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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 31, 2022 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

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was under covid lockdown, has blamed failures of leadership and judgment. it says some of the events should not have been allowed to take place, not have been allowed to take place. borisjohnson again apologised, and said he would reform the way downing street is run. opposition leaders called on him to resign. meanwhile, police investigating the claims say they have received hundreds of photographs and documents. the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the tensions in ukraine. the us raised concerns about the build—up of russian forces. moscow says it has nothing to do with ukraine's domestic crisis. the streaming service spotify says it will direct listeners to verified facts about coronavirus. some artists have removed their music from the platform after the us broadcasterjoe rogan included vaccine sceptics on his podcast.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are ali miraj, who is a columnist at the article, and aletha adu, who is a political correspondent at the daily mirror. welcome back to you both. a few more have come in since we last spoke. the guardian, which leads with sue gray's report, blamed a "failure of leadership" for allowing parties to take place in downing street when the country was under strict lockdown. the same story makes the front page of the times, which reports that borisjohnson is facing a police investigation over at least four lockdown parties. the financial times says the prime minister is rejecting calls to resign,
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following that report by sue gray. borisjohnson is pledging to right the wrongs of his premiership, following a bruising day in the commons, so says the express. the daily mail suggests the publication ofjust 12 pages has left the country stuck in limbo, and calls for the whole report to be published. the mirror reports that police officers are reviewing more than 300 images handed over from the cabinet office. and, according to the telegraph, borisjohnson is to ask sue gray for a new report — in a bid to appease his backbenchers and save his premiership. let's start now. aletha, i went to ali before. let's kick off with your paper, the mirror. one in his own flat, three
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handed over and still, zero shame. how much does that reflect do you think what some of his backbenchers feel? i think what some of his backbenchers feel? . ., ., ., , feel? i mean, we heard from many to mps feel? i mean, we heard from many tory mps in — feel? i mean, we heard from many tory mps in the — feel? i mean, we heard from many tory mps in the commons - feel? i mean, we heard from many tory mps in the commons this - tory mps in the commons this afternoon. the first heard from theresa may, and she asked the prime minister if he did not understand his own rules, or did he think the rules did not apply to him. or simply, he didn't even know they existed. we also heard from a new conservative mp, aaron bell, who spoke about his grief and asked borisjohnson if he was taking him for a fool. they said the prime minister no longer have their support. people really want to see the full report from sue gray, but she has been what some people have said muzzled because of the investigations. she wasn't able to
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publish everything just yet because the met police have launched their own investigation. so the saga continues, shortly after the prime minister made the statement in the commons. he spoke to conservative mps in a private meeting and said he is still the man to fix this, he is the man for thejob is still the man to fix this, he is the man for the job and he is still the man to fix this, he is the man for thejob and he is not going anywhere. according to some sources, he even shared, he had covid and he nearly died, so he understands. the question is to the public really feel that he understands their pain? the second —— sacrifices they had to make. the polls suggest otherwise. -- sacrifices they had to make. the polls suggest otherwise.— -- sacrifices they had to make. the polls suggest otherwise. theresa may came in clutching _ polls suggest otherwise. theresa may came in clutching a _ polls suggest otherwise. theresa may came in clutching a cold _ polls suggest otherwise. theresa may came in clutching a cold dish. - polls suggest otherwise. theresa may came in clutching a cold dish. no - came in clutching a cold dish. no love lost between her and the prime minister. has the prime minister done enough do you think to buy off or appease the backbenchers who've been so critical publicly? fine been so critical publicly? one backbencher _ been so critical publicly? one backbencher was _
