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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 27, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines: government policies on discharging patients from hospital to care homes at the start of the pandemic is ruled unlawful my dad worked all of his life, to the age of 75, paid national insurance. he had a right to life and they had a duty of care, and he was failed. tim weswood steps down from his show on capital xtra until further notice, following sexual misconduct claims made by seven women which he denies. the eu has accused russia of blackmail — after it cut off gas supplies to bulgaria and poland. both refused moscow's demand to pay for gas in roubles. an investigation is under way into claims a conservative mp watched pornography on his mobile phone in the house of commons five police officers face gross misconduct proceedings over the stop and search of team gb athlete bianca
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williams. and we meet sam ryder, the uk's new hope for this year's eurovision song contest. two women whose fathers died from covid—19 have won a high court challenge against the government over policies on discharging patients to care homes in england at the outset of the pandemic. cathy gardner and fay harris partially succeeded in their claims against the health secretary and public health england. in a ruling today, judges concluded that policies contained in documents released in march and early april 2020 were unlawful because they failed to take into account the risk to elderly and vulnerable residents
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from non—symptomatic transmission of the virus. our social affairs editor, alison holt, has this report. emerging from the high court, two women who argued the government failed to protect their fathers at the start of the pandemic. both men lived in care homes. today, the court concluded the government decision to discharge hospital patients into care homes was unlawful and irrational. i believed all along that my father and other residents of care homes were neglected and let down by the government. at that time, the government said it was ok to admit people into care homes, without recommending isolation. it effectively ceded covid into the care homes. that is what fay harris believes happened with her father, don. he was larger—than—life, he had a fantastic character, great fun. wicked sense of humour.
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he was living in a hampshire nursing home when the pandemic started. the 89—year—old was doing well but, within a month, he had died with covid. his daughter believes this was after the home tucked in hospital patients who developed the virus. i just think they were totally expendable. i don't think they were regarded at all. my dad worked all of his life, to the age of 75, paid national insurance. he had a right to life and they had a duty of care. and he was failed. the last time that i was able to see my father was about 24 hours before he died. doctor cathy gardner's father michael gibson died in an oxfordshire care home in early april 2020. he was in a ground—floor room so i was able to see him through a window. i was lucky that i could do that because i know many families, they couldn't see
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their loved at all. doctor gardner's background is in the study of viruses and she was shocked when hospital patients moved into her father's home without clear guidance on infection control. she believes early in the pandemic, care homes largely had to fend for themselves. i believe that lives could have been saved in care homes if the government had acted differently, if they had pursued a policy involving quarantine, testing, propertraining on infection control and ppe, all of those things, they could have saved lives. and it is important to remember that it wasn't just the old and vulnerable that died, that care home staff died, too. i want to remind - the house of what an incredibly difficult time that was. short time ago, the prime minister gave his response to the judgement. the thing that we didn't know| in mr speaker, was that covid could beat transmitted i a symptomatically in the way that it was. and that was somethingl that i wish we had known more about at the time.
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the government says that each death during the pandemic was a tragedy, but it insists it works tirelessly to protect people and that billions of pounds were poured into supporting care services, including with protective equipment and infection control. joining us now from the high court is our correspondent gareth barlow. this is a hugely significant ruling. it focuses on to a gentle man. michael gibson who was 88 and don harris who were 89. both were residence of care home and died in april and may of 2020. this is to remain out of potentially 20,000 residents of care homes who died while in those places of what should have been safety. this brings into question the policies put in place to try and protect the most vulnerable and at risk in society. and so the high court chiefjustice
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and dynamic they said that government had been unlawful and those policies had not gone far enough to protect its people. at that particular focus at the risk of transmission from asymptomatic people. the policies that allow people. the policies that allow people to be transferred from hospital into care homes without testing and a lack of a set of adequate safe guiding and isolation within care homes themselves. they said those risks had been highlighted. and that's eh patrick talked about them during a radio interview on the 13th of march 2020. the policies in the weeks following did not take that into account. for their part for two people here that have been responding most significantly, matt hancock was one of the people he spokesperson said ministers were cleared of wrongdoing and they had acted responsibly and it was public health england that failed to convey the issues and risks to ministers with regards to asymptomatic transmission. the prime minister we heard from earlier
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speaking during pmt news is that the government did not know much about the disease at that point in time in early 2020 and be restating you more. a government spokesperson said the majority of the judgement did clear the government. that it was in their favour. clear the government. that it was in theirfavour. they clear the government. that it was in their favour. they shadow labour for health was saying ministers ignored warnings and they cannot claim to have acted to have saved lives. he broke the law and that people died. here today outside the high court, family members and spoke of their relief of a tough two years and they feel vindicated but they have not got their loved ones back and for many other people whose loved ones died in care homes this will be a day pondering what happened to them and perhaps what they will do now. his grandmother was in a care home and back from covid—i9 into early days of the pandemic. he's a spokesperson for bereaved families forjustice. thank you forjoining
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us. talk about the ruling in a moment butjust briefly tell us about your grandmother's experience. her name was sheila and she was in a home in north london. tell us her story. home in north london. tell us her sto . ,, . , home in north london. tell us her sto . ,, ., , ' home in north london. tell us her sto. ,, home in north london. tell us her sto .,, ,, story. she was 94 years old. she was an incredible — story. she was 94 years old. she was an incredible woman _ story. she was 94 years old. she was an incredible woman and _ story. she was 94 years old. she was an incredible woman and she - story. she was 94 years old. she was an incredible woman and she had - story. she was 94 years old. she was | an incredible woman and she had such character and she was extremely caring. she had so much integrity and she was fun. she was mentally razor—sharp but physically deteriorating slightly and so she decided contrary to everything she always said she said she would never go into a care home she decided she wanted to try it but as a trial period so she moved in in early march and she kept her flat in north london available in case she wanted to move back and the first week she found it extremely difficult. but after that she turned a corner and improved and appreciated being cared for by staff but unfortunately she became ill very soon after that and deteriorated before she sadly died
