but there was pressure from others within the party for the law to be done about this for the whips to be done about this for the whips to go further and take some sort of action. there had been calls from some female conservatives for this mp to come forward himself. what we know is that neil parish is the mp for tiverton and honiton in devon, he spoke to the chief whip this afternoon is going to report himself to the standards committee of the house of commons. he has had the conservative whip suspended which means he has to citizen independent mp for the time being, pending the outcome of the investigation. we cannot prejudge this because it's just being looked at, when it comes to standards, what kind of sanctions are available if an mp is deemed to have slipped below the standards required? have slipped below the standards reuuired? ., , , ., .,
3:37 pm
required? some of it depends on what investigation — required? some of it depends on what investigation is _ required? some of it depends on what investigation is an _ required? some of it depends on what investigation is an process _ required? some of it depends on what investigation is an process is, - required? some of it depends on what investigation is an process is, but - investigation is an process is, but the sort of things that can be dished out as a sanction are things like calls for an apology, it is the possibility of suspending mps from the commons, for a certain emotive time and effort suspension is longer than ten sitting days that can have consequences like you can launch a recall petition. the ultimate sanction is expulsion from the commons but it depends on what the outcome would be and there are a number of options.— outcome would be and there are a number of options. the authorities in india are warning that around half the country may be facing a prolonged heatwave. the temperature has risen to 45 degrees celsuis in some places. divya arya has more from the state of rajasthan. the heat is scorching here. we're in the middle of the thar desert, in the city ofjaisalmer, which is usually known for its magnificent forts
3:38 pm
as a popular tourist destination, but is in the news for its soaring temperatures. now, the heat does get unrelenting in this desert area, temperatures going all the way up to 50 degrees injune. but they have started climbing much earlier this summer. the indian meteorological department has released data of 75 cities across the north—western central regions of india, including the city of jaisalmer, where the temperature is either 43 degrees or more, which is substantially high for this time of the year. now, people have been advised to stay indoors as much as possible. some states have ordered school closures. others, like rajasthan here, have ordered power cuts up to four hours in industrial establishments and in rural households. now, that is a huge problem, because rural households also see a huge water crisis in this period of summer and are dependent on power supply to pump water. we've seen many women walk to open wells and rainwater harvesting ponds, too, to fetch water on their heads. and they have to make multiple trips for that. so for those who have to step out, the advice is to wear cotton
3:39 pm
clothes, cover as much of their body as possible to avoid sunburns. and neighbouring pakistan has issued a heat warning after the hottest march in 61 years. the temperature reached 47 degrees celsius in parts of the country. saad sohail, from the bbc urdu service, has more. the authorities in pakistan have issued a heat wave alert, as the country experiences record—breaking april temperatures. especially along the border area between india and pakistan. such severe heat waves haven't been registered in the region until the month of may and june, but scientists agree that climate change has sped up the melting of glacier ice in the himalayas as well. the daytime temperatures in the southern part of pakistan is likely to be 40—45f higher than normal.
3:40 pm
one city recorded temperatures in a couple of days ago was 116 fahrenheit, which is higher than what is usually recorded in the month of april, according to the pakistan meteorological department, these temperatures are likely to increase gradually, impacting millions of lives in the country and the harvest of wheat as well. especially at a time when the ukraine war has sparked a food crisis. as the intensity of the heat increases, the public has been advised to stay indoors and avoid unnecessary exposure of sunlight. to talk more about the heatwave in south asia, i'm joined by professor arpita mondal, a hydroclimatologist at the indian institute of technology in mumbai. thank you very much. tell us what these conditions are like to live with. ., , , , with. honestly, it has been very bad, it is much _
3:41 pm
with. honestly, it has been very bad, it is much unlike _ with. honestly, it has been very bad, it is much unlike the - with. honestly, it has been very i bad, it is much unlike the previous years. i am bad, it is much unlike the previous years. iam in bad, it is much unlike the previous years. i am in mumbai where temperatures are not as high as several other parts of the country. but because of the humidity and there is a combination of heat and humidity which makes it really worth for the human body as well as for animal health. it's really quite bad here. ~ . , animal health. it's really quite bad here.~ . , . ,, animal health. it's really quite bad here. . . , ., ,, ., animal health. it's really quite bad here. . , ., , here. what is happening that is different from _ here. what is happening that is different from usual? - here. what is happening that is different from usual? there - here. what is happening that is| different from usual? there are actually three _ different from usual? there are actually three unique _ different from usual? there are actually three unique features | different from usual? there are - actually three unique features which has made this heatwave really stand out. number one, the heatwave has come prior to the expected period of heat waves. march 2022 was the hottest recorded on record. may and june are the months we're used to higher temperatures but this year it is much earlier. number two, different heatwaves affect pocket of the country which have been
3:42 pm
historically identified as hotspots of heatwaves but this year we are in the whole of the country, there is a huge spatial extent of this heatwave that almost a whole of the country is under this heatwave. the third thing is also the lack of showers which usually happen in this part of the world because of, it brings rainfall which is important for some crops, wheat for example, and wheat is also a crop which is very sensitive to temperature changes. what has happened is the soaring high temperatures have been detrimentalfor high temperatures have been detrimental for the cultivation of wheat and wheat is our second most important staple food crop. these are the features which really makes this heatwave stand out. what are the features which really makes this heatwave stand out.— this heatwave stand out. what are the other impacts _ this heatwave stand out. what are the other impacts on _ this heatwave stand out. what are the other impacts on food - this heatwave stand out. what are the other impacts on food supply, | the other impacts on food supply, animal life and of course human beings that you are most worried about? . . , beings that you are most worried about? . ., , ., beings that you are most worried about? . .,, ., .., , about? india has of course vulnerable _ about? india has of course vulnerable population - about? india has of course l
3:43 pm
vulnerable population which comprises of children and elderly people. we must realise india is in a developing state and the nation has been built so there is a lot of construction happening everywhere in the country and for this we have to be bent on what is cold daily wage labour. that means the labourers turn up, don't show up they don't get paid, and they don't have any savings, it affects their livelihoods and therefore it would be unfair to expect people to stay indoors. what also is something that we should be working on is that of course there should be interventions at federal as well as state levels. we also need to build public area, how should you hydrate yourself? how long should we stay outdoors if it is unavoidable? we must also realise
3:44 pm
a lot of our population is very poon a lot of our population is very poor. urban areas have slums where thousands of people stay and they don't even have a cool roof, let alone having air—conditioning. all of this makes the country really vulnerable to the harmful effects of heatwaves. ~ . , , ., ., heatwaves. what is being done to rotect heatwaves. what is being done to protect those _ heatwaves. what is being done to protect those who _ heatwaves. what is being done to protect those who are _ heatwaves. what is being done to protect those who are most - protect those who are most vulnerable? the authorities have got quite a big job on their hands. absolutely. there are examples of success stories because some cities suffered from massive heatwave in 2010 and the city came out with its own heat action plan. which was actually successful in dealing with the 2015 heatwave. unfortunately, the 2015 heatwave. unfortunately, the heatwave is not recognised as a major disaster, as part of a national disaster management act and we don't have a concrete heat action policy at federal or state level so hopefully with the international attention this event has garnered it
3:45 pm
will bring about some changes at the policy level. i think what has improved over the last couple of years is that the department is giving accurate forecasts. —— met department. ourfocus giving accurate forecasts. —— met department. our focus was on rainfall because we are an agriculture dependent cat country and rainfall and irrigation driven. it's only in the last couple of years the imd is coming up with heat forecasts which form essentially the first step in informing and taking decision on heatwave management. of course we need a lot of, a lot more public awareness programmes also. one small example i can give you in gujarat as you know there are indices but about by women and they have brought something which is essentially a combination of natural and naturalfibres essentially a combination of natural and natural fibres and essentially a combination of natural and naturalfibres and cardboard
3:46 pm
instead of the teen and aluminium sheets as sheds in slums, so some ingenious solutions like that are needed at the grassroots level in this country. needed at the grassroots level in this country-— this country. yes, lots of mitigation _ this country. yes, lots of mitigation needed - this country. yes, lots of mitigation needed when | this country. yes, lots of i mitigation needed when you this country. yes, lots of - mitigation needed when you have temperatures like this. professor, thank you very much for your time. pleasure. the three—time wimbledon men's singles champion, boris becker, is being sentenced around now for breaking uk insolvency laws. live now to southwark crown court in london and our correspondent there, helena wilkinson. in the last few seconds, boris becker has here at the crown court been sentenced by a judge to immediate custody, the sentence the judge has handed down to boris becker is one of two years and six months in total in prison. he will serve, thejudge has said to him, half of that inside prison, so he
