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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 27, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the goverment�*s policies on discharging patients to care homes in england at the start of the pandemic are ruled unlawful. the high court ruling comes after two women — whose fathers died from covid—19 during the pandemic — took the government to court. my dad worked all of his life, to the age of 75, paid national insurance. he had a right to life and they had a duty of care, and he was failed. we'll have all the latest. also on the programme: russian energy giant gazprom cuts gas supplies to poland and bulgaria for refusing to pay in roubles. five police officers face gross misconduct proceedings over the stop and search of team gb athlete bianca williams.
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the vampire devices draining energy in homes — and costing consumers dear. and coming up on the bbc news channel: liverpool look to take a step towards a third champions league final in five years. they face villarreal at anfield in tonight's semi. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc�*s news at one. two women whose fathers died from covid—19 have won a high court challenge against the government over policies on discharging patients to care homes in england at the outset of the pandemic. cathy gardner and fay harris partially succeeded in their claims against the health secretary and public health england. in a ruling today, judges concluded that policies contained in documents
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released in march and early—april 2020 were unlawful because they failed to take into account the risk to elderly and vulnerable residents from non—symptomatic transmission of the virus. our social affairs editor, alison holt, has this report. emerging from the high court, two women who argued the government failed to protect their fathers at the start of the pandemic. both men lived in care homes. today, the court concluded the government decision to discharge hospital patients into care homes was unlawful and irrational. i patients into care homes was unlawful and irrational. i believed all alonu unlawful and irrational. i believed all along that _ unlawful and irrational. i believed all along that my _ unlawful and irrational. i believed all along that my father _ unlawful and irrational. i believed all along that my father and - unlawful and irrational. i believedi all along that my father and other residents of care homes were neglected and let down by the government. fist neglected and let down by the government.— neglected and let down by the government. at that time, the government — government. at that time, the government said _ government. at that time, the government said it _ government. at that time, the government said it was - government. at that time, the government said it was ok - government. at that time, the government said it was ok to l government. at that time, the - government said it was ok to admit people _ government said it was ok to admit people into care homes, without recommending isolation. it effectively ceded covid into the care homes. effectively ceded covid into the care homes-— effectively ceded covid into the care homes. . , ., ., , care homes. that is what fay harris believes happened _ care homes. that is what fay harris
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believes happened with _ care homes. that is what fay harris believes happened with her- care homes. that is what fay harris believes happened with her father, | believes happened with her father, don. he believes happened with her father, don. ., , believes happened with her father, don. . , . . believes happened with her father, don. . , ., ., ., don. he was larger-than-life, he had a fantastic character, _ don. he was larger-than-life, he had a fantastic character, great _ don. he was larger-than-life, he had a fantastic character, great fun. - a fantastic character, great fun. wicked sense of humour. he was livin: in a wicked sense of humour. he was living in a hampshire _ wicked sense of humour. he was living in a hampshire nursing - wicked sense of humour. he was l living in a hampshire nursing home when the pandemic started. the 89—year—old was doing well but, within a month, he had died with covid. his daughter believes this was after the home tucked in hospital patients who developed the virus. i hospital patients who developed the virus. , ., , virus. i 'ust think they were totall virus. i just think they were totally expendable. - virus. i just think they were totally expendable. i - virus. i just think they were totally expendable. i don't| virus. i just think they were - totally expendable. i don't think they were regarded at all. my dad worked all of his life, to the age of 75, paid national insurance. he had a right to life and they had a duty of care. and he was failed. the last time that _ duty of care. and he was failed. the last time that l — duty of care. and he was failed. the last time that i was able to see my father was— last time that i was able to see my father was about 24 hours before he died~ _ father was about 24 hours before he died. ., . y father was about 24 hours before he died. ., ., , �*, ., died. doctor cathy gardner's father michael gibson _ died. doctor cathy gardner's father michael gibson died _ died. doctor cathy gardner's father michael gibson died in _ died. doctor cathy gardner's father michael gibson died in an - michael gibson died in an oxfordshire care home in early april 2020. he oxfordshire care home in early april 2020. ., , ., ., oxfordshire care home in early april 2020. ., ., ., 2020. he was in a ground-floor room so i was able — 2020. he was in a ground-floor room so i was able to _ 2020. he was in a ground-floor room so i was able to see _ 2020. he was in a ground-floor room so i was able to see him _ 2020. he was in a ground-floor room so i was able to see him through - 2020. he was in a ground-floor room so i was able to see him through a i so i was able to see him through a