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on the 2nd of april 2020. we were not able to see her or visit her. a care home when into a lockdown. we had telephone calls with her in which she was delirious, did not make much sense, barely responded to what we were saying and it was difficult to find out what was going on in the care home at the time. the regular and inconsistent information from staff as to what her illness where andy she was was suffering. but she was screaming out in pain and had knows pain relief until the night before she died when she was given morphine so she died a lonely death. she was afraid and she was delirious and today's judgement is painful but at least it gives some acknowledgement that this policy of discharging residents from hospital was not on the mrl but it was
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unlawful. it was not on the mrl but it was unlawful. . , was not on the mrl but it was unlawful-— was not on the mrl but it was unlawful. ., , ,., , ., unlawful. it was something you suspected _ unlawful. it was something you suspected all— unlawful. it was something you suspected all along _ unlawful. it was something you suspected all along and - unlawful. it was something you suspected all along and get - unlawful. it was something you i suspected all along and get ready the care home try to prevent a doctor from the care home try to prevent a doctorfrom putting covid—i9 as the care home try to prevent a doctor from putting covid—i9 as a cause of death or one of the illnesses on her death certificate. the government says that throughout the pandemic which of course the people by surprise, it was unprecedented. they worked tirelessly to protect people and policy change throughout time to avoid greater protection to us. what is your reaction to that? that avoid greater protection to us. what is your reaction to that?— is your reaction to that? that is an insult to the _ is your reaction to that? that is an insult to the memory _ is your reaction to that? that is an insult to the memory of _ is your reaction to that? that is an insult to the memory of my - insult to the memory of my grandmother and all those brief family members who lost people and loved ones and friends during this pandemic. we know that there were a catalogue of errors ending enough now to a public inquiry because what is clear from today's judgement is this is but one of the areas that need to be considered and there are a huge number in relation to care homes and notjust care homes but that really is the focus of bereaved families now is the price on that lessons can be learned because they don't appear to have done so far and
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for these mistakes and errors not to keep on happening as they are at the moment. ., . , , , ., moment. how much better equipped and how much better — moment. how much better equipped and how much better is _ moment. how much better equipped and how much better is government - moment. how much better equipped and how much better is government policy i how much better is government policy now? i how much better is government policy now? ., �* ~' , now? i don't think it is. unfortunately - now? i don't think it is. unfortunately to - now? i don't think it is. l unfortunately to disbelief now? i don't think it is. - unfortunately to disbelief and horror of us bereaved families, the government now removed what protections there were so that care homes now have for access to testing with the attention being they would be less access to testing in the future and they are still high numbers of infections. we have new infections and we have vaccines raining and a slow booster roll—out for people over 75 and there are a high numbers of deaths so clearly lessons have not been learnt and they need to be learned. we want to as bereaved family members a rapid review after the first waves so that lessons can be learned and unfortunately that did not happen and they have not been which is why as we say the focus now needs to be on the public inquiry. you mentioned
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there are a — on the public inquiry. you mentioned there are a number _ on the public inquiry. you mentioned there are a number of _ on the public inquiry. you mentioned there are a number of other- on the public inquiry. you mentioned| there are a number of other clenched —— questions you want the public inquiry to ask. explain what they are. in inquiry to ask. explain what they are. ., ., ., ., , ., are. in relation to care homes that doctor gardner— are. in relation to care homes that doctor gardner highlighted - are. in relation to care homes that doctor gardner highlighted earlier| doctor gardner highlighted earlier in terms of ppe and the government claim to have ppe and substantial amounts in the correct types but we know that did not happen even late in 2021 a care homes that had problems getting supplies of ppe and the appropriate ppe and the testing was when testing stopped there was no testing and care homes and now testing and my grandmother's care home and the lateness into lockdown initially the failures today lessons from abroad. there was a degree of british exceptionalism are not looking at what's happening in other countries when we had warning on the advantage of time and we knew what was happening and there were warnings in advance and other countries around the world in
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disbelief and unfortunately members of parliament were saying that will not happen here. we now from early senate committee hearings in hong kong they have certain measures in place and there are very few, there were no deaths, care home deaths in hong kong until recently because they had proper isolation procedures and train staff who were able to isolate people properly and even in germany we have have the deaths told that we have there were testing on release from hospital so we know we had one of the worst death tolls in the world and one of the worst financial pics that cannot be right and to to prevent that happening that are going to be future variance and they've already confirmed and set up that there are likely to be more dangerous variance in order to prepare for those we need to learn the lessons from the past.- the lessons from the past. thank ou. the dj tim westwood has stepped down this radio show on capital xtra until further notice, amid allegations of sexual misconduct claims. ajoint investigation by the bbc and the guardian featured the accounts of seven women relating
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to alleged incidents between 1992 and 2017. the 64—year—old strenuously denies the claims. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba is here another development in this today? yes, i was looking at the top of that extra website and looking at their line—up for saturday night where tim westwood has a weekly evening programme and i clicked and clicked two seconds later and he disappeared and the statement came in the next few seconds saying following the claims that have recently come to light tim westwood has stepped down from his show until further notice. of course this follows the allegations made in a bbc guardian investigation that had seven different women accusing westwood of predatory sexual behaviour and touching and abusing his position in the music industry to exploit them. we have to say of
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course that a spokesperson for mr westwood said he's a highly respected and highly successful dj and he strenuously denies in their entirety the serious allegations made against him. today it's not just being him stepping down from his show, to venues across the country, one in birmingham has cancelled dj sets that he was due to play in the near future and the bbc director general this morning described the allegations as being appalling. he said he saw no evidence of complaints made to the bbc because of course during the period of some of these complaints it's when he was working at the bbc where he was a big name on bbc radio i and radioi where he was a big name on bbc radio i and radio 1 extra for almost 20 years. he also appealed for anybody
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to come forward if they had things that could be they wish to say about tim westwood and his time at the bbc but to emphasise tim westwood strenuously denies all allegations that have been made against him. thank you. russia has been accused of escalating the war in ukraine by cutting off gas supplies to two european countries — poland and bulgaria — which moscow describes as �*unfriendly�* states. both of them are nato countries and get much of their gas from russia , but they've refused the kremlin�*s demand that they pay for their energy in russian roubles. the government in kyiv says president putin is trying to break the unity of its allies by using economic blackmail. from moscow, our correspondent, jenny hill, sent this report. russia's turned off the taps and state tv is enjoying the moment. gazprom announced this morning it would cut supplies to poland and bulgaria. both countries have refused to pay in roubles.
