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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 6, 2022 9:30am-10:00am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... as queen elizabeth celebrates 70 years on the throne, she says she wants the duchess of cornwall to be known as queen consort when prince charles becomes king. india begins two days of mourning as one of the country's most famous singers lata mangeshkar dies aged 92. british prime minister borisjohnson announces new appointments to his backroom staff following a wave of resignations over lockdown parties held at number 10. a five—year—old moroccan boy freed after being trapped in a well forfour days has died.
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time for the sport now. good morning, yes. it was the best possible start for scotland in their six nations campaign. beating england at murrayfield to retain the calcutta cup for the first time since 1984" it followed an emphatic win for ireland too, an all important bonus point victory over reigning champions wales..and the fans were there to see it all. joe wilson reports. this tournament has been waiting for them. supporters are back. welcome to the tradition. scotland versus england, best of rivals. it's a close relationship. in scotland make the most of this early opportunity, the most of this early opportunity, the man who crossed the line to score used to play for england's under 20s. then white. youthful energy from england came from marcus
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smith, in the number ten shirt. with that try, england's lead. they kick towards luke karen dickie, the only english defender, what happened. the outcome would have been different if he did not knock that on. then the game is tied. finn russell has a penalty to put scotland three points ahead and it was there and if scotland could hang on, if they could book that ball finally, anywhere safely, it was that game. beating england is always a joy of course but it's becoming a regular occurrence for scotland. and what you see on that team celebrating at the other end of the pitch, scotland... 6—nation champions. it means a lot to us but it means more for our— means a lot to us but it means more for our country and the people here. we deliver_ for our country and the people here. we deliver the winning performance what we _ we deliver the winning performance what we know where we can improve and we _ what we know where we can improve and we will _ what we know where we can improve and we will have to improve if we
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want _ and we will have to improve if we want to _ and we will have to improve if we want to win — and we will have to improve if we want to win another trophy this season — want to win another trophy this season. �* , want to win another trophy this season. ~ , , ,, ., , ., season. and first impressions, two minutes for — season. and first impressions, two minutes for ireland _ season. and first impressions, two minutes for ireland to _ season. and first impressions, two minutes for ireland to score - season. and first impressions, two | minutes for ireland to score against wales. by the end of the game, they had four tries, this was going out to gary ring rose. 29—7 against the defending champions. that is a statement. the draw for the 5th round of the fa cup takes place this morning and yesterday kidderminster harriers were agonisingly close to being in it. they were beaten by west ham despite taking the lead when alex penney opened the scoring. but it was heartbreak for the harriers as west ham equalised in injury time before jarrod bowen scored the winner in the final seconds of extra time. there was also nearly another shock at stamford bridge where league one side plymouth argyle took the lead against chelsea. the match went to extra time before marcus alonso finally scored the winner for chelsea. no such drama at everton where frank lampard took control for the first time since being appointed manager. they beat brentford 4—1
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to progress to the 5th round. —— no such drama at everton where frank lampard took control for the first time since being appointed manager. there's been more diappointment for england down under. their hopes of drawing the ashes series are ove, as australia claimed a five wicket win in their second 0ne—day international. england were bowled out for 129, elysse perry and tahlia mcgrath both getting three wickets. ellyse perry top—scored with a0. to the winter olympics where great britain's mixed curling team remain on course for a place in the semi finals. jen dodds and bruce mouat picked up a narrow 6—5 win over china this morning — theirfifth win in seven games so far. they're back in action again at lunchtime against norway. you're obviously fighting for the olympic medal so i think every time you're stepping onto the ice, we
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will give 100% and give everything we've got, and we've got another event on but right now this is the focus and we will fight for everything we have. team gb�*s andrew musgrave finished a respectable 17th in the men's skiathlon. he couldn't improve on the 7th he achieved at pyeongchang as alexander bolshunov from the russian 0lympic committee won gold. now who says kiwis can't fly? take a look at new zealand's zoi sidowski sinnott in the women's slopestyle this morning. she claimed her country's first ever gold medal at a winter olympics with a breathtaking final run. she could make it a double as well in the big air in a week's time. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much.