3:47 pm
will serve half of that prison sentence on licence and the other half will serve out, but the sentence boris becker has been handed down here at southwark crown court after being convicted of four counts of fraud at a trial three weeks ago here, he has been sentenced to two years and six months in total. the former golden boy of tennis has been in the dock here, he knew that there was a potential that he would have to serve an immediate custodial sentence, but�*s defence barrister earlier on in submissions had asked thejudge to suspend earlier on in submissions had asked the judge to suspend any custodial sentence, but we now know in the last few minutes that boris becker has been sentenced to two years and six months in prison. thejudge said
3:48 pm
during her sentencing remarks that boris becker had shown no humility. she also said you have lost your career, your reputation, and all of your property as a result of your bankruptcy. extraordinaire to think that boris becker, who was the youngest man to win the wimbledon at the age of 17, he had a glittering career, will now be spending some time behind bars in prison. a sentence of two years and six months in total. he has been sentenced to and thejudge said he in total. he has been sentenced to and the judge said he will serve half of that on licence. this and the judge said he will serve half of that on licence.- half of that on licence. this is because he — half of that on licence. this is because he was _ half of that on licence. this is because he was found - half of that on licence. this is because he was found guilty l half of that on licence. this is l because he was found guilty of half of that on licence. this is i because he was found guilty of four charges relating to bankruptcy about five years ago?— five years ago? yes, that is right. there was — five years ago? yes, that is right. there was a _ five years ago? yes, that is right. there was a trial _ five years ago? yes, that is right. there was a trial here _ five years ago? yes, that is right. there was a trial here and - five years ago? yes, that is right. there was a trial here and boris i there was a trial here and boris becker was facing 24 charges under
3:49 pm
the insolvency act. thejury becker was facing 24 charges under the insolvency act. the jury after that trial the verdict, they found him guilty of four counts under the insolvency act. the included a failure to declare a property in germany, and also he was found guilty of transferring hundreds of thousands of pounds from his business account, after his bankruptcy. he was acquitted of 20 charges, but he was found guilty of four charges and today, he has been sentenced in total for hiding four charges and today, he has been sentenced in totalfor hiding £2.5 million worth of assets and loans to avoid paying his debts. boris becker as i say, golden boy of tennis, former wimbledon champion, in the dock today, here at southwark crown court, he has been sentenced to two years and six months in prison, of which half of that he will serve on
3:50 pm
licence. joining me to discuss this is david law from the tennis podcast. ican alike i can alike you, remember boris becker winning that title at the age of 17 and here we are seeing him sent to prison. it's an extraordinary full from grace. yes, absolutelv- — extraordinary full from grace. yes, absolutely- i— extraordinary full from grace. yes, absolutely. i remember— extraordinary full from grace. yes, absolutely. i remember boris becker winning _ absolutely. i remember boris becker winning wimbledon age 17, i was 12 years— winning wimbledon age 17, i was 12 years of— winning wimbledon age 17, i was 12 years of age and it's a moment that made _ years of age and it's a moment that made me _ years of age and it's a moment that made me want to work in tennis and here i_ made me want to work in tennis and here lam _ made me want to work in tennis and here i am today working in tennis full-time — here i am today working in tennis full—time. he was an inspirational character— full—time. he was an inspirational character on the court, his win at wimbledon— character on the court, his win at wimbledon came from nowhere. as a l7-vear-old. — wimbledon came from nowhere. as a 17—year—old, really, he beat four more _ 17—year—old, really, he beat four more illustrious and famous names on the way— more illustrious and famous names on the way to— more illustrious and famous names on the way to winning that title. he did so— the way to winning that title. he did so diving all over the court in memories— did so diving all over the court in memories that i think everybody takes _ memories that i think everybody takes with them, that saw them at that point— takes with them, that saw them at that point in the mid—805. he reached — that point in the mid—805. he reached six out of the next seven
3:51 pm
wimbledon finals, won more than $25 million _ wimbledon finals, won more than $25 million in _ wimbledon finals, won more than $25 million in prize money. post—career, he was _ million in prize money. post—career, he was unable, it appears, to manage his life _ he was unable, it appears, to manage his life all— he was unable, it appears, to manage his life. all of that money disappeared in a really, in various failed _ disappeared in a really, in various failed business ventures and obviously he had a lot of domestic situations— obviously he had a lot of domestic situations as well, which meant that his money— situations as well, which meant that his money was going in various different— his money was going in various different directions and it is sad, really— different directions and it is sad, really from before that follow tennis. — really from before that follow tennis, that he has ended up in this situation, _ tennis, that he has ended up in this situation, for— tennis, that he has ended up in this situation, for his own reasons. for his own _ situation, for his own reasons. for his own behaviour that has ended up there _ his own behaviour that has ended up there but _ his own behaviour that has ended up there but it— his own behaviour that has ended up there. but it is a sad situation. i have there. but it is a sad situation. have got to there. but it is a sad situation. i have got to correct myself, i think when i first asked the question, i mentioned the prime minister's name. this is what happens when you have two boriss in the headline. boris becker is of course who we are speaking about. you mention these failed businesses, to what extent living this rarefied life makes you somewhat prone to making these mistakes, particularly when you
3:52 pm
achieve fame and that wealth at that young age and being a tennis player, young age and being a tennis player, you are away from home, aren't you? you are on tour for much of the year. it's a strange existence. it year. it's a strange existence. it is a strange existence and i think it's very— is a strange existence and i think it's very easy to come to that conclusion— it's very easy to come to that conclusion and i'm sure he is pointing _ conclusion and i'm sure he is pointing to that as well. i have heard — pointing to that as well. i have heard some of his comments that he continued _ heard some of his comments that he continued to live the lifestyle of a world _ continued to live the lifestyle of a world number one tennis player when his career— world number one tennis player when his career ended and of course the money— his career ended and of course the money is _ his career ended and of course the money is not coming in in the same amount— money is not coming in in the same amount as — money is not coming in in the same amount as it— money is not coming in in the same amount as it would have done when he was at _ amount as it would have done when he was at the _ amount as it would have done when he was at the height of his career. at the same — was at the height of his career. at the same time, many other successful tennis— the same time, many other successful tennis players have managed their lifestyles— tennis players have managed their lifestyles accordingly and one of his contemporaries, stefan edberg is in a very— his contemporaries, stefan edberg is in a very different situation in life — in a very different situation in life it — in a very different situation in life it is _ in a very different situation in life. it is sad to see him in the situation, _ life. it is sad to see him in the situation, we see him around the tennis— situation, we see him around the tennis circuit, he still worked for the last— tennis circuit, he still worked for the last few years as a commentator and pundit— the last few years as a commentator and pundit and he is very popular still on _ and pundit and he is very popular still on the — and pundit and he is very popular still on the circuit. he has held verv—
3:53 pm
still on the circuit. he has held very affectionately when he arrives at wimbledon, people want to have a photo _ at wimbledon, people want to have a photo with— at wimbledon, people want to have a photo with him. they remember the scenes— photo with him. they remember the scenes of— photo with him. they remember the scenes of him diving around centre court _ scenes of him diving around centre court hut _ scenes of him diving around centre court but i — scenes of him diving around centre court but i don't think he was able to really— court but i don't think he was able to really manage his life and i remember when to really manage his life and i rememberwhen he was to really manage his life and i remember when he was at the height of his— remember when he was at the height of his career, his fame was such in germany— of his career, his fame was such in germany that he was 100% recognised, they did _ germany that he was 100% recognised, they did a _ germany that he was 100% recognised, they did a study and found that if people _ they did a study and found that if people saw a picture of him, they knew— people saw a picture of him, they knew who — people saw a picture of him, they knew who he was. that sort of fame, ithink— knew who he was. that sort of fame, i think he _ knew who he was. that sort of fame, ithink he did — knew who he was. that sort of fame, ithink he did find knew who he was. that sort of fame, i think he did find may be difficult to completely deal with. and certainly we have seen the result of his business ventures and the various— his business ventures and the various elements of his lifestyle and they— various elements of his lifestyle and they have put him in this position— and they have put him in this position today.— and they have put him in this position today. and they have put him in this osition toda . ., ., , position today. how forgiving is the sort when position today. how forgiving is the sport when people _ position today. how forgiving is the sport when people get _ position today. how forgiving is the sport when people get things i position today. how forgiving is the l sport when people get things wrong? i don't know if you heard me, how forgiving is the sport of tennis when people get things wrong? ishield. when people get things wrong? well, i think people —
3:54 pm