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been so critical publicly? one backbencher was telling me, the words _ backbencher was telling me, the words of— backbencher was telling me, the words of dennis in relation to jeffrey— words of dennis in relation to jeffrey howell, being attacked by a dead sheep. jeffrey howell, being attacked by a dead sheep-— jeffrey howell, being attacked by a dead sheep.- but - jeffrey howell, being attacked by a dead sheep.- but theresa l jeffrey howell, being attacked by a . dead sheep.- but theresa may dead sheep. savage. but theresa may had a hapless — dead sheep. savage. but theresa may had a hapless premiership. _ dead sheep. savage. but theresa may had a hapless premiership. you - dead sheep. savage. but theresa may had a hapless premiership. you could| had a hapless premiership. you could never_ had a hapless premiership. you could never imagine her running i downing street_ never imagine her running i downing street operation, ending up with a situation _ street operation, ending up with a situation like this. i think she spoke — situation like this. i think she spoke with a lot of people. not only the backbenchers, but also people in the backbenchers, but also people in the country. — the backbenchers, but also people in the country, when she said either the country, when she said either the prime — the country, when she said either the prime minister didn't understand the prime minister didn't understand the rules, _ the prime minister didn't understand the rules, or he did, but he chose not to— the rules, or he did, but he chose not to follow them and those in his office _ not to follow them and those in his office either. which one is it? there — office either. which one is it? there was— office either. which one is it? there was no clear response. if you took at _ there was no clear response. if you look at senior figures like andrew mitchell, — look at senior figures like andrew mitchell, i— look at senior figures like andrew mitchell, i remember bumping into him arid— mitchell, i remember bumping into him and borisjohnson outside boris's — him and borisjohnson outside boris's house in 2001, when andrew mitcheii— boris's house in 2001, when andrew mitchell was coaching borisjohnson for his— mitchell was coaching borisjohnson for his interviews. this is how far back— for his interviews. this is how far back they— for his interviews. this is how far back they go. mitchell has been a long-time — back they go. mitchell has been a long—time supporter, for the last four for—
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long—time supporter, for the last four for 30 — long—time supporter, for the last four for 30 years, to say he's not surrporting — four for 30 years, to say he's not supporting the prime minister is a bil supporting the prime minister is a big moment. hats off to angela richardson, a private secretary, 2019 _ richardson, a private secretary, 2019 intake, a bright future ahead of her. _ 2019 intake, a bright future ahead of her, who is not prepared to go along _ of her, who is not prepared to go along and — of her, who is not prepared to go along and has resigned this evening. there _ along and has resigned this evening. there are _ along and has resigned this evening. there are people willing to put their— there are people willing to put their heads, but at the moment, what's _ their heads, but at the moment, what's keeping the prime minister still in _ what's keeping the prime minister still in place is, i believe, tory mps _ still in place is, i believe, tory we have _ still in place is, i believe, tory mps have not decided on who a potential— mps have not decided on who a potential successor is. when ian duncan — potential successor is. when ian duncan smith, was very clear when they would — duncan smith, was very clear when they would coalesce around michael howard~ _ they would coalesce around michael howard. they haven't come to a decision— howard. they haven't come to a decision yet on who the potential successor— decision yet on who the potential successor is. there is a feel, but not convinced.— successor is. there is a feel, but not convinced. . . , ., , , not convinced. aletha, perhaps some ofthe not convinced. aletha, perhaps some of the mps hold — not convinced. aletha, perhaps some of the mps hold their _ not convinced. aletha, perhaps some of the mps hold their noses, - not convinced. aletha, perhaps some of the mps hold their noses, but - of the mps hold their noses, but look at the fact that boris johnson is a winner electorally. moving on to the express. does it
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say what he needs to do to get it right? say what he needs to do to get it riuht? ., , say what he needs to do to get it ri. ht? ., , ., say what he needs to do to get it riuht? . , ., �* right? that is what we're all struggling — right? that is what we're all struggling to _ right? that is what we're all struggling to understand - right? that is what we're all struggling to understand of| right? that is what we're all. struggling to understand of the moment. does he understand what he needs to see? the question is nobody really knows. when it comes to the commons chamber, he stand that the dispatch box and apologises because it seems as though he should say sorry. instead of explaining what for. he has apologised for lying at the dispatch box and saying no rules were broken, and now he's saying that he understands what the public are going through. quite confusing for us all. the express, over the last few weeks, they've been coming out with damning front pages, and now it seems as though they are teetering on the edge. they don't want to accuse him of outright lying and saying he doesn't know what he's doing. they're still going to