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window _ so i was able to see him through a window i— so i was able to see him through a window. i was lucky that i could do that because i know many families, they couldn't see their loved at all. ., �*, ., , all. doctor gardner's background is in the study _ all. doctor gardner's background is in the study of _ all. doctor gardner's background is in the study of viruses _ all. doctor gardner's background is in the study of viruses and - all. doctor gardner's background is in the study of viruses and she - all. doctor gardner's background is in the study of viruses and she wasi in the study of viruses and she was shocked when hospital patients moved into her father's home without clear guidance on infection control. she believes early in the pandemic, care homes largely had to fend for themselves. i homes largely had to fend for themselves.— homes largely had to fend for themselves. i believe that lives could have _ themselves. i believe that lives could have been _ themselves. i believe that lives could have been saved - themselves. i believe that lives could have been saved in - themselves. i believe that lives could have been saved in care | themselves. i believe that lives - could have been saved in care homes if the _ could have been saved in care homes if the government had acted differently, if they had pursued a policy _ differently, if they had pursued a policy involving quarantine, testing. _ policy involving quarantine, testing, propertraining on infection control and ppe, all of those _ infection control and ppe, all of those things, they could have saved lives _ those things, they could have saved lives and _ those things, they could have saved lives and it— those things, they could have saved lives. and it is important to remember that it wasn't just the old and vulnerable that died, that care home _ and vulnerable that died, that care home staff died, too. i and vulnerable that died, that care home staff died, too.— home staff died, too. i want to remind the _ home staff died, too. i want to remind the house _ home staff died, too. i want to remind the house of— home staff died, too. i want to remind the house of what - home staff died, too. i want to remind the house of what an . remind the house of what an incredibly— remind the house of what an incredibly difficult— remind the house of what an incredibly difficult time - remind the house of what an incredibly difficult time that i remind the house of what an - incredibly difficult time that was. short_ incredibly difficult time that was. short lime — incredibly difficult time that was. short time ago. _ incredibly difficult time that was. short time ago, the _ incredibly difficult time that was. short time ago, the prime - incredibly difficult time that was. . short time ago, the prime minister gave his response to the judgment. the thing that we didn't know in mr speaker, _ the thing that we didn't know in mr speaker, was — the thing that we didn't know in mr speaker, was that _ the thing that we didn't know in mr speaker, was that covid _ the thing that we didn't know in mr speaker, was that covid could - the thing that we didn't know in mr speaker, was that covid could beat| speaker, was that covid could beat transmitted — speaker, was that covid could beat transmitted a — speaker, was that covid could beat transmitted a symptomatically- speaker, was that covid could beat transmitted a symptomatically in l speaker, was that covid could beat i transmitted a symptomatically in the way that— transmitted a symptomatically in the way that it _ transmitted a symptomatically in the way that it was _ transmitted a symptomatically in the way that it was. and _
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transmitted a symptomatically in the way that it was. and that _ transmitted a symptomatically in the way that it was. and that was - way that it was. and that was something _ way that it was. and that was something that _ way that it was. and that was something that i _ way that it was. and that was something that i wish - way that it was. and that was something that i wish we - way that it was. and that was something that i wish we had way that it was. and that was - something that i wish we had known more _ something that i wish we had known more about— something that i wish we had known more about at — something that i wish we had known more about at the _ something that i wish we had known more about at the time. _ something that i wish we had known more about at the time. the - more about at the time. the government _ more about at the time. the government says _ more about at the time. the government says that - more about at the time. government says that each more about at the time— government says that each death during the pandemic was a tragedy, but it insists it works tirelessly to protect people and that billions of pounds were poured into supporting care services, including with protective equipment and infection control. alison holt, bbc news. and alison is with me now. how significant a result is this? well, certainly for the families involved, it is very significant because many have felt extremely angry and traumatised by those early months when there were a high number of deaths in care homes, as we started to find out the extent of the virus and the pandemic, so very significant for them. it also gives us a taste of some of the debates and discussions that will lie ahead of any public inquiry with that analysis of decisions that were made, why they were made and when