when people get things wrong? well, i think people will _ when people get things wrong? well, i think people will still _ when people get things wrong? well, i think people will still hold him with affection for what he did on the court. — with affection for what he did on the court, there is no question. those _ the court, there is no question. those memories will last. at the same _ those memories will last. at the same time, this is... hugely embarrassing for him, it's a humiliation for him, it is prison time _ humiliation for him, it is prison time this _ humiliation for him, it is prison time this is _ humiliation for him, it is prison time. this is not a suspended sentence. _ time. this is not a suspended sentence, and it will follow him, it will stay— sentence, and it will follow him, it will stay with him, i think people mostly— will stay with him, i think people mostly within tennis willjust be sad _ mostly within tennis willjust be sad that — mostly within tennis willjust be sad. that somebody who has done as much _ sad. that somebody who has done as much in _ sad. that somebody who has done as much in the _ sad. that somebody who has done as much in the sport as he has an brought— much in the sport as he has an brought has much to it as he did, has ended — brought has much to it as he did, has ended up in the situation for through— has ended up in the situation for through his own doing, but it is still sad — through his own doing, but it is still sad. ., , ., ., ., , still sad. through his own doing, as ou sa , still sad. through his own doing, as you say. but— still sad. through his own doing, as you say. but this — still sad. through his own doing, as you say, but this has _ still sad. through his own doing, as you say, but this has been - still sad. through his own doing, as you say, but this has been a - still sad. through his own doing, as you say, but this has been a long i you say, but this has been a long time coming hasn't it? in many ways, this bankruptcy was five years ago and extraordinary to a lot of people that someone who turned £38 million during his career went bankrupt at all. you wonder who is around him being a criticalfriend? is it that kind of sport where people look out
3:55 pm
for each other? i kind of sport where people look out for each other?— for each other? i think it certainly can be the _ for each other? i think it certainly can be the kind _ for each other? i think it certainly can be the kind of _ for each other? i think it certainly can be the kind of sport _ for each other? i think it certainly can be the kind of sport where, l for each other? i think it certainly i can be the kind of sport where, when you are _ can be the kind of sport where, when you are on _ can be the kind of sport where, when you are on top and earning an enormous _ you are on top and earning an enormous amount of money and fame is off the _ enormous amount of money and fame is off the scale _ enormous amount of money and fame is off the scale which it was for him, he was _ off the scale which it was for him, he was as— off the scale which it was for him, he was as big a name as any in the sport's— he was as big a name as any in the sport's history for a period of time — sport's history for a period of time i— sport's history for a period of time, i think you get a lot of people — time, i think you get a lot of people around you who make a real fuss of _ people around you who make a real fuss of you — people around you who make a real fuss of you and tell you what you might _ fuss of you and tell you what you might want to hear rather than what is good _ might want to hear rather than what is good for— might want to hear rather than what is good for you. and in the court, he was _ is good for you. and in the court, he was blaming his advisers. he said i followed _ he was blaming his advisers. he said i followed the advice i was given and it— i followed the advice i was given and it went wrong. i do think that there _ and it went wrong. i do think that there is— and it went wrong. i do think that there is a — and it went wrong. i do think that there is a lot of people that are telling — there is a lot of people that are telling you a lot of things. i also think— telling you a lot of things. i also think there are people around him early— think there are people around him early in _ think there are people around him early in his— think there are people around him early in his career that were very experienced and would have told him .ood experienced and would have told him good things. whether he listened to that is— good things. whether he listened to that is another matter. you certainly _ that is another matter. you certainly do have a lot of attention and it— certainly do have a lot of attention and it is— certainly do have a lot of attention and it is not— certainly do have a lot of attention and it is not necessarily natural and it is not necessarily natural and normal attention and how you handle _ and normal attention and how you handle that goes along and normal attention and how you handle that goes a long way to how you end _
3:56 pm
handle that goes a long way to how you end up — handle that goes a long way to how you end up living the rest of your life when — you end up living the rest of your life when you are not a professional player— life when you are not a professional player with — life when you are not a professional player with all the money from endorsements coming in at the same rate. endorsements coming in at the same rate as _ endorsements coming in at the same rate as i _ endorsements coming in at the same rate. as i said, many have done it and achieved _ rate. as i said, many have done it and achieved it without ending up in the situation he is in. we appreciate _ the situation he is in. we appreciate you _ the situation he is in. , appreciate you talking to us about boris becker, let me stress that, i am getting a bit of nick taking on social media, quite understandably. thank you. easily done. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. for many of us it's a brighter, sunnier, warmer day today, compared with yesterday. in south yorkshire, for example, underneath all of this cloud yesterday, the temperature just topped out at nine celsius. it is much brighter out there today, and the temperature is heading up closer to the average for the time of year, 14 or 15 celsius. and that is the story across much of the uk. high pressure, plenty of dry weather again. an area of cloud, though, through much of the midlands, east anglia, south—east england, and hanging on through much of the afternoon. only beginning to clear later on.
3:57 pm
in fact, the odd lighted shower out of that towards essex and kent can't be ruled out. and the cloud here will be holding temperatures back compared with elsewhere where you get the brightest skies. early drizzle in north—east scotland petering out. the odd shower popping up in central and eastern parts of scotland. sunnier day in northern ireland, and temperatures are higher than yesterday, but there will be a few spots in south—east england, with the thickest cloud that may just hang around nine or 10 celsius as we go through the afternoon. that cloud doesn't disappear tonight. cloud increases through the night in northern ireland, the north and western scotland, keeping the frost at bay, whereas from southern scotland across wales and england, there will be a patchy frost and the coldest spots getting just below freezing, going into tomorrow morning. rewarded with a bright and sunny start to the day after the clear skies overnight. such a different day for northern ireland and scotland. we have got a weather system moving in. that is bringing in rain for the start of the weekend, gradually pushing across more of scotland during the afternoon, with a stronger wind, as well. lots of england and north wales getting it in that late afternoon,
3:58 pm
tomorrow, especially into the evening. ahead of that cloud increasing but staying dry for many daylight hours here. and as for the temperatures, they are going to be higher, especially towards east anglia and south—east england, compared with today. that weather system, then, moves south overnight and into sunday. it does begin to weaken on sunday. still has some rain with it, through particularly parts of wales and the western side of england, but elsewhere in england, you could see the little patchy rain from the cloud on sunday. not as much as many would like to see. in northern ireland and scotland, a few sunny spells break out, through the day on sunday, whereas in wales and england, it will be a cooler day. and then we are onto the bank holiday. expect a lot of cloud. there will be a few sunny spells breaking through and there. england are staying dry. there will be a little showery rain at times, more especially across northern areas. a cooler feeling day across scotland, and warmer feeling day across much of wales and england.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: former tennis star boris becker is in court — he faces a prison sentence. mp neil parish has had the conservative whip suspended while he is being investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber two british volunteers missing in ukraine are named as paul urey and dylan healy by aid organisation presidium network. paul's family say they are extremely worried and are praying for his safety. it comes as russia confirms it fired missiles into kyiv last night — the first direct attack on the capital for a fortnight a new hormone replacement therapy tsar is appointed as more than a million women are affected by supply issues. a report warns black children
4:01 pm
are disadvantaged in schools because they are viewed as less innocent and more adult—like. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news _ former wimbledon champion boris becker has been sentenced to prison. let's join becker has been sentenced to prison. let'sjoin helena becker has been sentenced to prison. let's join helena wilkinson outside southwark crown court for the sentencing hasjust southwark crown court for the sentencing has just happened. southwark crown court for the sentencing hasjust happened. he southwark crown court for the sentencing has just happened. he was hoping for a suspended sentence, but it has not happened.— it has not happened. absolutely, boris becker's _ it has not happened. absolutely,
4:02 pm
boris becker's defence _ it has not happened. absolutely, boris becker's defence barrister, j boris becker's defence barrister, during submissions earlier on this morning at the sentence hearing had urged thejudge and morning at the sentence hearing had urged the judge and argued that boris becker should receive a suspended prison sentence, but boris becker, who was on bail, he walked into the court building here this morning, would have been well aware that there was the potential for him to be sent immediately to prison, and that is exactly what has happened here in the last 15 minutes orso happened here in the last 15 minutes or so at southwark crown court in courts one, the former wimbledon champion, the youngest man to win wimbledon at the age of 17, boris becker, who had glittering tennis career, has this afternoon with sentenced by the judge to two years and six months, and he has been told that he will serve half of that on licence. thejudge, that he will serve half of that on licence. the judge, judge that he will serve half of that on licence. thejudge, judge deborah licence. the judge, judge deborah taylor, licence. thejudge, judge deborah taylor, in his sentencing remarks, said to boris becker, you have lost
4:03 pm