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support him, and that reflects how many conservative mps are feeling. they are all waiting for the full report to be published, and again, because of the mess police investigation, —— met police. the so—called 500 page report that she has ready to go, we're all sitting in limbo. ., v has ready to go, we're all sitting in limbo. . �*, ., ., in limbo. that's the front of the mail. is that a legal figure by number ten? if they ask sue gray not to go into detail? sue gray does call the events, she doesn't call them parties. i events, she doesn't call them arties. , .., events, she doesn't call them arties. , .. ., events, she doesn't call them arties. , ., ., parties. i remember, we can undo a prime minister. _ parties. i remember, we can undo a prime minister. i— parties. i remember, we can undo a prime minister. i don't _ parties. i remember, we can undo a prime minister. i don't think - parties. i remember, we can undo a prime minister. i don't think the - prime minister. i don't think the met themselves are coming out smelting — met themselves are coming out smelling of roses. initially telling us they— smelling of roses. initially telling us they wouldn't investigate historical issues, then deciding they— historical issues, then deciding they would, now calling for parts of
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sue gray's — they would, now calling for parts of sue gray's report to be redacted where investigations are continuing. look, _ where investigations are continuing. look, the _ where investigations are continuing. look, the met made a request for the names— look, the met made a request for the names not— look, the met made a request for the names not to be disclosed and details — names not to be disclosed and details of— names not to be disclosed and details of the parties investigated to he _ details of the parties investigated to be withheld. however, a former supreme _ to be withheld. however, a former supreme courtjustice to be withheld. however, a former supreme court justice was very clear in the _ supreme court justice was very clear in the last— supreme court justice was very clear in the last few days, saying there was absolutely no basis for the sue gray report— was absolutely no basis for the sue gray report to not be published in full. gray report to not be published in fuii~ now— gray report to not be published in full. now you have a situation which is bizarre _ full. now you have a situation which is bizarre to— full. now you have a situation which is bizarre. to placate his own backbenchers, the pm is going to now apparently— backbenchers, the pm is going to now apparently consider publishing sue gray 20 — apparently consider publishing sue gray 2.0. this cannot continue. they shouid've _ gray 2.0. this cannot continue. they shouid've just— gray 2.0. this cannot continue. they should've just published the whole thing _ should've just published the whole thing i_ should've just published the whole thing. i rememberthe old should've just published the whole thing. i remember the old adage should've just published the whole thing. i rememberthe old adage in the conservative press office, you went— the conservative press office, you went to _ the conservative press office, you went to ground and you didn't give a story— went to ground and you didn't give a story legs _ went to ground and you didn't give a story legs. with the met investigation, we will be waiting for sue —
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investigation, we will be waiting for sue gray's, sorry, cressida dick's— for sue gray's, sorry, cressida dick's report, which could run for months — dick's report, which could run for months in — dick's report, which could run for months. in the meantime, there is a serious _ months. in the meantime, there is a serious business for government. the prime _ serious business for government. the prime minister will beef up his team, — prime minister will beef up his team, bringing in a brilliant strategist, but he's not someone to run an— strategist, but he's not someone to run an operation. that's got to be coming _ run an operation. that's got to be coming from the prime minister, and it seems— coming from the prime minister, and it seems sets the culture. the coming from the prime minister, and it seems sets the culture.— it seems sets the culture. the prime minister missed _ it seems sets the culture. the prime minister missed a _ it seems sets the culture. the prime minister missed a phone _ it seems sets the culture. the prime minister missed a phone call - it seems sets the culture. the prime minister missed a phone call with . minister missed a phone call with putin today. i don't think he's phoned yet, and he was meant to fly as well. has there been an overreaction by the police? we're not looking at criminal prosecutions, we're looking at fixed fines for people who breach covid lockdown rules. fine fines for people who breach covid lockdown rules.— lockdown rules. one could say it miaht be lockdown rules. one could say it might be an _ lockdown rules. one could say it might be an overreaction - lockdown rules. one could say it might be an overreaction by - lockdown rules. one could say it i might be an overreaction by police, and others could say it might be the police's attempt to buy themselves sometimes. the met was saying they