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they were made. the issue of asymptomatic transmission, i mean, many will argue actually, by early march, there were reasonable indications that the virus could be carried without symptoms. the former health secretary matt hancock has responded a short time ago by saying that ministers were cleared of any wrongdoing and that they were not passed on information. again, as i say, all of these things, it is the start, if you like, of that analysis of what we need to learn from such a difficult and terrible time for so many people. difficult and terrible time for so many people-— difficult and terrible time for so many people. difficult and terrible time for so man --eole. . ~' , many people. ellison, thank you very much. many people. ellison, thank you very much- more — many people. ellison, thank you very much. more from _ many people. ellison, thank you very much. more from me _ many people. ellison, thank you very much. more from me in _ many people. ellison, thank you very much. more from me in a _ many people. ellison, thank you very much. more from me in a while. -- l much. more from me in a while. —— alison. now for the latest on the war in ukraine, let's go to ben brown in kyiv. thanks very much indeed. russia has been accused of escalating the war here by cutting off gas supplies to two european countries — poland and bulgaria — which moscow describes as �*unfriendly�* states.
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both of them are nato countries and they get most of their gas from russia, but they've refused the kremlin's demand that they pay for their energy in russian roubles. here in ukraine, the government says president putin is trying to break the unity of its allies by using economic blackmail. our moscow correspondent, jenny hill, reports. russia's turned off the taps and state tv is enjoying the moment. gazprom announced this morning it would cut supplies to poland and bulgaria. both countries had refused to pay in roubles. not that the polish prime minister was concerned. his country, he said, was ready to cut itself off from russian energy. translation: our gas storages are 7696 full. | this is a high level. much higher than in most european countries. vladimir putin knows many other
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european countries — germany, in particular — rely on his energy supplies, but he needs their custom. in january alone, it's estimated that what he calls �*unfriendly countries�*, most of europe, paid russia $6 billion for gas. and that's why, even though he's demanded countries pay in roubles, the reality is more complex. they can pay in euros or dollars, but only if they open russian bank accounts, which then exchange the currency, then make the final payment. it's believed, though not confirmed, that some european countries have opened those accounts. a few very big, key contracts are expiring. the german and italian, as i said so often, and some others. in end of may, during june, what will happen then? because then they will have to decide, will they pay according to this new mechanism or not? and most politicians in germany and in other parts of the eu have so far been leaning towards,
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you know, saying that, no, we will not do this and this is unacceptable. but, yeah, it will come up, it's crunch time. and this is putin's way of shooting across the bow. neither sanctions, threats, nor appeals have stopped vladimir putin and his war. the gulf between the russian president and the west grows ever wider. well, this morning's developments have provoked a furious response from the european union. the president of the commission ursula von der leyen has accused moscow of blackmail, saying its actions were unjustified and unacceptable. for its part, the kremlin has rejected those accusations, saying that the west and its sanctions have forced it into this course of action. and what we are seeing there, not for the first time, of course, is vladimir putin's narrative, this is what he will tell the russian people. that their country is in
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effect the innocent victim of western economic aggression. jenny, thank you very much indeed. jenny, thank you very much indeed. jenny hill in moscow. the united nations secretary—general antonio gutteres is coming here to kyiv tomorrow, in search of a peace agreement. yesterday, he was in moscow, trying to get russia to agree to humanitarian corridors to allow thousands of civilians, trapped in the besieged city of mariupol, to escape — people he says are in dire need of help. our correspondent catherine byaru hanga is in the town of zaporizhzhia, where she's been speaking to families who have managed to leave mariupol. smoke billows from the giant azovstal steelworks. ukraine says russia continues to bombard the plant, despite saying it wouldn't. the controversial nationalist azov regiment, which defends the facility, posted this video
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of an injured woman online. it says up to 1,000 civilians are trapped in the azovstal bunkers. but president putin insists there are no ongoing attacks and accuses ukrainian soldiers of using civilians as human shields. the united nations is calling for humanitarian access to mariupol. kateryna escaped the city with her husband and two children. the youngest, anna, is two years old. they braved russian checkpoints to get ukrainian—held territory. to get to ukrainian—held territory. translation: at the firstj checkpoint, the man there pointed his gun at us and wasn't letting us through until he saw that there was a child with us. it was frightening. i thought that that was it for us.