your career, your reputation and all of your property as a result of your bankruptcy, and as you said, boris becker was declared bankrupt in 2017, and it was here, three weeks ago, when he was found guilty of four counts under the insolvency act. he was acquitted of 20 charges, but today he has been sentenced to immediate custody, and the judge also said to boris becker during his sentencing remarks, she said that he had not shown remorse or humility. colleagues who were in court one as the sentence was handed down said he looked shocked at the sentence, he looked shocked at the sentence, he looked embarrassed, he bent down to pick up his bag, he nodded to his partner, who was in court today and has been had been throughout the trial, and his son was in court as
4:04 pm
well, and he was led away by court official begin that sentence of two years and six months, half of which he will on licence.— he will on licence. thank you very much. helena _ he will on licence. thank you very much. helena wilkinson - he will on licence. thank you very much. helena wilkinson at i much. helena wilkinson at southwark crown court in london. i've been speaking to david lowe from the tennis podcast and he gave me his reaction to the news. i tennis podcast and he gave me his reaction to the news.— reaction to the news. i remember boris reaction to the news. i remember ltoris ltecker— reaction to the news. i remember boris becker winning _ reaction to the news. i remember boris becker winning wimbledon | reaction to the news. i remember i boris becker winning wimbledon age 17, i wasjust 12 boris becker winning wimbledon age 17, i was just 12 years of age and it was a moment that made me want to work in tennis, and here today, and i work in tennis full—time. he was an inspirational character on the court, his win at wimbledon came from nowhere, as a 17—year—old, really, he'd be far more illustrious and famous names on the way to winning the title, he did so diving all over the court in memories that i think everyone takes with them, that saw his time at that point, in the mid—80s, and he reached six at the mid—80s, and he reached six at the next seven wimbledon finals, he won more than $25 million in prize
4:05 pm
money, the post—career he was unable, it appears, money, the post—career he was unable, itappears, to money, the post—career he was unable, it appears, to manage his life, and all of that money disappeared, really, in various failed business ventures, and obviously he had a lot of domestic situations, as well, which meant that his money was going in various different directions, and it's sad, really, throw people that punish follow tennis, from his own behaviour, that he is as i not there, but it's a sad situation. you mentioned — there, but it's a sad situation. you mentioned these _ there, but it's a sad situation. you mentioned these failed businesses, i wonder to what extent leading this rarefied life makes you prone to making these mistakes, critically when you achieve fame and wealth at that young an age, and being a tennis player, you are away from home, aren't you? you are on tour for much of the year, it is a strange existence. ll for much of the year, it is a strange existence.- for much of the year, it is a strange existence. it is a strange existence. _ strange existence. it is a strange existence, and _ strange existence. it is a strange existence, and i _ strange existence. it is a strange existence, and i think— strange existence. it is a strange existence, and i think it - strange existence. it is a strange existence, and i think it is i strange existence. it is a strange existence, and i think it is very i existence, and i think it is very easy to come to that conclusion, and
4:06 pm
i'm sure he is pointing to that as well, i've heard some of his comments, that he continued to lead the lifestyle of the world—renowned tennis player when his career ended, and of course the money isn't coming on in the same amount as it would have done when he was at the height of his career, but the same time, many, many other successful tennis players have manage the same time, many, many other successful tennis players have manage their lifestyles accordingly, and one of his contemporaries, stefan edberg, is in a very different situations live, it's said the same in this situation, he is still around in tennis, he has worked in recent years as a commentator and pundit, he is popular on the circuit, he is held in affection when he arrives at wimbledon, people want to have their photo with him, they remember this incident diving centre court, but i don't think he was able to really manage his life. i remember when he was at the height of his career, his fame as such in germany that he was
4:07 pm
100% recognised, they did a study and found that people saw a picture of him, they knew who he was, that sort of thing, i think, he did find may be difficult to completely deal with, and certainly we have seen the results of his business ventures in the various elements of his lifestyle, and they have put him in this position today. the mp neil parish has had the conservative whip suspended while he is being investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber. he apparently reported himself to the standards committee of the house of commons. let's talk to our political correspondent helen catt. a lot of people have been wondering who this is, now we have the name. yes, this accusation was made earlier in the week at a meeting of conservative mps, one female mp had said she had seen a colleague sitting near her in the commons
4:08 pm
chamber watching pornography on his mobile phone, a second mp backed her up mobile phone, a second mp backed her up on that, as opposed to the independent grievance process for sexual misconduct, this is to be done by people who have witnessed it up done by people who have witnessed it up in her victim of it, the process has begun, but we are also told that neil parish, the mp for tiverton and honiton in devon, he is also the chair of the environment committee, that he had spoken to the chief whip this afternoon, and was reporting himself to the parliamentary commissionerfor himself to the parliamentary commissioner for standards himself to the parliamentary commissionerfor standards in himself to the parliamentary commissioner for standards in the house of commons, and the conservative party has suspended the whip from him pending the output of the investigation, meaning he won't be able to sit as a conservative mp, who asked to sit as an independent. what happens with the sort of investigation generally? i don't want to pre—empt what will happen in this case, but what of the committee
4:09 pm
have? ., ., have? there are two separate processes _ have? there are two separate processes here, _ have? there are two separate processes here, but - have? there are two separate processes here, but they i have? there are two separate| processes here, but they need have? there are two separate i processes here, but they need is the similar place, one hand is the parliamentary system which works by, the incident is reported and investigated, gets put on the case, they look into the basic facts, then they look into the basic facts, then they parliamentary committee of the standards, kathryn stone, decides if there is a case to pursue, there is a full investigation, she makes the cooling on that. she will also report, because he is reported to himself, she will have to report an investigator not to. that is generally done confidentially. to that point, she can recommend some sanctions, and she can refer this to the committee, committee of mps, who can also recommend sanctions, and the sanctions are quite broad, so that can be anything from demanding an apology, written apology or spoken apology, to suspending an mp from the commons for a certain number of days, and if an mp is
4:10 pm
suspended from the commons for ten sitting days, for example, that can trigger a recall, they can recall their mp, and the ultimate sanction as you can expel an mp from the commons, but there are these investigative processes that need to be gone through, because we cannot prejudge it. h0. be gone through, because we cannot -are'ude it. ., , ., ., ., pre'udge it. no, we must not do that at prejudge it. no, we must not do that at all. prejudge it. no, we must not do that at all- thank— prejudge it. no, we must not do that at all. thank you _ prejudge it. no, we must not do that at all. thank you very _ prejudge it. no, we must not do that at all. thank you very much. - two british aid volunteers missing in ukraine have been named as paul urey and dylan healy. the nonprofit organisation, presidium network, said the volunteers were providing humanitarian assistance in ukraine when they were captured by the russian military. paul urey�*s family say they are extremely worried and hope for his safety. they were detained at a checkpoint near the city of zaporizhzhia in southern ukraine on monday. the foreign office is said to be urgently seeking more information. meanwhile, russia has confirmed that it attacked kyiv last night — it says it was targeting a missile factory.
4:11 pm
our correspondent, joe inwood, reports from kyiv. if kyiv thought it was safe from russian attack, last night was a rude awakening. the capital had not been targeted by russian missiles for two weeks. translation: the first one struck l on that side, it was really loud. l i thought it fell somewhere near my office. after about ten seconds, the second one hit — here. i then realised this one was even closer. translation: they've killed so many people. | it's really difficult. our brothers, thanks to them for our freedom, they won't leave anything standing. i can't any more. russia says it was targeting a missile production facility. four people were hospitalised and one woman was killed. what's most extraordinary about this attack is that it happened while the secretary general of the united nations was in kyiv just a couple of miles away. according to vitali klitschko, the mayor of the city, moscow was sending a message.
4:12 pm
translation: this is the "hello" to him. i mr putin has shown him a middle finger at this moment. _ shelling and destroying our houses. it had already been a tiring day for antonio guterres, after witnessing for himself the site of alleged russian war crimes, he held meetings aimed at solving one of the toughest issues of the war, setting up humanitarian corridors from the besieged city of mariupol. it's hoped there could be some movement today but, so far, even the diplomatic might of the un has failed to a achieve a breakthrough. nato is now warning this conflict could last for years. all sides say they want a diplomatic solution but after the events of yesterday, that feels as far away as ever. joe inwood, bbc news, kyiv. millions of ukraine's children have fled their homes since the war began — the united nations children's agency unicef estimates two
4:13 pm
thirds of the country's children are now displaced. for some, it's an even harder journey, because they don't have their parents with them. one children's home on the eastern front line — in luhansk — had to relocate hundreds of miles across the country to the western city of lviv. danjohnson has been to meet some of those who moved there. watch for the flush of panic across angelina's face. air raid siren wails. but she knows the drill. she's been through more air raids than any 11—year—old should. air raid siren contnues. the lives of these orphanage children are now dominated by running from war and taking coverfrom attacks. are you scared, angelina? angelina tells us to stay down, and keep away from the windows.