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hello and a warm welcome to our review of the sunday papers. with me are james rampton, features writer for the independent, and laura hughes, political and diplomatic correspondent for the financial times. today's front pages starting with... a picture of the queen smiling on the front page of the sunday telegraph — it writes that the duchess of cornwall will be crowned queen camilla when prince charles ascends to the throne. camilla will be queen — that's the headline of the sunday mirror — highlighting the monarch�*s announcement in her platinum jubliee message. the observer writes that one of the prime minister's most loyal backbench supporters has said it's inevitable that tory mps would remove him from office following the partygate scandal. meanwhile the independent reports that tory opponents of the pm are warning against submitting letters of no confidence too soon, instead urging them to wait until the result of the met investigation into downing street parties. the express looks at what it calls the pm's survival plan, as borisjohnson pledged to warm the cockles of tory hearts.
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and away from westminster, the sunday times reveals latest analysis shows teachers at some private schools at least doubled the proportion of a stars handed out at a level last year during covid. so let's begin. thank you forjoining me, james and laura. starting with the front page of the sunday mirror. camilla will be queen. an announcement really that means, and i don't know if you agree, lower, there will not be the uncertainty, let's say, when charles does ascend the throne about the royal camilla —— make the role camilla will take. royal camilla -- make the role camilla will take.— royal camilla -- make the role camilla will take. yes, i think a lot of peeple — camilla will take. yes, i think a lot of people thought _ camilla will take. yes, i think a lot of people thought it - camilla will take. yes, i think a lot of people thought it would i camilla will take. yes, i think a . lot of people thought it would take the queen dying for this issue to be resolved and clearly, given the death of her husband last year, prince philip, she has realised that she might not be around forever and i think she wants to get things settled and sorted, and this comes off the back of a really tumultuous
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yearfor off the back of a really tumultuous year for the royals with megan and harry moving to america, obviously the sort of story surrounding prince andrew and i think this is a reflection of her wanting to get all her affairs in order so that when she does eventually go, there is not a real and there is not controversy for her son or for a real and there is not controversy for her son orfor camilla a real and there is not controversy for her son or for camilla who clearly she has developed a close relationship with over the years, especially given the drama that has been swelling around the royal family recently. this been swelling around the royal family recently.— been swelling around the royal family recently. been swelling around the royal famil recentl. , ., , , ., family recently. this does show the trusty queen _ family recently. this does show the trusty queen now— family recently. this does show the trusty queen now has _ family recently. this does show the trusty queen now has a _ family recently. this does show the trusty queen now has a duchess i family recently. this does show the trusty queen now has a duchess of| trusty queen now has a duchess of cornwall. , ,., , cornwall. yes, i might say there would be some _ cornwall. yes, i might say there would be some cynics _ cornwall. yes, i might say there would be some cynics who - cornwall. yes, i might say there | would be some cynics who would cornwall. yes, i might say there - would be some cynics who would think whatever, camilla is changing her name when she becomes queen. there is also an argument that journalistically, is a strange choice to have this on the front page when the government may be on the brink of collapse. but i do think the story is important in the fact that it underscores the continuity of the monarchy which i
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think is one of its great strengths. let reflect for a minute, the queen acceded to the throne 70 years ago and that is astonishing, that is longer than most of us have been alive so would be to take a moment to pay tribute to that but as laura said, she is cleverly ensuring a smooth transition to the next generation, the fact that camilla will be queen consort, a bit like prince albert was prince consort, it gives a standing —— was king consort, it gives an understanding that it may not have previously been in place. after the terrible death of princess diana, the way that camilla showed up prince charles and the monarchy in general which went through a very torrid time the, it's almost as if this is an award for making charles happy and ensuring the stability of the monarchy and quite rightly, she is popular and this reflects that.—
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quite rightly, she is popular and this reflects that. looking at the role camilla _ this reflects that. looking at the role camilla may _ this reflects that. looking at the role camilla may potentially - this reflects that. looking at the role camilla may potentially be l role camilla may potentially be playing, what difference does it make to her and indeed charles if she does take on... when she does take on the name queen camilla? i think it will make a difference because it is reflective of the fact that she now is being considered as a royal and she didn't take on the title of princess of wales because of the death of diana and the upset that caused any nation and the controversy that surrounded her for years, really, because we all sort of understand that, really, prince charles has always laughed and always wanted to marry her but that it was not allowed and princess diana was such a hugely popular figure in this country, she's had to sort of stand at the side a bit more than other members of the royal family would have to do, out of respect but also a slight emotional