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not that the polish prime minister was concerned. his country, he said, was ready to cut itself off from russian energy. translation: our gas storages are 7696 full. | this is a high level. much higher than in most european countries. - vladimir putin knows many other european countries — germany, in particular — rely on his energy supplies, but he needs their custom. in january alone, it's estimated that what he calls "unfriendly countries", most of europe, paid russia $6 billion for gas. and that's why, even though he's demanded countries pay in roubles, the reality is more complex. they can pay in euros or dollars, but only if they open russian bank accounts, which then exchange the currency, then make the final payment. it's believed, though not confirmed, that some european countries have opened those accounts.
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a few very big, key contracts are expiring. the german and italian, as i said so often, and some others. in end of may, during june, what will happen then? because then they will have to decide, will they pay according to this new mechanism or not? and most politicians in germany and in other parts of the eu have so far been leaning towards, you know, saying that, no, we will not do this and this is unacceptable. but, yeah, it will come up, it's crunch time. and this is putin's way of shooting across the bow. neither sanctions, threats, nor appeals have stopped vladimir putin and his war. the gulf between the russian president and the west grows ever wider. we can cross live to kyiv now and ben brown. the ukrainian capital and president
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received important guests in recent weeks. next up the un secretary—general. weeks. next up the un secretary-general. weeks. next up the un secreta -general. ., ., , , secretary-general. antonio guterres is cominu secretary-general. antonio guterres is coming here _ secretary-general. antonio guterres is coming here and _ secretary-general. antonio guterres is coming here and today _ secretary-general. antonio guterres is coming here and today actually . is coming here and today actually but he is officially meeting president zelensky tomorrow and having seen president putin and moscow yesterday so it's a bit of shuffle diplomacy aimed at getting some sort of cease—fire ideally a longer—term piece deal but that does not look likely. a cease—fire does not look likely. a cease—fire does not look likely either. the russians did not seem interested in talking constructively to mr birthers and that ukrainians, there pretty angry and irritated by the fact that the un secretary—general went to moscow first. they thought he should have come here first. so he does not go that well for those talks tomorrow. meanwhile the fighting goes on and we have seen and notjust military
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escalation in the east but in economic s collage —— escalation. this decision by the russians to cut off gas supplies to poland and bulgaria and i've been getting reaction to that news from a member of the ukrainian parliament here. they actually use gas and oiljust as a weapon. that's why they show to their partners, while the conditions of the _ their partners, while the conditions of the contractjust their partners, while the conditions of the contract just cutting their partners, while the conditions of the contractjust cutting off their partners, while the conditions of the contract just cutting off gas so they— of the contract just cutting off gas so theyjust use gas as a weapon against _ so theyjust use gas as a weapon against their partners. do so theyjust use gas as a weapon against their partners.— so theyjust use gas as a weapon against their partners. do you think the are against their partners. do you think they are trying _ against their partners. do you think they are trying to — against their partners. do you think they are trying to divide _ against their partners. do you think they are trying to divide the - against their partners. do you think they are trying to divide the last - they are trying to divide the last or divide europe? i they are trying to divide the last or divide europe?— they are trying to divide the last or divide europe? i think the next ste will or divide europe? i think the next step will unite _ or divide europe? i think the next step will unite you _ or divide europe? i think the next step will unite you up _ or divide europe? i think the next step will unite you up against - step will unite you up against russia — step will unite you up against russia and against the kremlin and against _ russia and against the kremlin and against putin because i think now all against putin because i think now att of— against putin because i think now all of them clearly understand who
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putin _ all of them clearly understand who putin is~ _ all of them clearly understand who putin is. , ._ ., putin is. yesterday we saw that meetin: putin is. yesterday we saw that meeting of— putin is. yesterday we saw that meeting of about _ putin is. yesterday we saw that meeting of about 40 _ putin is. yesterday we saw that meeting of about 40 countries | putin is. yesterday we saw that l meeting of about 40 countries in germany, eu countries, nato countries, other countries as well coming together and decided to step up coming together and decided to step up the supply of weapons to you, to ukraine, germany sending happy —— heavy weapons as well, you must be pleased with that?— pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal _ pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal to _ pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal to us _ pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal to us that _ pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal to us that we - pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal to us that we have l pleased with that? yes, this is a clear signal to us that we have a j clear signal to us that we have a lot of— clear signal to us that we have a lot of partners and allies and we will he _ lot of partners and allies and we will be provided for on a daily basis — will be provided for on a daily basis with this. today we will have these _ basis with this. today we will have these weapons because we needed it yesterday— these weapons because we needed it yesterday and the day before yesterday and the day before yesterday and the day before yesterday and from the beginning of this war— yesterday and from the beginning of this war because we understood that even in _ this war because we understood that even in the _ this war because we understood that even in the beginning of this war we understood it will continue not days
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or weeks _ understood it will continue not days or weeks and that's why it's important for us to defeat russia and to— important for us to defeat russia and to do— important for us to defeat russia and to do that we need heavy weapons _ and to do that we need heavy weapons-— and to do that we need heavy weaons. . . ,, ., weapons. what russia has said, the russian foreign _ weapons. what russia has said, the russian foreign minister— weapons. what russia has said, the russian foreign minister said - weapons. what russia has said, the russian foreign minister said natol russian foreign minister said nato is using ukraine and fighting a proxy war against russia and he says it's risking a third world war. i think they're trying to find some explanation for their people that they face not only with ukrainian army— they face not only with ukrainian army and — they face not only with ukrainian army and it was defeated near kyiv but they— army and it was defeated near kyiv but they tried to explain that look at these, — but they tried to explain that look at these, we are fighting with western— at these, we are fighting with western war, the whole western war with nato _ western war, the whole western war with nato but this is not true. this isjust_ with nato but this is not true. this is just trying — with nato but this is not true. this isjust trying to with nato but this is not true. this is just trying to find an explanation, that's all.