4:14 pm
she's a veteran even before she's reached her teenage years. smartphone apps show alerts spreading across the country, and thoughts turn to home. "this is lysychansk", angelina says. reading memories of the town she was evacuated from. "i want to go home. "the more they shoot, the more i want to go back", she says. but angelina has no idea what awaits. this is why they came west. bombs landed close to their orphanage in the luhansk region soon after they escaped in the early days of the invasion. local officials sent us these pictures of the damage. the un says nearly five million ukrainian children are now refugees. this man tells me he heard shooting and bombing early on the morning of the invasion.
4:15 pm
translation: i didn't know exactly what the sounds were. _ then russian tanks invaded lysychansk. we packed all our stuff. the manager was thinking we would evacuate to lviv or kyiv. lviv it was, but even this far west, they're not safe. his phone now holds videos of a missile strike nearby. translation: it was very close to here. i we even saw the fire. the windows were blown out and some shrapnel flew in. it was here on the floor. i was working on fragments of glass. angelina offers a lesson in the attempt to redraw ukraine's geography. "take me back to lysychansk", she says. "i want the war to be over, "then we will rebuild lysycha nsk and our country. " danjohnson, bbc news, lviv.
4:16 pm
the headlines on bbc news... former wimbledon champion boris becker receives a sentence of two and a half years after being found guilty on four charges relating to bankruptcy. conservative mp neil parish has the whip removed after watching pornography in the commons chamber, allegedly. paul urey and dylan healy are missing in ukraine. the family is worried for their safety. the premier of the british virgin islands has been arrested in florida on drug trafficking and money laundering charges. andrew foye was detained by us agents posing as cocaine traffickers. here's our diplomatic correspondent, james landale. good day to my people of the british virgin islands and those abroad. this is andrew fahie, premier
4:17 pm
of the british virgin islands, effectively the prime minister of the small british overseas territory in the eastern caribbean but perhaps not for much longer. for yesterday, he was arrested at this airport in miami by undercover us drug enforcement agents pretending to be members of a mexican cartel. now he's facing charges of drug—trafficking and money—laundering. the head of the dea said... there have long been questions over the way this sun—drenched tax haven has been governed, where thousands of secretive holding companies are used to hide money. since january last year, andrew fahie has been the subject of a commission of inquiry into allegations of misgovernment and corruption in the islands.
4:18 pm
a commission where he was controversially defended by the conservative mp, the former attorney general, geoffrey cox. the foreign secretary, liz truss, said she was appalled by what she called "these serious allegations". she spoke to the governor of the bvi, john rankin, a diplomat who represents the queen there. he'll chair an emergency meeting of the territory's cabinet later today. the foreign secretary, visiting the netherlands this morning, said mr fahie's arrest demonstrated the importance of the commission of inquiry, which is expected to report soon. as for mr fahie, he's expected in court later. when he was detained he reportedly said, "why am i being arrested? "i don't have any money or drugs." james landale, bbc news. more than 40 palestinians have been injured injerusalem's al aqsa
4:19 pm
black schoolchildren are likely to face tougher punishments than other pupils because they're viewed as less innocent, and more like adults. a new report from the commission on young lives in england says a racial bias known as �*adultification', means black children have lower levels of safeguarding. concerns have been growing since the case emerged of child o - a 15—year—old girl who was strip searched at her school in london without an appropriate adult present. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports: black girls and boys, they're treated differently. yeah, 100%, 100%. i do think there's a lot of, like, problems with racism. in south london, these teenagers say the way they look affects their experiences in and out of school. a few days ago, i got i stopped and searched. did you understand the nature of the search, did they kind of go through why they stopped you and explained? no. i asked for their police station, their name, . they didn't give me nothing,
4:20 pm
theyiust left _ this is their reality, and last month, the shocking case of child o, the 15—year—old black girl who was strip—searched at school by police, led to angry protests. this case, yet again, adds to the wider issue of how black people are treated by the authorities in this country — exposing more resentment, more fear and more mistrust in places where young people should feel safe. today, a new report, chaired by england's former children's commissioner, looking at how to improve support for vulnerable young people, has made a number of recommendations. it starts with training for teachers, i think, to have anti—racist practise and racial discrimination at the heart of that initial teacher training. it isn't at the moment. to have recruitment drives, to get more black teachers into the classroom and in senior leadership roles and in governor roles, too. at the moment, 90% of teachers are white, especially in primary school.
4:21 pm
he is actually huge in history... the government says the teaching workforce is becoming more diverse, and it's strengthened safeguarding guidance for schools, with regular training for staff. but child safeguarding leaders are becoming increasingly worried about a racial bias, known as adultification — where black children, like child o, are met with suspicion rather than care. black girls tend to be perceived as being loud, as being aggressive and being hyper resilient. so if you want to, again, explore the adultification of black girls, let's look at the history. we have to root it within, or place it, within slavery and colonialism. these mums, who are also local authority and school governors, say everyone has a responsibility. if you have an understanding of the injustices and the discrimination that is happening towards young black girls, you are more than capable to be
4:22 pm
in a position to say, hang on, i don't agree with this, let me insert myself onto a governing board and actually use my privilege to be able to speak up on behalf of that community, or on behalf of young black girls. my black skin isn't a threat. their black skin isn't a threat. her tears arejust as important as your tears. in the case of child o, the metropolitan police has apologised and the independent office of police conduct is expected to release the findings of its investigation next month. adina campbell, bbc news. the number of people testing positive for coronavirus in the uk has decreased by nearly a quarter, according to the office for national statistics. about1 in 23 people would have tested positive for the virus in the week to 23rd april, down from 1 in 17 the previous week.
4:23 pm
our health reporter philippa roxbyjoins me now. this is positive news, missing a big drop, down to 2.8 million people affected in the uk, so everything moving in the right direction. england, scotland, northern ireland, 125 people infected now, just a few weeks ago we were in the middle of quite a big spike driven by the omicron variant, and we got to figures like one in 13 people infected, so it is deftly coming down, but we need to wait a few more weeks to see if this trend continues, because it has been the easter holidays and people been out of school and mix mixing quite so much in the workplace, as we will see if that trend continues. but there are still _ see if that trend continues. but there are still data for mid april showing about 1150 people died in the previous week with covid—19 on the previous week with covid—19 on the death certificate. it's down about 500 a week compared with mid—january, but still a lot of
4:24 pm
people dying because of covid. yes. people dying because of covid. yes, covid deaths — people dying because of covid. yes, covid deaths are _ people dying because of covid. yes, covid deaths are still— people dying because of covid. use: covid deaths are still occurring, and hospital admission still occurring, hospital admissions coming down, so an indication that maybe this omicron variant has burned itself out, and that the combination of lots of vaccination in the population and people having already been infected is making these covid infection levels come down. these covid infection levels come down, , .,, these covid infection levels come down. ., these covid infection levels come down. , ., , these covid infection levels come down. ., , down. some people of course as we know starting _ down. some people of course as we know starting on _ down. some people of course as we know starting on the _ down. some people of course as we know starting on the fourth - down. some people of course as we know starting on the fourth dose. i know starting on the fourth dose. yes, that's right, there's been a poster campaign this spring, people getting theirfull dose, poster campaign this spring, people getting their full dose, there poster campaign this spring, people getting theirfull dose, there is likely to be other campaigns before next winter, there is likely to be more people vaccinated, just in case there is another version coming, and of course another variant is always a slight worry, this virus is not going to go away, and we just have to keep monitoring to see the next variant becomes along. lode to keep monitoring to see the next variant becomes along.— to keep monitoring to see the next variant becomes along. we are being encouraued variant becomes along. we are being encouraged to _ variant becomes along. we are being encouraged to live _ variant becomes along. we are being encouraged to live with _ variant becomes along. we are being encouraged to live with the _ variant becomes along. we are being encouraged to live with the virus, i encouraged to live with the virus, but some people that is more frightening than for others, if you have some underlying health issue or are immune suppressed. for
4:25 pm
have some underlying health issue or are immune suppressed.— have some underlying health issue or are immune suppressed. for the most vulnerable people, _ are immune suppressed. for the most vulnerable people, there _ are immune suppressed. for the most vulnerable people, there will - are immune suppressed. for the most vulnerable people, there will be i vulnerable people, there will be more protected now, having their force, and we are always is protected as we can be, so people being told to take the measures they need to to carry on safely, and of course free testing in england has now ended, so this ons survey, this is the best picture we can get to how covid is affecting the uk right now. ., ~' how covid is affecting the uk right now. . ~ , ., how covid is affecting the uk right now. ., ~ , ., y how covid is affecting the uk right now. . ~ i. , . ., now. thank you very much. the labour pa has now. thank you very much. the labour party has said — now. thank you very much. the labour party has said its _ now. thank you very much. the labour party has said its deputy _ now. thank you very much. the labour party has said its deputy leader - party has said its deputy leader angela rayner was present last year when there were current license restrictions in place. they acknowledge that they had previous told journalists that angela rayner was not at the event. sir keir starmer has been speaking at the keynote address in scotland. whether an . ela keynote address in scotland. whether angela rayner — keynote address in scotland. whether angela rayner was — keynote address in scotland. whether angela rayner was there _ keynote address in scotland. whether angela rayner was there or _ keynote address in scotland. whether angela rayner was there or not i keynote address in scotland. whether| angela rayner was there or not makes no difference. there is no breach in the rules, the matter is already being looked into. stark contrast
4:26 pm
between that and the goings—on at downing street where we know there were 50 fines issued already in an investigation is still going on, so there is absolutely no comparison to be made here. obviously, i do understand, with elections coming, why tories are trying to throw as much mud as they can, but the issue that i am utterly focused on is the cost of living crisis, helping people with their energy bills, and calling the government out for imposing even more tax on people during the middle of a kosovan crisis. ., ., during the middle of a kosovan crisis. . ., ,, ., , , ., crisis. laura sugden was pregnant when her partner— crisis. laura sugden was pregnant when her partner was _ crisis. laura sugden was pregnant when her partner was killed i crisis. laura sugden was pregnant when her partner was killed with l crisis. laura sugden was pregnantj when her partner was killed with a crossbow. she was shot in head but managed to raise the alarm. month she began campaigning for tighter restrictions on crossbows. i’m campaigning for tighter restrictions on crossbows— on crossbows. i'm so grateful for hamley people — on crossbows. i'm so grateful for hamley people got _ on crossbows. i'm so grateful for hamley people got behind i on crossbows. i'm so grateful for hamley people got behind my i hamley people got behind my campaign, got so many signatures.