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intelligence in reading the public mood and knowing that she was not liked and loved by everybody and this sort of giving her this title is a symbol... from the queen but also that he has accepted and that it should be treated like any other member of the royal family would be in normal circumstances, i would get more popular over the years and i think it would mean a great deal to her and it clearly means a great deal to charles and it's as if we've gone full cycle here. his love of her was so controversial at the beginning, he was not allowed to be with her and this is the queen in a way saying, i accept her and accept the decision, and i wanted to be happy i'm gone. there is a picture of the queen with the platinum jubilee cake but the main story is party gait. pm removal
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now inevitable, one is loyalist. james, depending on who you speak to and what you read, you get different views but do you think it is inevitable? i views but do you think it is inevitable?— inevitable? i do. ithink the significance of the story is l significance of the story is the source from which it comes. a former vice—chairman of the 1922 committee, someone who would never rock the boat normally, but i think it indicates the severity of the crisis that boris johnson indicates the severity of the crisis that borisjohnson is undergoing that borisjohnson is undergoing that walker himself has spoken out, saying it's like a greek tragedy unfolding, he is very concerned that the prime minister will be ousted rather than have agents in his own department and maintain a smidgen of dignity which he would do if he perhaps resigned rather than was ditched. there is also the story that steve barclay has been brought in as the chief of staff and bhutto harry as the director of
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communications. —— and guto harri as director of communications. it shows that there may be a difficulty of finding someone and it's a poisoned chalice of taking a job that only last a few weeks but you're having to look at bringing in new people like that. there is also this swirling rumour that they are approaching 50 letters that have gone into so graham brady of the chair of the 1922 committee already and that this process may begin this week, so dark time for the prime minister underlined by the fact that such a loyalist has spoken out against him. such a loyalist has spoken out against him-— such a loyalist has spoken out auainst him. ~ ., ., ,, such a loyalist has spoken out against him. i against him. what do you think? i auree against him. what do you think? i aaree that against him. what do you think? i agree that the _ against him. what do you think? i agree that the intervention - against him. what do you think? i agree that the intervention is - agree that the intervention is significant and it follows lots of really significant interventions from backbench tory mps, former ministers who have been very loyal, thinking of nick gibb in the telegraph, who have come out and publicly said they think it is time
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for borisjohnson to go on the turn of the interventions is quite different to some of the more predictable mps who are calling for arroyos to submit your letters of no confidence, the turn of charles walker is a lot more along the lines of if the prime minister should go himself, avoid the drama, avoid the humiliation, don't put the party through this, and leave of your own accord in a sort of respectful way but that clearly is not going to happen if the other papers are to be believed. but it's a reflection as well of how varied the mps are in the party who are uncomfortable, this is not one cohort, one generation. there is a huge variety of former ministers, former cabinet ministers, young, new, fresh mps all feeling the same thing which is that they do not have confidence in boris johnson. ., ., , . , they do not have confidence in boris johnson. ., . , ., johnson. that goes nicely to the
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front page _ johnson. that goes nicely to the front page of — johnson. that goes nicely to the front page of the _ johnson. that goes nicely to the front page of the times - johnson. that goes nicely to the front page of the times which i johnson. that goes nicely to the i front page of the times which says, your need a tag is a vision to drive me out of downing street, boris johnson tells allies, he is determined to cling onto power as he prepares to face a confidence vote as soon as this week. a tank division?— as soon as this week. a tank division? . , ., . , , division? that is an incredibly “arrinr division? that is an incredibly jarring reference. _ division? that is an incredibly jarring reference. the - division? that is an incredibly jarring reference. the four i division? that is an incredibly i jarring reference. the four panzer division, which is another example of his grotesque and completely inappropriate use of second world war imagery to dramatise himself. he is the most self aggrandising narcissistic person you can imagine and this reminds me of the fact that when he was eight years old, he told his sister that his ambition was to be world king, and this is a world king who in a very ignominious way is refusing to give up his crown. all the signs against them, many people including his top aide elastic resigning over the horrible way in which he used thejimmy
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savile case as a cheap shot against the opposition leader, so it does seem like the tide has turned against him but like some nero fiddling... he is refusing to accept the reality that the tide is turning against him, and he is saying, you have to drag me out with tanks. as we do approach following week, with the potential of a no—confidence vote, it will be very interesting to see whether the force of not only mps but apparently this great story in the sunday times saying his wife is now saying and she is a highly influential political figure, she is now saying and she is a highly influential politicalfigure, she is apparently saying, i'm fed up with this, all the stories are negative, we would be better off going and brackets, we would properly make a lot more money if you are not in number ten. lot more money if you are not in number ten-— lot more money if you are not in number ten. ~ ., ., ,, ., number ten. what do you think about the front page? _ number ten. what do you think about the front page? it's _ number ten. what do you think about the front page? it's not _ number ten. what do you think about the front page? it's not too _ the front page? it's not too surprising _ the front page? it's not too surprising that _ the front page? it's not too surprising that boris - the front page? it's not too l surprising that boris johnson