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natalia left mariupol a month ago. she hopes her home still stands, despite the shelling. an increasing number of residents like natalia say russian soldiers forced them out of their homes and took them to towns they controlled. she remembers the moment she and 100 of her neighbours were found hiding in a bunker. translation: i realised that something bad was going - to happen at that moment. after that, everything collapsed. all my hopes collapsed. i realised that those were the people that i did not invite, did not expect and did not want to come. natalia and her husband are now living in central ukraine. she says russian controls weren't too strict and they hitchhiked from a town called primorsky. katerina and her family are also safe, living in a shelter for now,
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but she tells me it's hard to believe the hell they've all been through. just listen to that — peace and quiet. a massive relief for families that have spent night after night under heavy shelling. but the volunteers here tell us that the number of people coming through their doors has fallen because of the siege on mariupol and the fact that people can't get out. they're likely spending another night under heavy bombardment. catherine byaruhanga, bbc news, zaporizhzhia. let's get an overview of what is happening. with me is our correspondent, joe inwood. a few weeks ago, russian forces withdrew from their positions around this city in order, moscow said, to focus on the fight in the east, how is that campaign going in the east? in a word, slowly. it is a very
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different from a battle to the one we saw here. this was urban warfare, there were ambushes. in the east, in there were ambushes. in the east, in the donbas region, ukrainian forces are very firmly dug in, it is a different kind of battle, you have heavy artillery, lots of aerial bombardment and a grinding form of attrition warfare, there are big changes i have seen myself. ukrainian forces are well equipped, dug in and not going anywhere anytime soon. but they are sustaining casualties, both sides tell us that each day, they have small victories, counter offences from the ukrainians but, in short, there has not been a big breakthrough. today, we have seen something quite interesting and the self. in kherson, the first big city, major population centre to fall to the russians and today, the russians have said they have taken over the whole region. the reason this is significant is because they have been warnings from president zelensky the russians will hold what they call a pseudo— referendum, essentially a false vote on
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independence and the fear is that if he does this, it could be used as a way of pretending there is a legal basis for occupying the territory of ukraine and breaking it up. thank ou ve ukraine and breaking it up. thank you very much — ukraine and breaking it up. thank you very much indeed. _ ukraine and breaking it up. thank you very much indeed. joe - ukraine and breaking it up. thank you very much indeed. joe inwood, our kyiv correspondent. and that's just about it from us here today in kyiv. i'll now hand you back to the studio in london. thank you. a conservative mp has reportedly been caught watching pornography while sitting in the chamber of the house of commons. it's understood concerns were raised by a minister at a meeting last night. our political correspondent helen catt is in our westminster newsroom. what more do we know about this? we know that there was this meeting of female conservative mps last night, it is a regular meeting. at that, a female minister said she had been sitting next to conservative mp in the house of commons and she noticed he was watching pornography. she named that mp and another person present also backed her up on this. a spokesman for the whip's office, responsible