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isjust trying to find an explanation, that's all. that is a member of _ explanation, that's all. that is a member of the _ explanation, that's all. that is a member of the ukrainian - explanation, that's all. that is a - member of the ukrainian parliament here, a member of president zelensky�*s party. in fact he was telling me that he has just been to the front and the east end of the best region and he said it's a difficult situation for ukrainian troops and they are fighting very hard but they are outnumbered by russian forces and the russians say they have made some advances in the east by the war here goes on and as we are seeing the un secretary—general arriving here for talks with president zelensky to try to 0ndoa but helps not very high at all. and a quick reminder — we'll be taking your questions on the war in ukraine tomorrow at 12:30pm. we'll have guests able to answer a range of questions about the war, from the battle raging in the east of the country, the consequences for civilians and what more western countries could or should be doing to stop russia. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions, and you can e—mail us
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on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. the conservative party is investigating reports that a tory mp watched porn on his mobile phone while sitting next to a female minister in the commons chamber. the bbc understands that the female minister made the complaint at a regular meeting with female mps and the chief whip last night. let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. there are some stories you read out loud and you can't quite believe the words you have read. this is one of them. �* ., ., ., ., them. i've got to say around parliament _ them. i've got to say around parliament there _ them. i've got to say around parliament there is - them. i've got to say around parliament there is a - them. i've got to say around parliament there is a bit - them. i've got to say around parliament there is a bit of i them. i've got to say around| parliament there is a bit of a them. i've got to say around - parliament there is a bit of a sense of that disbelief as well. a lot of anger about this story and let me tell you what we know for sure. last night there was a meeting of conservative mps, a regular meeting where someone brought up this accusation that a male tory mp had been looking at sonography while in
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the commons chamber. a second conservative mp back that up and said they had seen something similar and the whip office, the people in charge of government discipline so conservative party discipline are looking into this and a spokeswoman for the chief webb has said it would be completely unacceptable and would not be tolerated and it's caused a lot of anger within parliament in general but a lot of anger in the conservative party as well. and i will go on bbc news he spoke to the conservative mp. ii will go on bbc news he spoke to the conservative mp.— conservative mp. if they are guilty of doinu conservative mp. if they are guilty of doing this _ conservative mp. if they are guilty of doing this on _ conservative mp. if they are guilty of doing this on the _ conservative mp. if they are guilty of doing this on the front - conservative mp. if they are guilty of doing this on the front bench i of doing this on the front bench when _ of doing this on the front bench when they are supposed to be working. _ when they are supposed to be working, they need sacking. i don't have _ working, they need sacking. idon't have any— working, they need sacking. i don't have any qualms about that because they are _ have any qualms about that because they are professionals. we are supposed _ they are professionals. we are supposed to set an example in this place _ supposed to set an example in this place and _ supposed to set an example in this place and that is absolutely appalling and i am totally shocked by what's — appalling and i am totally shocked by what's happened and ijust want
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if it's— by what's happened and ijust want if it's true — by what's happened and ijust want if it's true that person gone. that is the view _ if it's true that person gone. that is the view of _ if it's true that person gone. that is the view of one _ if it's true that person gone. t'isgt is the view of one conservative mp, privately there are others who agree. we don't know who the person accused of this is so we have not been able to ask them for any response. we don't think many people know who has been accused of this but more generally there has been that question in the last few days after the story about angela rayner, you remember the outrage after they made on sunday quoted an anonymous conservative mp suggesting she crossed and uncrossed her legs to try and distract the prime minister at prime minister questions. there was outrage about that as well and we've also been hearing from neighbour shadow leader of the house of commons. i neighbour shadow leader of the house of commons-— of commons. i would like these claims look _ of commons. i would like these claims look into _ of commons. i would like these claims look into and _ of commons. i would like these claims look into and urgently. l of commons. i would like these claims look into and urgently. i| claims look into and urgently. i understand the chief whip is doing that and that's the right thing to do. there are people who know who this person is and i hope he is able
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to find out and take the very stressed action but i have to say it's a stain on parliament and a stain on democracy that somebody really thinks it's acceptable and it definitely is not to come into a place of work and the pace of the date where we make laws and watch pornography on their mobile phone? that is disrespectful to their constituents.— that is disrespectful to their constituents. . , constituents. that is pick up some of those issues _ constituents. that is pick up some of those issues with _ constituents. that is pick up some of those issues with the _ constituents. that is pick up some of those issues with the green - constituents. that is pick up some of those issues with the green mp j of those issues with the green mp caroline lucas. i know you could not hear those clips as they paid out there but we heard a couple of mps from various parties say how angry they are about this. do you think there's a big cultural problem in parliament, do you think there are big issues that need to be dealt with? i big issues that need to be dealt with? ., ~' big issues that need to be dealt with? ., ~ ., , with? i do think there are big issues that _ with? i do think there are big issues that need _ with? i do think there are big issues that need to _ with? i do think there are big issues that need to be - with? i do think there are big issues that need to be dealtl with? i do think there are big - issues that need to be dealt with and this last week has been a horrendous week for parliament and a horrendous week for parliament and a horrendous week for standards in public life. this is a place that appears to be mired in sexism and misogyny and we need to have better ways of starting that out. if it is
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the case that ministers are found guilty of having been responsible for sexual misconduct the question i asked the prime minister today was when he used the ministerial code to sack that minister if that were the case and i'm very glad now put on the record that he would do that for sexual harassment and i wish he would do it when it came bullying. pretty patel was accused of bullying and depending us to himself has been found guilty of lying to the ministerial code meet some overhaul so it can be applied to the prime minister himself but essentially what we need here are stronger rules and rules that are properly abided by an independent rules so we can clean up his pace once and for all. there were various investigations going on into mps including into cabinet ministers and that process is secretly silly don't know what's going on with that. what will changes would you like to see and what does that happen in here that showed? ~ . ., ,