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the front page? it's not too - surprising that boris johnson would surprising that borisjohnson would be briefing, or his allies would be briefing the sorts of lines out and i think that next week will be very important. the other thing to remember is that even if we get to the 54 remember is that even if we get to the 5a letter threshold required to trigger a vote of no confidence, you then need 180 tory mps to vote against him and if you remember back to when the party tried to oust theresa may from downing street, she won her vote of no confidence and it is harder than it looks and everybody feels that once you pass this 54 everybody feels that once you pass this 5a threshold, that is it, the beginning of the end. it might be but the problem is there is no real agreement or consensus on who exactly the right person is to replace borisjohnson. there is division over the timing of submitting these letters, lots of mps feel that we need to wait for the metropolitan police inquiry to conclude before making any moves because then you have the whole full
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picture, so for now, borisjohnson is hoping, by shaking up his top team in downing street and pledging to do lots of wonderful things that backbenchers really want to hear, he can hang on a bit longer. this is an incredibly fatuous time, nobody knows what will happen, you might go soon, you might decide that he doesn't want to go through the humiliation of a vote but it still does not quite feel as though everybody is on the same page here in terms of what the plan is to get rid of him and what happens next, and that is very helpful for boris johnson. ., and that is very helpful for boris johnson. . ., , , and that is very helpful for boris johnson. . , ., and that is very helpful for boris johnson. . ,, johnson. that leads us to the sunday exress johnson. that leads us to the sunday ex - ress on johnson. that leads us to the sunday express on the _ johnson. that leads us to the sunday express on the front _ johnson. that leads us to the sunday express on the front page _ johnson. that leads us to the sunday express on the front page there, i express on the front page there, bullish pm survival plans. this is about what boris johnson apparently wants to do to ensure that he is able to stay and it says here he pledged to warm the cockles of tory hearts as he made a deal with the
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backbenchers. how does one do that? i probably should not go into that in a family show but i do think... i hear the sound in a family show but i do think... i hearthe sound in in a family show but i do think... i hear the sound in the background of the clutching at straws, this dreadful phrase being used, again massively self aggrandising, operation safe egg dog. and the desperation of the prime minister now of what works, what is the red meat we can send to foaming at the mouth tories, cut taxes, slimly government, lots of terrible announcements made when this operation first began and for media absolutely unwarranted and over—the—top attacks on the bbc, the suggestion that the royal navy would patrol the channel and turned back boats of refugees which the royal navy has since said it would not do, that smacks of such a lot of desperation to me but it shows the dire position that the prime
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minister is in, the loyal paper will parrot the mps who are loyal to the pm back to me, thisjust looks like the last days of the roman empire. do you agree with that assessment? i think it is a really unpredictable time and i cannot say with any confidence what i think is going to happen, and i'm in parliamentand talking to mps every single day that i am at work because he is in massive trouble, he really is, but like i said, i'm not sure that the troops have necessarily got their next leader lined up or are united on one front in terms of what their strategy is, but it is noticeable when you see the prime minister out and about, talking, i think it has really dawned on him that he is in
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trouble here and this is definitely a different borisjohnson to the one i have ever seen before. he does seem very deflated and you can understand why some people around him, his closest family, might be saying it's time to get out because the pressure on him as relentless and the headlines are incredibly negative, and we do not have the results of this metropolitan police inquiry which is just a huge story, and could be incredibly damaging. 0k, and could be incredibly damaging. ok, let's move on to talk about something else now and that is the front page of the sunday times, and this is a story, the headline basically reads, private schools gained covid to boost grades. it says teachers at dozens of private schools allegedly at least double the proportion of a stars handed out and pupils were not sitting exams at that point. you have read the story,
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what do you make of it? it is that point. you have read the story, what do you make of it?— what do you make of it? it is a terrific story, _ what do you make of it? it is a terrific story, congratulations l what do you make of it? it is a. terrific story, congratulations to the sunday times, is a freedom of information request that has revealed what, to me, are quite shocking result. in 2019, these schools gave 16.1% of people a stars and in 2021, it went up to 39.5 when teachers were marking their own homework. this seems to me like another story of an elite perpetuating an elite and i do think it is disgraceful, really, if it is true that these private schools perhaps to justify the enormous fees they charge, are in some ways showing some sort of bias towards their own pupils, again i hasten to add, if true. but i do think there is an elitism in this country that has dogged us and why do we keep