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don't investigate any incidents in the past. the deputy prime minister has come on media saying the same thing, and now here we are also, a lot of accusations. it seems as though what many could be, we have seen former prime ministers being investigated by the police, and that took even more than a year. i'm referring to sir tony blair. that investigation said took 16 months. you can tell any member of the public that this will be going on fori6 public that this will be going on for 16 months. i can only assume they want to be extremely happy with that, but i think it's really important that we all remember the importance of this story. it's not about the prime minister having lots of cake or dancing to abba parties,
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it's about people dying in people not being able to be with their loved ones. as about our own government setting these rules to follow. they weren't easy rules. it was an unknown time, and no one knew how long we would be subject to these rules for. yet all the time, when we were suffering inside or going into our... downing street officials felt it was right for them to be able to enjoy themselves. this is what we want answers, and hopefully, we'll get those. we can only hope soon. picking up on the abba party, sung in the flat after dominic cummings �*s departure. both of you are inside in and out of downing street or have been over the years. the police
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presence there, these offices, officers will know when someone is in a garden and parties are being held. is that an issue?— held. is that an issue? well, i think the _ held. is that an issue? well, i thinkthe first _ held. is that an issue? well, i think the first is _ held. is that an issue? well, i think the first is if _ held. is that an issue? well, i think the first is if one is - held. is that an issue? well, i | think the first is if one is going to have — think the first is if one is going to have a — think the first is if one is going to have a party that looks like it's not in line — to have a party that looks like it's not in line with the big cats —— one would think— not in line with the big cats —— one would think they had the decency to play deep _ would think they had the decency to play deep chicago house rather than abbe _ play deep chicago house rather than abbe the _ play deep chicago house rather than abba. the police don't have eyes and ears everywhere. if there was a party _ ears everywhere. if there was a party going on with people coming and going, you would think that someone — and going, you would think that someone would notice. i think the bigger— someone would notice. i think the bigger issue is the police should have _ bigger issue is the police should have taken a view early on and investigate this in some depth up front, _ investigate this in some depth up front, and — investigate this in some depth up front, and now you have a situation where _ front, and now you have a situation where this— front, and now you have a situation where this is— front, and now you have a situation where this is going to ramble on and distract— where this is going to ramble on and distract from serious business of government. you mentioned the fact that the _ government. you mentioned the fact that the putin call was deferred until—
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that the putin call was deferred until tomorrow. there is a serious business — until tomorrow. there is a serious business to— until tomorrow. there is a serious business to be done, and the germans are all— business to be done, and the germans are all over— business to be done, and the germans are all over the place in terms of whether— are all over the place in terms of whether they will be imposing sanctions. this business has to be done _ sanctions. this business has to be done we — sanctions. this business has to be done. we have issues coming on the track— done. we have issues coming on the track with— done. we have issues coming on the track with the rise in insurance, energy— track with the rise in insurance, energy costs, and the prime minister is having — energy costs, and the prime minister is having to — energy costs, and the prime minister is having to defend this. i find it really— is having to defend this. i find it really unedifying that really capable, hard—working, honest ministers, _ capable, hard—working, honest ministers, of which there are many, are having _ ministers, of which there are many, are having to— ministers, of which there are many, are having to defend this. also, their— are having to defend this. also, their own — are having to defend this. also, their own representational risks by being _ their own representational risks by being part — their own representational risks by being part of this endless show. the public— being part of this endless show. the public is _ being part of this endless show. the public is getting tired and has moved — public is getting tired and has moved on. i think the public is quite — moved on. i think the public is quite exhausted with the whole thing — quite exhausted with the whole thing i— quite exhausted with the whole thing. i do think the question of trust and — thing. i do think the question of trust and judgment on the pm is now a serious _ trust and judgment on the pm is now a serious issue, and it's tainted. it a serious issue, and it's tainted. it needs— a serious issue, and it's tainted. it needs to — a serious issue, and it's tainted. it needs to be dealt with. just looking at the times's front