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what does that happen in here that showed? ~ _, , ., , , showed? when it comes to ministers and i do showed? when it comes to ministers and i do think— showed? when it comes to ministers and i do think we _ showed? when it comes to ministers and i do think we need _ showed? when it comes to ministers and i do think we need to _ showed? when it comes to ministers and i do think we need to have - showed? when it comes to ministers and i do think we need to have a - and i do think we need to have a ministerial code that is property of a scene in an independent way and that means the person who is overseeing it is not someone appointed by the prime minister it has to be genuinely independent. that way if ministers are found guilty and they can be removed. if the prime minister himself is found guilty he can be removed so that the first thing. as a cultural issue that we have to address. i was involved in the setting up of the independent complaints and grievances scheme which is a scheme which is being used now by people making around harassment for example and they are not processes that people can use to try to bring mps to account or other people they work with two accounts. but it's clear they need to be more training for mps and i wanted that training to be mandatory and i lost that battle but mps need to know how to act in the workplace. it should not mean saying but it clearly does it is the case at a very senior tory mp has been
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squirting for pornography in the house of commons so we need to have mandatory training at a different kind of culture and we need to have an example set from the top by changing the way the ministerial code is policed. brute changing the way the ministerial code is policed.— changing the way the ministerial code is policed. we heard from that conservative _ code is policed. we heard from that conservative mp _ code is policed. we heard from that conservative mp that _ code is policed. we heard from that conservative mp that she _ code is policed. we heard from that conservative mp that she thinks - code is policed. we heard from that conservative mp that she thinks if. conservative mp that she thinks if the story does prove to be correct and after an investigation of the whip office find someone was looking at pornography in the commons chamber they should be thrown out. is that what you would like to see as well? ~ ,,., , .,, ., is that what you would like to see aswell? ~ , ., , as well? absolutely. it has to be made an example _ as well? absolutely. it has to be made an example of. _ as well? absolutely. it has to be made an example of. it's - as well? absolutely. it has to be made an example of. it's a - as well? absolutely. it has to be made an example of. it's a work| as well? absolutely. it has to be - made an example of. it's a work pace and squirting to pornography is not just a private thing you're doing if you are doing it in the workplace it is humiliating for your colleagues around you and i think it setting an incredibly bad example. this is supposed to be a place of good practice and too often there are mps who are dragging us down. they need to go. who are dragging us down. they need to no. ., ~' ,, who are dragging us down. they need to no. ., ~ ,, ., who are dragging us down. they need to no. . ,, ., who are dragging us down. they need toao. ., ., ., who are dragging us down. they need to go. thank you for coming to speak to us.
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as you can hear it, there is a lot of frustration and anger among mps and the big question is what happens next? we know this investigation is going on from the whip's office we think the chief with potentially knows the person who has been accused and if that's the case, you would expect there to be some sort of outcome to that process was of exactly when that might happen and exactly when that might happen and exactly what it will mean, we just don't know yet. thank you very much, nick. now it's time for a look at the weather. chris has joined chris hasjoined us. what were looking at today? looks a little grayer than i would like. this is actually eastern england in scarborough and there is a lot of cloud for a few of you and the cloud did not do much at all really. it's been a largely dry day but pretty great across large parts of england but like recent days is not been like that everywhere. look at the
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sunshine for northern ireland and eastern scotland niacin western wales and parts of western england also seeing breaks in the cloud with the cloud continuing to rolling off the cloud continuing to rolling off the north sea further eastwards. in the north sea further eastwards. in the sunshine, i'm sure for eastern scotland and an improvement compared to yesterday, but sunnier and would've been a good bit warmer as well and looking at the leverett picture overnight, the club will continue to move in across england and blocked from getting across the mountains with the high ground so northwest requesting and keeping clear spells and a bit of frost here. with that cloud will be extensive across most parts of england i think as we start the day on thursday and the best of the sunshine again will be across western area for the day and i think we will sleep some good breaks across eastern scotland and probably will start to get a bit of sunshine just starting to nudge into the northeast of england as well. where the sunshine comes out, not feeling bad at all with light winds, 13—16 underneath the cloudier skies where it lingers all day, maybe about 10-11 it lingers all day, maybe about 10—11 for a number of you and that your latest.
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hello, this is bbc news with me, martine croxall. the headlines — the way the government discharged patients from hospital to care homes at the start of the pandemic is ruled unlawful. tim westwood steps down from his show on capital xtra until further notice following sexual misconduct claims made by seven women, which he denies. an investigation is under way into claims a conservative mp watched pornography on his mobile phone in the house of commons. the european union warns member states against caving in to moscow's conditions for selling gas. five police officers face gross misconduct proceedings over the stop and search of team gb athlete bianca williams. we meet sam ryder, the uk's new hope for this year's eurovision song contest.
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i envy his wind machine actually. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's isaac. they have kept you busy today. they really have. liverpool take on villareal in the champions league semifinal at anfield tonight. the reds are still in with a chance of winning four competitions this season. they won the league cup earlier this year, are into the fa cup final and are a point behind manchester city in the race for the premier league title. it's been a pretty spectacular season for the merseyside club so far. all the talk is about whether they can do something no other men's team has done before. captainjordan henderson said what they team has achieved under klopp is special, but there's still a long way to go. they've got to get past last year's europa league winner villareal. they've taken out bayern munich and juventus already, and henderson isn't taking them lightly. and juventus already, and henderson very and juventus already, and henderson difficult tearr very difficult team, very good team.