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getting prime ministers from one school? the most expensive and prestigious school in the country. why is the cabinet predominantly private school educated? i think there was a system here that is underscored and bolstered by stories like this that it will look after itself and that is why it is such a great story, exposing that perpetuating elite.- great story, exposing that perpetuating elite. what do you think? i perpetuating elite. what do you think? | think _ perpetuating elite. what do you think? i think this _ perpetuating elite. what do you think? i think this is _ perpetuating elite. what do you think? i think this is a _ perpetuating elite. what do you think? i think this is a really i perpetuating elite. what do you i think? i think this is a really good sto and think? i think this is a really good story and i _ think? i think this is a really good story and i completely _ think? i think this is a really good story and i completely agree, i think? i think this is a really good story and i completely agree, thej story and i completely agree, the figures are completely damning. winchester, where the chancellor went, sought their number of a stars go went, sought their number of a stars 9° up went, sought their number of a stars go up by 42.3%. that is completely crazy. the pandemic was hard for everybody, hard for lots of young people, but this isjust everybody, hard for lots of young people, but this is just the sort of reminder again of how much harder it was for some children than others because clearly if you're getting a stars, you would be getting a place
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at university and this impacts the rest of your life and if he did not have teachers or do not have parents who are calling teachers and asking them to make sure to and tommy got them to make sure to and tommy got the grades they wanted them to get, you are set back for the rest of your life and this is clearly unfair. i also couldn't believe, i think it was fit was the figure of grades that actually provides, so —— that are actually revised, so the sample of a—levels that roll it out to make sure they were fair so tiny that you could not really see them change at all and i think there clearly needs to be some sort of investigation but try telling that to students who might also be at university, having secured these excellent grades, that they could be “p excellent grades, that they could be up for review. that is incredibly contentious, no school will want to tell their parents that, it is a really hard one but i don't know what you do about this now, but it is clearly unfair.—
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is clearly unfair. yes, let's end there. features _ is clearly unfair. yes, let's end there. features writer -- i is clearly unfair. yes, let's end | there. features writer -- james is clearly unfair. yes, let's end i there. features writer -- james and there. features writer —— james and laura, really good to have you both on the programme and talk through the sunday papers with you, thank you both once again. and thank you for watching, that is it that for this morning, next as the weather. goodbye. hello again. looking at a much colder they with gusty north—westerly winds dragging on plenty of showers and showers have been falling as snow in parts of scotland, this is the mori area and thank you for that. higher elevations in the highlands, some particularly heavy snow and could well be some localised destruction because we are expecting more of the snow to come in through the rest of the day today though as i say, a showery day, called, gusty winds, but at least there will be something
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of an improvement across england and wales where we have started off with persistent, heavy rain getting out of the way now with their showers following and becoming really widespread. the showers being at the most frequent across northern areas of the uk but there were immune from seeing them come across with four more could see thicker cloud and rain for much of the day but scotland will have the greatest risk of seeing some accumulating snow and overly high ground, maybe 10— centimetres building up so localised to transport disruption is a possibility here and it will say pretty chilly with temperatures quite widely at seven celsius but it will feel colder than that with the south seen temperatures tend celsius orso south seen temperatures tend celsius or so but probably starting to feel colder through the afternoon as that clear whether strides in. 0vernight, showers continue for a time but after midnight, fading away, clear skies take over and as the winds for light, there will be a pretty widespread frost which will allow
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some icy stretches to develop an takers into monday morning. monday sees further changes in the weather as this warm front moves across the uk and we will have south—westerly winds following which will boost the temperatures and it will be a much milder day. for monday morning, probably a nice sunrise for all of you. sunshine rising through the day as the warm front spreads thicker cloud, patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle from the western turning quite murky as well. we end the day with heavy rain working into western scotland with those temperatures on the mild side, 10—12 c pretty widely and staying quite mild for a few of you through tuesday and wednesday as well before turning cooler later in the week as high pressure starts to build in and the weather becomes dry with more in the way of sunshine. that is the latest weather.
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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. our top stories... as queen elizabeth celebrates 70 years on the throne — she says she wants the duchess of cornwall, to be known as queen consort when prince charles becomes king. i'm jane hill live at buckingham palace as the queen becomes the first british monarch to celebrate a platinum jubilee. bollywood singing. india begins two days of mourning as one of the country's most famous singers lata mangeshkar dies aged 92. british prime minister borisjohnson considers further changes to his top team following a wave of resignations over lockdown parties.

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