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page. bullish, div prime minister leaving number ten. what did you make of his performance in the comments today? and the attacks that he made on keir starmer, who is being very forensic about the sue gray report. being very forensic about the sue gray report-— being very forensic about the sue gra re ort. ~ �* , gray report. well, we've seen quite a chance gray report. well, we've seen quite a change in — gray report. well, we've seen quite a change in boris's _ gray report. well, we've seen quite a change in boris's tone, _ gray report. well, we've seen quite a change in boris's tone, and - gray report. well, we've seen quite a change in boris's tone, and the i a change in boris's tone, and the first time we heard him apologise this year, many people were shot. —— shocked. you could hear a pin drop. borisjohnson to shocked. you could hear a pin drop. boris johnson to apologise, shocked. you could hear a pin drop. borisjohnson to apologise, it's a major thing. borisjohnson to apologise, it's a majorthing. here borisjohnson to apologise, it's a major thing. here is a prime minister apologising for a video of his own staff laughing at the fact that they had secret lockdown parties. while everyone else was following the rules. since then, we've heard various media saying, "i don't know what happened." distancing himself from news events and from the truth. at one point, he
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was saying, "nobody told me that what we were doing was wrong." when he came to the dispatch box today, it almost seemed very rehearsed. and itjust it almost seemed very rehearsed. and it just shows throughout it almost seemed very rehearsed. and itjust shows throughout his statement, even if keir starmer expressed the fact that many people have gone through so much, and feel guilty, you still have the prime minister dropped that apology very quickly and start going on the offensive, accusing keir starmer of not putting jimmy seibel behind bars, which is not true. we even had some of the prime minister's most loyal supporters after the statement thanking the prime minister, backing the news. it seems as if they were back to square one. he's got some
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time to gain the support of his own party, gain the support of the public. highlighting the fact that britain apparently has the most booming economy, and we've had the strongest maxi roll—out. itjust highlights what went on in lockdown, how many parties went on. was he there, was his wife there, and what is he going to do about that? lets squeeze in a few more stories. just moving to the right of the times's front page. years of masks on flights. why is that? unfortunately, there's harmonisation between _ unfortunately, there's harmonisation between different countries and their— between different countries and their rules around mask wearing, and it looks _ their rules around mask wearing, and it looks like _ their rules around mask wearing, and it looks like we are, anyone want to id it looks like we are, anyone want to go abroad, which many people do, i think a _ go abroad, which many people do, i think a lot _ go abroad, which many people do, i think a lot of— go abroad, which many people do, i think a lot of people are desperate to get— think a lot of people are desperate to get away for a break after the last couple of years, will have to wear a _ last couple of years, will have to wear a mask. when the rules were lifted, _ wear a mask. when the rules were lifted, i_ wear a mask. when the rules were lifted, i went on two trips to
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berlin, _ lifted, i went on two trips to berlin, and i had to weara mask. it's berlin, and i had to weara mask. it's not _ berlin, and i had to weara mask. it's not the — berlin, and i had to weara mask. it's not the most enjoyable experience on a plane, but unfortunately, i think it will last _ unfortunately, i think it will last... the good news is better to have _ last... the good news is better to have people wearing masks flying the no fiving _ have people wearing masks flying the no flying at all. have people wearing masks flying the no flying at all-— no flying at all. let's go to the telegraph- _ no flying at all. let's go to the telegraph. anger _ no flying at all. let's go to the telegraph. anger after - no flying at all. let's go to the | telegraph. anger after reversal no flying at all. let's go to the - telegraph. anger after reversal on jabs. the care homes will fill reeves, they've lost a lot of staff because people weren't allowed to work in those home —— feel grief. where do you stand on that? it’s where do you stand on that? it's 'ust where do you stand on that? it�*s just disappointment. this isjust another policy that's been scrapped, you turned in. sajid javid came to the commons and said times have changed. —— u—turned. we were still having the delta variant, now things