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very good players and semifinal of the champions league, a good moment, it will always be difficult. so, yes, we need to be at our very best and that only gives us a chance of winning really, so do ourjob on the page and hopefully enough to get us into the final. fast bowler anya shrubsole has signed for southern vipers as a player—coach. it comes just weeks after she announced her international retirement. the 2017 world cup winner willjoin up with charlotte edwards and said she's "incredibly grateful to be given the responsibility" to work with some young and exciting bowlers. former england hooker tom youngs has retired from professional rugby with immediate effect at the age of 35. the leicester tigers veteran has been on leave since october to care for his sick wife, tiffany. he played 215 times for leicester, won 28 england caps and featured for the british and irish lions. youngs said he "always planned this season being my last" and he "had no regrets". tigers fans will get to say their goodbyes on saturday. he'll lead the team out ahead
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of their premiership game with bristol. promoter barry hearn says he doesn't believe tyson fury will retire. he expects him to fight the winner of the anthonyjoshua—0leksandr usyk rematch, which is happening injuly. hearn says a fury—joshua matchup would be an incredible fight and the prize money on offer would be too much for fury to refuse. have you any idea how much money there is on that fight? i mean, it's like 100 million plus. i don't care how much money you've got, it's one more fight to make sure your family are protected forever. he's a great entertainer, tyson. he deserves everything he gets, and he's a really difficult guy to fight. there's only one way to beat tyson fury, and that is you have to attack him and you have to knock him out.
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if thejoshua turns up against usyk that did did last time and uses the same tactics, it's the same result. usyk against tyson fury, not as big as tyson fury against aj. that is on another planet. the quarterfinals continue at the world snooker championship in sheffield this afternoon. it's been a close match so far, but mark williams of wales has just taken the lead against china's yan bingtao. he won 13 frames to ii. and on the other table, it's close between four—time championjohn higgins and number 14 seed jack lisowski lisowski just won the 13th frame, but higgins leads 8—7. earlier, ronnie 0'sullivan was the first to book his place in the semifinals. he made it look easy in the end as he finshed with a 126 break to beat scotland's stephen maguire13—5. if 0'sullivan wins the title, it'll be his seventh, which will take him level with stephen hendry as the most successful player in the tournament's history. that's all the sport for now.
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thank you very much, see you later. five metropolitan police officers will face disciplinary charges in a gross misconduct hearing over the stop and search of the team gb sprinter bianca williams and her partner in london two years ago. it follows an investigation by the police watchdog, the independent office of police conduct. 0ur correspondent adina campbell is following the case. well, we now know the five officers involved are an actin police sergeant and four police constables. they're all facing gross misconduct proceedings after bianca williams and her partner ricardo dos santos were stopped in july 2020. now, the iopc, that's the police watchdog the independent 0ffice of police conduct, they have been looking at a number of allegations which include whether reasonable force was used against the couple and if the couple were treated differently, less favourably,
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because of their race. the couple were stopped in north—west london onjuly the 4th in 2020. at the time of the search, their three—month—old baby son was in the back of the car. they were separated from him while in handcuffs. footage of that search was widely shared on social media. it was shared by their coach, linford christie, who of course is a former 100—metre olympic champion. the couple believe that they were racially profiled and say that they were targeted because they're black and also because of the type of car they were driving at the time, which was a mercedes. the couple have welcomed today's decision and say today's decision and say that they hope this will lead to the met being more open, more honest and more reflective about cultural racism. the london mayor, sadiq khan, has also welcomed today's decision, and he says he hopes
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there's no further delay with these proceedings. if these allegations are proven, the officers could be sacked. the hearings are expected to take place by the end of this year. more on our top story of the government being accused of moving patients unlawfully at the beginning of the pandemic. let's speak to a barrister who is a lawyer who is an expert in this particular area of law. welcome. would you mind explaining in simple terms what this case was about and what it was focused on?— case was about and what it was focused on? , ., , ., ,., ., focused on? this was an important case that was _ focused on? this was an important case that was looking _ focused on? this was an important case that was looking at _ focused on? this was an important case that was looking at some - focused on? this was an important case that was looking at some of. focused on? this was an important i case that was looking at some of the policies that were brought out by the secretary of state for health as well as public health england at the start of the pandemic, so talking about documents and advice that was
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brought out by the state sometime in january, february and particularly march and april at the start of the pandemic. the net effect of the advice in those documents was that when people entered care homes, usually as patients come up when they were often leaving hospitals, that they were not required according to these advised documents to be tested and they were not required to be isolated for 14 days. and the aim of the action that was brought by this case was to ask the court to review that advice and the court to review that advice and the court concluded that the net effect of those advice documents was they were irrational and that they failed to advise care homes about the risk of patients who had not been tested for covid or who were not being tested being allowed to mingle with some of the most vulnerable people in these care homes. and of course what the claimants said was it
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resulted in the death of tens of thousands of people as a result of that wrong, unlawful advice. find that wrong, unlawful advice. and once ou that wrong, unlawful advice. and once you are _ that wrong, unlawful advice. and once you are in _ that wrong, unlawful advice. and once you are in a _ that wrong, unlawful advice. and once you are in a care home with covid, you are not coming out. many commentators we have submitted today say it is significant, but how much of a surprise is it particularly to those who knew something of these documents? i those who knew something of these documents?— documents? i think that those who were running _ documents? i think that those who were running care _ documents? i think that those who were running care homes - documents? i think that those who | were running care homes certainly, it will be a little surprise to them, and even in the early days of them, and even in the early days of the pandemic, those in charge of care homes were raising the flag, the red flag, two ministers, saying this is unworkable. there was a lot of pressure, you remember, at the outset to try and get people out of hospitals as soon as possible to clear the beds, and of course one route out of hospital was to send certain people, certain elderly people in particular, straight to
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care homes. that's the mischief that they were not required to be tested in advance and were allowed to mingle at a time when it was common knowledge among experts and amongst ministers that particular the health secretary that the first five or six days a people who catch the covid virus, they often are a systematic, don't know they've got it and they are not sharing any signs of the virus and they are the most infectious, about one third to one half of infections taking place during that period. that was the dangerous mix that took place. you mention the — dangerous mix that took place. you mention the health or a terry who of course of the time was matt hancock. a spokesperson today says the court case governmentally clears ministers of any wrongdoing and says mr hancock acted reasonably on all counts and he has stated recently that he wishes this was brought his attention earlier. to what extent them is it not a ministerial problem but public health england problem? the court in this case did not have
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to apportion blame to particular individuals, however what the court did conclude was that the net effect of these documents was that the irrational failure or a combination of these documents and of course therefore on that ground, the secretary of state in his former capacity, not personal capacity, and his former capacity and public health england both lost. interesting thing about this is the claimants were not seeking damages. how might that change though in future in light of this judgment? yes, this was a judicial review, therefore one would expect damages to be sought. however, it does not mean it's a green light for every relative who feels that their loved one has passed away as a result of these guidance to sue the government. it does make it a little easier on a very important point.