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for the whip's office, responsible for party discipline in the commons, said the chief whip was looking into this, that the behaviour was wholly unacceptable and that action will be taken, so we wait to see what that will be. , _, , ., ., ~ will be. this comes after a week in which there _ will be. this comes after a week in which there has _ will be. this comes after a week in which there has been _ will be. this comes after a week in which there has been criticism - will be. this comes after a week in which there has been criticism of. which there has been criticism of sexism at westminster after that article published at the weekend about the laboured deputy leader angela rayner. the about the laboured deputy leader angela rayner-— angela rayner. the article in the mail on sunday _ angela rayner. the article in the mail on sunday that _ angela rayner. the article in the mail on sunday that was - angela rayner. the article in the mail on sunday that was pretty l mail on sunday that was pretty widely criticised, it quoted an unnamed conservative mp saying that angela rayner had a strategy of crossing and uncrossing her legs at prime minister's questions to put borisjohnson off and the article drew parallels with the film basic instinct. today, keir starmer said he hoped to back i had sent a message to his party that sexism and misogyny had no place, borisjohnson said there could be absolutely no place for it in parliament. there is also supposed to have been a meeting today between the editor of the mail on sunday and the speaker of the house of commons. that has not happened because the editor pulled out of that, saying thatjournalists
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should not take instructions from house of commons officials. his letter was published in the daily mail, which has also written an article saying it has more tory mps that that original reporting. it also pointed to an interview angela rayner had given earlier this year where she appeared to laugh off that basic instinct comparison, although she says in the podcast she was mortified by it. ms rayner has since said that women sometimes tried to brush aside the sexism they face, but that doesn't make it ok. helen, thank ou but that doesn't make it ok. helen, thank you very _ but that doesn't make it ok. helen, thank you very much. _ the time is 1:16. our top story this lunchtime: two women whose fathers died from covid—19 have won a high court challenge against the government over discharging patients to care homes. # space, man... and coming up, we meet sam ryder, the uk's new hope for this year's eurovision song contest. coming up on the bbc news channel: ronnie o'sullivan makes short work of stephen maguire in the quarterfinal of the world snooker championship, as he continues his bid for a record equalling seventh
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title at the crucible. have you heard of a �*vampire device�*? they�*re those electronic items such as chargers, computers and smart devices that sap power when on standby, wasting energy. a new study from british gas estimates that as much as £147 per household could be saved by switching 13 devices — like tvs or microwaves — off at the wall. although, some estimates of savings by other organisations are lower. our technology correspondent marc cieslak reports. in ashby—de—la—zouch, leicestershire, for mother of one, sarah, money is tight. her partner often works away from home and she�*s retraining as a paramedic. it wasn�*t good news when her latest electricity bill arrived. before the price increase, the bill would be between 70 and £80. this month when it came in,
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it wasjust over £220. a lot of tears had from that, a lot of nights lying awake in bed, just going, "i don�*t know how we�*re going do it." like many of us, sarah�*s home has its fair share of technology and devices powered by electricity. i already see there�*s plenty of devices out here. there�*s quite a lot. we�*ve got our alexa, smart metre and we�*ve got a phone charger all on that side. what have we got going on in here? is this a smart tv? yes. do you leave it on standby? yes, we do. and why do you leave it on standby? i mean, you don�*t think it�*s going to cost a lot because it�*s not doing anything. but our technology—filled homes are a big part of the problem. every time we switch this tech to standby, we become victim to so—called vampire devices. this is technology which still draws power even when it�*s not in use or it�*s in standby mode. now, individual devices don�*t use that much electricity, but, when we multiply it by all of the consumer electronics that fill our homes, it all starts to add up.