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have changed and omicron is dominant. not being as dangerous as delta, so this is not needed any more. but we've had many care homes having to make big sacrifices, working around the clock, manoeuvring about... they weren't jobs, and a lot of patients have suffered because of this. this is also the same sector that suffered because people weren't able to see their loved ones are the pandemic. the same rules that borisjohnson and downing street officials, many of them, didn't follow. there's just a lot to swallow at the moment, and it's just disappointing that they couldn't have sorted it when omicron was not the dominant strain before christmas. the harsh reality is that if you don't allow people to work in the nhs, you won't have enough people to fill the post. there are a huge number of vacancies _ there are a huge number of
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vacancies. they can't fill that with immigration because there aren't enough _ immigration because there aren't enough people. the government was very particular around controlling the borders and trying to talented... i don't think the government had a choice. i think they— government had a choice. i think they tried — government had a choice. i think they tried to present this that 0micron _ they tried to present this that omicron is less severe than delta, and that's— omicron is less severe than delta, and that's why the advice is they can go— and that's why the advice is they can go down this road. traditional stam -s can go down this road. traditional stamps face _ can go down this road. traditional stamps face a _ can go down this road. traditional stamps face a sticky _ can go down this road. traditional stamps face a sticky end. - can go down this road. traditional stamps face a sticky end. what i can go down this road. traditional| stamps face a sticky end. what do you think about not being able to lick your stamp? not many are likeable. they come off plastic. do you want to be able to watch videos on your stamp? you want to be able to watch videos on yourstamp? i’m you want to be able to watch videos on your stamp?— on your stamp? i'm quite sad about it. i like on your stamp? i'm quite sad about it- i like the — on your stamp? i'm quite sad about it. i like the experience _ on your stamp? i'm quite sad about it. i like the experience of- on your stamp? i'm quite sad about it. i like the experience of licking i it. i like the experience of licking the envelope. not so much to my family's joy. the envelope. not so much to my family'sjoy. there's the envelope. not so much to my family's joy. there's a whole process and i think this is the
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first amendment we've seen to posting in letters in the last 200 years, which is quite striking. i didn't see what was wrong with stamps in the first place. sorry, we are now -- — stamps in the first place. sorry, we are now -- running _ stamps in the first place. sorry, we are now -- running out _ stamps in the first place. sorry, we are now -- running out of - stamps in the first place. sorry, we are now -- running out of time. - are now —— running out of time. indeed. i used to collect stamps when _ indeed. i used to collect stamps when i _ indeed. i used to collect stamps when i was a child. i remember going to staniey— when i was a child. i remember going to stanley gibbons to pick up stamps _ to stanley gibbons to pick up stamps. it's moving with the times. ithink— stamps. it's moving with the times. i think people do want qr codes. if people _ i think people do want qr codes. if people have got that much time on their hands, fantastic.— their hands, fantastic. laughter mi . ht their hands, fantastic. laughter miuht be their hands, fantastic. laughter might be more — their hands, fantastic. laughter might be more interesting - their hands, fantastic. laughter might be more interesting than i their hands, fantastic. laughter might be more interesting than a | might be more interesting than a letter. ali, aletha, thank you both very much. that is it for this addition. i'm back with the same slot tomorrow night.
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hello, i'm marc edwards with your sport. it's a transfer deadline day special, and as always at this time of year, clubs are scrambling to get their business done before the window closes. there's been plenty of news swirling around transfers in and transfers out in the last couple of hours, and here to talk us through the main confirmed deals is our reporter ben croucher. ben, bring us up to date. yeah, it's been a really busy transfer deadline day, one of the busiest in recent memory. let's start with some of the big transfers, then. donny van de beek on loan from manchester united to everton, joining frank lampard at goodison park. elsewhere, julian alvarez has joined for £14 million from river plate. the argentina striker won't be seen at city this season, as he's gone back on loan to argentina. one of the big late deals, aaron ramsey going from juventus to rangers. he's talked about playing european football and playing in front of 50,000 — one of the big reasons for the move. juventus will be contributing a large portion of his wages. couple more outgoings atjuventus.