4:27 pm
amid a pro, determination to find evidence, but the murder of her partner with a crossbow in 2018 was not an isolated incident. l partner with a crossbow in 2018 was not an isolated incident. i do believe that _ not an isolated incident. i do believe that has _ not an isolated incident. l u believe that has changed their thought in from the initial thought of saying the incidents are isolated, now they have figures in front of them to look at, that is only proved that it is not an isolated incident, and it is on the increase. ., ., ., ., ., increase. her freedom of information reuuests increase. her freedom of information requests have _ increase. her freedom of information requests have revealed _ increase. her freedom of information requests have revealed thousands i increase. her freedom of information requests have revealed thousands of| requests have revealed thousands of crossbow incidents have been logged by police forces across the uk. next month, she will meet with the home office. ., ., , ., , office. so, i am hopefulthat 'ust b bein: office. so, i am hopefulthat 'ust by being asked fl office. so, i am hopefulthat 'ust by being asked to i office. so, i am hopefulthat 'ust by being asked to attend i office. so, i am hopefulthat 'ust by being asked to attend a i office. so, i am hopefulthatjust i by being asked to attend a meeting like that, somebody is listening. i would like to hope that they are, from them just asking to go down there for a meeting, it is quite promising really, i have not got any high hopes for it, but it is more than what i have had in the last year, so it can only be a good
4:28 pm
thing. year, so it can only be a good thin. ., ., year, so it can only be a good thin.. ., ., , year, so it can only be a good thinu. . . , ,, . �*, year, so it can only be a good thing. laura says shane's, stricter controls on _ thing. laura says shane's, stricter controls on crossbow _ thing. laura says shane's, stricter controls on crossbow ownership, l controls on crossbow ownership, would be a fitting long legacy for the man she loved. he would be a fitting long legacy for the man she loved.— would be a fitting long legacy for the man she loved. he would have done exactly _ the man she loved. he would have done exactly the _ the man she loved. he would have done exactly the same _ the man she loved. he would have done exactly the same thing. i i the man she loved. he would have i done exactly the same thing. i know he would. that's probably one of the things that gives me the fight i've got, because i know that if she was here and it was him here and not me, i know 100% he would not stop until you got the law through. as the most determined law to be met personally i ever met, such as knowing that gives me in a fight to be able to keep going. and i will. until somebody listens. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. a lot of sunshine out there compared to the past few days, it is pretty nice, if you're in glasgow, for example, 18 degrees at the moment, 11 degrees in london with a lot of cloud here. that is going to disappear into tonight, and for many
4:29 pm
will be clear tonight. northern ireland and western scotland crowding up with the breeze kicking up, under clearskies crowding up with the breeze kicking up, under clear skies elsewhere we may well see a frost into tomorrow morning, the road though, of early sunshine. look at the difference in northern ireland west of scotland in the morning. the rain moving in across the rest of scotland across the afternoon, knocking on the door of england and wales by the end of the afternoon, wetter, windier weather moving on from the north west, south and east at that, though the cloud increases, warm, sunny spells to be had. more of those in england and wales, we will see that rain, pot limitand is, too, and on sunday isa rain, pot limitand is, too, and on sunday is a chance to see some rain across parts of wales and england and are mostly cloudy bank holiday with a chance of a shower or two.
4:30 pm
in the last half hour, the three—time wimbledon men's singles champion, boris becker, has been sentenced former wimbledon champion boris becker has been the mp neil parish has had the conservative whip suspended while he is being investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber. two british aid volunteers missing in ukraine have been named as paul urey and dylan healy. paul urey�*s family say they are extremely worried and hope for his safety. meanwhile, russia has confirmed that it attacked kyiv last night — it says it was targeting a missile factory. a report warns black children are disadvantaged in schools because they are viewed as less innocent and more adult—like. we're going to start with more on that story that you've been hearing that has broken in the last hour.
4:31 pm
that the former wimbledon champion boris becker has been jailed for 2.5 years for hiding £2.5 million worth of assets and loans to avoid paying debts. our correspondentjane dougall is following the story. what can you tell us? a custodial sentence for the 16 grand slam champion, it's quite a full from grace, isn't it? while handing down the sentence, the judge told the former world number one, you have lost your career, your reputation and all of your property as a result of your bankruptcy. she went on to say he had shown no remorse or humility, he looked shocked and embarrassed and his partner and eldest son were in court. he came to court earlier on with a tie with wimbledon colours knowing a custodial sentence was a possibility because a few weeks ago he was convicted of four charges under the insolvency act for hiding £2.5 million of assets and loans to avoid paying his debts. those debts
4:32 pm
were up to £50 million and that was over an unpaid loan of more than £3 million on his estate in majorca in spain and that's why he was declared bankrupt in 2017. 51am spain and that's why he was declared bankrupt in 2017.— bankrupt in 2017. such a huge name in the world — bankrupt in 2017. such a huge name in the world of— bankrupt in 2017. such a huge name in the world of tennis. _ bankrupt in 2017. such a huge name in the world of tennis. can - bankrupt in 2017. such a huge name in the world of tennis. can he i in the world of tennis. can he recover his reputation? that's an interesting _ recover his reputation? that's an interesting question, _ recover his reputation? that's an interesting question, during i interesting question, during litigation, his defence barrister said it had been very damaging for becker's brand when he was declared bankrupt in 2017. it made it difficult to get work and be an ambassador, that have been hard to come by which is why he argued for a suspended sentence, but this custodial is obviously going to ruin his reputation and don't forget this man was world number one, 16 grand slant champion, came to prominence when he won wimbledon aged 17, the youngest champion in the history of men's singles at the tournament. he won 49 singles, 15 doubles, inducted into the hall of fame. such an
4:33 pm
illustrious career but that list of achievements will be followed by the disgrace of a prison sentence. thank ou for disgrace of a prison sentence. thank you forioining _ disgrace of a prison sentence. thank you forjoining us. _ we've got a new bidder looking to buy chelsea football club. the british businessman sirjim ratcliffe, has made a late offer for the club. ratcliffe, is the chairman of the global chemicals company, ineos. he's offered £4.25 billion. it'll be 2.5 billion for the initial purchase. then an extra £1.75 billion for further investment into the stadium and players over the next decade. the deadline for interested parties was last month so it's unclear whether ratcliffe's offer will be considered. we're well into the semifinals of the world snooker championship where it's an all british last 4 at the crucible with 14 world titles between them. ronnie o'sullivan and john higgins are at the table at the moment. back and forth we go in that one. they started this session at 4 frames all. it's now 6—all.