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thank you for talking to us today. thank you for talking to us today. thank you for talking to us today. thank you very much. britons wanting to apply for a new passport are being warned not to leave it until the last minute. the passport office says the delays are because of a large backlog after brexit and covid. the prime minister is warning the service could be privatised if things do not improve. the shadow home secretary raised the issue of passport delays with an urgent question in the house of commons this afternoon. my constituents fear their honeymoon may now be wrecked because their passports haven't arrived, even though they applied in plenty of time. we've had cases of people cancelling jobs, parents trying to get holiday for a sick child, waiting since january, huge, long delays by the passport office and by the contractor, tnt. the message today on the one—week fast—track service says, "system busy, please try again later", and the online premium service has no appointments anywhere in the country. so, people can't get urgent travel such as to go to funerals or to urgent events.
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so, the minister has said more passports are being processed and that is clearly welcome, but it is clearly not enough. this increase in demand this year was totally predictable. the home office was asked in 2020 and 2021 what it was doing to plan, but people are already losing holidays, trips to see loved ones and thousands of pounds that they have spent in good faith. because of the lack of planning at the passport 0ffice and at the home office, which is in danger of becoming a stay—at—home office instead for people this summer. the home office minister, kevin foster, says the government is taking action to improve the issues. as of the ist of april, there are over 4000 staff in passport production roles. and as i say, we're in the process of recruiting another 700. i'd also again make the point that 90% of applications were completed within six weeks, and the service standard is ten weeks.
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my advice to anyone who is looking to go on holiday this summer is exactly what i said the other day, which is to get your application in now. so, we are making a range of efforts — staff are working weekends, on incentivised overtime, and certainly we are confident that we will not need to change the ten—week target. but, as i've made the point, this is a record level of demand and a record output. far in excess of what we have seen before. and for those who have compelling and compassionate reasons to travel, such as funerals or family ill—health, we will expedite their applications. the prison service in england and wales is failing to recognise the dangers of islamist gangs injails, according to a report published today. the independent reviewer of terrorist legislation has urged officials to pay more attention to the influence of convicted terrorists on other inmates. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports.
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usman khan running from the scene of the fishmonger�*s hall attack. he'd just stabbed two people to death. tackled to the ground and then shot, he'd only recently been released from prison. his attack, in which saskia jones and jack merritt died, was the first of four attacks in just seven months committed by serving prisoners or ones who'd just been released. an official report said today that too often islamist gangs had been able to exercise control on prison wings, deciding which officers could attend prayers, even setting up sharia courts and ordering inmates to be flogged. and this increased the chances of terrorist attacks. the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, jonathan hall qc, said...
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allahu akbar! this week, we went inside woodhill prison to see what's now being done to tackle the threat. we filmed for the first time inside the separation centre, one of only three in england. here, key terrorist radicalisers are incarerated to reduce their pernicious influence. these separation centres are prisons within prisons, where the most ideallogically dangerous inmates can be isolated so that they can't radicalise other prisoners. to complete the isolation, they even have their own separate exercise yard and gym. but the separation centres are underused. so far, only 15 inmates have ever been in one. the system for referring men here is too complex and sometimes dogged by challenges under the human rights act. thejustice secretary, dominic raab, says he wants to make it easier to send inmates to the centres
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and claims his proposed to human rights legislation will help. this is about making sure that those that would taint the well, poison the well, inside prisons, radicalise more people, recruit more people to terrorist ranks, cannot do so. it's a very austere regime. it's different from what any other prisoner would experience in general population. it's very resource intensive, but it's absolutely the right thing to do to safeguard the public. behind these doors, where we weren't allowed to film for safety reasons, is an ultra—secure close supervision centre. here, the most violent inmates are held — including michael adebowale, who killed lee rigby. ministers now plan to increase the number of cells in unit like this. daniel sanford, bbc news, in woodhill prison. russia's war in ukraine is now in its third month and has claimed thousands of lives. memorials to the countries' shared history were once
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found throughout ukraine, but ever since the annexation of crimea, they've been coming down. from kyiv, joe inwood has more. for 40 years, this statue has stood in central kyiv, a monument to friendship between the peoples of ukraine and russia. but now, after two months of all—out war and eight years of fighting in the east of the country, there is not much left of that friendship. and so the city council have decided that this statue needs to come down. i spoke to the mayor of the city, vitali klitschko. today, russia destroyed the normal life of millions of ukrainians and destroyed the peace in europe. and that's why we make demolition of this moment and this place, this place — her name, the place of friendship between russia and ukraine. it's no friendship any more. the russians, by himself,
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destroyed everything. and to talk about the war more widely, how do you feel? how are you feeling about how your country is fighting at this point? we defend, actually, the future of our children. do you feel the difference with the russian soldier fighting for the money? we're fighting for the children. for our children. and that's why i'm more than sure who wins this war. definitely win. of course, everyone knows you finally as a world champion boxer. presumably you wouldn't mind getting in a ring with vladimir putin. i'd never have the idea to go inside the ring. especially no reason to fighting with old and unhealthy people. now getting these statues down is not easy. they've tried to lift them off. one of the heads actually came off as a result.