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rodrigo bentancur and dejan kulusevski joining tottenham hotspur. bentancurjoining for around $20 million, around £14 million initially. lots of outgoings, though, at tottenham hotspur, including the likes of their record signing, tanguy ndombele, going on loan to lyon — giovani lo celso and bryan gil also on their way out. take a look at newcastle united at the bottom end of the premier league. they've signed matt targett on loan from aston villa, falling down the pecking order at villa park, but he's bolstering their defence, along with the likes of kieran trippier. also in the relegation fight, burnley have signed wolfsburg striker wout weghorst for £12 million. that's pretty much a like—for—like replacement for chris wood. six foot six, scored 17 goals in the german league, hoping to fire burnley out of that relegation battle. one to keep an eye on, pierre—emerick aubameyang — will he bejoining barcelona on a free from arsenal mark? of course, for all those late deals, you can stay right up
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to date on the bbc sport website. thank you very much, ben. now, one of the biggest talking points has been around christian eriksen's return to football. you'll remember the last time he was on a pitch, he collapsed after suffering a cardiac arrest during last year's euros. well, now he's signed for brentford. olly foster's been following the story. this was christian eriksen's last competitive game. seven months ago, denmark's hopes, as ever, rested on their talisman. his european championship lasted just 42 minutes. football stopped and feared the worst after he collapsed in their opening match. his team—mate shielded him as he received emergency treatment on the pitch for a cardiac arrest. the medics' rapid response saved his life, and amazingly, his career, as he prepares to play again at the highest level. i'm happy to announce that i've signed for brentford football club. i can't wait to get started and hopefully i will see you all very soon. he's no stranger to the premier league. in seven years at tottenham,
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he established himself as one of the world's great attacking midfielders. in his final full season there, he carried them to the champions league final. inter milan came calling, and he helped them win the league title, but they had to let him go. he now has a pacemaker, and italian league rules don't permit that. for the past months as a free agent, he's been working on his fitness, and he's now been cleared to play. it is a good news story to see him back doing what he loves and it's a really testament to his resilience, and the medical team behind him looking after him for the last few months. but the safety of knowing he has a defibrillator that will treat him at any stage, whether he's playing at home or is sedentary, perhaps the ability to treat him to try to prevent these things happening and a role important to understand what we're looking into play. brentford don't have the pedigree of his previous clubs, but they will give him the platform to show that he still has it. they've described to sign up
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for the rest of the season as an unbelievable opportunity. unbelievable — that could be the title of an eriksen biography. and in world cup year, the story is far from over. olly foster, bbc news. and it's notjust about the new player signings today. we've had a pretty big manager signing on monday, as everton finally confirmed frank lampard as their new head coach. just over a year since he was sacked by chelsea, lampard has signed a two—and—a—half—year deal and says he's "hungry to get started". but he faces a challenge to turn things round for everton, who sacked rafa benitez afterjust one win in 13 games. the toffees lie 16th in the premier league, four points above the relegation zone. the draw for the fifth round of the women's fa cup has taken place, and we have a manchester derby to look forward to. united will host the three—time winners city. elsewhere, holders chelsea will welcome leicester to london. the current women's super league leader and 14—time fa cup winners, arsenal, will travel to championship table—toppers liverpool.
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the games will be played at the end of the month. formula 1 is to make covid—19 vaccines mandatory for all personnel this year. no—one will be able to work within the paddock without being fullyjabbed. the policy will apply to all personnel — which includes drivers — although that shouldn't affect their ability to compete as all are understood to be vaccinated already. and that's all the sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye. hello. the week got off to a stormy start thanks to corrie. the winds won't be quite as strong in the days ahead, but overall, this week will still see things staying pretty windy. for tuesday, there'll be area of low pressure to the north of the uk, keeping things windy, especially across northern scotland
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— gusts perhaps up to 80 mph. what we are doing, though, is it switching to some milder atlantic air for tuesday after a blast of pretty cold arctic air to start the week. so, despite the wind on tuesday, it will feel milder. that weather front that you see there mostly actually just bearing some cloud, perhaps some patchy light rain and drizzle, particularly for some of the higher ground. not much brightness across wales and central england on tuesday, perhaps some early sunshine in the east. best of the sunshine for northernmost england and for scotland, but here, the strongest of the winds, perhaps gusting up to 80 mph across northernmost scotland. but some much healthier looking temperatures — 12 or 13.
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welcome to newsday — reporting live from singapore — i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... has your leadership failed? the initial report into parties at downing street during covid lockdowns finds "failures of leadership and judgement" at number ten — putting prime ministerjohnson under renewed pressure. i want to say sorry. and i'm sorry for the things we simply didn't get right. i get it, and i will fix it. by routinely breaking the rules he sets, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people sacrificing contempt and he showed

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