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britain�*s largest electricity supplier, british gas, has carried out a new study based on 13 common devices like tvs and washing machines. it claims £147 of our electricity bills is the result of devices on standby, that�*s the equivalent of two months�* worth of electricity charges. the energy saving trust have a different calculation, though. they think £55 of our annual bill is the fault of vampire devices. top vampire devices that are costing the uk households the most are your set—top boxes and your televisions. combined, they can cost, on average, around £50 per year on standby. also, your microwaves around £16 per year, also on standby. so the greatest solution to this is reallyjust simply switching off at the plug when not in use. this is the office. yes. and this, i can see here from the light there, that�*s on standby. i think there�*s are a lot of items in this room that could be switched off at the wall. a lot of people will do this
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with their bedside tables, where they have their mobile phones on charge. they use it as an alarm clock, things like that, so even though there aren�*t phones plugged into either of those chargers, the chargers themselves are still drawing power. 0k. so do you think you might do something about that in the future? yes, it�*s an easy switch to switch them off. if something doesn't need to be on, then you should switch it off at the wall or unplug it. you just try and make it as easy as possible to turn it off. but if you have got a whole bunch of stuff plugged in behind the television, you maybe want to plug them all into one extension lead. saving money by switching devices off won�*t solve cost of living problems overnight. but in the same way that every bit of power used adds up to a bigger bill, every bit of money saved can relieve a tiny bit of that pressure. marc cieslak, bbc news. love bug! the prison service in england and wales is failing to recognise the dangers of islamist gangs injails, according
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to report published today. the independent reviewer of terrorist legislation has urged officials to pay more attention to the influence of convicted terrorists on other inmates. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. usman khan running from the scene of the fishmonger�*s hall attack. he�*d just stabbed two people to death. tackled to the ground and then shot, he�*d only recently been released from prison. his attack, in which saskia jones and jack merritt died, was the first of four attacks in just seven months committed by serving prisoners or ones who�*d just been released. an official report said today that too often islamist gangs had been able to exercise control on prison wings, deciding which officers could attend prayers, even setting up sharia courts and ordering inmates to be flogged and this increased the chances of terrorist attacks. the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, jonathan hall qc, said...
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allahu akbar! this week, we went inside woodhill prison to see what�*s now being done to tackle the threat. we filmed for the first time inside the separation centre, one of only three in england. here, key terrorist radicalisers are incarerated to reduce their pernicious influence. these separation centres are prisons within prisons, where the most ideallogically dangerous inmates can be isolated, so that they can�*t radicalise other prisoners. to complete the isolation, they even have their own separate exercise yard and gym. but the separation centres are underused. so far, only 15 inmates have ever been in one.
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the system for referring men here is too complex and sometimes dogged by challenges under the human rights act. thejustice secretary, dominic raab, says he wants to make it easier to send inmates to the centres, and claims his proposed changes to human rights legislation will help. this is about making sure that those that would taint the well, poison the well, inside prisons, radicalise more people, recruit more people to terrorist ranks, cannot do so. it�*s a very austere regime. it�*s different from what any other prisoner would experience in general population. it�*s very resource intensive, but it�*s absolutely the right thing to do to safeguard the public. behind these doors, where we weren�*t allowed to film for safety reasons, is an ultra—secure close supervision centre. here, the most violent inmates are held — including michael adebowale, who killed lee rigby. ministers now plan to increase the number of cells in unit like this. daniel sanford, bbc news, in woodhill prison.