4:34 pm
it's now 7—6. it's so close between them, they have 10 world titles between them, including 6 for o'sullivan, who'll equal stephen hendry�*s record of 7, if he wins this year. in the other semifinal, judd trump leads mark williams by 11 frames to 5. that's all the sport for now. thank you, good to see you. the authorities in india are warning that around half the country may be facing a prolonged heatwave. the temperature has risen to 45 degrees celsuis in some places. divya arya has more from the state of rajasthan. the heat is scorching here. we're in the middle of the thar desert, in the city ofjaisalmer, which is usually known for its magnificent forts as a popular tourist destination, but is in the news for its soaring temperatures. now, the heat does get unrelenting in this desert area, temperatures going all the way up to 50 degrees injune.
4:35 pm
but they have started climbing much earlier this summer. the indian meteorological department has released data of 75 cities across the north—western central regions of india, including the city of jaisalmer, where the temperature is either 43 degrees or more, which is substantially high for this time of the year. now, people have been advised to stay indoors as much as possible. some states have ordered school closures. others, like rajasthan here, have ordered power cuts up to four hours in industrial establishments and in rural households. now, that is a huge problem, because rural households also see a huge water crisis in this period of summer and are dependent on power supply to pump water. we've seen many women walk to open wells and rainwater harvesting ponds, too, to fetch water on their heads. and they have to make multiple trips for that. so for those who have to step out, the advice is to wear cotton clothes, cover as much of their body as possible to avoid sunburns. and neighbouring pakistan has issued a heat warning after the hottest march in 61 years.
4:36 pm
the temperature reached 47 degrees celsius in parts of the country. saad sohail, from the bbc urdu service, has more. the authorities in pakistan have issued a heat wave alert, as the country experiences record—breaking april temperatures. especially along the border area between india and pakistan. such severe heat waves haven't been registered in the region until the month of may and june, but scientists agree that climate change has sped up the melting of glacier ice in the himalayas as well. the daytime temperatures in the southern part of pakistan is likely to be 40—45f higher than normal. one city recorded temperatures in a couple of days ago was 116 fahrenheit, which is higher than what is usually recorded in the month of april, according to the pakistan meteorological department, these temperatures are likely to increase gradually, impacting millions of lives in the country and the harvest of wheat as well. especially at a time when the ukraine war has sparked a food crisis.
4:37 pm
as the intensity of the heat increases, the public has been advised to stay indoors and avoid unnecessary exposure of sunlight. professor arpita mondal is a hydroclimatologist at the indian institute of technology in mumbai. honestly, it has been very bad, it is much unlike the previous years. i am in mumbai where temperatures are not as high as several other parts of the country. but because of the humidity
4:38 pm
and there is a combination of heat and humidity which makes it really worth for the human body as well as for animal health. it's really quite bad here. what is happening that is different from usual? there are actually three unique features which has made this heatwave really stand out. number one, the heatwave has occurred much prior to the expected period of heatwaves. march 2022 was the hottest recorded in india and we are in april. may and june are the months we're used to higher temperatures but this year it is much earlier. number two, typiaclly, heatwaves affect pocket of the country which have been historically identified as hotspots of heatwaves but this year, they are in the whole of the country, there is a huge spatial extent of this heatwave, almost a whole of the country is under this heatwave.
4:39 pm
the third thing is also the lack of monsson showers which usually happen in this part of the world because of western disturbances, it brings rainfall which is important for some crops, wheat for example, and wheat is also a crop which is very sensitive to temperature changes. what has happened is the soaring high temperatures have been detrimental for the cultivation of wheat and wheat is our second most important staple food crop. these are the features which really makes this heatwave stand out. what are the other impacts on food supply, animal life and of course human beings that you are most worried about? india has of course vulnerable population which comprises of children and elderly people. we must also realise india is in a developing state and the nation is being built so there is a lot of construction
4:40 pm
happening everywhere in the country and for this we have to depend on what is called daily wage labour. that means the labourers turn up, if don't show up they don't get paid, and they don't have any savings, it affects their livelihoods and therefore it would be unfair to expect people to stay indoors. what also is something that we should be working on is that of course there should be interventions at federal as well as state levels. we also need to build public area, how should you hydrate yourself? how long should we stay outdoors if it is unavoidable? we must also realise a lot of our population is very poor. urban areas have slums where thousands of people stay and they don't even have a cool roof, let alone having air—conditioning. all of this makes the country really vulnerable to the harmful effects of heatwaves.
4:41 pm
a new hormone replacement therapy tsar is appointed as more than a million women are affected by supply issues earlier today i spoke to menopause campaigner victoria palfrey — who has been trying to raise awareness of the issues bought on by menopause, after she was diagnosed with perimenspause in her 30s. yes, perimenopause phase is the period before your last period, menopause is 12 months after your last period. i am experiencing perimenopausal symptoms, and your natural oestrogen
4:42 pm
and hormone levels are fluctuating, it's only really when i started on my hrt that i noticed a difference, and i know that that is what it is, i am perimenopausal. a lot of women put up with it, don't they, for longer than they need to, not realising that there are things that can help. what sort of products do work, in your experience? if you cannot take them, how much of a setback is it? the safest type is the body identical hrt which comes in gel patches or sprays, transdermally is safe for most people. so when you start hrt, it tends to be on the gel,
4:43 pm
because it is more easy to administer and you can increase the dose fairly quickly, and you can feel the effects very quickly. it is very individualised, because women absorb it differently, so the gel can sometimes absorb better than patches, or the sprays, or vice versa, i've been on it for over 12 months now, but it has taken me to this point to find a dosage and the type that suits me the best, so i am on patches now, and i don't take the gel, but for women that now are finding that they can't get hold of the gel, it is, to then transition onto a different type, it is worrying, because any kind of change in your dosage or the delivery can change the relief of your symptoms, so you are kind of looking to start all over again to then try and find a level, and yes, there arguments that some
4:44 pm
is better than none, of course, and if women are desperate then they will take whatever they can get, but it is not quite as easy as swapping from one to the other with no kind of change or side effects. we are talking about tiny doses of different hormones. they can have a massive impact on how well you feel. what would you say to madelaine mcternan, the news tsar who is hopefully going to sort out the supply issues? i am happy she has been appointed and can address this kind of shortage in the short—term and can get things on an even keel. i am really frustrated it has got to this point. i have had trouble getting hold of my patches for 12 months. i had to call around pharmacies to get hold of them. now the gel is the problem, which has a knock—on effect, so the thing is, demand for only ever increase now that women
4:45 pm
are becoming aware of the list of symptoms, the perimenopausal phase. the impact on the workforce, family life, the long—term health benefits of hrt, it's only going to get, demand is only going to increase, so we need a long—term solution, better education, better training for gps, and we need to government to take us seriously. and a quick reminder we'll be taking your questions on menopause, for your questions answered next week, the programme will be live on tuesday at 11.30am where we'll have expert guests to answer the questions you send in whether thats to understand what menopause or the symptoms to look out for. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbc your questions or you can email us on... the headlines on bbc news...