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so, they're angle—grinding the base, but they've decided they have to come down and remove a reminder of a soviet past and be replaced with something that represents an independent future for ukraine. cheers. a bill that recognises british sign language as a legal language in england and wales is soon to make his dream to law as it has passed both houses of parliament and is soon to go for royal assent. the eurovision song contest will soon be upon us, and this year it takes place in italy. it's been 13 years since the uk finished in the top ten, but hoping to change that is the essex singer sam ryder. our music correspondent mark savage went to meet him before he heads to turin. the uk's recent track record at the eurovision song contest has been pretty miserable.
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the united kingdom, zero points. in 2019 and 2021, we took last place, but that looks set to change this year. sam ryder�*s song space man is currently one of the favourites to win with bookmakers. # i'm in space, man...# for people who don't know the sam ryder story, tell us about... ..tell us about growing up. i grew up in a house of music, not that my parents were musicians, but theyjust loved music. so, it's records playing constantly. earth, wind and fire, beautiful south, queen. and, like, even now, they listen to the same records, like, full blast. i mean, full blast, when they're like cleaning the house or mowing the lawn. my neighbours all know. the records will be playing so loud, so they can still hear it over the lawnmower. sam came to fame during lockdown, after he started posting cover versions on the video—sharing website tiktok. i'd been working in construction for years and years and then sort of started singing at weddings. it took, you know,
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lockdown to happen, for all the weddings and stuff to be cancelled, all of us to be stuck indoors, for me to sort of think, you know, i don't want to stop singing just because i can't sing at people's weddings now. but how am i going to do that? and it was, i guess, kind of a digital way of me flicking through a record collection. the first video was hit me, baby, one more time by britney spears. i sang it as high as i could in my mum's kitchen. and it all started snowballing from there. # lose my mind! # so give me a sign. # hit me baby one more time...# and alicia keys, you covered one of her songs? yeah! yeah, i honestly thought that was — you know deep—fake stuff, i thought someone was messing with me. and like someone, i don't know, has figured out how to be alicia keys. # but everything means nothing...# beautiful soul, beautiful person. and they don't have
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to do that, you know? like, kind of encourage someone who is just an emerging artist coming through the ranks. it changes everything for that artist. the last two times the uk has been to eurovision, we've come in last place. that either puts more pressure on you or it gives you complete freedom because you can't do any worse. oh, yeah. so, where do you fall on that scale? it's so... i think if you tell yourself you've got pressure... i mean, with my personality, i think you're starting off on the wrong third. singing and songwriting and performing, it shouldn't be about a scoreboard. # i'm up in space, man...# mark savage, bbc news. a great idea, let's just ignore the scoreboard. the weather forecast with chris.
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some of us have seen some sunshine but other stuck with cloudy skies with the clouds rolling in often northeast this is how scarborough looked to the internet would not much side of sunshine here. the cloud has been pretty extensive across most of england but there have been some breaks in the cloud, wales, western england and northern ireland and across a good part of southern and eastern scotland out in the sunshine but the day felt really different given the april sun has a fair bit of strength to at this time of year. 0vernight tonight, that cloud of the north sea will continue to feed and across much of england, so staying pretty cloudy for most areas here. best of the breaks further westwards but however with those brakes developing through the night, it will be a cold night with temperatures low enough to give some patches of frost where we have the clearest skies for longest. for thursday, i think we start off with a good deal of cloud around particular call central and eastern england but it might well be that cloud gets nibbled away and we get a bit more sunshine coming out across
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northern england, wales and the south of england but area of the east midlands in through the east midlands intro to lincolnshire in norfolk might have a bit to break the cloud across these areas. 0n the whole, more of a seeing a bit more sunshine compared with those that will stay cloudy. for friday, the same kind of mix of weather with either cloud or sun and i think across eastern areas of england were iraqi to have medically discussed but still sunshine around and in the sunshine, 17 for glasgow and cardiff, things starting to just turn a bit milder but into the weekend, high pressure dominating the weather of recent days will we get enough to let a week with a front move southwards. so, on saturday, here comes a front with some rain moving into scotland and northern ireland and england and should state largely drive with some bright or sunny smells coming and going and temperatures read about 14-16 going and temperatures read about 14—16 and about 11—13 for the north with the rain. the rain as it moves southwards saturday night into
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sunday turns increasingly light and patchy so not everyone will see the rain and a lot of garters would want a bit of what weather but there is not a huge amount of rain falling on sunday it as a system works in and it becomes drier and brighter this time across scotland and northern ireland. temperatures are at about 13-16, ireland. temperatures are at about 13—16, so after a prolonged spell of dry and settle weather, we will see some changes in the picture as we head into the weekend and finally a bit of rain to come across the north but no huge amounts in the forecast. that's the latest.
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today at six — the high court rules that government policies on discharging hospital patients into care homes in england at the start of the pandemic were "unlawful". the court heard that moving untested patients into care homes had been "one of the most devastating policy failures" of the modern era. the ruling came after two women whose fathers died in care homes took legal action against public health england a protective ring around care homes in the first wave of the pandemic was nothing more than a despicable lie. we'll be looking at the implications of the ruling for families across the uk. also today, the latest on russia's invasion of ukraine.
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president putin declares that russia will respond immediately to any

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