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five metropolitan police officers will face disciplinary charges in a gross misconduct hearing over the stop and search of the team gb sprinter bianca williams — and her partner — in london two years ago. it follows an investigation by the police watchdog, the independent office of police conduct. our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell is at scotland yard. the five officers are facing a number of gros misconduct allegations, including if force was reasonably used against the couple and if they were treated less favourably because of their race. bianca williams, who is 28, is a commonwealth games gold medallist. her and her partner ricardo dos santos were stopped in maida vale west london injuly 2020. at the time, the three—month—old baby was in the back of the car while they
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were separated from him and handcuffed. footage of that search was widely shared on social media. now the couple say they were racially profiled and believed they were targeted because they are black. they have welcomed the decision today and say they hope this opens the door for the met to be more honest and open and reflective about the culture of racism. the mayor of london also welcomed the decision today and says it is important there is no further delay in these proceedings. the met has apologised to the couple and say that they have fully co—operated with this iop sea investigation. if these investigations are proven, the officers could be sacked. the hearings are expected to take place by the end of the year.— by the end of the year. adina campbell. — by the end of the year. adina campbell, thank _ by the end of the year. adina campbell, thank you - by the end of the year. adina campbell, thank you very - by the end of the year. adina i campbell, thank you very much. the reality tv star and former glamour model — katie price — has appeared before magistrates in crawley, charged with breaching a restraining order. the 43—year—old is accused of breaching a restraining order
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against ex—husband kieran hayler�*s fiancee, michelle penticost, in january. ms price, from west sussex, pleaded not guilty and requested a crown court trial. the eurovision song contest will soon be upon us — and this year it takes place in italy. it�*s been 13 years since the uk finished in the top 10, but hoping to change that is the essex singer sam ryder. our music correspondent, mark savage, went to meet him before he heads to turin. the uk�*s recent track record at the eurovision song contest has been pretty miserable. the united kingdom, zero points. in 2019 and 2021, we took last place, but that looks set to change this year. sam ryder�*s song space man is currently one of the favourites to win with bookmakers. # i�*m in space, man...# for people who don�*t know the sam ryder story, tell us about... tell us about growing up. i grew up in a house of music, not that my parents were musicians, but theyjust loved music. so it�*s records playing constantly.
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earth, wind and fire, beautiful south, queen. and, like, even now, they listen to the same records, like, full blast. i mean, full blast, when they�*re like cleaning the house or mowing the lawn. my neighbours all know. the records will be playing so loud, so they can still hear it over the lawnmower. sam came to fame during lockdown, after he started posting cover versions on the video sharing website tiktok. i�*d been working in construction for years and years and then sort of started singing at weddings. it took, you know, lockdown to happen, for the weddings and stuff to be cancelled, all of us to be stuck indoors, for me to sort of think, you know, i don�*t want to stop singing just because i can�*t sing at people�*s weddings now. but how am i going to do that? it was, i guess, kind of a digital way of me flicking through a record collection. the first video was hit me baby one more time by britney spears. i sang it as high as i could in my mum�*s kitchen. and it all started snowballing from there.
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# lose my mind! # so give me a sign. # hit me baby one more time. and alicia keys, you covered one of her songs? yeah! yeah, i honestly thought that was — you know deep fake stuff, i thought someone was messing with me. and like someone, i don�*t know, has figured out how to be alicia keys. # but everything means nothing...# beautiful soul, beautiful person. and they don�*t have to do that, you know? like, kind of encourage someone who is just an emerging artist coming through the ranks. it changes everything for that artist. the last two times the uk has been to eurovision, we�*ve come in last place. that either puts more pressure on you or it gives you complete freedom because you can�*t do any worse. oh, yeah. so where do you fall on that scale? it�*s so... i think if you tell yourself
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you�*ve got pressure... i mean, with my personality, i think you�*re starting off on the wrong foot. singing and songwriting and performing, it shouldn�*t be about a scoreboard. # i�*m up in space, man...# mark savage, bbc news. no pressure! time for a look at the weather. here�*s susan. no pressure on you either, what are you showing us today? it is no pressure on you either, what are you showing us today?— you showing us today? it is all about high _ you showing us today? it is all about high pressure. - you showing us today? it is all about high pressure. that - you showing us today? it is all about high pressure. that is l you showing us today? it is all| about high pressure. that is so you showing us today? it is all- about high pressure. that is so bad it was painful! it is really dry. we have been going on about dry pressure for days, weeks, and we will still be going on about it for a few days yet as well. very dry this april widely across the uk, but particularly for southern counties of england. 70% down on april rainfall so far and there is not much to correct that through the remainder of this month. why? it is

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