4:46 pm
former wimbledon champion boris becker receives a sentence of two and a half years after being found guilty on four charges relating to bankruptcy. conservative mp neil parish has the whip removed after allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber. paul urey and dylan healy are missing in ukraine. the family is worried for their safety. the mp neil parish has had the conservative whip suspended while he is being investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber. let's speak to daisy cooper. we know his name and what is happening and he has put, referred himself to the standards committee. how acceptable
4:47 pm
do you think that is for starters? l do you think that is for starters? i don't think it's acceptable at all and i think he should have resigned and i think he should have resigned and given that he has refused to resign so far it's incumbent on borisjohnson as prime minister to tell the parish he should resign. if this happened in any other workplace at all he would be dismissed immediately for gross misconduct and parliament should not be treated any differently. parliament should not be treated any differentl . ,, ., , ., parliament should not be treated any differentl . ,, ., ., ., parliament should not be treated any differentl . . ., ., ., , differently. should you allow this investigation _ differently. should you allow this investigation to _ differently. should you allow this investigation to play _ differently. should you allow this investigation to play out - differently. should you allow this investigation to play out first i investigation to play out first before you make these statements? we before you make these statements? , have two female mps that have corroborated the evidence with each other and with parliament and with the whip and they both saw this happening. they both saw neil parish watching pornography in the chamber. it would be an insult to them to allow him to have this lengthy investigation that could potentially kick it into the long grass. it's incumbent on conservative party whips to simply talk to neil parish,
4:48 pm
check his viewing history and effort can be confirmed what has been alleged has happened, they should kick him out. there needs to be much faster action by the conservative party. he faster action by the conservative pa . , ~ ., ., ., party. he is the mp for tiverton and taunton, what _ party. he is the mp for tiverton and taunton, what should _ party. he is the mp for tiverton and taunton, what should his _ taunton, what should his constituents have? he has a big majority in that constituency. there are rules in — majority in that constituency. there are rules in place _ majority in that constituency. there are rules in place in _ majority in that constituency. there are rules in place in parliament- are rules in place in parliament that mean in many cases, often mps are open to challenge. for example, if the parliamentary commission on standards makes a recommendation to the standards committee, then some mps are often suspended and often if they are suspended for ten days or more that can trigger a by—election if there is an element of recall. the challenge we have at the moment is that constituents often don't get much of a say until there is either a by—election or an election but i think most right minded people would agree that this is really unacceptable behaviour and actually given the mp has refused to resign so far, borisjohnson should tell
4:49 pm
him he should. so far, boris johnson should tell him he should.— so far, boris johnson should tell him he should. ,, . �* . . him he should. suella braverman the attorney general _ him he should. suella braverman the attorney general has _ him he should. suella braverman the attorney general has said _ him he should. suella braverman the attorney general has said this - him he should. suella braverman the attorney general has said this week. attorney general has said this week that some men, a minority of men in politics, behave like animals. what more would you want to see to make sure that behaviour notjust in the house of commons chamber but within politics generally, is tidied up? there are so many things that need to happen and when it's a culture issue it's hard to identify a single silver bullet. the fact is when this behaviour exists, often not exclusively, but in large part, it is behaviour displayed by men, so men themselves need to change that behaviour but we need to look at the employment relationship that exists in parliament, mps are not employed by parliament, we are effectively employed by ourselves which means there is no way to hold mps to the same levels of you would expect in any other workplace in britain and it's important we look at that.
4:50 pm
fundamentally what we have right here and now is an mp who has, in any art other workplace would be found guilty of grossman�*s conduct and employers would get rid of them straightaway. we need that swift action in parliament too. basis? action in parliament too. daisy coo er, action in parliament too. daisy c00per. thank _ action in parliament too. daisy cooper, thank you _ action in parliament too. daisy cooper, thank you very - action in parliament too. daisy cooper, thank you very much. | a trial to extend the school day in wales is coming to an end. for the last ten weeks, pupils at 1a schools have been offered an extra hour every day, with the focus on activities rather than academic learning. our correspondent hywel griffith has been to see how it's gone. it's changed definitely for me, because i've enjoyed school a lot more, because it's like something to look forward to at the end of the day. the day flys past really fast. before, it used to be bit boring. after you go home, there's nothing really to do. but now there's something to look forward to and do, like, after school. so you'll be sad to see it end? yeah. spread the dough out and you're i
4:51 pm
going to turn the tray as you do it. time's up on this school's big experiment. an extra hour every day for ten weeks to stretch and excite these children about learning again coming out of the pandemic. so, did it work? yeah, it's made it feel a little bit different because when i wasn't doing these activities, i was looking forward to go home and play on my ipad and all that. but now after school, i get to do other activities and i get to see my friends more time. yes, great. good. from taekwondo... ..to lego and ceramics, they've been put through their paces — not in traditional academic subjects, but sessions that help build confidence. it's also helped out many parents, likejordan, whose daughter took part. i would say it's been beneficial. as a working parent, - i would say it's definitely been more beneficial because instead of thinking about childcare - costs, they're staying - in school that extra times. after ten weeks of cooking, drumming, dancing and everything
4:52 pm
else, one lesson has already been learnt — that rolling out the extra hour for every school and every pupil in wales would be hugely complicated and expensive. hello, come on in. welcome to the lego club. the school had the freedom to piece together its own plan, with staff offered extra pay if they wanted to help and local companies employed to come in, too. only years 5 and 6 took part. offering it to every child would be tough. it would be a very difficult task to run for every year group, especially for us — being over three sites. it would definitely need possibly one or two full—time employers to... so a huge undertaking? yeah, huge, yeah, definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah. when you go home, you're going to cook these. they're going to have to go in the oven, 0k? so what will the end result be? some unions oppose the extra hours, warning they can turn schools into childcare centres.
4:53 pm
the welsh government says it will evaluate what's been learnt here before making any decisions. hywel griffith, bbc news, abertillery. it was a hit tv drama that ran for six series, chronicling the lives of the crawley family in the refined surroundings of an english country estate. downton abbey moved to the big screen in 2019 and you probably know it's back for another outing, the second film is in cinemas today, following the family to the south of france. our correspondent alex stanger caught up with the cast. have you told them, lady grantham? she's told us nothing. do sit down. how do you feel when you pick up a downton script? i count my lines. his own name. yeah, yeah, yeah. "does he survive to the end?" mr barber is a producer and director. he wants to make a film at downton. i'm alwaysjust so intrigued
4:54 pm
to see what he has next. i this whole storyline - with the film crew coming in and invading downton and, - you know, mary becoming so integral to that really surprised me. action! cut, cut. sorry. you usually have, even in a small scene, have a beginning, middle and end. but this — no way. it seems the public only want films that talk. i should have thought the best thing about films is that you can't hear them. it's almost more challenging than having a ginormous - part with lots of lines, with lots of scenes. i oh, i find it... it takes a lot... it takes a real sense of craft. you need to know when to come in and... and make it natural. and what level to come in and make it natural. and when to talk over each other! yes. i know you've probably been asked it before, but have you taken anything from the set? you know, we can't take anything, because it's all... goes into storage and it's all very much protected and looked after. you can buy stuff from the gift shop.
4:55 pm
yeah. but it's not the same. yeah, you can buy some marmalade. do you remember when we went to... i always call it - downton abbey world. but i think it has - a different name to that. the exhibition. there were really fun things in the shop. . they were, like, baubles with our faces on and stuff like that. - i got my mum a daisy bauble. daisy and mrs patmore. is that a little bit horrifying? it's quite funny. there is something about him. like a wild animal ready to spring. is there going to be a trilogy? if the second film is halfway as successful as the first, then who knows? it would be a treat. i mean, the fact is that we've all managed to get back together because we don't throw chairs at each other and we enjoy being injulian fellowes�* story. and if the audience still feels the same about us after this film, then, who knows? maybe. alex stanger, bbc news. this film will be discussed at 6:1i5pm in the film review.
4:56 pm
james corden has announced he is leaving the us talk show "the late late show". he's hosted the show for seven years, but the actor has previously said he never intended for the programme to be his "final destination". high pressure has kept us dry. this is some rain into northern ireland and scotland during saturday. overnight, the cloud will increase along with the breeze, that will keep the frost at bay whereas elsewhere through southern scotland, wales and england, you can see the blue, patchy frost and the cold spots down below freezing going into the morning. a cold start with 20 of sunshine. away from that incoming weather system, sunshine. away from that incoming weathersystem, it sunshine. away from that incoming weather system, it will bring rain
4:57 pm
across northern ireland, to western scotland, across the rest of scotland, across the rest of scotland into the afternoon and towards north—west england and north wales during the afternoon. ahead of that, after that morning sunshine, cloud will increase. further sunny spells. a warmer day compared with today in east anglia and south—east england. it will be cooler and windier with the rain in northern ireland and scotland. the rain does move south overnight tonight and into sunday. is going to weaken but has rain with it. some outbreaks of rain in what will be a much milder night. after tonight, rain in what will be a much milder night. aftertonight, no rain in what will be a much milder night. after tonight, no frost for the rest of the weekend and into the start of next week. here is another look at the system. gradually petering out with rain. as its weakening, there will not be much rain at all where we have had such a dry april across the east and south—east of england. that said, it will be damp in places on sunday.
4:58 pm
outbreaks of rain into the afternoon whereas for scotland and northern ireland, it will sunny spells for england and wales without cloud it will be cooler. for the bank holiday itself, a lot of cloud around. a few sunny spells here and there. many places will stay dry, also the chance of seeing showers across northern areas of the uk. colder day in northern scotland, warmer by then, in england and wales.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
this is bbc news. the six time grand slam champion boris becker is sentenced to 2.5 years in prison after being found guilty of four charges related to his bankruptcy. mp neil parish has had the conservative whip suspended while he is being investigated for allegedly watching pornography in the commons chamber. two british volunteers missing in ukraine are named as paul urey and dylan healy. paul's family say they are extremely worried and are praying for his safety. it comes as russia confirms it fired missiles into kyiv last night — the first direct attack on the capital for a fortnight.
5:01 pm
a new hormone replacement therapy tsar is appointed as more

66 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on